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Sample records for ace solar occultation

  1. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 per centimeter resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 per centimeter (2.3-13 micrometers). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X(sub CO2)) in the altitude range 7-10 kilometers from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 per centimeter, altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly-mean XCO2 covering 60 S to 60 N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE XCO2 time series have been compared with previously-reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X(sub CO2) from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 plus or minus 0.025 in the northern hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 plus or minus 0.019 on average in the southern hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE derived trend is approximately 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

  2. New temperature and pressure retrieval algorithm for high-resolution infrared solar occultation spectroscopy: analysis and validation against ACE-FTS and COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K. S.; Toon, G. C.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by the initial selection of a high-resolution solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to fly to Mars on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, we have been developing algorithms for retrieving volume mixing ratio vertical profiles of trace gases, the primary component of which is a new algorithm and software for retrieving vertical profiles of temperature and pressure from the spectra. In contrast to Earth-observing instruments, which can rely on accurate meteorological models, a priori information, and spacecraft position, Mars retrievals require a method with minimal reliance on such data. The temperature and pressure retrieval algorithms developed for this work were evaluated using Earth-observing spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) FTS, a solar occultation instrument in orbit since 2003, and the basis for the instrument selected for a Mars mission. ACE-FTS makes multiple measurements during an occultation, separated in altitude by 1.5-5 km, and we analyze 10 CO2 vibration-rotation bands at each altitude, each with a different usable altitude range. We describe the algorithms and present results of their application and their comparison to the ACE-FTS data products. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) provides vertical profiles of temperature up to 40 km with high vertical resolution. Using six satellites and GPS radio occultation, COSMIC's data product has excellent temporal and spatial coverage, allowing us to find coincident measurements with ACE with very tight criteria: less than 1.5 h and 150 km. We present an inter-comparison of temperature profiles retrieved from ACE-FTS using our algorithm, that of the ACE Science Team (v3.5), and from COSMIC. When our retrievals are compared to ACE-FTS v3.5, we find mean differences between -5 and +2 K, and that our retrieved profiles have no seasonal or zonal biases, but do have a warm bias in the stratosphere and a cold bias in the

  3. New temperature and pressure retrieval algorithm for high-resolution infrared solar occultation spectroscopy: analysis and validation against ACE-FTS and COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kevin S.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Boone, Chris D.; Strong, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the initial selection of a high-resolution solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to fly to Mars on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, we have been developing algorithms for retrieving volume mixing ratio vertical profiles of trace gases, the primary component of which is a new algorithm and software for retrieving vertical profiles of temperature and pressure from the spectra. In contrast to Earth-observing instruments, which can rely on accurate meteorological models, a priori information, and spacecraft position, Mars retrievals require a method with minimal reliance on such data. The temperature and pressure retrieval algorithms developed for this work were evaluated using Earth-observing spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) FTS, a solar occultation instrument in orbit since 2003, and the basis for the instrument selected for a Mars mission. ACE-FTS makes multiple measurements during an occultation, separated in altitude by 1.5-5 km, and we analyse 10 CO2 vibration-rotation bands at each altitude, each with a different usable altitude range. We describe the algorithms and present results of their application and their comparison to the ACE-FTS data products. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) provides vertical profiles of temperature up to 40 km with high vertical resolution. Using six satellites and GPS radio occultation, COSMIC's data product has excellent temporal and spatial coverage, allowing us to find coincident measurements with ACE with very tight criteria: less than 1.5 h and 150 km. We present an intercomparison of temperature profiles retrieved from ACE-FTS using our algorithm, that of the ACE Science Team (v3.5), and from COSMIC. When our retrievals are compared to ACE-FTS v3.5, we find mean differences between -5 and +2 K and that our retrieved profiles have no seasonal or zonal biases but do have a warm bias in the stratosphere and a cold bias in the

  4. Distributions and Seasonal Variations of Tropospheric Ethene (C2H4) from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) Solar Occultation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbin, H.; Hurtmans, D.; Clarisse, L.; Turquety, S.; Clerbaux, C.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Boone, C.; Bernath, P. F.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the first measurements of ethene (C2H4) distributions in the upper troposphere. These are obtained by retrieving vertical profiles from 5 to 20 km from infrared solar occultation spectra recorded in 2005 and 2006 by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). Background volume mixin^ ratios (vmrs) ranging from a few to about 50 pptv (10(exp -1) are measured at the different altitudes, while for certain occultations, vmrs as high as 200 pptv are observed. Zonal distributions and vertically resolved latitudinal distributions are derived for the two year period analyzed, highlighting spatial - including a North-South gradient - as well as seasonal variations. We show the latter to be more pronounced at the highest latitudes, presumably as a result of less active photochemistry during winter. The observation of C2H4 enhancements in remote Arctic regions at high latitudes is consistent with the occurrence of fast transport processes of gaseous pollution from the continents leading to Arctic haze. Citation: Herbin, H., D. Hurtmans, L. Clarisse, S. Turquety, C. Clerbaux, C. P. Rinsland, C. Boone, P. F. Bernath, and P.-F. Colieur (2009), Distributions and seasonal variations of tropospheric ethene (C2H4) from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) solar occultation spectra,

  5. Retrieval of carbon dioxide vertical profiles from solar occultation observations and associated error budgets for ACE-FTS and CASS-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioris, C. E.; Boone, C. D.; Nassar, R.; Sutton, K. J.; Gordon, I. E.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-02-01

    An algorithm is developed to retrieve the vertical profile of carbon dioxide in the 5 to 25 km altitude range using mid-infrared solar occultation spectra from the main instrument of the ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission, namely the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). The main challenge is to find an atmospheric phenomenon which can be used for accurate tangent height determination in the lower atmosphere, where the tangent heights (THs) calculated from geometric and timing information is not of sufficient accuracy. Error budgets for the retrieval of CO2 from ACE-FTS and the FTS on a potential follow-on mission named CASS (Chemical and Aerosol Sounding Satellite) are calculated and contrasted. Retrieved THs are typically within 60 m of those retrieved using the ACE version 3.x software after revisiting the temperature dependence of the N2 CIA (Collision-Induced Absorption) laboratory measurements and accounting for sulfate aerosol extinction. After correcting for the known residual high bias of ACE version 3.x THs expected from CO2 spectroscopic/isotopic inconsistencies, the remaining bias for tangent heights determined with the N2 CIA is -20m. CO2 in the 5-13 km range in the 2009-2011 time frame is validated against aircraft measurements from CARIBIC, CONTRAIL and HIPPO, yielding typical biases of -1.7 ppm in the 5-13 km range. The standard error of these biases in this vertical range is 0.4 ppm. The multi-year ACE-FTS dataset is valuable in determining the seasonal variation of the latitudinal gradient which arises from the strong seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere troposphere. The annual growth of CO2 in this time frame is determined to be 2.5 ± 0.7 ppm yr-1, in agreement with the currently accepted global growth rate based on ground-based measurements.

  6. Sunset-sunrise difference in solar occultation ozone measurements (SAGE II, HALOE, and ACE-FTS) and its relationship to tidal vertical winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, T.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.; Kinnison, D.; Zawodny, J. M.; McHugh, M.; Walker, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper contains a comprehensive investigation of the sunset-sunrise difference (SSD; i.e., the sunset-minus-sunrise value) of the ozone mixing ratio in the latitude range of 10° S-10° N. SSD values were determined from solar occultation measurements based on data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). The SSD was negative at altitudes of 20-30 km (-0.1 ppmv at 25 km) and positive at 30-50 km (+0.2 ppmv at 40-45 km) for HALOE and ACE-FTS data. SAGE II data also showed a qualitatively similar result, although the SSD in the upper stratosphere was two times larger than those derived from the other datasets. On the basis of an analysis of data from the Superconducting Submillimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), and a nudged chemical-transport model (the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model: SD-WACCM), we conclude that the SSD can be explained by diurnal variations in the ozone concentration, particularly those caused by vertical transport by the atmospheric tidal winds. All datasets showed significant seasonal variations in the SSD; the SSD in the upper stratosphere is greatest from December through February, while that in the lower stratosphere reaches a maximum twice: during the periods March-April and September-October. Based on an analysis of SD-WACCM results, we found that these seasonal variations follow those associated with the tidal vertical winds.

  7. Sunset-sunrise difference in solar occultation ozone measurements (SAGE II, HALOE, and ACE-FTS) and its relationship to tidal vertical winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, T.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.; Kinnison, D.; Zawodny, J. M.; McHugh, M.; Walker, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a comprehensive investigation of the sunset-sunrise difference (SSD, i.e., the sunset-minus-sunrise value) of the ozone mixing ratio in the latitude range of 10° S-10° N. SSD values were determined from solar occultation measurements based on data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS). The SSD was negative at altitudes of 20-30 km (-0.1 ppmv at 25 km) and positive at 30-50 km (+0.2 ppmv at 40-45 km) for HALOE and ACE-FTS data. SAGE II data also showed a qualitatively similar result, although the SSD in the upper stratosphere was 2 times larger than those derived from the other data sets. On the basis of an analysis of data from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and a nudged chemical transport model (the specified dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model: SD-WACCM), we conclude that the SSD can be explained by diurnal variations in the ozone concentration, particularly those caused by vertical transport by the atmospheric tidal winds. All data sets showed significant seasonal variations in the SSD; the SSD in the upper stratosphere is greatest from December through February, while that in the lower stratosphere reaches a maximum twice: during the periods March-April and September-October. Based on an analysis of SD-WACCM results, we found that these seasonal variations follow those associated with the tidal vertical winds.

  8. Retrieval of carbon dioxide vertical profiles from solar occultation observations and associated error budgets for ACE-FTS and CASS-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioris, C. E.; Boone, C. D.; Nassar, R.; Sutton, K. J.; Gordon, I. E.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm is developed to retrieve the vertical profile of carbon dioxide in the 5 to 25 km altitude range using mid-infrared solar occultation spectra from the main instrument of the ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission, namely the Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The main challenge is to find an atmospheric phenomenon which can be used for accurate tangent height determination in the lower atmosphere, where the tangent heights (THs) calculated from geometric and timing information are not of sufficient accuracy. Error budgets for the retrieval of CO2 from ACE-FTS and the FTS on a potential follow-on mission named CASS (Chemical and Aerosol Sounding Satellite) are calculated and contrasted. Retrieved THs have typical biases of 60 m relative to those retrieved using the ACE version 3.x software after revisiting the temperature dependence of the N2 CIA (collision-induced absorption) laboratory measurements and accounting for sulfate aerosol extinction. After correcting for the known residual high bias of ACE version 3.x THs expected from CO2 spectroscopic/isotopic inconsistencies, the remaining bias for tangent heights determined with the N2 CIA is -20 m. CO2 in the 5-13 km range in the 2009-2011 time frame is validated against aircraft measurements from CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container), CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airline), and HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations), yielding typical biases of -1.7 ppm in the 5-13 km range. The standard error of these biases in this vertical range is 0.4 ppm. The multi-year ACE-FTS data set is valuable in determining the seasonal variation of the latitudinal gradient which arises from the strong seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere troposphere. The annual growth of CO2 in this time frame is determined to be 2.6 ± 0.4 ppm year-1, in agreement with the currently accepted global growth rate based on

  9. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and

  10. Solar Occultation Retrieval Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpe, Jerry D.

    2004-01-01

    This effort addresses the comparison and validation of currently operational solar occultation retrieval algorithms, and the development of generalized algorithms for future application to multiple platforms. initial development of generalized forward model algorithms capable of simulating transmission data from of the POAM II/III and SAGE II/III instruments. Work in the 2" quarter will focus on: completion of forward model algorithms, including accurate spectral characteristics for all instruments, and comparison of simulated transmission data with actual level 1 instrument data for specific occultation events.

  11. Stellar Occultation Studies of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Earth-based observations of stellar occultations provide extremely high spatial resolution for bodies in the outer solar system, about 10,000 times better than that of traditional imaging observations. Stellar occultation data can be used to establish the structure of atmospheres and rings of solar system bodies at high spatial resolution. Airborne occultation observations are particularly effective, since the controlled mobility of the observing platform allows the observer to fly within the optimum part of the occultation shadow for most events that are visible from Earth. Airborne observations are carried out above any clouds and are nearly free of scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere. KAO occultation observations resulted in the first detection of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere, discovery of the Uranian rings, the first detection of Pluto's atmosphere, the first Earth-based investigations of Triton's atmosphere, and the discovery of narrow jets from Chiron's nucleus. The first SOFIA occultation opportunity will be an investigation of Pluto's atmospheric structure in November, 2002, and will resolve a problem that has lingered since the KAO discovery observation fourteen years earlier. We plan to continue our successful airborne occultation program with the greatly enhanced capability provided by SOFIA. We propose here to replace our KAO occultation photometer with one having twice the throughput, half the noise, a somewhat wider wavelength range, four times the field of view, and ten times the frame rate to optimize its performance and to capitalize on the larger collecting area offered by SOFIA. It will also allow for simultaneous visible and IR occultation observations, greatly enriching the results that we can obtain from occultations. We call this new imaging occultation photometer HOPI (High-speed Occultation Photometer and Imager). HOPI will provide a signal-to-noise ratio two to four times that of our present photometer for a given

  12. Nh and CH in the Ace Satellite Solar Spectrumtitle of your Abstract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Ram, R. S.; Colin, R.

    2010-06-01

    The Canadian ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission has a high resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in low earth orbit. The primary ACE mission goal is the study ozone chemistry in the stratosphere although it is making a wide range of other measurements, for example, of organic molecules in the troposphere. In the normal operating mode, the ACE-FTS measures a sequence of atmospheric absorption spectra during sunrise and sunset (``solar occultation''). As part of the measurement sequence about 16 high sun exoatmospheric spectra are recorded for each occultation to serve as reference spectra. We have co-added 224782 pure solar spectra to produce the ACE solar atlas in the 750--4400 cm-1 spectral region [Hase et al., JQSRT 111, 521 (2010), see http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca/solaratlas.html]. The ACE solar spectrum displays prominent vibration-rotation bands of CO, OH, NH and CH, and pure rotational lines of OH and NH. An improved spectroscopic analysis for OH has already been published [Bernath and Colin, JMS 257, 20 (2009)] and we now report on similar work for NH and CH. The vibration-rotation spectra of NH have been reinvestigated using laboratory spectra and infrared solar spectra recorded from orbit by the ACE and ATMOS instruments. In addition to identifying the previously unobserved 6-5 vibration-rotation band in the laboratory spectra, many additional high N rotational lines have been observed. By combining the new observations with the previously published data and recent far infrared data, an improved set of molecular constants and term values have been derived for the NH X^3Σ^- and A^3Π states. Vibration-rotation spectra of the CH X^2Π ground state have also been re-analyzed based on laboratory spectra, the ACE solar spectrum and published data. The previously unobserved 5-4 band has been measured and the other four bands (1-0 to 4-3) have been extended to higher J values. TEXT OF YOUR ABSTRACT

  13. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in leveling and orienting the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is seated on a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory has six high-resolution particle detection sensors and three monitoring instruments. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  14. Transmission profiles from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalach, Jacob; Von Savigny, Christian

    Vertical atmospheric transmission profiles contain information about its composition and make it possible to reconstruct the vertical distribution of its components. The measurement of stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles and its size distribution is the goal of the ROMIC-ROSA project for which transmission profiles are the most important precondition. One established method to obtain such profiles are satellite born occultation measurements. For this project SCIAMACHY (EnviSat) solar occultation measurements are analysed. The data set covers a time period of ten years within a wavelength interval between 240 and 2380 nm. Due to different spatial resolution of the measured solar profiles a direct application of existing analysis tools and algorithms is not possible. First they have to be adjusted to the present data. This contribution explains the present data processing and shows the resulting transmission profiles.

  15. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. The panel on which they are working is identical to the panel (one of four) seen in the foreground on the ACE spacecraft. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low- energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  16. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  17. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in guiding the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is hoisted over a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will contribute to the understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  18. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory Engineer Cliff Willey (kneeling) and Engineering Assistant Jim Hutcheson from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  19. Occultation studies of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    The planetary occultation program began at Lowell Observatory in 1973 with a worldwide campaign to observe mutual occultations and eclipses of the Galilean Satellites. Then the temperature profile of the Martian atmosphere was measured from data taken during the occultation of epsilon Geminorum, the Rings of Uranus were discovered as they occulted SAO 158687, and the dimensions of Pallas were measured when that minor planet occulted SAO 85009. In 1979 the present grant was initiated, providing funds for portable photometric instrumentation used to observe occultations by asteroids as well as by Uranus and Neptune. Software for predicting occultations of catalog stars by asteroids, planets, and comets was written in 1983. Lowell currently provides most of the available predictions for asteroid occultations. Realizing in 1983 that the lack of a high-quality astrometric telescope dedicated to occultation work was limiting progress, an 18-inch, F/8 lens was acquired and adapted to an existing mounting at Lowell. Although acquisition of the lens and implementation of the new telescope has been accomplished primarily with non-grant funds, the instrument makes a major contribution to occultation research.

  20. First multi-year occultation observations of CO2 in the MLT by ACE satellite: observations and analysis using the extended CMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beagley, S. R.; Boone, C. D.; Fomichev, V. I.; Jin, J. J.; Semeniuk, K.; McConnell, J. C.; Bernath, P. F.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents the first global set of observations of CO2 in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) obtained by the ACE-FTS instrument on SCISAT-I, a small Canadian satellite launched in 2003. The observations use the solar occultation technique and document the fall-off in the mixing ratio of CO2 in the MLT region. The beginning of the fall-off of the CO2, or "knee" occurs at about 78 km and lies higher than in the CRISTA-1 measurements (~70 km) but lower than in the SABER 1.06 (~80 km) and much lower than in rocket measurements. We also present the measurements of CO obtained concurrently which provide important constraints for analysis. We have compared the ACE measurements with simulations of the CO2 and CO distributions in the vertically extended version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM). Applying standard chemistry we find that we cannot get agreement between the model and ACE CO2 observations although the CO observations are adequately reproduced. There appears to be about a 10 km offset compared to the observed ACE CO2, with the model "knee" occurring too high. In analyzing the disagreement, we have investigated the variation of several parameters of interest (photolysis rates, formation rate for CO2, and the impact of uncertainty in turbulent eddy diffusion) in order to explore parameter space for this problem. Our conclusions are that there must be a loss process for CO2, about 2-4~times faster than photolysis that will sequester the carbon in some form other than CO and we have speculated on the role of meteoritic dust as a possible candidate. In addition, from this study we have highlighted a possible important role for unresolved vertical eddy diffusion in 3-D models in determining the distribution of candidate species in the mesosphere which requires further study.

  1. First multi-year occultation observations of CO2 in the MLT by ACE satellite: observations and analysis using the extended CMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beagley, S. R.; Boone, C. D.; Fomichev, V. I.; Jin, J. J.; Semeniuk, K.; McConnell, J. C.; Bernath, P. F.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the first multi-year global set of observations of CO2 in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) obtained by the ACE-FTS instrument on SCISAT-I, a small Canadian satellite launched in 2003. The observations use the solar occultation technique and document the fall-off in the mixing ratio of CO2 in the MLT region. The beginning of the fall-off of the CO2, or "knee" occurs at about 78 km and lies higher than in the CRISTA measurements (~70 km) but lower than in the SABER 1.06 (~82 km) and much lower than in rocket measurements. We also present the measurements of CO obtained concurrently which provide important constraints for analysis. We have compared the ACE measurements with simulations of the CO2 and CO distributions in the vertically extended version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM). Applying standard chemistry we find that we cannot get agreement between the model and ACE CO2 observations although the CO observations are adequately reproduced. There appears to be about a 10 km offset compared to the observed ACE CO2, with the model knee occurring too high. In analysing the disagreement, we have investigated the variation of several parameters of interest, photolysis rates, formation rate for CO2, and the impact of uncertainty in eddy diffusion, in order to explore parameter space for this problem. Our conclusions are that there must be a loss process for CO2, about 2-4 times faster than photolysis that will sequester the carbon in some form other than CO and we have speculated on the role of meteoritic dust as a possible candidate. In addition, from this study we have highlighted a possible important role for vertical eddy diffusion in 3-D models in determining the distribution of candidate species in the mesosphere which requires further study.

  2. Exploring the Solar System with Stellar Occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    By recording the light intensity as a function of time when a planet occults a relatively bright star, the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of the planet can be probed. The main feature of stellar occultation observations is their high spatial resolution, typically several thousand times better than the resolution achievable with ground-based imaging. Five stellar occultations have been observed. The main results of these observations are summarized. Stellar occultations have been observed on Uranus, Mars, Pallas, Neptune and the Jovian Ring.

  3. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  4. Transient F Ring Dust Features in Cassini UVIS Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. M.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Attree, N.; Murray, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from an investigation of the variable particle size distribution in Saturn's dynamic F ring. We analyze 13 solar occultations observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), of which 4 occultations show a clear signature of diffracted sunlight. The magnitude and scattering angle of the diffraction signal suggest the presence of a significant population of micron-sized dust particles; however, the lack of a detection of diffracted light in other solar occultations implies that such a population is transient or spatially variable. Initial comparisons with images from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) suggest that a diffraction signal is detected in UVIS occultations that coincide with a recent collisional event in the F ring core, as seen in the ISS images. This implies that such events release a significant population of dust, which can then be measured by the diffraction signature in the UVIS data. We use a forward-modeling approach to place constraints on the particle size distribution of the F ring during each solar occultation. We present these measurements of the size distribution and our comparisons of the F ring dust population as measured by UVIS with the ISS images of the ring.

  5. Advancing the Quality of Solar Occultation Retrievals through Solar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Hervig, M. E.; Marshall, B. T.; Russell, J. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Brown, C. W.; Burton, J. C.; Deaver, L. E.; Magill, B. E.; McHugh, M. J.; Paxton, G. J.; Thompson, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    The quality of retrieved profiles (e.g. mixing ratio, temperature, pressure, and extinction) from solar occultation sensors is strongly dependent on the angular fidelity of the measurements. The SOFIE instrument, launched on-board the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) satellite on April 25, 2007, was designed to provide very high precision broadband measurements for the study of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs), that appear near 83km, just below the high latitude summer mesopause. The SOFIE instrument achieves an unprecedented angular fidelity by imaging the sun on a 2D detector array and tracking the edges with an uncertainty of <0.1 arc seconds. This makes possible retrieved profiles of vertical high resolution mixing ratios, refraction base temperature and pressure from tropopause to lower mesosphere, and transmission with accuracy sufficient to infer cosmic smoke extinction. Details of the approach and recent results will be presented.

  6. Digital solar edge tracker for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Moore, A. S.; Stump, C. W.; Mayo, L. S.

    1987-01-01

    The optical and electronic design of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (Haloe) elevation sun sensor is described. The Haloe instrument is a gas-correlation radiometer now being developed at NASA Langley for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The system uses a Galilean telescope to form a solar image on a linear silicon photodiode array. The array is a self-scanned monolithic CCD. The addresses of both solar edges imaged on the array are used by the control/pointing system to scan the Haloe science instantaneous field of view (IFOV) across the vertical solar diameter during instrument calibration and then to maintain the science IFOV 4 arcmin below the top edge during the science data occultation event. Vertical resolution of 16 arcsec and a radiometric dynamic range of 100 are achieved at the 700-nm operating wavelength. The design provides for loss of individual photodiode elements without loss of angular tracking capability.

  7. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  8. SASKTRANIF- a New Engine for the Radiative Transfer Modeling of Solar Occultation Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Lloyd, N.; Rieger, L. A.; Jensen, L.; Walker, K. A.; Degenstein, D. A.; Bourassa, A. E.; Boone, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical distributions of atmospheric gases measured by satellite instruments can be retrieved by mathematical inversion algorithms involving a forward model of the radiative transfer equation. Hence, an accurate forward model to predict atmospheric spectra is necessary for estimating volume mixing ratio quantities of these gases. One particular forward model is the SASKTRAN Inter-Face (or SASKTRANIF), which is a line by line radiative transfer model typically used to model atmospheric spectra arising from limb scattered sunlight at ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths, using linear ray tracing and a three dimensional spherical shell atmosphere of homogeneous layers. An additional engine has now been implemented, designed to model solar occultation based measurements. Solar rays are traced through each atmospheric layer using an algorithm that accounts for refraction of the atmosphere. The extinction is calculated along the line of sight for a penetrating ray intersecting multiple layers of the atmosphere given a known chemical composition. By default, the engine uses the HITRAN 2008 spectral database to obtain information about the absorption cross sections of each modeled species, and also utilizes user defined climatologies for a priori information (such as input trace gas concentrations, temperature, and pressure). The new engine is currently in a testing phase. Here, we firstly compare synthesized spectra from SASKTRANIF with spectra derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) forward model. Secondly, we retrieve vertical volume mixing ratio profiles of various atmospheric gases by performing a global fit to ACE-FTS measured spectra where model parameters are determined using a Marquardt-Levenberg nonlinear least squares algorithm. Resulting vertical profiles are compared to those derived using the ACE-FTS retrieval system.

  9. The 1973 solar occultation of the Crab Nebula pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisberg, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The mean electron density of the solar corona was determined by measuring the dispersion of radiofrequency pulses from pulsar NP 0532 during the June 1973 solar occultation. Trends continued which were noticed in 1971 as solar activity declined. Model fitting results suggest that the corona continued to become even more concentrated toward the equator in 1973 than in 1971. The number density of electrons in most regions decreased. The best model of the distribution of corona electrons is suggested to be one with zero density at the poles. K-corona isophotes and contours of equal path-integrated density are presented for several models. Electron density versus date and position in the corona are tabulated. It is seen that there is no simple relationship between the onset of major solar activity and density or scattering enhancements.

  10. Theoretical performance of solar coronagraphs using sharp-edged or apodized circular external occulters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.

    2013-10-01

    Context. This study focuses on an instrument able to monitor the corona close to the solar limb. Aims: We study the performance of externally occulted solar coronagraphs. We compute the shape of the umbra and penumbra produced by the occulter at the entrance aperture of the telescope and compare levels of rejection obtained for a circular occulter with a sharp or smooth transmission at the edge. Methods: We show that the umbral pattern in an externally occulted coronagraph can be written as a convolution product between the occulter diffraction pattern and an image of the Sun. We then focus on the analysis to circular symmetric occulters. We first derive an analytical expression using two Lommel series for the Fresnel diffraction pattern produced by a sharp-edged circular occulter. Two different expressions are used for inside and outside the occulter's geometric shadow. We verify that a numerical approach that directly solves the Huygens-Fresnel integral gives the same result. This suggests that the numerical computation can be used for a circular occulter with any variable transmission. Results: With the objective of observing the solar corona a few minutes from limb, a sharp-edged circular occulter of a few meters cannot produce an umbra darker than 10-4 of the direct sunlight. The same occulter, having an apodization zone of a few percent of the diameter (3 cm for a 1.5 m occulter), darkers the umbra down to 10-8 of the direct sunlight for linear transmission and to 10-12 for Sonine or cosine bell transmissions. An investigation for an apodized occulter with manufacturing defaults is quickly performed. Conclusions: It has been possible to numerically demonstrate the large superiority of apodized circular occulters with respect to the sharp-edged ones. These occulters allow the theoretical observation of the very limb-close corona with not yet obtained contrast ratios.

  11. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Satellite solar occultation sounding of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles, achievements, and prospects for satellite solar occultation sounding of the middle atmosphere. Advantages, disadvantages, and spatial and temporal coverage capabilities are described. Progress over the past 15 years is reviewed, and results from a recent satellite aerosol experiment are presented. Questions with regard to Doppler shift, atmospheric refraction, instrument pointing, pressure sensing, and measurement of diurnally active species are addressed. Two experiments now orbiting on the Nimbus-7 and AEM-B satellites, and approved experiments under development for future flights on Spacelab and the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, are also described. In some cases more than one experiment is scheduled to be flown on the same spacecraft, and the advantages and synergistic effects of these applications are discussed.

  13. SOLAR OCCULTATION BY TITAN MEASURED BY CASSINI/UVIS

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Benilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21 Degree-Sign and 28 Degree-Sign south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 A and 630 A) in the ionization continuum of the N{sub 2} absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 A where absorption is due to CH{sub 4}. The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N{sub 2} scale height of {approx}76 km and a temperature of {approx}153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  14. Solar Occultation by Titan Measured by Cassini/UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21° and 28° south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 Å and 630 Å) in the ionization continuum of the N2 absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 Å where absorption is due to CH4. The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N2 and CH4 column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N2 scale height of ~76 km and a temperature of ~153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  15. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  16. The Present and Future of Occultation Surveys of the Outer Solar System: From TAOS to Whipple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica; Alcock, C.; Murray, S.; Werner, M.; TAOS Collaboration

    2009-09-01

    We have analyzed new data from the TAOS occultation survey and set new, sensitive upper limits to the number density of KBOs of diameter D<30 km, and of objects in Sedna-like orbits. We present the first constraints on models of the formation and evolution of the Solar System based on occultation survey data. We show what future occultation programs must be able to do in order to survey comprehensively the populations of small bodies in the outer solar system, and describe a Discovery class mission, Whipple, that can achieve these goals.

  17. James Webb Space Telescope Observations of Stellar Occultations by Solar System Bodies and Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; French, R. G.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Stansberry, J.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Vilenius, E.; Müller, Th.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Bosh, A.; Duffard, R.; Lellouch, E.; Tancredi, G.; Young, L.; Milam, Stefanie N.; the JWST “Occultations” Focus Group

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of Solar System bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a byproduct of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  18. Coronal Sources and In Situ Properties of the Solar Winds Sampled by ACE During 1999 - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui; Li, Bo; Li, Xing; Huang, Zhenghua; Mou, Chaozhou; Jiao, Fangran; Xia, Lidong

    2015-05-01

    We identify the coronal sources of the solar winds sampled by the ACE spacecraft during 1999 - 2008 and examine the in situ solar wind properties as a function of wind sources. The standard two-step mapping technique is adopted to establish the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic flux tubes along which the ACE winds flow. The footpoints are then placed in the context of EIT 284 Å images and photospheric magnetograms, allowing us to categorize the sources into four groups: coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs), the quiet Sun (QS), and "undefined". This practice also enables us to establish the response to solar activity of the fractions occupied by each type of solar wind, and of their speeds and O7+/O6+ ratios measured in situ. We find that during the maximum phase, the majority of ACE winds originate from ARs. During the declining phase, CHs and ARs are equally important contributors to the ACE solar winds. The QS contribution increases with decreasing solar activity and maximizes in the minimum phase when the QS appears to be the primary supplier of the ACE winds. With decreasing activity, the winds from all sources tend to become cooler, as represented by the increasingly low O7+/O6+ ratios. On the other hand, during each activity phase, the AR winds tend to be the slowest and are associated with the highest O7+/O6+ ratios, while the CH winds correspond to the other extreme, with the QS winds lying in between. Applying the same analysis method to the slow winds alone, here defined as the winds with speeds lower than 500 km s-1, we find basically the same overall behavior, as far as the contributions of individual groups of sources are concerned. This statistical study indicates that QS regions are an important source of the solar wind during the minimum phase.

  19. [Stellar Occultation Studies of Small Bodies in the Outer Solar System: Accomplishments, Status, and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, James

    2005-01-01

    Bodies residing in the outer solar system exhibit unique physical processes, and some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. Pluto, the largest known Kuiper Belt object (KBO), and its near twin Triton--an ex-KBO that has been captured by Neptune--have nitrogen atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with surface ice. These atmospheres are most sensitively probed from Earth by the technique of Stellar occultations, which can provide the temperature and pressure profiles of these atmospheres at a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. Recent results from occultations show that the surface pressure of Triton's atmosphere has been increasing and that the shape of the atmosphere deviates from its expected spherical figure. With the occultation technique we can also learn the sizes of smaller bodies that have formed in the outer solar system: Charon, the Centaurs, and KBOs. Our proposed program involves identifying occultation candidates, predicting occultations, observing occultations, analysis of the data, and synthesis of the occultation results with other data. The main goals for our proposed work are to (i) further observe occultations by Triton with the objectives of understanding its pressure changes, distortion, and enigmatic thermal structure (ii) determine whether the abrupt drop in Pluto's stellar occultation light curve is caused by a sharp thermal gradient near its surface or by atmospheric haze, (iii) further observations to characterize the potential collapse of Pluto's atmosphere as it recedes from the sun (information that should be of interest to the Pluto-Kuiper Express), ( iv ) determine Charon's radius more accurately than can be done with the mutual events to derive a better estimate of Charon's density, and ( v ) directly determine the size (and albedo) of Centaurs with the goal of more accurately estimating the sizes of KBOS.

  20. Orbit design for solar and dual satellite occultation measurements of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.; Harrison, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of satellite based occultation missions are considered for measuring atmospheric constituents. Nominal cases for each type are presented to demonstrate representative solutions to orbit design problems. For the solar occultation mode, large areas of the globe can be covered during a one year mission, but the measurements are limited to local dawn or dusk. For the dual satellite mode, with a laser aboard a second satellite to act as a source, diurnal coverage can be obtained at the expense of more complex systems and mission scenarios. In this mode, orbit pairs are selected which maintain their relative orbit plane geometry while their differing periods drive cyclic patterns of latitude coverage. A simulated one year solar occultation mission is used to illustrate one way of analyzing occultation data by averaging measurements within bands of constant latitude.

  1. Optimization of the occulter for the Solar Orbiter/METIS coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Vivès, Sébastien; Romoli, Marco; Guillon, Christophe; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Escolle, Clement; Focardi, Mauro; Antonucci, Ester; Fineschi, Silvano; Naletto, Giampiero; Nicolini, Gianalfredo; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Spadaro, Daniele

    2012-09-01

    METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy investigation), selected to fly aboard the Solar Orbiter ESA/NASA mission, is conceived to perform imaging (in visible, UV and EUV) and spectroscopy (in EUV) of the solar corona, by means of an integrated instrument suite located on a single optical bench and sharing the same aperture on the satellite heat shield. As every coronagraph, METIS is highly demanding in terms of stray light suppression. Coronagraphs history teaches that a particular attention must be dedicated to the occulter optimization. The METIS occulting system is of particular interest due to its innovative concept. In order to meet the strict thermal requirements of Solar Orbiter, METIS optical design has been optimized by moving the entrance pupil at the level of the external occulter on the S/C thermal shield, thus reducing the size of the external aperture. The scheme is based on an inverted external-occulter (IEO). The IEO consists of a circular aperture on the Solar Orbiter thermal shield. A spherical mirror rejects back the disk-light through the IEO. A breadboard of the occulting assembly (BOA) has been manufactured in order to perform stray light tests in front of two solar simulators (in Marseille, France and in Torino, Italy). A first measurement campaign has been carried on at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. In this paper we describe the BOA design, the laboratory set-up and the preliminary results.

  2. Orbit dynamics and geographical coverage capabilities of satellite-based solar occultation experiments for global monitoring of stratospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Orbit dynamics of the solar occultation technique for satellite measurements of the Earth's atmosphere are described. A one-year mission is simulated and the orbit and mission design implications are discussed in detail. Geographical coverage capabilities are examined parametrically for a range of orbit conditions. The hypothetical mission is used to produce a simulated one-year data base of solar occultation measurements; each occultation event is assumed to produce a single number, or 'measurement' and some statistical properties of the data set are examined. A simple model is fitted to the data to demonstrate a procedure for examining global distributions of atmospheric constitutents with the solar occultation technique.

  3. TAOS: An Occultation Survey of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M. J.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F. B.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W. P.; Cook, K. H.; de Pater, I.; Geary, J. C.; Kim, D.-W.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Marshall, S. L.; Norton, T.; Protopapas, P.; Rice, J. A.; Ruiz Reyes, M.; Schwamb, M. E.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Wang, J.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-W.

    2011-10-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation survey (TAOS) operate four small telescopes in central Taiwan to search for occultations by small (∼1 km diameter) Kuiper Belt Objects. The system is fully robotic, requiring human intervention only in the event of hardware failures. However, the status of the system during observations is monitored remotely via smart-phone. A successor survey, the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)1 is currently being constructed. This next generation survey will be more than one hundred times as sensitive as the earlier survey. In my talk I will present the results of TAOS I, discuss the future plans of the survey, and provide a detailed description of the TAOS II project.

  4. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  5. Solar Activity and GCR Particle Flux Variations: Assessment and Modeling with Ulysses and ACE/CRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar

    Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment during the current and historically known lower solar minimum condition indicate some of the very high anticipated measurements of particle spectral data. Data from the Ulysses spacecraft in the polar orbit about the sun during the years 2004 and 2008 (about 5 AU) provided proton and alpha particle flux data and showed such anticipated high particle flux variations. Also, ACE/CRIS spacecraft data during the years 2007 and 2009 showed some of the high particle flux measurements of several heavy ions such as oxygen and iron. We present Ulysses and ACE/CRIS measured particle flux data and discuss their high density and variations in the context of the current low solar activity for depicting current space radiation environment.

  6. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  7. Elemental composition variations in the solar wind: Comparisons between Ulysses and ACE within different solar wind regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilleri, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The elemental composition of the solar wind is likely established at the base of the corona, a conclusion based on the observed dependence of solar wind abundances on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. Although the plasma conditions within the ecliptic solar wind are highly variable, the elemental composition is less so, and is an indicator of the nature of the solar source. In particular, coronal hole (CH, fast) solar wind tends to have less of a FIP enhancement of the low -FIP elements (e.g., Fe, Mg, Si) than interstream (IS, slow) solar wind. The elemental composition of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is more variable, but tends to be similar to IS composition. The question we address here is how much does the average composition of the different solar wind regimes vary over the course of the solar cycle and between solar cycles. For the most recent solar cycle, which included the unusually deep and prolonged solar minimum (2006 - 2010) Lepri et al. (2013) have shown measurable drifts in the elemental composition within solar wind regimes using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS). In contrast, von Steiger and Zurbuchen (2011) have shown using Ulysses SWIC data that the composition of the very fast polar coronal hole flow has remained constant. Here, we extend the Lepri et al. ecliptic analysis to include data from Ulysses, which allows us to expand the analysis to the previous solar cycle (1990 - 2001), as well as check consistency with their recent solar cycle results. (Note that although Ulysses was nominally a polar mission, it spent considerable time at low latitudes as well.) A major driver for this investigation is the Genesis Mission solar wind sample analysis. Namely, was the solar wind sampled by Genesis between late 2001 and early 2004 typical of the solar wind over longer time scales, and hence a representative sample of the long-term solar wind, or was it somehow unique

  8. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sicardy, Bruno; Bézard, Bruno; Sotin, Christophe; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matt; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 μm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution (~10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 10 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 μm, and CO, at 4.7 μm. We can extract methane's abundance between 70 and 750 km and CO's between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 μm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 μm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  9. Technical Note: A Time-Dependent I(sub 0) Correction for Solar Occultation Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar occultation has proven to be a reliable technique for the measurement of atmospheric constituents in the stratosphere. NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE, SAGE II, and SAGE III) together have provided over 25 years of quality solar occultation data, a data record which has been an important resource for the scientific exploration of atmospheric composition and climate change. Herein, we describe an improvement to the processing of SAGE data that corrects for a previously uncorrected short-term timedependence in the calibration function. The variability relates to the apparent rotation of the scanning track with respect to the face of the sun due to the motion of the satellite. Correcting for this effect results in a decrease in the measurement noise in the Level 1 line-of-sight optical depth measurements of approximately 40% in the middle and upper stratospheric SAGE II and III where it has been applied. The technique is potentially useful for any scanning solar occultation instrument, and suggests further improvement for future occultation measurements if a full disk imaging system can be included.

  10. Intercalibration and Cross-Correlation of Ace and Wind Solar Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This report covers activities funded from October 1, 1998 through September 30, 2002. Two yearly status reports have been filed on this grant, and they are included as Appendix 1. The purpose of this grant was to compare ACE and Wind solar wind parameters when the two spacecraft were near to one another and then to use the intercalibrated parameters to carry out scientific investigations. In September, 2001 a request for a one-year, no-cost extension until September 30, 2002 was submitted and approved. The statement of work for that extension included adjustment of ACE densities below wind speeds of 350 km/s, a study of shock normal orientations using travel time delays between the two spacecraft, comparison of density jumps at shocks, and a study of temperature anisotropies and double streaming to see if such features evolved between the spacecraft.

  11. Application of a silicon photodiode array for solar edge tracking in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Moore, A. S.; Stump, C. S.; Mayo, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    The optical and electronic design of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) elevation sunsensor is described. This system uses a Galilean telescope to form a solar image on a linear silicon photodiode array. The array is a self-scanned, monolithic charge coupled device. The addresses of both solar edges imaged on the array are used by the control/pointing system to scan the HALOE science instantaneous-field-of-view (IFOV) across the vertical solar diameter during instrument calibration, and then maintain the science IFOV four arcmin below the top edge during the science data occultation event. Vertical resolution of 16 arcsec and a radiometric dynamic range of 100 are achieved at the 0.7 micrometer operating wavelength. The design provides for loss of individual photodiode elements without loss of angular tracking capability. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that is now being developed by NASA Langley Research Center for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  12. Dependence of Current-Sheet-like Structure on the Solar Wind Type from the ACE Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, L. E.; Li, G.

    2012-12-01

    Solar wind is an ideal testbed for studying various properties of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence (MHD), including its intermittent characteristics. One type of intermittent structure in the solar wind is current-sheet-like structures. These structures may originate from the solar surface or may emerge as a result of non-linear interactions in the solar wind. Depending on how they form, in particular whether or not they are formed in the solar wind, their occurrence rate may be a function of the solar wind type. In this work, we examine how the current sheet occurrence rate depend on the solar wind type. In classifying the solar wind type, we follow the criteria given in Zhao and Fisk (2009) and use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) plasma data in the year of 2010. The current sheets are identified using the method developed in Li (2008) and Miao et al. (2011). Our results show that the occurrence rate has a different solar wind speed dependence for the coronal hole wind (CHW) and the non coronal hole wind (NCHW).

  13. Anomalously low C6+/C5+ ratio in solar wind: ACE/SWICS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Fisk, L. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Carbon and Oxygen ionization states in the solar wind plasma freeze-in within 2 solar radii (Rs) from the solar surface, and then they do not change as they propagate with the solar wind into the heliosphere. Therefore, the O7+/O6+ and C6+/C5+ charge state ratios measured in situ maintain a record of the thermal properties (electron temperature and density) of the inner corona where the solar wind originates. Since these two ratios freeze-in at very similar height, they are expected to be correlated. However, an investigation of the correlation between these two ratios as measured by ACE/SWICS instrument from 1998 to 201l shows that there is a subset of "Outliers" departing from the expected correlation. We find about 49.4% of these Outliers is related to the Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), while 49.6% of them is slow speed wind (Vp < 500 km/s) and about 1.0% of them is fast solar wind (Vp > 500 km/s). We compare the outlier-slow-speed wind with the normal slow wind (defined as Vp < 500 km/s and O7+/O6+ > 0.2) and find that the reason that causes the Outliers to depart from the correlation is their extremely depleted C6+/C5+ ratio which is decreased by 80% compared to the normal slow wind. We discuss the implication of the Outlier solar wind for the solar wind acceleration mechanism.

  14. Occultations of stars by solar system objects. III - A photographic search for occultations of faint stars by selected asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Franz, O. G.; Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.

    1983-02-01

    Occultations of stars fainter than the AGK and SAO catalog limits by selected minor planets during their 1983 apparitions have been identified by scanning plates taken with the 13-in. Lowell astrograph. A total of 33 upcoming occultations have been found involving 1 Ceres, 10 Hygiea, 52 Europa, 65 Cybele, 451 Patientia, 511 Davida, and 704 Interamnia.

  15. Features of solar wind acceleration according to radio occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efimov, A. I.

    1995-01-01

    In addressing one of the fundamental problems in solar physics establishing the mechanism(s) responsible for the solar wind acceleration and the corona heating - it is essential to have a reliable knowledge of the heliocentric radial dependence of the solar wind properties. Adequate data are available for small solar distances R less than 4 R(solar mass) from coronal white light and EUV observations and at distances R greater than 60 R(solar mass) from in situ measurements. One of the few methods available to fill in the gap between these boundaries is the radio scintillation technique. Taking the example of the solar wind velocity, the most reliable such measurements are obtained when phase fluctuation observations of scattered radio waves, which are not susceptible to saturation effects, are recorded at two or more widely-spaced ground stations. Two extensive observation campaigns of this type were carried out with the Venus-orbiting satellites Venera 10 in 1976 and Venera 15/16 in 1984. The observations were performed over the course of three months near superior conjunction at solar offset distances R approximately 6-80 R(solar mass). The main results from the subsequent analysis of these data are: (1) velocities vary between 250 and 380 km s(exp -1) for R greater than 20 R(solar mass), agreeing with similar measurements using natural sources (IPS); (2) velocities derived from two-station phase fluctuation observations varv between 70 and 120 km s(exp -1) for R less than 12 R(solar mass), i.e. values substantially lower than those derived from conventional IPS data; and (3) it is suggested that the different velocity profiles derived from the two data sets at small R may be due to the effects of magnetosonic and Alfvenic waves on radio wave scattering. Further analysis of additional radio sounding data should help resolve the apparent discrepancy.

  16. On the use of Cherenkov Telescopes for outer Solar system body occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2014-12-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) are arrays of very large optical telescopes that are well-suited for rapid photometry of bright sources. I investigate their potential in observing stellar occultations by small objects in the outer Solar system, Transjovian Objects (TJOs). These occultations cast diffraction patterns on the Earth. Current IACT arrays are capable of detecting objects smaller than 100 m in radius in the Kuiper Belt and 1 km radius out to 5000 au. The future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will have even greater capabilities. Because the arrays include several telescopes, they can potentially measure the speeds of TJOs without degeneracies, and the sizes of the TJOs and background stars. I estimate the achievable precision using a Fisher matrix analysis. With CTA, the precisions of these parameter estimations will be as good as a few per cent. I consider how often detectable occultations occur by members of different TJO populations, including Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Oort Cloud objects, and satellites and Trojans of Uranus and Neptune. The great sensitivity of IACT arrays means that they likely detect KBO occultations once every O(10) hours when looking near the ecliptic. IACTs can also set useful limits on many other TJO populations.

  17. Occultations of stars by solar system objects. V - A photographic search for occultations by selected asteroids in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; Bowell, E.; Klemola, A.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic plates taken with the 0.5-m Carnegie double astrograph have been used to identify upcoming asteroid occultations not found in earlier star catalog searches. Twenty-six occultations involving the minor planets 1 Ceres, 10 Hygiea, 52 Europa, 65 Cybele, 451 Patientia, 511 Davida, and 704 Interamnia were found in this search. Of particular interest is the occultation of BD + 8 deg 471 by 1 Ceres on November 13, 1984, which is predicted to be observable throughout much of Mexico and, perhaps, in the southern United States.

  18. ACE-FTS observation of a young biomass burning plume: first reported measurements of C2H4, C3H6O, H2CO and PAN by infrared occultation from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coheur, P.-F.; Herbin, H.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Wespes, C.; Carleer, M.; Turquety, S.; Rinsland, C. P.; Remedios, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2007-10-01

    In the course of our study of the upper tropospheric composition with the infrared Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), we found an occultation sequence that on 8 October 2005, sampled a remarkable plume near the east coast of Tanzania. Model simulations of the CO distribution in the Southern hemisphere are performed for this period and they suggest that the emissions for this event likely originated from a nearby forest fire, after which the plume was transported from the source region to the upper troposphere. Taking advantage of the very high signal-to-noise ratio of the ACE-FTS spectra over a wide wavenumber range (750-4400 cm-1), we present in-depth analyses of the chemical composition of this plume in the middle and upper troposphere, focusing on the measurements of weakly absorbing pollutants. For this specific biomass burning event, we report simultaneous observations of an unprecedented number of organic species. Measurements of C2H4 (ethene), C3H4 (propyne), H2CO (formaldehyde), C3H6O (acetone) and CH3COO2NO2 (peroxyacetylnitrate, abbreviated as PAN) are the first reported detections using infrared occultation spectroscopy from satellites. Based on the lifetime of the emitted species, we discuss the photochemical age of the plume and also report, whenever possible, the enhancement ratios relative to CO.

  19. ACE-FTS observation of a young biomass burning plume: first reported measurements of C2H4, C3H6O, H2CO and PAN by infrared occultation from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coheur, P.-F.; Herbin, H.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Wespes, C.; Carleer, M.; Turquety, S.; Rinsland, C. P.; Remedios, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2007-06-01

    In the course of our study of the upper tropospheric composition with the infrared Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), we found an occultation sequence that on 8 October 2005, sampled a remarkable plume near the east coast of Tanzania. Model simulations of the CO distribution in the Southern hemisphere are performed for this period and they demonstrate that the emissions for this event originated from a nearby forest fire, after which the plume was transported from the source region to the upper troposphere. Taking advantage of the very high signal-to-noise ratio of the ACE-FTS spectra over a wide wavenumber range (750-4400 cm-1), we present in-depth analyses of the chemical composition of this plume in the middle and upper troposphere, focusing on the measurements of weakly absorbing pollutants. For this specific biomass burning event, we report simultaneous observations of an unprecedented number of organic species. Measurements of C2H4 (ethene), C3H4 (propyne), H2CO (formaldehyde), C3H6O (acetone) and CH3COO2NO2 (peroxyacetylnitrate, abbreviated as PAN) are the first reported detections using infrared occultation spectroscopy from satellites. Based on the lifetime of the emitted species, we discuss the photochemical age of the plume and also report, whenever possible, the enhancement ratios relative to CO.

  20. ACE-FTS Observation of a Young Biomass Burning Plume: First Reported Measurements of C2H4, C3H6O, H2CO and PAN by Infrared Occultation from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coheur, Pierre-Francois; Herbin, Herve; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hurtmans, Daniel; Wespes, Catherine; Carleer, Michel; Turquety, Solene; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Remedios, John; Hauglustaine, Didier; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    In the course of our study of the upper tropospheric composition with the infrared 35 Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE FTS), we 36 found an occultation sequence that on 8 October 2005, sampled a remarkable plume near the 37 east coast of Tanzania. Model simulations of the CO distribution in the Southern hemisphere 38 are performed for this period and they demonstrate that the emissions for this event originated 39 from a nearby forest fire, after which the plume was transported from the source region to the 40 upper troposphere. Taking advantage of the very high signal-to-noise ratio of the ACE FTS 41 spectra over a wide wavenumber range (750-4400 cm(exp -1), we present in-depth analyses of the 42 chemical composition of this plume in the middle and upper troposphere, focusing on the 43 measurements of weakly absorbing pollutants. For this specific biomass burning event, we 44 report simultaneous observations of an unprecedented number of organic species. 45 Measurements of C2H4 (ethene), C3H4 (propyne), H2CO (formaldehyde), C3H6O (acetone) 46 and CH3COO2NO2 (perxoxyacetylnitrate, abbreviated as PAN) are the first reported 47 detections using infrared occultation spectroscopy from satellites. Based on the lifetime of the 48 emitted species, we discuss the photochemical age of the plume and also report, whenever 49 possible, the enhancement ratios relative to CO.

  1. Heliophysics from and of the Moon - the Solar Occultation Explorer (SOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Daw, Adrian N.; Habal, Shadia R.; Sittler, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental processes of the inner corona of the Sun at 1.1 to 3 solar radii can occasionally be investigated in detail by ground-based solar eclipse observations at quasi-yearly intervals. The combination of portable ground-based telescopes and the distant occulting edge provided by the lunar limb allows imaging of coronal structure and ion excitation emission lines at the highest available spatial and spectral resolution. These observations are limited to the visible eastern and western coronal regions and cannot view the intervening region over the central disk in the hemisphere towards Earth. A comparable configuration for continuous coronal observations from a spacecraft, e.g. with an external occulter disk on a 100-meter boom, is conceivable and could generate 3-D data models of the corona via tomographic reconstruction from time series measurements but may not now be technically or economically feasible. The faster and cheaper approach would be to make high cadence eclipse observations from one or more small satellites in lunar orbit. The Solar Occultation Explorer (SOX) is suggested as an explorer-class NASA mission that would conduct eclipse observations at daily to hourly cadence depending on the orbit. This smallsat would carry two principal instrument suites: (1 ) spectroscopic imaging telescope with sub-nm resolution for selected coronal emission lines diagnostic of coronal plasma charge state, denSity, and temperature, and (2) in-situ field & particle instrument suite for measurements of the solar wind and local lunar environments. The most comparable flight heritage instrument, the LASCO C1 spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission, did achieve high visible-band spectral resolution with a Fabry-Perot interferometer but was limited in brightness sensitivity by usage of an internal occulter system and has not been operational since June 1998 The SOX mission concept is undergoing initial study by the Lunar Solar Origins

  2. Occultations of stars by solar system objects. VII - Occultations of catalog stars by asteroids in 1988 and 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.; Millis, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Predictions are given for 102 occultations of stars by minor planets occurring in 1988 and 1989. The predictions are based on a computerized comparison of asteroid ephemerides with star positions given in eight major astrometric catalogs. The search is completed for all numbered asteroids whose orbits are accurately known and that reach an angular diameter of at least 0.08 arcsec during the search years. Preliminary information sufficient for planning is given for each occultation.

  3. RECON - A new system for probing the outer solar system with stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M. W.; Keller, J. M.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2015-10-01

    The Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON) is a new system for coordinated occultation observations of outer solar system objects. Occultations by objects in the outer solar system are more difficult to predict due to their large distance and limited duration of the astrometric data used to determine their orbits and positions. This project brings together the research and educational community into a unique citizen-science partnership to overcome the difficulties of observing these distant objects. The goal of the project is to get sizes and shapes for TNOs with diameters larger than 100 km. As a result of the system design it will also serve as a probe for binary systems with spatial separations too small to be resolved directly. Our system takes the new approach of setting up a large number of fixed observing stations and letting the shadows come to the network. The nominal spacing of the stations is 50 km. The spread of the network is roughly 2000 km along a roughly north-south line in the western United States. The network contains 56 stations that are committed to the project and we get additional ad hoc support from the International Occultation Timing Association. At our minimum size, two stations will record an event while the other stations will be probing for secondary events. Larger objects will get more chords and will allow determination of shape profiles. The stations are almost exclusively sited and associated with schools, usually at the 9-12 grade level. We have successfully completed our first TNO observation which is presented in the compainion paper by G. Rossi et al (this conference).

  4. Coating and surface finishing definition for the Solar Orbiter/METIS inverted external occulter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Romoli, Marco; Vives, Sebastien; Baccani, Cristian; Escolle, Clement; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Focardi, Mauro; Da Deppo, Vania; Moses, John D.; Fineschi, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    The METIS coronagraph aboard the Solar Orbiter mission will undergo extreme environmental conditions (e.g., a thermal excursion of about 350 degrees throughout the various mission phases), due to the peculiar spacecraft trajectory that will reach a perihelion of 0.28 AUs. METIS is characterized by an innovative design for the occultation system that allows to halve the thermal load inside the instrument while guaranteeing the stray light reduction that is required for a solar coronagraph. The Inverted External Occulter (IEO) concept revolutionizes the classical scheme, by exchanging the usual positions of the entrance aperture (that is now the outermost element of the instrument facing the Sun) with the actual occulter (that is a spherical mirror inside the coronagraph boom). The chosen material for the IEO manufacturing is Titanium, as a trade o_ between light weight, strength and low thermal expansion coefficient. A 2 years long test campaign has been run to define the IEO geometry, and its results are addressed in previous dedicated papers. This work describes the results of a further campaign aimed at defining the IEO surface and edge finishing, the support flange geometry and the Titanium coating. Various edge finishing were installed on a prototype of the instrument occulting system and their performance in stray light reduction were compared. The support flange geometry was designed in order to reduce the overall weight, to control the thermal load and to accentuate its stray light suppression performance. The coating is a particularly delicate issue. A black coating is necessary in order to assess the stray light issues, typically critical for visible coronagraphs. Black coating of Titanium is not a standard process, thus several space qualified black coatings were experimented on Titanium and characterized. The impact of the IEO coatings was evaluated, the reflectivity and the BRDFs were measured and are addressed in the paper.

  5. Stratospheric constituent measurements using UV solar occultation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Gillis, J.; Goldman, A.; Kosters, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemistry of the stratospheric ozone layer was studied as the result of predictions that trace amounts of pollutants can significantly affect the layer. One of the key species in the determination of the effects of these pollutants is the OH radical. A balloon flight was made to determine whether data on atmospheric OH could be obtained from lower resolution solar spectra obtained from high altitude during sunset.

  6. Seasonal comparisons of retrieved temperature and water vapour between ACE-FTS and COSMIC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kevin; Toon, Geoff; Boone, Chris; Strong, Kim

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the selection of a high-resolution solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to fly to Mars, we developed new algorithms for retrieving vertical profiles of temperature and pressure from spectra. We present temperature retrieval results from remote sensing spectra collected by the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), which recently celebrated its tenth year in orbit. ACE utilizes a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating between 750-4400 cm-1 in limb-scanning mode using the sun as a light source (solar occultation). We compare our retrieved profiles to those of the ACE Science Team and the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC). COSMIC is a group of six small satellites that use signals from GPS satellites to measure water vapour pressure an temperature via radio occultation. We have collected five sets of zonal and seasonal coincidences with a tight criteria of 150 km and 1 hour. Retrieved H2O profiles from both satellites will also be presented for these data sets. Compared to ACE, we can achieve T differences between 1 and 5 K below 50 km, perform less well between 50 and 100 km. Compared to COSMIC, available below 40 km, we perform similarly, while the ACE retrievals are in close agreement.

  7. The Composition and Structure of Enceladus' Plume from a Cassini UVIS Observation of a Solar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Shemansky, D. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, I.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed an occultation of the sun by Enceladus’ water vapor plume on May 18, 2010. UVIS used its extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channel for this new observation, to detect absorptions in the wavelength range 55 to 110 nm. Molecular nitrogen and water vapor have absorptions in this range. The N2 b(3,0) line is at 97.2 nm, extinguishing the solar H Lyman gamma emission. Cassini’s Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected a species with an atomic mass of 28 amu, which could be CO, C2H4 or N2 [1, 2]. Definitive UVIS detection of N2 was important to clear up this ambiguity, and this was an important goal of the observation, as the presence or lack of N2 is key to models of the geochemistry in the interior [3, 4, 5]. UVIS did not detect N2 and we set an upper limit for the column density of 3 x 10^13 cm^-2. The absorption features in the spectrum are best fit by a water vapor column density of 0.9 x 10^16 cm^-2. This column density is in family with previous UVIS measurements from stellar occultations in 2005 and 2007 at far ultraviolet wavelengths, suggesting that Enceladus’ activity has been stable for the last 5 years [6, 7]. We used fluctuations in the signal to probe the structure of the gas jets again, as was analyzed in the 2007 occultation of zeta Orionis [7]. Gas jets are correlated to the dust jets detected by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem [8]. The path of the sun cut through the jets horizontally at an altitude above the limb of ~15 km at the closest point. The resolution of the solar occultation is higher than the stellar occultation, and collimation of the gas jets observed in the solar occultation is greater than estimated in 2007. The observed collimation allows us to derive a mach number of ~4 for the ratio of the vertical velocity in the jet to the thermal velocity of the plume gas. The new opportunity afforded by this solar occultation is used to further model the structure and

  8. A Survey of Velocity Distributions of Solar Wind Ions : ACE/SWICS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.; Marsch, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The state of solar wind ions is generally described by a small set of state variables. In detail these aretotal density (or flux), center of mass (or bulk) velocity, and temperature. These variables are obtainedfrom measured velocity distributions either by fitting a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution or by calculatingthe zeroth, first, and second order moments of the distribution. Obviously the first approach requires athermalized distribution to yield meaningful results, while the second approach is universally valid.However, in both cases the shape of the distribution can not be reproduced by the derived parameters.From observations of solar wind protons and alpha particles it is known that the assumption of a thermalized distribution is not valid, at least for the majority of observations. For heavy solar wind ions most observationsare severely limited by statistics and do not even allow to distinguish whether the distribution is thermal or not.This often insufficient characterization of the solar wind VDF severely limits the information which can beobtained for more detailed studies, especially about microscopic kinetic physics and the associatedwave-particle interactions. These naturally yield deviations from Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions.To address this problem we have analyzed ten years worth of data from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS)and the Magnetometer (MAG) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). From our analysis we obtained reduced 1D velocity spectra in 12 minute cadence for some 40 solar wind ions, from protons and alpha particles up to iron.Using the magnetic field vector information we were able to study periods where the reduced 1D spectra representthe parallel and perpendicular shape of the velocity distributions. We present our results and discussthem in the aforementioned context.

  9. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES): Proposed Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Bailey, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to resolve the critical but underexplored role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in climate change. The mission would provide the suite of measurements required to quantify UTLS transport pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of changes in UTLS composition forced by expected changes in these pathways as the climate evolves. The discrimination and quantification of UTLS transport pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosols and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of UTLS transport (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of < 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only of order 10% of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Earth Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is a 6-element constellation of autonomous small satellites, each mated with a GLO sensor, and deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the

  10. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Fish, C. S.; Gordley, L. L.; Fromm, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to quantify the critical role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in the climate system. The mission would provide, for the first time, the suite of measurements required to quantify stratosphere/troposphere exchange (STE) pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of potential changes in STE pathways with climate change. The discrimination and quantification of STE pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosol and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of STE (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only a few percent of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is an 8-element constellation of autonomous CubeSats, each mated with a GLO sensor, deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the SOCRATES mission and GLO instrument concepts.

  11. Vertical structure and size distributions of Martian aerosols from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Blamont, J. E.; Krasnopol'skii, V. A.; Korablev, O. I.; Atreya, S. K.; West, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Phobos 2 spectrometer measurements of solar occultations close to the evening terminator have furnished data on the vertical structure of the Martian aerosols near the northern spring equinox. Since the thermal structure derived from saturated IR profiles of water vapor does not allow the reaching of the CO2 frost point at cloud altitudes, said clouds' particles may be formed by H2O ice. Dust was also monitored at two wavelengths; it is assumed that the dust particles are levitated by eddy mixing. A parallel is drawn between these thin clouds and the polar mesospheric clouds observed on earth.

  12. Equivalence Method for Retrieving Stratospheric Constituent Profiles from Infrared Solar Occultation Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinreb, Michael P.

    1986-03-01

    Mixing ratios of stratospheric constituents can be inferred from satellite- or balloon-based infrared solar occultation measurements. The nonlinear system of equations that relates the measurements to the mixing ratios is often solved by the `onion-peeling' technique. We show how to implement onion-peeling with an algorithm in which limb paths are represented by equivalent homogeneous paths. The essential computations are confined to the tangent layers instead of the full multilayer limb paths. The algorithm yields the same solutions as conventional onion-peeling but requires significantly less computation time.

  13. Equivalence method for retrieving stratospheric constituent profiles from infrared solar occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinreb, M. P.

    1986-03-01

    Mixing ratios of stratospheric constituents can be inferred from satellite- or balloon-based infrared solar occultation measurements. The nonlinear system of equations that relates the measurements to the mixing ratios is often solved by the 'onion-peeling' technique. The way to implement onion-peeling with an algorithm in which limb paths are represented by equivalent homogeneous paths is shown. The essential computations are confined to the tangent layers instead of the full multilayer limb paths. The algorithm yields the same solutions as conventional onion-peeling but requires significantly less computation time.

  14. ACE/SWICS OBSERVATIONS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS WITHIN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Weberg, Micah J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Lepri, Susan T. E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2012-11-20

    We present the first in situ observations of heavy ion dropouts within the slow solar wind, observed for select elements ranging from helium to iron. For iron, these dropouts manifest themselves as depletions of the Fe/H ratio by factors up to {approx}25. The events often exhibit mass-dependent fractionation and are contained in slow, unsteady wind found within a few days from known stream interfaces. We propose that such dropouts are evidence of gravitational settling within large coronal loops, which later undergo interchange reconnection and become source regions of slow, unsteady wind. Previously, spectroscopic studies by Raymond et al. in 1997 (and later Feldman et al. in 1999) have yielded strong evidence for gravitational settling within these loops. However, their expected in situ signature plasma with heavy elements fractionated by mass was not observed prior to this study. Using data from the SWICS instrument on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we investigate the composition of the solar wind within these dropouts and explore long term trends over most of a solar cycle.

  15. The effect of solar radio bursts on the GNSS radio occultation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Zhao, Biqiang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Wei, Yong; Lei, Jiuhou; Solomon, Stan; Rocken, Christian

    2013-09-01

    radio burst (SRB) is the radio wave emission after a solar flare, covering a broad frequency range, originated from the Sun's atmosphere. During the SRB occurrence, some specific frequency radio wave could interfere with the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and therefore disturb the received signals. In this study, the low Earth orbit- (LEO-) based high-resolution GNSS radio occultation (RO) signals from multiple satellites (COSMIC, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C, Metop-A, and TerraSAR-X) processed in University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) were first used to evaluate the effect of SRB on the RO technique. The radio solar telescope network (RSTN) observed radio flux was used to represent SRB occurrence. An extreme case during 6 December 2006 and statistical analysis during April 2006 to September 2012 were studied. The LEO RO signals show frequent loss of lock (LOL), simultaneous decrease on L1 and L2 signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) globally during daytime, small-scale perturbations of SNR, and decreased successful retrieval percentage (SRP) for both ionospheric and atmospheric occultations during SRB occurrence. A potential harmonic band interference was identified. Either decreased data volume or data quality will influence weather prediction, climate study, and space weather monitoring by using RO data during SRB time. Statistically, the SRP of ionospheric and atmospheric occultation retrieval shows ~4% and ~13% decrease, respectively, while the SNR of L1 and L2 show ~5.7% and ~11.7% decrease, respectively. A threshold value of ~1807 SFU of 1415 MHz frequency, which can result in observable GNSS SNR decrease, was derived based on our statistical analysis.

  16. Investigating Coronal Origin of the Solar Wind, a Joint SOHO/UVCS and ACE/SWICS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raymond, J. C.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.

    2005-05-01

    The solar wind ion composition is generally 'frozen-in' within 5 solar radii of the Sun. Many characteristics in the elemental abundances measured in the solar wind are believed to be set in the chromospheric and low coronal levels. Therefore solar wind ion and elemental composition data combined with spectroscopic observations of the inner corona such as those from SOHO/UVCS, are ideal for investigating the coronal origin of the solar wind. We present such joint analysis using SOHO/UVCS and ACE/SWICS data along with a 3-D MHD traceback model. In October 1999, UVCS observed the west limb for 7 consecutive days with the passing of an equatorial coronal hole followed by an active region. This corresponds to a rarefaction transition from fast to slow wind seen by ACE. We present a correlation study of the electron temperature and elemental abundances between the corona and the solar wind from these two datasets. The solar wind ion and elemental composition measured by PLASTIC onboard STEREO would be valuable in conducting such analysis for investigating the formation of the solar wind.

  17. SOLAR WIND HEAVY IONS OVER SOLAR CYCLE 23: ACE/SWICS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar wind plasma and compositional properties reflect the physical properties of the corona and its evolution over time. Studies comparing the previous solar minimum with the most recent, unusual solar minimum indicate that significant environmental changes are occurring globally on the Sun. For example, the magnetic field decreased 30% between the last two solar minima, and the ionic charge states of O have been reported to change toward lower values in the fast wind. In this work, we systematically and comprehensively analyze the compositional changes of the solar wind during cycle 23 from 2000 to 2010 while the Sun moved from solar maximum to solar minimum. We find a systematic change of C, O, Si, and Fe ionic charge states toward lower ionization distributions. We also discuss long-term changes in elemental abundances and show that there is a {approx}50% decrease of heavy ion abundances (He, C, O, Si, and Fe) relative to H as the Sun went from solar maximum to solar minimum. During this time, the relative abundances in the slow wind remain organized by their first ionization potential. We discuss these results and their implications for models of the evolution of the solar atmosphere, and for the identification of the fast and slow wind themselves.

  18. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  19. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan’s Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, S.; Sicardy, B.; Bézard, B.; Sotin, C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 µm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution ( 10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 8 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 µm, and CO, at 4.7 µm. We can extract methane’s abundance between 70 and 700 km and CO’s between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 µm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 µm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  20. Solar Occultation Satellite Data and Derived Meteorological Products: Sampling Issues and Comparisons with Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria; Daffer, William H.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hoppel, Karl W.; Walker, Kaley A.; Knosp, Brian W.; Boone, Chris; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Santee, Michelle L.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Pawson, Steven; Jackson, David R.; Deaver, Lance; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Lambert, Alyn; Schwartz, Michael J.; Froidevaux, Lucien; McLeod, Sean; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max J.; Trepte, Charles R.; Livesey, Nathaniel; Harwood, Robert S.; Waters, Joe W.

    2007-01-01

    Derived Meteorological Products (DMPs, including potential temperature (theta), potential vorticity, equivalent latitude (EqL), horizontal winds and tropopause locations) have been produced for the locations and times of measurements by several solar occultation (SO) instruments and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). DMPs are calculated from several meteorological analyses for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and III, Halogen Occultation Experiment, and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II and III SO instruments and MLS. Time-series comparisons of MLS version 1.5 and SO data using DMPs show good qualitative agreement in time evolution of O3, N2O, H20, CO, HNO3, HCl and temperature; quantitative agreement is good in most cases. EqL-coordinate comparisons of MLS version 2.2 and SO data show good quantitative agreement throughout the stratosphere for most of these species, with significant biases for a few species in localized regions. Comparisons in EqL coordinates of MLS and SO data, and of SO data with geographically coincident MLS data provide insight into where and how sampling effects are important in interpretation of the sparse SO data, thus assisting in fully utilizing the SO data in scientific studies and comparisons with other sparse datasets. The DMPs are valuable for scientific studies and to facilitate validation of non-coincident measurements.

  1. Two-Dimensional Assimilation Of Solar Occultation Satellite Data To Study Long-Term Ozone Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, M. A.; Zhou, X.; Smyshlyaev, S.

    The methodology of two-dimensional chemistry-transport model driven data assimilation is used to evaluate atmospheric ozone changes for several decades. The SUNY-SPb two-dimensional transport-chemistry model, using the same mathematical framework, has been used to assimilate atmospheric composition data from two different solar occultation satellite instruments. The associated errors of the satellite observations are objectively calculated based on estimation theory. Two-dimensional data assimilation results for ozone are shown for SAGE II Version 6.2 and for HALOE Version 19 data. SAGE II was launched in October of 1984, and HALOE was launched on September of 1991. The SAGE II data spans two periods of high stratospheric aerosol loading (from El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo), almost 10 QBO periods, 4 major ENSO events, and almost two complete solar cycles. The HALOE data spans one period of high stratospheric aerosol loading, almost 6 QBO periods, 3 major ENSO events, and about 1 1/2 solar cycles. HALOE and SAGE II results will be compared for the same periods. Assimilated satellite data are used to study the role of solar activity variations, atmospheric dynamics, and aerosol effects for long-term ozone variability in the lower and upper stratosphere and mesosphere.

  2. The use of stellar occultations to study the figures and atmospheres of small bodies in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael James

    The methods of analyzing stellar occultations by small bodies in the outer solar system are discussed with examples from Triton, Pluto, and Charon. Simulations were performed characterizing the analysis of multi-chord occultations including: the effects of the direction of residual minimization in figure fits, the complications in measuring the reliability of fitted figure parameters when there are few degrees of freedom, and the proper treatment of grazing chords in model fitting. The 2005 July 11 C313.2 stellar occultation by Charon was analyzed. Occultation timings from the three published data sets were combined to accurately determine the mean radius of Charon: 606.0 ± 1.5 km. The analysis indicates that a slight oblateness in the body (0.006 ± 0.003) best matches the data, with a confidence level of 86%. Charon's mean radius corresponds to a bulk density of 1.63 ± 0.07 g/cm 3 , which is significantly less than Pluto's (1.92 ± 0.12 g/cm 3 ), consistent with an impact formation scenario in which at least one of the impactors was differentiated. The 2002 August 21 P131.1 and the 1988 June 9 P8 stellar occultations by Pluto were analyzed. The ellipticity of Pluto's atmosphere as measured by the P131.1 event is 0.066 ± 0.040, with a Gaussian confidence level of 63%, and the ellipticity as measured by the P8 occultations is 0.091 ± 0.041, with a Gaussian confidence level of 70%. If this nonsphericity is confirmed, its size and variation could possibly be attributed to superrotating winds driven by sources such as surface frost migration due to changing insolation patterns or albedo properties, gravity waves, and an asymmetric mass distribution in Pluto itself. The 2001 August 23 Tr231 stellar occultation by Triton was analyzed. The half- light radius of Triton's atmosphere was calculated from astrometrically calibrated model fits to the occultation light curve. The resulting half-light radius of 1479.01 km is larger than the value of 1456.3 km derived from

  3. Bulk Properties of Solar Wind Protons: Inter-comparison of Observations From STEREO, SOHO, ACE, and WIND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunac, K. D.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. A.; Popecki, M. A.; Farrugia, C.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M.; Ellis, L.; Singer, K.; Walker, C.; Blush, L. M.; Bochsler, P.; Wurz, P.; Daoudi, H.; Giammanco, C.; Karrer, R.; Opitz, A.; Klecker, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Koeten, M.; Thompson, B.

    2007-05-01

    The twin STEREO observatories were launched in October 2006. The PLASTIC experiment onboard both spacecraft analyzes ions with energies between 0.25 and 80 keV/charge, including solar wind protons. Information on bulk properties such as density, speed, and temperature are obtained. In early 2007 STEREO A was separated from SOHO, ACE, WIND, and STEREO B by hundreds of earth radii within the ecliptic plane, and by tens of earth radii out of the ecliptic plane. We report on comparisons of bulk parameters between these spacecraft, and what they show us about small-scale temporal and spatial variations in the solar wind.

  4. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO(2) absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Russell Iii, J M; Drayson, S R

    1979-06-15

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occultation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO(2) (e.g., 2.0 microm, 2.7 microm, or 4.3 microm), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy. PMID:20212584

  5. Mission analysis for earth atmospheric measurements using solar occultation experiments on Shuttle Spacelabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. F.; Lawrence, G. F.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    The maximum geographical coverage of solar occultation experiments for various Shuttle-Spacelab mission concepts is defined and an analysis that includes trade-offs between parameters such as launch time, season, orbital inclination and altitude is presented as well as the mission design data for the Spacelab-3 flight. The effects of orbital ranges from 220 to 600 km on geographical coverage are examined with inclinations up to 97 deg for sun-synchronous orbit. Results show that the widest band of latitude coverage in the tropics and the temperate zones can be achieved with a mid-inclined (i.e., 57 deg) orbit and a mid-morning or late-night launch time.

  6. Measurements of O3, NO2 and Temperature during the 2004 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzenmacher, Tobias E.; Walker, Kaley A.; Strong, Kimberly; Berman, Richard; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Drummond, James R.; Fast, Hans; Fraser, Annemarie; MacQuarrie, Keith; Midwinter, Clive; Sung, Keeyoon; McElroy, C. Thomas; Mittermeier, Richard L.; Walker, Jennifer; Wu, Hongjiang

    2005-07-01

    The 2004 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign was conducted to provide correlative data for validating measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission. These measurements were made at Eureka, Nunavut during polar springtime 2004. Six ground-based instruments were operated during the intensive phase of the campaign and ozonesondes and radiosondes were flown. During this time, ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO were performing solar-occultation measurements over the Canadian Arctic. We report the first comparisons between campaign measurements and those from ACE, focusing on O3, NO2 and temperature. Initial mean O3 profiles from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO agree to within 20% between 10 and 30 km, and the NO2 profiles agree to within 40% between 17 and 40 km, which is within the standard deviations. The ACE-FTS temperature profiles agree to better than 2.5 K with the radiosonde temperatures from 10 to 32 km and with the lidar temperatures from 17 to 45 km.

  7. Multi-Year Characterization of PSCs Using Solar Occultation Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Drdla, K.; Bokarius, K.; Fromm, M.; Alfred, J.

    2004-01-01

    POAM solar occultation observations from1994 to present are studied for the purpose of determining Type I PSC formation characteristics and winter-long evolution. This information is critical to an improved understanding and predictive capability of stratospheric ozone depletion. Solar occultation satellite observations of these clouds yields more continuous and wide-spread information than can be obtained from aircraft, balloon, or ground-based observations. This multi-winter PSC study is augmented by the use of our Type Ia/Ib discrimination scheme. Recent studies of PSC formation made with POAM observations and simulations during the 1999-2000 Arctic winter have shown characteristics that shed light on the formation mechanisms responsible for Type Ia solid phase PSCs. This study examines PSC observations from many years on a common basis to see if the characteristics observed & cuing the 1999-2000 Arctic winter ai-e observed in other years and if other characteristics can be identified. The results show that Type Ia PSCs form at the beginning of the winter, within several days of the fxst drop in temperature below TNAT, and peak early in the winter. Type Ia PSCs typically outnumber Ib PSCs over the winter, especially at the beginning of the winter. Type Ia and Ib PSC observations continue throughout the winter. Micro-physical models of PSC formation must match these observed characteristics. Some models predict that temperatures must be more 5 K below T-NAT for five days before significant freezing can occur. This is not seen in the POAM observations. Differences in PSC characte ristics between the first two Arctic winters (1 994- 1995 and 1995- 1 996) and later winters also suggest the influence of volcanic perturb ations on PSC formation. Type Ia and Ib PSC characteristics observed by POAM III and SAGE III for the 2002-2003 Arctic winter are compared.

  8. Distinct EUV minimum of the solar irradiance (16-40 nm) observed by SolACES spectrometers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in August/September 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikutowski, B.; Brunner, R.; Erhardt, Ch.; Knecht, St.; Schmidtke, G.

    2011-09-01

    In the field of terrestrial climatology the continuous monitoring of the solar irradiance with highest possible accuracy is an important goal. SolACES as a part of the ESA mission SOLAR on the ISS is measuring the short-wavelength solar EUV irradiance from 16-150 nm. This data will be made available to the scientific community to investigate the impact of the solar irradiance variability on the Earth's climate as well as the thermospheric/ionospheric interactions that are pursued in the TIGER program. Since the successful launch with the shuttle mission STS-122 on February 7th, 2008, SolACES initially recorded the low EUV irradiance during the extended solar activity minimum. Thereafter it has been observing the EUV irradiance during the increasing solar activity with enhanced intensity and changing spectral composition. SolACES consists of three grazing incidence planar grating spectrometers. In addition there are two three-signal ionisation chambers, each with exchangeable band-pass filters to determine the absolute EUV fluxes repeatedly during the mission. One important problem of space-borne instrumentation recording the solar EUV irradiance is the degradation of the spectrometer sensitivity. The two double ionisation chambers of SolACES, which could be re-filled with three different gases for each recording, allow the recalibration of the efficiencies of the three SolACES spectrometers from time to time.

  9. Validation of the Earth atmosphere models using the EUV solar occultation data from the CORONAS and PROBA 2 instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Kuzin, Sergey; Berghmans, David; Pertsov, Andrey; Dominique, Marie; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin

    Absorption in the atmosphere below 500 km results in attenuation of the solar EUV flux, variation of its spectra and distortion of solar images acquired by solar EUV instruments operating on LEO satellites even on solar synchronous orbits. Occultation measurements are important for planning of solar observations from these satellites, and can be used for monitoring the upper atmosphere as well as for studying its response to the solar activity. We present the results of the occultation measurements of the solar EUV radiation obtained by the CORONAS-F/SPIRIT telescope at high solar activity (2002), by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS telescope at low activity (2009), and by the SWAP telescope and LYRA radiometer onboard the PROBA 2 satellite at moderate activity (2010). The measured attenuation profiles and the retrieved linear extinction coefficients at the heights 200-500 km are compared with simulations by the NRLMSIS-00 and DTM2013 atmospheric models. It was shown that the results of simulations by the DTM2013 model are well agreed with the data of measurements at all stages of solar activity and in presence of the geomagnetic storm, whereas the results of the NRLMSISE-00 model significantly diverge from the measurements, in particular, at high and low activity. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration under Grant Agreement “eHeroes” (project № 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  10. Occultation studies of the Solar system. Semiannual status report, 1 July-31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Millis, R. L.

    1987-02-01

    The planetary occultation program began at Lowell Observatory in 1973 with a worldwide campaign to observe mutual occultations and eclipses of the Galilean Satellites. Then the temperature profile of the Martian atmosphere was measured from data taken during the occultation of epsilon Geminorum, the Rings of Uranus were discovered as they occulted SAO 158687, and the dimensions of Pallas were measured when that minor planet occulted SAO 85009. In 1979 the present grant was initiated, providing funds for portable photometric instrumentation used to observe occultations by asteroids as well as by Uranus and Neptune. Software for predicting occultations of catalog stars by asteroids, planets, and comets was written in 1983. Lowell currently provides most of the available predictions for asteroid occultations. Realizing in 1983 that the lack of a high-quality astrometric telescope dedicated to occultation work was limiting progress, an 18-inch, F/8 lens was acquired and adapted to an existing mounting at Lowell. Although acquisition of the lens and implementation of the new telescope has been accomplished primarily with non-grant funds, the instrument makes a major contribution to occultation research.

  11. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2014-06-24

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88-5 μm at a resolution of 12-18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. PMID:24876272

  12. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan’s atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88–5 μm at a resolution of 12–18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan’s haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1–10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. PMID:24876272

  13. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-06-01

    High altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world -- Titan -- to clarify how high altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectru m. Our spectra show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

  14. Cloud, dust, and ozone vertical profiles from solar occultation measurements: Implications for dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Blamont, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An instrument was designed for solar occultation measurements of the martian atmosphere from the Phobos spacecraft. It was composed of three different dispersive systems working in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.22-0.32 microns) for the measurement of O3 and aerosols, in the near infrared (NIR: 0.76 microns, 0.94 microns) for the detection of O2 and H2O, and in the infrared (IR: 1.9 microns, 3.7 microns) where CO2 and H2O were measured. A detailed description of the instrument may be found in the special issue of Nature. Its principle objective is to measure from the Phobos orbit the spectrum of the Sun, modified by atmospheric extinction, during sunset. The UV-NIR spot has an angular diameter of 1 arcmin, or approximately 3 km vertical resolution, and is located near the center of the solar disk. The IR field is about twice as large and its line of sight is shifted by 8.5 arcmin, or approximately 20 km, relative to the previous one. It is therefore located near the edge of the solar disk. Sampling times are generally 0.5, 1, and 2 s for IR, UV, and NIR channels respectively, corresponding to vertical excursions of the line of sight of 1, 2, and 4 km respectively under nominal conditions. The instrument operated from February 8 to March 26 (the martian equinox occurred on February 17). The latitude of the intersection of the Sun-spacecraft axis with the surface of Mars varied from -11 to +20, the seasonal date L(sub s) being in the range 0 - 20. All measurements were therefore made near northern spring equinox in equatorial regions. Due to an error in the pointing system, only partial results were obtained, the region below approximately equals 30 km altitude being never sounded by the UV-NIR spectrometer. On the contrary, nine complete occultations were obtained in the IR channels, whose line of sight was fortunately approximately equals 20 km below the UV-NIR axis.

  15. Solar EUV Irradiance Measurements by the Auto-Calibrating EUV Spectrometers (SolACES) Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Nikutowski, B.; Jacobi, C.; Brunner, R.; Erhardt, C.; Knecht, S.; Scherle, J.; Schlagenhauf, J.

    2014-05-01

    SolACES is part of the ESA SOLAR ISS mission that started aboard the shuttle mission STS-122 on 7 February 2008. The instrument has recorded solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance from 16 to 150 nm during the extended solar activity minimum and the beginning solar cycle 24 with rising solar activity and increasingly changing spectral composition. The SOLAR mission has been extended from a period of 18 months to > 8 years until the end of 2016. SolACES is operating three grazing incidence planar grating spectrometers and two three-current ionization chambers. The latter ones are considered as primary radiometric detector standards. Re-filling the ionization chambers with three different gases repeatedly and using overlapping band-pass filters, the absolute EUV fluxes are derived in these spectral intervals. This way the serious problem of continuing efficiency changes in space-borne instrumentation is overcome during the mission. Evaluating the three currents of the ionization chambers, the overlapping spectral ranges of the spectrometers and of the filters plus inter-comparing the results from the EUV photon absorption in the gases with different absorption cross sections, there are manifold instrumental possibilities to cross-check the results providing a high degree of reliability to the spectral irradiance derived. During the mission a very strong up-and-down variability of the spectrometric efficiency by orders of magnitude is observed. One of the effects involved is channeltron degradation. However, there are still open questions on other effects contributing to these changes. A survey of the measurements carried out and first results of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data are presented. Inter-comparison with EUV data from other space missions shows good agreement such that the international effort has started to elaborate a complete set of EUV-SSI data taking into account all data available from 2008 to 2013.

  16. Stratospheric NO and NO2 Abundances from ATMOS Solar-Occultation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Allen, M.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Collins, G. B.; Huston, K. H.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Chang, A. Y.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Irion, F. W.; Lowenstein, M.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Podolske, J. R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Using results from a time-dependent photochemical model to calculate the diurnal variation of NO and NO2, we have corrected Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) solar-occultation retrievals of the NO and NO2 abundances at 90' solar zenith angle. Neglecting to adjust for the rapid variation of these gases across the terminator results in potential errors in retrieved profiles of approximately 20% for NO2 and greater than 100% for NC at altitudes below 25 km. Sensitivity analysis indicates that knowledge of the local 03 and temperature profiles, rather than zonal mean or climatological conditions of these quantities, is required to obtain reliable retrievals of NO and NO2 in the lower stratosphere. Extremely inaccurate 03 or temperature values at 20 km can result in 50% errors in retrieved NO or NO2. Mixing ratios of NO in the mid-latitude, lower stratosphere measured by ATMOS during the November 1994 ATLAS-3 mission compare favorably with in situ ER-2 observations, providing strong corroboration of the reliability of the adjusted space-borne measurements.

  17. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  18. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Robert, Severine; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Willame, Yannick; Lopez-Moreno, Jose Juan; Patel, Manish; Belluci, Giancarlo; Daerden, Frank; Neefs, Eddy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Julio

    2013-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite was selected as part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 µm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities. Since last year's abstract, much progress has been made on the instrument design and prototypes have been tested, especially concerning the very challenging thermal needs of the instrument. This paper will concentrate on the developments in the last year that prove NOMAD will be a very powerful, sensitive instrument.

  19. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; López-Moreno, J.-J.; Patel, M. R.; Bellucci, G.; Daerden, F.; Drummond, R.; Neefs, E.; Robert, S.; Rodriguez Gomez, J.

    2012-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite has been selected by ESA and NASA to be part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities.

  20. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, S.; Bramstedt, K.; Hilker, M.; Liebing, P.; Plieninger, J.; Reuter, M.; Rozanov, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). The retrieval is performed using a method called "Onion Peeling DOAS" (ONPD) which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) fit. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection and of the retrieval approach the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be extended to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5-10 % for CH4 and 2-3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002-April 2012) and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated, which are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  1. ACE infrared spectral atlases of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Five infrared atmospheric atlases are presented using solar occultation spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in low earth orbit. The spectral atlases were created for Arctic summer, Arctic winter, mid-latitude summer, mid-latitude winter and the tropics. Each covers the spectral range from 700 to 4400 cm-1 and consists of 31 spectra that span an altitude range of 6-126 km in 4-km altitude intervals. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, each spectrum in the atlas is an average of at least several hundred individual ACE-FTS limb transmission spectra. Representative plots in pdf format at 10 km (troposphere), 30 km (stratosphere), 70 km (mesosphere), and 110 km (lower thermosphere) are also available.

  2. Variations in Solar Wind Fractionation as Seen by ACE/SWICS and the Implications for Genesis Mission Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilleri, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lepri, S. T.; Shearer, P.; Gilbert, J. A.; von Steiger, R.; Wiens, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    We use Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) elemental composition data to compare the variations in solar wind (SW) fractionation as measured by SWICS during the last solar maximum (1999-2001), the solar minimum (2006-2009), and the period in which the Genesis spacecraft was collecting SW (late 2001—early 2004). We differentiate our analysis in terms of SW regimes (i.e., originating from interstream or coronal hole flows, or coronal mass ejecta). Abundances are normalized to the low-first ionization potential (low-FIP) ion magnesium to uncover correlations that are not apparent when normalizing to high-FIP ions. We find that relative to magnesium, the other low-FIP elements are measurably fractionated, but the degree of fractionation does not vary significantly over the solar cycle. For the high-FIP ions, variation in fractionation over the solar cycle is significant: greatest for Ne/Mg and C/Mg, less so for O/Mg, and the least for He/Mg. When abundance ratios are examined as a function of SW speed, we find a strong correlation, with the remarkable observation that the degree of fractionation follows a mass-dependent trend. We discuss the implications for correcting the Genesis sample return results to photospheric abundances.

  3. Unique Observation of a Solar Flare by Lunar Occultation During the 2010 Annular Solar Eclipse Through Ionospheric Disturbances of VLF Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Surya K.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Sushanta K.

    2012-06-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Irregularities caused by excess or deficient extreme ultra-violet and X-rays, which otherwise sustain the ionosphere, change the waveguide properties and hence the signals are modified. We report the results of monitoring of the NWC transmitter (19.8 kHz) by a receiver placed at Khukurdaha (22°27'N, 87°45'E) during the partial solar eclipse (75 %) of 15th January, 2010. The propagation path from the transmitter to the receiver crosses the annular eclipse belt. We got a clear depression in the data during the period of the eclipse. Most interestingly, there was also a X-ray flaring activity in the sun on that day which reached its peak (C-type) right after the time when the eclipse reached its maximum. We saw the effects of the occultation of this flare in our VLF signal since a part of the X-ray active region was clearly blocked by the moon. We quantitatively compared by using analogies with previous observations and found best fitting parameters for the time when the flare was occulted. We then reconstructed the VLF signal in the absence of the occulted flare. To our knowledge, this is the first such incident where the solar flare was observed through lunar occultation and that too during a partial eclipse.

  4. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  5. Occultations of stars by solar system objects. VIII - Occultations of catalog stars by asteroids, planets, Titan, and Triton in 1990 and 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.; Millis, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Predictions are given for occultations of catalog stars by asteroids, planets, Titan, and Triton in 1990 and 1991. The predictions are based on a computerized comparison of the occulting bodies' ephemerides and nine major star catalogs. The search is complete for all numbered asteroids whose angular diameters exceed 0.08 arcsec during the search years. Preliminary ground tracks are shown for the more favorable occultations.

  6. Simulation of source intensity variations from atmospheric dust for solar occultation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K. S.; Toon, G. C.; Strong, K.

    2016-05-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer observing in solar occultation mode from orbit is ideally suited to detecting and characterizing vertical profiles of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere. This technique benefits from a long optical path length and high signal strength, and can have high spectral resolution. The Martian atmosphere is often subject to large quantities of suspended dust, which attenuates solar radiation along the line-of-sight. An instrument making solar occultation measurements scans the limb of the atmosphere continuously, and the optical path moves through layers of increasing or decreasing dust levels during a single interferogram acquisition, resulting in time-varying signal intensity. If uncorrected, source intensity variations (SIVs) can affect the relative depth of absorption lines, negatively impacting trace gas retrievals. We have simulated SIVs using synthetic spectra for the Martian atmosphere, and investigated different techniques to mitigate the effects of SIVs. We examined high-pass filters in the wavenumber domain, and smoothing methods in the optical path difference (OPD) domain, and conclude that using a convolution operator in the OPD domain can isolate the SIVs and be used to correct for it. We observe spectral residuals of less than 0.25% in both high- and low-dust conditions, and retrieved volume mixing ratio vertical profile differences on the order of 0.5-3% for several trace gases known to be present in the Martian atmosphere. These differences are smaller than those caused by adding realistic noise to the spectra. This work thus demonstrates that it should be possible to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases in a dusty Martian atmosphere using solar occultation if the interferograms are corrected for the effects of dust.

  7. Climate-active Trace Gases from ACE Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Brown, A.; Harrison, J.; Chipperfield, M.; Boone, C.; Wilson, C.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of more than 30 trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. Launched by NASA in August 2003 for a nominal two-year mission, ACE performance remains excellent after 8 years in orbit. Volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of sixteen halogenated trace gases are routinely retrieved from ACE-FTS atmospheric spectra: CCl4, CF4, CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), C2Cl3F3 (CFC-113), CH3Cl, ClONO2, COF2, COCl2, COClF, CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3CCl2F (HCFC-141b), CH3CClF2 (HCFC-142b), HCl, HF and SF6. ACE also provides VMR profiles for CH4, N2O and OCS; HCFC-23 (CHF3) is a recent research product. ACE-FTS measurements were compared to surface measurements made by the AGAGE network and output from the SLIMCAT three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model, which is constrained by similar surface data. ACE-FTS measurements of CFCs (and HCl) show declining trends which agree with both AGAGE and SLIMCAT values. The concentrations of HCFCs are increasing with ACE-FTS, SLIMCAT and AGAGE all showing positive trends. These results illustrate the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing ozone depleting substances. The replacement of CFCs with HCFCs has led to an increase in the VMR of HF in the stratosphere. As chlorine containing compounds continue to be phased out and replaced by fluorine-containing molecules, it is likely that total atmospheric fluorine will continue increasing in the near future. These species are all powerful greenhouse gases. ACE provides near global VMR

  8. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Stefan; Bramstedt, Klaus; Hilker, Michael; Liebing, Patricia; Plieninger, Johannes; Reuter, Max; Rozanov, Alexei; Sioris, Christopher E.; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). The retrieval is performed using a method called onion peeling DOAS (ONPD), which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) fit in the spectral region between 1559 and 1671 nm. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection as well as of the retrieval approach, the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be broadened from 20 to 40 km to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles (17-45 km) of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5-10 % for CH4 and 2-3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002-April 2012) and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated. CH4 trends above about 20 km are not significantly different from zero and the trend at 17 km is about 3 ppbv year-1. The derived CO2 trends show a general decrease with altitude with values of about 1.9 ppmv year-1 at 21 km and about 1.3 ppmv year-1 at 39 km. These results are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  9. Solar sensor subsystems alignment check using solar scans for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, S. G.; Moore, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    The alignment of a dual-axes sun sensor subsystem to a telescope having a multiple sensor subsystem is described. The sun sensor consists of two analog and one digital silicon detectors. The analog detectors are shadow mask type operating in the visible spectrum. The detectors are mounted for azimuth and elevation positioning of biaxial gimbals. The digital detector is a linear diode array that operates at a spectral position of 0.7 micron and is used for elevation positioning. The position signals correspond to relative angles between the sun sensor and the solar disk. These three detectors are aligned on an Invar structure which is mounted to a Cassegrain telescope. This telescope relays solar radiance to an eight channel detector subsystem operating in the infrared range from 2 to 10 microns. The test technique and results to check the boresight alignment of these two subsystems by scanning the solar disk will be reported. The boresight alignment for both the azimuth and elevation axes of the two detector subsystems is verified using this technique.

  10. Unique observation of a Solar Flare by Lunar Occultation during the 2010 Annular Solar Eclipse through ionospheric disturbances in VLF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanta Maji, Surya; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Irregularities caused by excess or deficient solar extreme ultra-violet and X-rays, which otherwise sustain the ionosphere, changes the waveguide properties and hence the signals are modified. We report the results of monitoring of the NWC transmitter (19.8kHz) by a receiver placed at Khukurdaha (~80 km away from Kolkata) during the partial solar eclipse (75%) of 15th January, 2010. The receiving station and the transmitter were on two opposite sides of the annular eclipse belt. We got a clear depression in the data during the period of partial eclipse. Most interestingly, there was also a flaring activity in the sun on that day which reached its peak (C-type) just after the time when the eclipse was near maximum. We saw effects of the occultation of this flare in our VLF signal since a part of the active region was clearly blocking the moon. We model this occultation, and reconstructed the VLF signal in the absence of the flare. To our knowledge, this is the first such incident where the solar flare was observed through lunar occultation and that too during a partial eclipse.

  11. Improved ACE-FTS observations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy; Chipperfield, Martyn; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), on board the SCISAT satellite, has been recording solar occultation spectra through the Earth's atmosphere since 2004 and continues to take measurements with only minor loss in performance. ACE-FTS time series are available for a range of chlorine 'source' gases, including CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3Cl and CCl4. Recently there has been much community interest in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a substance regulated by the Montreal Protocol because it leads to the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. Estimated sources and sinks of CCl4 remain inconsistent with observations of its abundance. Satellite observations of CCl4 in the stratosphere are particularly useful in validating stratospheric loss (photolysis) rates; in fact the atmospheric loss of CCl4 is essentially all due to photolysis in the stratosphere. However, the latest ACE-FTS v3.5 CCl4 retrieval is biased high by ˜ 20-30%. A new ACE-FTS retrieval scheme utilising new laboratory spectroscopic measurements of CCl4 and improved microwindow selection has recently been developed. This improves upon the v3.5 retrieval and resolves the issue of the high bias; this new scheme will form the basis for the upcoming v4 processing version of ACE-FTS data. This presentation will outline the improvements made in the retrieval, and a subset of data will be compared with modelled CCl4 distributions from SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. The use of ACE-FTS data to evaluate the modelled stratospheric loss rate of CCl4 will also be discussed. The evaluated model, which also includes a treatment of surface soil and ocean sinks, will then be used to quantify current uncertainties in the global budget of CCl4.

  12. Pressure Sounding of the Middle Atmosphere from ATMOS Solar Occultation Measurements of Atmospheric CO(sub 2) Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Rinsland, C.; Zander, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(sub 2) lines with temperature-insensitive intensities. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of 1-3%, corresponding to a tangent point height precision, depending on the scale height, of 70-210 meters.

  13. Titan's surface composition and atmospheric transmission with solar occultation measurements by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Solar occultation measurements by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reveal the near-infrared transmission of Titan's atmosphere down to an altitude of ∼40 km. By combining these observations with VIMS reflectance measurements of Titan's surface and knowledge of haze and gas opacity profiles from the Huygens probe, we constrain a simple model for the transfer of radiation in Titan's atmosphere in order to derive surface reflectance in the methane windows used for compositional analysis. The advantages of this model are twofold: (1) it is accurate enough to yield useful results, yet simple enough to be implemented in just a few lines of code, and (2) the model parameters are directly constrained by the VIMS occultation and on-planet measurements. We focus on the 2.0, 2.7, 2.8 and 5.0 μm windows, where haze opacity is minimized, and diagnostic vibrational bands exist for water ice and other candidate surface species. A particularly important result is the strong atmospheric attenuation at 2.7 μm compared to 2.8 μm, resulting in a reversal of apparent spectral slope in a compositionally diagnostic wavelength range. These results show that Titan's surface reflectance is much "bluer" and more closely matched by water ice than the uncorrected spectra would indicate, although the majority of Titan's surface has a spectrum consistent with mixtures (either intimate or areal) of water ice and haze particles precipitated from the atmosphere. Compositions of geologic units can be accurately modeled as mixtures ranging from predominantly water ice (Sinlap crater ejecta and margins of dark equatorial terrain) to predominantly organic-rich (Tui Regio and Hotei Regio), with particles in the size range ∼10-20 μm. In distinguishing between hypothesized formation mechanisms for Tui and Hotei Regio, their organic-rich composition favors a process that concentrates precipitated haze particles, such as playa lake evaporite deposition (Barnes, J.W., Bow

  14. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  15. Solar-cycle dependence of a model turbulence spectrum using IMP and ACE observations over 38 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, R. A.; Nel, A. E.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Ab initio modulation models require a number of turbulence quantities as input for any reasonable diffusion tensor. While turbulence transport models describe the radial evolution of such quantities, they in turn require observations in the inner heliosphere as input values. So far we have concentrated on solar minimum conditions (e.g. Engelbrecht and Burger 2013, ApJ), but are now looking at long-term modulation which requires turbulence data over at a least a solar magnetic cycle. As a start we analyzed 1-minute resolution data for the N-component of the magnetic field, from 1974 to 2012, covering about two solar magnetic cycles (initially using IMP and then ACE data). We assume a very simple three-stage power-law frequency spectrum, calculate the integral from the highest to the lowest frequency, and fit it to variances calculated with lags from 5 minutes to 80 hours. From the fit we then obtain not only the asymptotic variance at large lags, but also the spectral index of the inertial and the energy, as well as the breakpoint between the inertial and energy range (bendover scale) and between the energy and cutoff range (cutoff scale). All values given here are preliminary. The cutoff range is a constraint imposed in order to ensure a finite energy density; the spectrum is forced to be either flat or to decrease with decreasing frequency in this range. Given that cosmic rays sample magnetic fluctuations over long periods in their transport through the heliosphere, we average the spectra over at least 27 days. We find that the variance of the N-component has a clear solar cycle dependence, with smaller values (~6 nT2) during solar minimum and larger during solar maximum periods (~17 nT2), well correlated with the magnetic field magnitude (e.g. Smith et al. 2006, ApJ). Whereas the inertial range spectral index (-1.65 ± 0.06) does not show a significant solar cycle variation, the energy range index (-1.1 ± 0.3) seems to be anti-correlated with the variance

  16. Global model of the F2 layer peak height for low solar activity based on GPS radio-occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, V. N.; Karpachev, A. T.; Tsybulya, K. G.

    2013-11-01

    We propose a global median model SMF2 (Satellite Model of the F2 layer) of the ionospheric F2-layer height maximum (hmF2), based on GPS radio-occultation data for low solar activity periods (F10.7A<80). The model utilizes data provided by GPS receivers onboard satellites CHAMP (~100,000 hmF2 values), GRACE (~70,000) and COSMIC (~2,000,000). The data were preprocessed to remove cases where the absolute maximum of the electron density lies outside the F2 region. Ground-based ionospheric sounding data were used for comparison and validation. Spatial dependence of hmF2 is modeled by a Legendre-function expansion. Temporal dependence, as a function of Universal Time (UT), is described by a Fourier expansion. Inputs of the model are: geographical coordinates, month and F10.7A solar activity index. The model is designed for quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kр=1-2), typical for low solar activity. SMF2 agrees well with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI) in those regions, where the ground-based ionosonde network is dense. Maximal difference between the models is found in the equatorial belt, over the oceans and the polar caps. Standard deviations of the radio-occultation and Digisonde data from the predicted SMF2 median are 10-16 km for all seasons, against 13-29 km for IRI-2012. Average relative deviations are 3-4 times less than for IRI, 3-4% against 9-12%. Therefore, the proposed hmF2 model is more accurate than IRI-2012.

  17. Effect of coronal magnetic fields on the formation of the solar wind from radio polarization occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Andreev, V. E.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.

    1999-04-01

    An analysis of radio occultation of the near-solar plasma using linearly polarized S-band (2.3 GHz) signals from the HELIOS-1 and HELIOS-2 spacecraft is presented. Fluctuations in the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization were measured simultaneously at three widely spaced ground stations of the NASA Deep Space Network at Canberra, Madrid, and Goldstone. The temporal energy spectra of the Faraday-rotation fluctuations (FRF) were obtained using measurements in 1981 and 1983 for heliocentric distances R = (3_12)R_S (R_S is the solar radius). We have studied the dependences of the shape and variance of the FRF spectra on heliocentric distance. The power-law index for the two-dimensional FRF spatial spectrum is close to beta = 2 for heliocentric distances R = (3_6)R_S, and decreases with distance from the Sun, reaching the value beta = 1.2 at R = 10R_S. Comparison with earlier measurements of the power-law index beta' for radio-occultation phase-fluctuation spectra shows that beta ~= beta' when R = (3_6)R_S and beta < beta' ~= 2 at larger distances. The time lag between the FRF for different receiving stations was measured using a cross-correlation analysis, enabling determination of the velocities of the irregularities, which are in good agreement with the expected Alfven speed. The correlation between temporal variations of the fluctuation intensity and the time lag is studied. The FRFs are primarily determined by Alfven waves. The solar wind regime in the acceleration region is governed by coronal magnetic fields.

  18. LONGITUDINAL AND RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE PEAK INTENSITIES: STEREO, ACE, SOHO, GOES, AND MESSENGER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lario, D.; Ho, G. C.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Aran, A.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B.

    2013-04-10

    Simultaneous measurements of solar energetic particle (SEP) events by two or more of the spacecraft located near 1 AU during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 (i.e., STEREO-A, STEREO-B, and near-Earth spacecraft such as ACE, SOHO, and GOES) are used to determine the longitudinal dependence of 71-112 keV electron, 0.7-3 MeV electron, 15-40 MeV proton, and 25-53 MeV proton peak intensities measured in the prompt component of SEP events. Distributions of the peak intensities for the selected 35 events with identifiable solar origin are approximated by the form exp [ - ({phi} - {phi}{sub 0}){sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2}], where {phi} is the longitudinal separation between the parent active region and the footpoint of the nominal interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, {phi}{sub 0} is the distribution centroid, and {sigma} determines the longitudinal gradient. The MESSENGER spacecraft, at helioradii R < 1 AU, allows us to determine a lower limit to the radial dependence of the 71-112 keV electron peak intensities measured along IMF lines. We find five events for which the nominal magnetic footpoint of MESSENGER was less than 20 Degree-Sign apart from the nominal footpoint of a spacecraft near 1 AU. Although the expected theoretical radial dependence for the peak intensity of the events observed along the same field line can be approximated by a functional form R {sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} < 3, we find two events for which {alpha} > 3. These two cases correspond to SEP events occurring in a complex interplanetary medium that favored the enhancement of peak intensities near Mercury but hindered the SEP transport to 1 AU.

  19. A Summary of 3-D Reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval and Comparison with in-Ecliptic Solar Wind Measurements from STEREO, ACE, and Wind Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Mario M.; Jackson, B. V.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Tokumaru, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present a summary of results from simultaneous Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab) Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS), STEREO, ACE, and Wind observations using three-dimensional reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval - Carrington rotation 2068. This is part of the world-wide IPS community's International Heliosphysical Year (IHY) collaboration. We show the global structure of the inner heliosphere and how our 3-D reconstructions compare with in-ecliptic spacecraft measurements.

  20. ACE-FTS instrument: activities in preparation for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucy, Marc-Andre; Walker, Kaley A.; Fortin, Serge; Deutsch, Christophe

    2003-11-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is the mission selected by the Canadian Space Agency for its next science satellite, SCISAT-1. ACE consists of a suite of instruments in which the primary element is an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) coupled with an auxiliary 2-channel visible (525 nm) and near infrared imager (1020 nm). A secondary instrument, MAESTRO, provides spectrographic data from the near ultra-violet to the near infrared, including the visible spectral range. In combination the instrument payload covers the spectral range from 0.25 to 13.3 micron. A comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature will be made by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. The ACE mission will measure and analyse the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. A high inclination (74 degrees), low earth orbit (650 km) allows coverage of tropical, mid-latitude and polar regions. This paper presents the instrument-related activities in preparation for launch. In particular, activities related to the integration of instrument to spacecraft are presented as well as tests of the instrument on-board the SciSat-1 bus. Environmental qualification activities at spacecraft-level are described. An overview of the characterization and calibration campaign is presented. Activities for integration and verification at launch site are also covered. The latest status of the spacecraft is also presented.

  1. The Pinhole/Occulter Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Dabbs, J. R. (Editor); Baity, W. A. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Scientific objectives and requirements are discussed for solar X-ray observations, coronagraph observations, studies of coronal particle acceleration, and cosmic X-ray observations. Improved sensitivity and resolution can be provided for these studies using the pinhole/occulter facility which consists of a self-deployed boom of 50 m length separating an occulter plane from a detector plane. The X-ray detectors and coronagraphic optics mounted on the detector plane are analogous to the focal plane instrumentation of an ordinary telescope except that they use the occulter only for providing a shadow pattern. The occulter plane is passive and has no electrical interface with the rest of the facility.

  2. The two-micron spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze derived from Cassini/VIMS solar occultation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Courtin, Régis; Sohn, Mirim; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-11-01

    Vertically-resolved spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze in the 2-μm wavelength range were derived from solar occultation spectra measured by Cassini/VIMS on January 15, 2006. At the various altitudes probed by the solar occultation measurements, we reproduced the observed spectra using a radiative transfer program including absorption by CH4 ro-vibrational bands, collision-induced absorption by N2-N2 pairs, and H2-N2 dimers, as well as absorption and scattering by the haze particles. The retrieved optical depth spectra (or τ-spectra) for the haze show marked variations in the 2.1-2.8 μm range, with peaks near 2.30 and 2.35 μm, and the relative amplitude of these peaks changing with altitude. The gross spectral shape of the τ-spectra is found similar to the typical 2-μm absorption spectra of the alkane group of hydrocarbon (CnH2n+2) ices. The τ-spectra retrieved at 2 μm and those previously retrieved at 3 μm by Kim et al. (2011) are simultaneously reproduced by combinations of 2- and 3-μm absorbance spectra of alkane ices such as CH4, C2H6, C5H12, C6H14, with the addition of a nitrile ice, CH3CN. These combinations are neither unique nor limited and need more fine-tuning to fit the detailed features of the τ-spectra. There is a need for additional laboratory measurements of absorbance and indices of refraction for a wider variety of hydrocarbon and nitrile ices in the temperature range relevant to Titan.

  3. In Charon's Shadow: Analysis of the UV Solar Occultation from New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Joshua A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Ennico, K. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Gladstone, G. R.; Summers, M. E.; Greathouse, T. K.; Retherford, K. D.; Versteeg, M. H.; Parker, J. W.; Steffl, A. J.; Schindhelm, E.; Strobel, D. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Woods, W. W.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of Charon, Pluto's largest moon, have so far yielded no evidence for a substantial atmosphere. However, during the flyby of New Horizons through the Pluto-Charon system, the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph successfully acquired the most sensitive measurements to date during an occultation of the sun as New Horizons passed through Charon's shadow. These observations include wavelength coverage in the extreme- and far-ultraviolet (EUV and FUV) from 52 nm to 187 nm. We will present these results from Alice, and discuss their implications for an atmosphere on Charon.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  4. Time delay occultation data of the Helios spacecraft for probing the electron density distribution in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    S-band time delay measurements were collected from the spacecraft Helios A and B during three solar occultations in 1975/76 within heliocentric distances of about 3 and 215 earth radius in terms of range, Doppler frequency shift, and electron content. Characteristic features of measurement and data processing are described. Typical data sets are discussed to probe the electron density distribution near the sun (west and east limb as well) including the outer and extended corona. Steady-state and dynamical aspects of the solar corona are presented and compared with earth-bound-K-coronagraph measurements. Using a weighted least squares estimation, parameters of an average coronal electron density profile are derived in a preliminary analysis to yield electron densities at r = 3, 65, 215 earth radius. Transient phenomena are discussed and a velocity of propagation v is nearly equal to 900 km/s is determined for plasma ejecta from a solar flare observed during an extraordinary set of Helios B electron content measurements.

  5. The retrieval of the concentrations of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide from satellite solar occultation measurements at sunset and sunrise

    SciTech Connect

    Cartalis, C.I.

    1989-01-01

    HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment), scheduled to fly on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in 1991, aims to retrieve the vertical concentration profiles of seven minor stratospheric constituents in order to improve the understanding of ozone's photochemistry. This dissertation concentrates on the retrieval of the concentrations of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, which both play an active role in the photochemistry of ozone. The investigation is complicated because of their large diurnal changes which are intensified at sunrise and sunset. Consequently, the retrieval of NO and NO{sub 2} from solar occultation measurements at twilight needs to take into account the lifetimes and the rapid interconversion of NO and NO{sub 2}. If the temporal and spatial variations of NO and NO{sub 2} are neglected, the resulting errors for altitudes less than 20 km reach 100 and 5% respectively and for both sunset and sunrise. A photochemical scheme is developed and a separate code calculates the photodissociation rates of the species involved in photochemical reactions, as a function of latitude, temperature, altitude and season. A retrieval code is developed combining an iterative inversion algorithm, working from top of the atmosphere downwards, and a parameterization of the variability of NO and NO{sub 2}. The method is used to examine the accuracy of the retrieval of the vertical concentration profiles and results show that the recovered profiles are in good agreement with measured ones, reflect the trends of NO and NO{sub 2} at sunset and sunrise and satisfy the accuracy expectations of the HALOE experiment.

  6. All about Occultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2001-01-01

    Describes occultation events involving the moon, when the moon blocks the view of planets or stars. Describes other events such as a partial solar eclipse, a penumbral lunar eclipse, meteor showers, and moon phases. Provides a list of internet resources related to these events. (DLH)

  7. Effects of the ionosphere and solar activity on radio occultation signals: Application to CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Liou, Y. A.; Wickert, J.; Schmidt, T.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Liu, S. F.

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the ionospheric effect on the phase and amplitude of radio occultation (RO) signal. The introduced theoretical model predicts a correlation between the phase acceleration and intensity variations of RO signal and opens a way to locate layered structures in the propagation medium, in particular, in trans-ionospheric satellite-to-satellite links. For considered CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) RO events, the locations of the inclined plasma layers in the lower ionosphere are estimated, and the electron density distribution is retrieved. By analysis of the CHAMP RO data, we reveal the dependence of the intensity variations of RO signal on sharp changes in the DST index and on the local time. Maps of the seasonal, geographical, and temporal distributions of the CHAMP RO events with amplitude scintillations, having high S4 index values, and observed during the years 2001-2004 indicate dependence on solar activity. As follows from this analysis, the GPS signals in the trans-ionospheric links can be used for investigating the location and parameters of inclined plasma layers and monitoring the influence of solar activity on the ionosphere with global coverage.

  8. On the Response of Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Stratospheric Oxone and Temperature to the 11-yr Solar Cycle Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented on responses in 14-yr time series of stratospheric ozone and temperature from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) to a solar cycle (SC-like) variation. The ozone time series are for ten, 20-degree wide, latitude bins from 45S to 45N and for thirteen "half-Umkehr" layers of about 2.5 km thickness and extending from 63 hPa to 0.7 hPa. The temperature time series analyses were restricted to pressure levels in the range of 2 hPa to 0.7 hPa. Multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques were applied to each of the 130 time series of zonally-averaged, sunrise plus sunset ozone points over that latitude/pressure domain. A simple, 11-yr periodic term and a linear trend term were added to the final MLR models after their seasonal and interannual terms had been determined. Where the amplitudes of the 11-yr terms were significant, they were in-phase with those of the more standard proxies for the solar uv-flux. The max minus min response for ozone is of order 2 to 3% from about 2 to 5 hPa and for the latitudes of 45S to 45N. There is also a significant max minus min response of order 1 K for temperature between 15S and 15N and from 2 to 0.7 hPa. The associated linear trends for ozone are near zero in the upper stratosphere. Negative ozone trends of 4 to 6%/decade were found at 10 to 20 hPa across the low to middle latitudes of both hemispheres. It is concluded that the analyzed responses from the HALOE data are of good quality and can be used to evaluate the responses of climate/chemistry models to a solar cycle forcing.

  9. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  10. Vertical profiles of dust and ozone in the Martian atmosphere deduced from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blamont, J. E.; Chassefiere, E.; Goutail, J. P.; Mege, B.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Souchon, G.; Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Krysko, A. A.; Moroz, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The vertical distribution of the ozone content and of the aerosols in the Martian atmosphere at the equinox and near the equator was studied with the aid of a biaxial pointing device, a microprocessor-controlled flat mirror of elliptical shape. An upper limit of 5 x 10 to the 7th mol/cu cm for ozone was obtained above an altitude of 30 km. For the aerosols, a semiquantitative distribution has been obtained between 10 and 50 km of altitude. The scale height is nearly equal to the atmospheric scale height in the 10-20 km region where mixing seems to predominate, and falls rapidly to a thickness of about 2 km at 30 km. In 10 percent of the occultations, a stratified haze has been detected between 40 and 50 km. The particle radius of cloud constituents is estimated and optical thickness per kilometer of these hazes at peak extinction are approximated. An eddy diffusion coefficient and a mixing ratio are estimated for clouds assumed to be at equilibrium.

  11. Faraday rotation fluctutation spectra observed during solar occultation of the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V.; Efimov, A. I.; Samoznaev, L.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) measurements using linearly polarized radio signals from the two Helios spacecraft were carried out during the period from 1975 to 1984. This paper presents the results of a spectral analysis of the Helios S-band FR fluctuations observed at heliocentric distances from 2.6 to 15 solar radii during the superior conjunctions 1975-1983. The mean intensity of the FR fluctuations does not exceed the noise level for solar offsets greater than ca. 15 solar radii. The rms FR fluctuation amplitude increases rapidly as the radio ray path approaches the Sun, varying according to a power law (exponent: 2.85 +/- 0.15) at solar distances 4-12 solar radii. At distances inside 4 solar radii the increase is even steeper (exponent: 5.6 +/- 0.2). The equivalent two-dimensional FR fluctuation spectrum is well modeled by a single power-law over the frequency range from 5 to 50 mHz. For heliocentric distances larger than 4 solar radii the spectral index varies between 1.1 and 1.6 with a mean value of 1.4 +/- 0.2, corresponding to a 3-D spectral index p = 2.4. FR fluctuations thus display a somwhat lower spectral index compared with phase and amplitude fluctuations. Surprisingly high values of the spectral index were found for measurements inside 4 solar radii (p = 2.9 +/- 0.2). This may arise from the increasingly dominant effect of the magnetic field on radio wave propagation at small solar offsets. Finally, a quasiperiodic component, believed to be associated with Alfven waves, was discovered in some (but not all!) fluctuation spectra observed simultaneously at two ground stations. Characteristic periods and bulk velocities of this component were 240 +/- 30 sec and 300 +/- 60 km/s, respectively.

  12. Pressure sounding of the middle atmosphere from ATMOS solar occultation measurements of atmospheric CO(2) absorption lines.

    PubMed

    Abrams, M C; Gunson, M R; Lowes, L L; Rinsland, C P; Zander, R

    1996-06-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier-transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(2) lines with temperature-insensitive strengths by measuring the slant-column CO(2) amount and by adjusting the viewing geometry until the calculated column matches the observed column. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of l%-3%, corresponding to a tangent-point height precision of 70-210 m. The total uncertainty is limited primarily by the quality of the spectra and ranges between 4% and 6% (280-420 m) for spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 300:1 and between 4% and 10% for spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1. The retrieval of atmospheric pressure increases the accuracy of the retrieved-gas concentrations by minimizing the effect of systematic errors introduced by climatological pressure data, ephemeris parameters, and the uncertainties in instrumental pointing. PMID:21085429

  13. Trends and Solar Cycle Effects in Temperature Versus Altitude From the Halogen Occultation Experiment for the Mesosphere and Upper Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, Ellis E.

    2009-01-01

    Fourteen-year time series of mesospheric and upper stratospheric temperatures from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) are analyzed and reported. The data have been binned according to ten-degree wide latitude zones from 40S to 40N and at 10 altitudes from 43 to 80 km-a total of 90 separate time series. Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis techniques have been applied to those time series. This study focuses on resolving their 11-yr solar cycle (or SC-like) responses and their linear trend terms. Findings for T(z) from HALOE are compared directly with published results from ground-based Rayleigh lidar and rocketsonde measurements. SC-like responses from HALOE compare well with those from lidar station data at low latitudes. The cooling trends from HALOE also agree reasonably well with those from the lidar data for the concurrent decade. Cooling trends of the lower mesosphere from HALOE are not as large as those from rocketsondes and from lidar station time series of the previous two decades, presumably because the changes in the upper stratospheric ozone were near zero during the HALOE time period and did not affect those trends.

  14. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor a disorder called sarcoidosis . People with sarcoidosis may have their ACE level tested regularly to ... normal ACE level may be a sign of sarcoidosis. ACE levels may rise or fall as sarcoidosis ...

  15. LADEE UVS Observations of Solar Occultation by Exospheric Dust Above the Lunar Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Cook, A. M.; Colaprete, A.; Shirley, M. H.; Vargo, K. E.; Elphic, R. C.; Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a lunar orbiter launched in September 2012 that investigates the composition and temporal variation of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment. The primary goals of the mission are to characterize the pristine gas and dust exosphere prior to future lunar exploration activities, which may alter the lunar environment. To address this goal, the LADEE instrument suite includes an Ultraviolet/ Visible Spectrometer (UVS), which searches for dust, Na, K, and trace gases such as OH, H2O, Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Ti, Fe, as well as other previously undetected species. UVS has two sets of optics: a limb-viewing telescope, and a solar viewing telescope. The solar viewer is equipped with a diffuser (see Figure 1a) that allows UVS to stare directly at the solar disk as the Sun starts to set (or rise from) behind the lunar limb. Solar viewer measurements generally have very high signal to noise (SNR greater than 500) for 20-30 ms integration times. The 1-degree solar viewer field of view subtends a diameter of approximately 8 km at a distance of 400-450 km.

  16. Profiles of Stratospheric Chlorine Nitrate from ATMOS/ATLAS 1 Infrared Solar Occultation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Mahieu, E.; Goldman, A.; Ko, M. K. W.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Sze, N. D.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric volume mixing ration profiles of chlorine nitrate have been retrieved from 0.01-cm(sub -1) resolution infrared solar occutation spectra recorded at latitudes between 14 degrees N and 54 degrees S by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer during the ATLAS 1 shuttle mission (March 24 to April 2, 1992).

  17. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO2 absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occulation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO2 (e.g., 2.0, 2.7, or 4.3 microns), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  18. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  19. Atmospheric pseudo-retrievals for averaging kernel and total uncertainty characterization for ACE-FTS level 2 (PRAKTICAL) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheese, Patrick; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris

    2016-04-01

    For over the past decade, the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer) instrument on the Canadian SciSat satellite has been observing the Earth's limb via solar occultation in the 750-4400 cm-1 spectral region with 0.02 cm-1 spectral resolution. The most recent version of the level 2 data, version 3.5 (v3.5), which starts in February of 2004 and is currently ongoing, is comprised of volume mixing ratio profiles of over 30 atmospheric trace species and over 20 subsidiary isotopologues. This study will use ACE-FTS level 1 spectra and the v3.5 forward model in pseudo-retrievals that use a Levenberg-Marquardt optimal estimation technique in order to produce representative ACE-FTS averaging kernels and to characterize the systematic and random uncertainties inherent in the level 2 profiles. In order to ensure that the derived error statistics are consistent with the v3.5 data, the results will be compared to random and systematic uncertainties propagated through the standard v3.5 retrieval algorithm. The ACE-FTS uncertainties will also be compared to the reported uncertainties of data sets from other atmospheric limb sounders.

  20. Seasonal variability of upper tropospheric acetone using ACE-FTS observations and LMDz-INCA model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Harrison, Jeremy; Szopa, Sophie; Bernath, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The vertically-resolved distributions of oxygenated organic compounds (oVOCs) are mainly inferred from surface and airborne measurements with limited spatial and temporal coverage. This results in a limited understanding of the atmospheric budget of these compounds and of their impact on the upper tropospheric chemistry. In the last decade, satellite observations which complement in-situ measurements have become available, providing global distributions of several oVOCs. For example, Scisat-1, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) has measured several oVOCs including methanol and formaldehyde. ACE is a Canadian-led satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere that has been in operation since 2004. The primary instrument on board is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) featuring broad spectral coverage in the infrared (750-4400 cm-1) with high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1). The FTS instrument can measure down to 5 km altitude with a high signal-to-noise ratio using solar occultation. The ACE-FTS has the ability to measure seasonal and height-resolved distributions of minor tropospheric constituents on a near-global scale and provides the opportunity to evaluate our understanding of important atmospheric oxygenated organic species. ACE-FTS acetone retrievals will be presented. The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of acetone will be described and compared to LMDz-INCA model simulations.

  1. Review of the ACE-FTS measurements and recent results for the troposphere and UTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, Peter

    The ACE satellite mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; and (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1 ) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1 ) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. Aerosols and clouds are being monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 0.525 and 1.02 microns as measured by two filtered imagers as well as by their infrared spectra. A dual spectrograph called MAESTRO was added to the mission to extend the wavelength coverage to the 280-1000 nm spectral region. The principal investigator for MAESTRO is T. McElroy of the Meteorological Service of Canada. The FTS and imagers have been built by ABB-Bomem in Quebec City, while the satellite bus has been made by Bristol Aerospace in Winnipeg. ACE was selected in the Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT-1 program, and was successfully launched by NASA on August 12, 2003 for a nominal 2-year mission. The first results of ACE have been presented in a special issue of Geophysics Research Letters in 2005 and recently a special issue on ACE validation has been prepared for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics by K

  2. Chemical Data Assimilation: A Case Study of Solar Occultation Data From the Atlas 1 Mission of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Khattatov, B.; Mussa, H.

    2003-01-01

    A key advantage of using data assimilation is the propagation of information from data-rich regions to data-poor regions, which is particularly relevant to the use of solar occultation data such as from ATMOS. For the first time an in depth uncertainty analyses is included in a photochemical model-data intercomparison including observation, representativeness, and theoretical uncertainty. Chemical data assimilation of solar occultation measurements can be used to reconstruct full diurnal cycles and to evaluate their chemical self-consistency. This paper considers as an example the measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Experiment (ATMOS) instrument Atlas-1 during March 1992 for a vertical profile flow tracking coordinates at an equivalent PV latitude of 38 S. ATMOS was chosen because it simultaneously observes several species. This equivalent PV latitude was chosen as it was where ATMOS n observed the atmosphere's composition over the largest range of altitudes. A single vertical profile was used so that the detailed diurnal information that assimilation utilizes could be highlighted. There is generally good self-consistency between the ATMOS Atlas-1 observations and photochemical theory.

  3. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  4. Construction of a photometer to detect stellar occultations by outer solar system bodies for the Whipple mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Kenter, Almus T.; Alcock, Charles; Murray, Stephen S.; Loose, Markus; Gauron, Thomas; Germain, Gregg; Peregrim, Lawrence

    2014-08-01

    The Whipple mission was a proposal submitted to the NASA Discovery AO in 2010 to study the solid bodies of the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud via a blind occultation survey. Though not accepted for flight, the proposal was awarded funding for technology development. Detecting a significant number of Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs) via a blind occultation survey requires a low noise, wide field of view, multi object differential photometer. The light curve decrement is typically a few percent over timescales of tenths of seconds or seconds for Kuiper Belt and Oort cloud objects, respectively. To obtain a statistically interesting number of detections, this photometer needs to observe many thousands of stars over several years since the rate of occultation for a single star given the space density of the TNOs is low. The light curves from these stars must be monitored with a sensor with a temporal resolution of rv 25-50 ms and with a read noise of< 20 e- rms. Since these requirements are outside the capability of CCDs, the Whipple mission intends to use Teledyne H2RG HyViSI Silicon Hybrid CMOS detectors operating in "window" read mode. The full Whipple focal plane consists of a 3x3 array of these sensors, with each sensor comprised of 1024x 1024 36/μm pixels. Combined with the telescope optic, the Whipple focal plane provides a FOV of rv36 deg2 . In operation, each HyViSI detector, coupled to a Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC, monitors the flux from 650 stars at 40 Hz. The ASIC digitizes the data at the required cadence and an FPGA provides preliminary occultation event selection. The proposed 2010 Whipple mission utilized a spacecraft in a a "drift-away" orbit which signifi­ cantly limited the available telemetry data rate. Most of the light curve processing is required to be on-board the satellite so only candidate occultation events are telemetered to the ground. Occul­ tation light curves must be processed in real time on the satellite by an Field Programmable Gate Array

  5. First observation of 628 CO 2 isotopologue band at 3.3 μm in the atmosphere of Venus by solar occultation from Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Wilquet, Valérie; Montmessin, F.; Dahoo, R.; Villard, E.; Korablev, O.; Fedorova, A.

    2008-05-01

    The new ESA Venus Express orbiter is the first mission applying the probing technique of solar and stellar occultation to the atmosphere of Venus, with the SPICAV/SOIR instrument. SOIR is a new type of spectrometer used for solar occultations in the range 2.2-4.3 μm. Thanks to a high spectral resolving power R˜15,000-20,000 (unprecedented in planetary space exploration), a new gaseous absorption band was soon detected in the atmospheric transmission spectra around 2982 cm -1, showing a structure resembling an unresolved Q branch and a number of isolated lines with a regular wave number pattern. This absorption could not be matched to any species contained in HITRAN or GEISA databases, but was found very similar to an absorption pattern observed by a US team in the spectrum of solar light reflected by the ground of Mars [Villanueva, G.L., Mumma, M.J., Novak, R.E., Hewagama, T., 2008. Icarus 195 (1), 34-44]. This team then suggested to us that the absorption was due to an uncatalogued transition of the 16O 12C 18O molecule. The possible existence of this band was soon confirmed from theoretical considerations by Perevalov and Tashkun. Some SOIR observations of the atmospheric transmission are presented around 2982 cm -1, and rough calculations of line strengths of the Q branch are produced, based on the isotopic ratio measured earlier in the lower atmosphere of Venus. This discovery emphasizes the role of isotopologues of CO 2 (as well as H 2O and HDO) as important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere of Venus.

  6. On the Assessment and Uncertainty of Atmospheric Trace Gas Burden Measurements with High Resolution Infrared Solar Occultation Spectra from Space by the ATMOS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. C.; Chang, A. Y.; Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Stiller, G. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument is a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer that measures atmospheric composition from low Earth orbit with infrared solar occultation sounding in the limb geometry. Following an initial flight in 1985, ATMOS participated in the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1, 2, and 3 Space Shuttle missions in 1992, 1993, and 1994 yielding a total of 440 occultation measurements over a nine year period. The suite of more than thirty atmospheric trace gases profiled includes CO2, O3, N2O, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, HNO3, HCl, HF, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CHF2Cl, and N2O5. The analysis method has been revised throughout the mission years culminating in the 'version 2' data set. The spectroscopic error analysis is described in the context of supporting the precision estimates reported with the profiles; in addition, systematic uncertainties assessed from the quality of the spectroscopic database are described and tabulated for comparisons with other experiments.

  7. Zonal Winds Between 25 and 120 Km Retrieved from Solar Occultation Spectra. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancleef, Garrett Warren; Shaw, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric winds at heights between 25 and 120 km have been retrieved with precisions of 5/ms from the Doppler shifts of atmospheric absorption lines measured from a satellite-borne instrument. Lines of the upsilon 3 CO2 and upsilon 2 H2O rotation-vibration bands caused by gases in the instrument allowed the instrumental frequency scale to be absolutely calibrated so that accurate relative speeds could be obtained. By comparing the positions of both sets of instrumental lines the calibration of the frequency scale was determined to be stable to a precision of less than 2 x 10(-5) cm during the course of each occultation. It was found that the instrumental resolution of 0.015 cm after apodization, the signal to noise ratio of about 100 and stable calibration allowed relative speeds to be determined to a precision of 5 ms or better by using small numbers of absorption lines between 1600 and 3200 cm. Absolute absorption line positions were simultaneously recovered to precisions of 5 x 10(-5) cm or better. The wind speed profiles determined from four sunset occultations and one sunrise occultation show remarkable similarities in the magnitudes and directions of the zonal wind velocities as functions of height. These wind profiles appear to be manifestations of atmospheric tides.

  8. Identification of the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch in stratospheric solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Goldman, A.; Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic identification for the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch at 830.4/cm is reported based on 0.01/cm resolution solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer and a recent analysis of this band. Least-squares fits to 0.0025/cm resolution laboratory spectra in the Q branch region indicate an integrated intensity of 0.529 x 10(exp -18)/cm/mol/sq cm at 296 K for this weak band. Stratospheric HNO3 retrievals derived from the ATMOS data are consistent with this value within its estimated uncertainty of about +/- 30%. A set of spectroscopic line parameters suitable for atmospheric studies has been generated.

  9. Profiles of stratospheric chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) from atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Mahieu, E.; Goldman, A.; Ko, M. K. W.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Sze, N. D.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric volume mixing ratio profiles of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) have been retrieved from 0.01/cm resolution infrared solar occultation spectra recorded at latitudes between 14 deg N and 54 deg S by the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer during the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 shuttle mission (March 24 to April 2, 1992). The results were obtained from nonlinear least squares fittings of the ClONO2 nu(sub 4) band Q branch at 780.21/cm with improved spectroscopic parameters generated on the basis of recent laboratory work. The individual profiles, which have an accuracy of about +/- 20%, are compared with previous observations and model calculations.

  10. Determination of hydrocarbon abundances and the strength of eddy mixing in the stratosphere of Neptune: Analysis of UVS solar occultation lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1995-01-01

    Work on completing our analysis of the Voyager UVS solar occultation data acquired during Neptune encounter is essentially complete, as testified by the attached poster materials. The photochemical modeling addresses the recent revision in branching ratios for radical production in the photolysis of methane at H Lyman alpha implied by the lab measurements of Mordaunt et al. (1993). The software generated in this effort has been useful for checking the degree to which photochemical models addressing other datasets (mainly infrared) are consistent with the UVS data. This work complements the UVS modeling results in that the IR data refer to deeper pressure levels; as regards the modeling of UVS data, the most significant result is the convincing support for the presence of a stagnant lower stratosphere. Evidence for strong dynamical (mixing) transport of minor constituents at shallower pressures is provided by the UVS data analysis.

  11. The Effects of Magnetic Anomalies Discovered at Mars on the Structure of the Martian Ionosphere and the Solar Wind Interaction as Follows from Radio Occultation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Cloutier, P.; Kliore, A. J.; Breus, T. K.; Krymskii, A. M.; Bauer, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron density distribution in the ionosphere of nonmagnetic (or weakly magnetized) planet depends not only on the solar ultraviolet intensity, but also on the nature of the SW interaction with this planet. Two scenarios previously have been developed based on the observations of the bow shock crossings and on the electron density distribution within the ionosphere. According to one of them Mars has an intrinsic magnetosphere produced by a dipole magnetic field and the Martian ionosphere is protected from the SW flow except during "overpressure conditions, when the planetary magnetic field can not balance the SW dynamic pressure. In the second scenario the Martian intrinsic magnetic dipole field is so weak that Mars has mainly an induced magnetosphere and a Venus-like SW/ionosphere interaction. Today the possible existence of a sufficiently strong global magnetic field that participates in the SW/Mars interaction can no longer be supported. The results obtained by the Mars-Global-Surveyor (MGS) space-craft show the existence of highly variable, but also very localized magnetic fields of crustal origin at Mars as high as 400-1500 nT. The absence of the large-scale global magnetic field at Mars makes it similar to Venus, except for possible effects of the magnetic anomalies associated with the remnant crustal magnetization. However the previous results on the Martian ionosphere obtained mainly by the radio occultation methods show that there appears to be a permanent existence of a global horizontal magnetic field in the Martian ionosphere. Moreover the global induced magnetic field in the Venus ionosphere is not typical at the solar zenith angles explored by the radio occultation methods. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. New and Improved Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogen-Containing Species for ACE-FTS Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), onboard the SCISAT-1 satellite, is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) instrument covering the 750-4400 cm-1 spectral region in solar occultation mode. Launched in August 2003, the ACE-FTS has been taking atmospheric measurements for over ten years. With long atmospheric pathlengths (˜300 km) and the sun as a radiation source, the ACE-FTS provides a low detection threshold for trace species in the atmosphere. In fact, it measures the vertical profiles of more molecules in the atmosphere than any other satellite instrument.

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. The quantification of the atmospheric abundances of such molecules from measurements taken by the ACE-FTS and other satellite instruments crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. HITRAN contains absorption cross section datasets for a number of these species, but many of them have minor deficiencies that introduce systematic errors into satellite retrievals. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  13. The Influence of Pickup Protons, from Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen, on the Propagation of Interplanetary Shocks from the Halloween 2003 Solar Events to ACE and Ulysses: A 3-D MHD Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe our 3-D, time ]dependent, MHD solar wind model that we recently modified to include the physics of pickup protons from interstellar neutral hydrogen. The model has a time-dependent lower boundary condition, at 0.1 AU, that is driven by source surface map files through an empirical interface module. We describe the empirical interface and its parameter tuning to maximize model agreement with background (quiet) solar wind observations at ACE. We then give results of a simulation study of the famous Halloween 2003 series of solar events. We began with shock inputs from the Fearless Forecast real ]time shock arrival prediction study, and then we iteratively adjusted input shock speeds to obtain agreement between observed and simulated shock arrival times at ACE. We then extended the model grid to 5.5 AU and compared those simulation results with Ulysses observations at 5.2 AU. Next we undertook the more difficult tuning of shock speeds and locations to get matching shock arrival times at both ACE and Ulysses. Then we ran this last case again with neutral hydrogen density set to zero, to identify the effect of pickup ions. We show that the speed of interplanetary shocks propagating from the Sun to Ulysses is reduced by the effects of pickup protons. We plan to make further improvements to the model as we continue our benchmarking process to 10 AU, comparing our results with Cassini observations, and eventually on to 100 AU, comparing our results with Voyager 1 and 2 observations.

  14. Solar Energetic Particle spectral and compositional invariance in the 3-D Heliosphere: Ulysses and ACE/WIND comparisons in late 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Marsden, Richard G.; Tranquille, Cecil; Patterson, Doug; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2013-04-01

    We carry out the first detailed examination and comparison of elemental spectra and composition in the late decay phase of two Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in the so-called 'reservoir' regions, between spacecraft widely separated in latitude, as well as in longitude and radial distance in the Heliosphere. Energetic particle data from instruments onboard the Ulysses spacecraft located at a high heliospheric latitude of about 70 deg N and at a heliocentric distance of about 2.5 AU and from spacecraft at L1 are used in this work. Particle intensities over time are observed to be in close agreement following the shock passage over the widely separated spacecraft. Electron measurements were used to identify the extent of the particle reservoir. In this update on reservoir composition studies, we extend our previous work to sub-MeV/nucleon energies, using measurements from HI-SCALE on Ulysses and EPAM on ACE. Implications of the observations for models of SEP transport are also discussed. Acknowledgments: The presented work has received funding from the European Union FP7 project COMESEP (263252) and has also been supported by NASA under grants NNH09AK79I and NNX09AU98G (AJT).

  15. An intercomparison study of isotopic ozone profiles from the ACE-FTS, JEM-SMILES, and Odin-SMR instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Walker, K. A.; Suzuki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Urban, J.; Bernath, P. F.; Manney, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of various atmospheric isotopologue species are a valuable source of information, as they can improve our current understanding of the atmosphere. For example, isotopic signatures in atmospheric profiles can be used to investigate atmospheric dynamical processes, while differences in the isotopic composition of atmospheric trace gases can be traced to effects due to their sources and sinks. This study focuses on the intercomparison of three satellite missions that provide measurements of isotopic species. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003) was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature, pressure, and vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species, including isotopologue profiles for; O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, CO2 and NO. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over one year and with a vertical resolution of typically 3-4 km. ACE-FTS O3 isotopologue volume mixing ratio profiles are firstly compared to data measured by the Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS), and the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) aboard the Swedish Odin satellite. Secondly, we intercompare the isotopic fractionation profiles for each ozone isotopologue product measured by the three instruments to further ascertain a level of confidence in the measurements.

  16. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  17. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-01-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  18. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-02-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  19. The Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Park, Jae H.; Drayson, S. R.; Hesketh, W. D.; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Frederick, John E.; Harries, John E.; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of O3, HCl, HF, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, aerosol extinction, and temperature versus pressure with an instantaneous vertical field of view of 1.6 km at the earth limb. Latitudinal coverage is from 80 deg S to 80 deg N over the course of 1 year and includes extensive observations of the Antarctic region during spring. The altitude range of the measurements extends from about 15 km to about 60-130 km, depending on channel. Experiment operations have been essentially flawless, and all performance criteria either meet or exceed specifications. Internal data consistency checks, comparisons with correlative measurements, and qualitative comparisons with 1985 atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) results are in good agreement. Examples of pressure versus latitude cross sections and a global orthographic projection for the September 21 to October 15, 1992, period show the utility of CH4, HF, and H2O as tracers, the occurrence of dehydration in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the presence of the water vapor hygropause in the tropics, evidence of Antarctic air in the tropics, the influence of Hadley tropical upwelling, and the first global distribution of HCl, HF, and NO throughout the stratosphere. Nitric oxide measurements extend through the lower thermosphere.

  20. The Occult Today: Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary E.

    1975-01-01

    Author offered some reflections on the "why" of the contemporary interest in the occult. He attempted to convince the reader that, if he or she has been surprised by the recent rise of occultism, sober reflection will dispell some fears and, perhaps, even convince him or her that occultism is not merely superstition. (Author/RK)

  1. The influence of pickup protons, from interstellar neutral hydrogen, on the propagation of interplanetary shocks from the Halloween 2003 solar events to ACE and Ulysses: A 3-D MHD modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.

    2011-03-01

    We describe our 3-D, time-dependent, MHD solar wind model that we recently modified to include the physics of pickup protons from interstellar neutral hydrogen. The model has a time-dependent lower boundary condition, at 0.1 AU, that is driven by source surface map files through an empirical interface module. We describe the empirical interface and its parameter tuning to maximize model agreement with background (quiet) solar wind observations at ACE. We then give results of a simulation study of the famous Halloween 2003 series of solar events. We began with shock inputs from the Fearless Forecast real-time shock arrival prediction study, and then we iteratively adjusted input shock speeds to obtain agreement between observed and simulated shock arrival times at ACE. We then extended the model grid to 5.5 AU and compared those simulation results with Ulysses observations at 5.2 AU. Next we undertook the more difficult tuning of shock speeds and locations to get matching shock arrival times at both ACE and Ulysses. Then we ran this last case again with neutral hydrogen density set to zero, to identify the effect of pickup ions. We show that the speed of interplanetary shocks propagating from the Sun to Ulysses is reduced by the effects of pickup protons. We plan to make further improvements to the model as we continue our benchmarking process to 10 AU, comparing our results with Cassini observations, and eventually on to 100 AU, comparing our results with Voyager 1 and 2 observations.

  2. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  3. Line mixing effects in solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere - Measurements and comparisons with calculations for the 1932/cm CO2 Q branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Strow, L. Larrabee

    1989-01-01

    Line mixing effects have been observed in a CO2 Q branch recorded in 0.01/cm-resolution IR solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere. The spectral data were obtained by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer during the Spacelab 3 mission in the spring of 1985. Analysis of the 1932.47/cm Q branch of (C-12)(O-16)2 shows absorption coefficients below the band origin about 0.62 times those calculated using a standard Voigt line-shape function. Calculations of line mixing using the Lorentz halfwidths of the lines and a simple energy-gap scaling law to parameterize rotational energy transfer reproduce the observed absorption coefficients to about 10 percent. The present results provide the first quantitative information on air-broadened line mixing effects in a Q branch at low temperatures (about 210 K) and show that these effects are significant even at the low pressures of the lower stratosphere (about 100 mbar).

  4. Measurements of industrial emissions of VOCs, NH3, NO2 and SO2 in Texas using the Solar Occultation Flux method and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Rivera, C.; Lefer, B.; Patel, M.

    2007-12-01

    Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) measurements of olefines and alkanes have been conducted to pin-point and quantify the largest sources of olefines and alkanes in the vicinity of Houston and in south eastern Texas during September 2006. The SOF measurements were part of the extensive summer campaign TexAQS 2006, included in the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II). The SOF technique is an optical method utilizing the absorption of direct solar infrared radiation in the 1.8-14 micrometer range for retrieval of total columns of various species such as ethylene, propylene, ammonia and alkanes. The instrument is carried on a mobile platform, making it possible to conduct transects of the emission plume downwind an industry, and thus integrate all the molecules of the plume cross section in real time. By multiplying with the plume wind speed, the total flux emerging from the source is obtained. Flux estimates with SOF were obtained for the large petrochemical and refining complexes around the Houston area. This was done in parallell with airborne plume studies by other parties. The primary research goal was to supply a data set for emission inventory comparisons and for input to models looking at the strong ozone production in Texas. The SOF measurements show that the hourly gas emissions from the Houston Ship channel area correspond to about 1 metric ton of ethylene, 1.5 tons of propylene, 12 tons of alkanes, 1/4 ton of NH3 and about 5 tons of SO2 and NO2. For the VOCs this is an order of magnitude or greater than reported VOC emissions in the 2004 inventory.

  5. SCIAMACHY Lunar Occultation Water Vapor Retrieval & Validation For The Southern Hemispheric Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Faiza; Bramstedt, Klaus; Rozanov, Alexei; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) onboard the European Space Agency's ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT) observes the earth's atmosphere in nadir, limb and solar/lunar occultation geometry covering the UV to NIR (240nm -2380nm) spectral range. The instrument is dedicated to improve our knowl-edge in atmospheric composition and global atmospheric change serving the needs for climate monitoring. The instrument thereby provides total columns as well as vertical profiles of the climate parameters that are relevant to the ozone chemistry, air pollution and global climate change issues, from the troposphere upto the mesosphere. The water vapor has a longer chemical lifetime in the stratosphere and in the polar region it accounts for the chemistry and dynamics. The amount of water vapor in the polar stratosphere directly influence the ozone depletion by controlling the polar vortex temperatures and the formation temperature of the polar stratospheric clouds. From the lunar transmission spectra measured by SCIAMACHY from 2003 to present, stratospheric number density profiles of water vapor have been retrieved over the high southern latitudes ( 50° S -90° S ). The H2 O profiles are retrieved in the altitude range 17-50 km from the calibrated level-1 data using the spectral window 1350-1420 nm. To access the quality and accuracy of this H2 O prod-uct, the validation has been carried out using the correlative solar occultation spectra measured by other instruments such as the satellite instrument ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Ex-periment Fourier Transform Spectrometer) and HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment). The lunar occultation water vapor retrieval, optimization and the results of the comparisons are presented here. For the Antarctic region, there is a coverage scarcity of the atmospheric species which play significant role in the chemistry and dynamics associated with the polar vortex and the ozone hole by the

  6. Titan's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS solar occultations: CH4, CO and evidence for C2H6 absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe; de Kok, Remco J.; Sicardy, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the VIMS solar occultations dataset, which allows us to extract vertically resolved information on the characteristics of Titan's atmosphere between ∼100 and 700 km with a vertical resolution of ∼10 km. After a series of data treatment procedures to correct problems in pointing stability and parasitic light, 4 occultations out of 10 are retained. This sample covers different seasons and latitudes of Titan. The transmittances show clearly the evolution of the haze, with the detection of the detached layer at ∼310 km in September 2011 at mid-northern latitudes. Through the inversion of the transmission spectra with a line-by-line radiative transfer code we retrieve the vertical distribution of CH4 and CO mixing ratio. For methane inversion we use its 1.4, 1.7 and 2.3 μm bands. The first two bands are always in good agreement and yield an average stratospheric abundance of 1.28 ± 0.08%, after correcting for forward-scattering effects, with no significant differences between the occultations. This is significantly less than the value of 1.48% obtained by the GCMS/Huygens instrument. We find that the 2.3 μm band cannot be used for the extraction of methane abundance because it is blended with other absorptions, not included in our atmospheric model. The analysis of the residual spectra after the inversion shows that such additional absorptions are present through a great part of the VIMS wavelength range. We attribute many of these bands, including the one at 2.3 μm, to gaseous ethane, whose near-infrared spectrum is not well modeled yet. Ethane also contributes significantly to the strong absorption at 3.2-3.5 μm that was previously attributed only to C-H stretching bands from aerosols. Ethane bands may affect the surface windows too, especially at 2.7 μm. Other residual bands are generated by stretching modes of C-H, C-C and C-N bonds. In addition to the C-H stretch from aliphatic hydrocarbons at 3.4 μm, we detect a strong and

  7. Coronal Radio Occultation Experiments with the Helios Solar Probes: Correlation/Spectral Analysis of Faraday Rotation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Rogashkova, A. I.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-09-01

    The coronal Faraday rotation (FR) experiments using the linearly polarized signals of the Helios-1 and Helios-2 interplanetary probes remain a unique investigation of the magnetic field of the solar corona and its aperiodic and quasi-periodic variations. The unexpectedly long lifetime of these spacecraft (1974 - 1986) enabled studies from very deep solar-activity minimum (1975 - 1976) into the strong activity maximum (1979). Important experimental data were also obtained for the rising (1977 - 1978) and declining (1980 - 1984) branches of the solar-activity cycle. Previous publications have presented results of the initial experimental data only for coronal-sounding experiments performed during individual solar-conjunction opportunities. This report is a more detailed analysis of the Helios FR measurements for the entire period 1975 - 1984. Radial profiles of the FR fluctuation (FRF) intensity recorded during the deepest solar-activity minimum in 1975 - 1976 are shown to differ distinctly from those during the strong solar-activity maximum in 1979. In particular, the decrease of the FRF intensity with solar-offset distance is substantially steeper in 1979 than in 1975/1976. In all cases, however, the FR data reveal quasi-periodic wave-like fluctuations in addition to the random background with a power-law spectrum. The dominant period of these fluctuations, recorded during 35 % of the total measurement time, is found to be close to five minutes. Large-scale FR variations at considerably longer periods (1.1 - 2.7 hours) were observed during 20 % of the measurement time. Knowing the intrinsic motion of the radio ray path from spacecraft to Earth and making a reasonable assumption about the solar-wind velocity, FRF observations at widely spaced ground stations have been used to estimate the velocity of coronal Alfvén waves. The velocity values range between 290 and 550 km s-1 at heliocentric distances between 3.5 and 4.5 R⊙ and are marginally lower (150 - 450 km s

  8. Earth rotation derived from occultation records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sôma, Mitsuru; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-01

    We determined the values of the Earth's rotation parameter, ΔT = T T - UT, around AD 500 after confirming that the value of the tidal acceleration, dot{n}, of the lunar motion remained unchanged during the period between ancient times and the present. For determining of ΔT, we used contemporaneous occultations of planets by the Moon. In general, occultation records are not useful. However, there are some records that give us a stringent condition for the range of ΔT. Records of the lunar occultations in AD 503 and AD 513 are such examples. In order to assure the usefulness of this occultation data, we used contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses, which have not been used in the preceding work. This is the first work in which the lunar occultation data have been used as primary data to determine the value of ΔT together with auxiliary contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses. Our ΔT value is less than a smoothed value (Stephenson 1997) by at least 450 s. The result is consistent with our earlier results obtained from solar eclipses.

  9. ACE to Ulysses Coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    The EPAM charged particle instrument on ACE is the backup for the HISCALE instrument on Ulysses making the two ideally suited for spatial coherence studies over large heliosphere distances. Fluxes of low-energy ( ~50 - 200 keV) electrons are detected in eight spatial sectors on both spacecraft. A spherical harmonic description of the particle flux as a function of time using only the l=0 and l=1 degree coefficients describes most of the observed flux. Here we concentrate on the three l=1 coefficients for the 60--100 kev electrons.Between the two spacecraft these result in nine coherence estimates that are all typically moderately coherent, but the fact that the different coefficients at each spacecraft are also coherent with each other makes interpretation difficult. To avoid this difficulty we estimated the canonical coherences between the two groups of three series. This, in effect, chooses an optimum coordinate system at each spacecraft and for each frequency and estimates the coherence in this frame. Using one--minute data, we find that the canonical coherences are generally larger at high frequencies (3 mHz and above) than they are at low frequencies. This appears to be generally true and does not depend particularly on time, range, etc. However, if the data segment is chosen too long, say > 30 days with 1--minute sampling, the coherence at high frequencies drops. This may be because the spatial and temporal features of the mode are confounded, or possibly because the solar modes p--modes are known to change frequency with solar activity, so do not appear coherent on long blocks.The coherences are not smooth functions of frequency, but have a bimodal distribution particularly in the 100 μHz to 5 mHz range. Classifying the data at frequencies where the canonical coherences are high in terms of apparent polarization and orientation, we note two major families of modes that appear to be organized by the Parker spiral. The magnetic field data on the two

  10. UMBRAS: a matched occulter and telescope for imaging extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Alfred B.; Jordan, Ian J.; Kochte, Mark; Fraquelli, Dorothy A.; Bruhweiler, Fred; Hollis, Jan M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; DiSanti, Mike A.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Leitner, Jesse; Burns, Richard D.; Starin, Scott R.; Rodrigue, Melodi; Fadali, M. S.; Skelton, Dennis L.; Hart, Helen M.; Hamilton, Forrest C.; Cheng, Kwang-Ping

    2003-02-01

    We describe a 1-meter space telescope plus free-flying occulter craft mission that would provide direct imaging and spectroscopic observations of Jovian and Uranus-sized planets about nearby stars not detectable by Doppler techniques. The Doppler technique is most sensitive for the detection of massive, close-in extrasolar planets while the use of a free-flying occulter would make it possible to image and study stellar systems with planets comparable to our own Solar System. Such a mission with a larger telescope has the potential to detect earth-like planets. Previous studies of free-flying occulters reported advantages in having the occulting spot outside the telescope compared to a classical coronagraph onboard a space telescope. Using an external occulter means light scatter within the telescope is reduced due to fewer internal obstructions and less light entering the telescope and the polishing tolerances of the primary mirror and the supporting optics can be less stringent, thereby providing higher contrast and fainter detection limits. In this concept, the occulting spot is positioned over the star by translating the occulter craft, at distances of 1,000 to 15,000 kms from the telescope, on the sky instead of by moving the telescope. Any source within the telescope field-of-view can be occulted without moving the telescope. In this paper, we present our current concept for a 1-m space telescope matched to a free-flying occulter, the Umbral Missions Blocking Radiating Astronomical Sources (UMBRAS) space mission. An UMBRAS space mission consists of a Solar Powered Ion Driven Eclipsing Rover (SPIDER) occulter craft and a matched (apodized) telescope. The occulter spacecraft would be semi-autonomous, with its own propulsion systems, internal power (solar cells), communications, and navigation capability. Spacecraft rendezvous and formation flying would be achieved with the aid of telescope imaging, RF or laser ranging, celestial navigation inputs, and formation

  11. Studies in occultation astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.

    1980-01-01

    Major scientific results are summarized for the following studies: (1) observations of the 8 April 1976 occultation of epsilon Geminorum by Mars; (2) studies in occultation techniques; and (3) the March 1974 occultation of Saturn by the Moon. A re-analysis of the 1974 lunar occultation of the Titan indicates that Titan is strongly limb darkened, with D approximately greater than 5800km; there is internal evidence in the data that Titan's atmosphere is inhomogeneous; and that observations are inconsistent with any sample homogeneous model atmosphere which matches the P (lambda) and Beta (lambda) observations of Titan.

  12. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  13. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier transform spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Gerrit; Walker, Kaley A.; Conway, Stephanie; Saitoh, Naoko; Boone, Chris D.; Strong, Kimberly; Drummond, James R.

    2016-05-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three data sets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional collocation criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and

  14. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier Transform Spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three datasets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Lab at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and between 1.5 and 3

  15. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  16. Convective towers detection using GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, R.; Neubert, T.; Syndergaard, S.; Nielsen, J.

    2010-12-01

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapour mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. To gain a better understanding of deep convective processes, the study of tropical cyclones could play an important role since they lead to deep convective activity. With this work we want to investigate if severe storms leave a significant signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. The GPS radio occultation (RO) technique is useful for studying severe weather phenomena because the GPS signals penetrate through clouds and allow measurements of atmospheric profiles related to temperature, pressure, and water vapour with high vertical resolution. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS RO missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 hours and a space window of 300 km from the eye of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS RO signal is typically larger than the climatology above the tropopause. Comparisons with co-located radiosondes, climatology of tropopause altitudes and GOES analyses will also be shown to support our hypothesis and to corroborate the idea that the bending angle anomaly can be used as an indicator of convective towers. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) payload on the International Space Station.

  17. An ACE diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  18. An ACE diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  19. Upper troposphere and stratosphere distribution of hydrocarbon species in ACE-FTS measurements and GEOS-Chem simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Walker, Kaley A.; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Jones, Ashley; Sheese, Patrick E.; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of carbon-containing species, referred to herein as "hydrocarbons", are important components needed for describing and understanding the influence of natural and anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric chemistry. Analysis of the global pattern of hydrocarbons contributes to our understanding of the influence of regional and seasonal variation in air pollution and natural fire events. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) has monitored trace gases in the upper troposphere and stratosphere based on solar occultation measurements for more than ten years. In this study, we investigate the global pattern of seven "hydrocarbon" species (CO, C2H6, C2H2, HCN, H2CO, CH3OH, and HCOOH) and OCS using the ACE-FTS version 3.5 dataset from 2004 to 2013. All hydrocarbons show strong seasonal variation and regional differences, but the detailed pattern differs according to the speciation of the hydrocarbons. For example, in the Northern Hemisphere, CO, C2H6, and C2H2 show the highest mixing ratios in winter, but high CH3OH and HCOOH appear in summer. In the Southern hemisphere, H2CO, HCN, and HCOOH show high mixing ratios in springtime. These patterns indicate the impact of different emission sources including fuel combustion, wildfire emission, and chemical production. By calculating correlations with CO, these results can provide useful information to characterize each hydrocarbon emission. The ACE-FTS measurements have also been compared with GEOS-Chem output to examine the model performance and spatiotemporal patterns in the simulations.

  20. APL workers install CRIS on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Workers from the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) install the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). From left, are Al Sadilek, Marcos Gonzalez and Cliff Willey. CRIS is one of nine instruments on ACE, which will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of the solar corona, solar flares and the acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was developed for NASA by the APL. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched Aug. 21 aboard a two-stage Delta II 7920-8 rocket from Space Launch Complex 17, Pad A.

  1. Preliminary Results From the Champ Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajj, G.; Dong, D.; Iijima, B.; Kuang, D.; Kursinski, R.; Mannucci, A.; Meehan, T.; Romans, L.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Yunck, T.

    2001-05-01

    Champ collects 200-250 globally distributed GPS occultations every day providing a wealth of information on atmospheric parameters such as pressure, temperature, humidity between 0-60 km altitude and electron density above 60 km altitude. There are several aspects to the Champ occultation measurements which distinguish them from prior measurements (such as from GPS/MET, Oersted and SAC-C): (1) They are taken during solar maximum; (2) they are collected with a new generation receiver ("BlackJack") which provides high quality L1 and L2 measurements even when the DoD anti-spoofing of the GPS signal is turned on; (3) the tracking loop in the receiver is optimized to allow the occulted signal to descend very low in the atmosphere (<1km from the surface). A further distinction comes from the fact that selective availability (the dithering of the GPS clocks) was permanently turned off by DoD, therefore reducing or eliminating the need for 1-second ground measurements previously used to difference out high frequency GPS clock drifts. This talk will present results obtained at JPL from the early Champ occultation data sets, first collected in February, 2001, and will address the specific issues listed above. Specifically, we will present (a) statistics on how low in the atmosphere occultations are able to probe as a function of geographical latitudes and humidity conditions; (b) the limitations on higher altitude atmospheric retrievals (between 30-60 km) caused by the ionosphere at different local times and solar conditions, including comparisons to GPS/MET data taken during solar minimum; (c) individual and statistical comparisons of temperature and water vapor to atmospheric analyses such as NCEP and ECMWF and other data sets such as radiosondes; (d) the impact of including or excluding high rate ground data.

  2. Variability in Saturn's upper atmosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Strobel, D. F.; West, R. A.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-10-01

    We present new density and temperature profiles based on more than 20 stellar occultations by Saturn's upper atmosphere observed simultaneously by the EUV and FUV channels of the Cassini/UVIS instrument. With these results, more than 40 stellar and solar occultations from Cassini/UVIS [1, 2, 3] and 6 occultations from Voyager/UVS [4] have now been analyzed. The results provide valuable constraints on models of chemistry, dynamics and thermal structure in the upper atmosphere. They are also required to plan for the end of the Cassini mission.

  3. Frequencies of occultations of stars by planets, satellites, and asteroids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Leary, B.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations show that several occultations of stars by the large satellites of the outer planets, Pluto, and the large asteroids could be observed each decade with existing equipment at earth-based telescopes. A systematic program of occultation predictions and observations is urged in order to improve our knowledge about the atmospheres, sizes, shapes, topography, and positions of these poorly understood bodies, in support of forthcoming spacecraft missions to the outer solar system.

  4. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  5. Understanding the 11-year Solar Cycle Signal in Stratospheric Ozone using a 3D CTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu

    2014-05-01

    The exact structure of the 11-year solar cycle signal in stratospheric ozone is still an open scientific question. Long-term satellite data such as Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) show a positive solar response in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere (US/LM), but a negligible signal in the tropical middle stratosphere. On the other hand, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements show a positive signal in the lower and middle stratosphere and smaller solar signal in the tropical US/LM. Currently most chemical models are able to simulate a "double-peak"-structured solar signal but the model simulated solar signals tend to show better agreement with the HALOE-derived solar signal than those from SBUV or SAGE measurements. Also, some recent studies argue that due to the significantly different solar variability during the recent solar cycle (23), the solar signal in the US/LM ozone is negative (out of phase with total solar irradiance changes) for this later period compared to previous solar cycles. We have used 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to better understand the possible mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Various model simulations have been performed for 1979-2012 time period using ERA-Interim meteorological fields as a dynamical forcing. Model output is sampled at collocated measurement points for three satellite instruments performing stratospheric ozone measurements using the solar occultation technique: SAGE II (1984-2005), HALOE (1992-2005) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE, 2003-present). Overall the modelled ozone shows good agreement with all the data sets. However, in the US/LM, modelled ozone anomalies are better correlated with HALOE and ACE than SAGE II measurements. Hence the modelled solar signal in the stratospheric and lower mesospheric ozone also shows better agreement with the solar signal derived using HALOE and

  6. National Survey of ACE Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Ernesto A.

    In 1987-88, a national survey was conducted to determine the adult/continuing education (ACE) policies and practices of large, urban community colleges. Questionnaires were mailed to ACE deans at 74 colleges, requesting information about program characteristics, funding sources, personnel, curriculum review, and marketing and publicity. Study…

  7. KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, S. J.; Welch, D. L.; Kavelaars, J. J. E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2009-05-15

    A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

  8. Balloon-based infrared solar-occultation measurements of stratospheric O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, HNO/sub 3/, and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, M.P.; Chang, I.L.

    1987-09-01

    In July 1985 the authors performed an infrared solar-occultation experiment with a balloon-borne, non-scanning, multi-detector grating spectrometer. From the data, the authors retrieved simultaneous mixing-ratio profiles of ozone, water vapor, nitric acid, and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ between 12 and 35 km. The retrieved ozone and water-vapor profiles were compared with concurrent in-situ measurements with electrochemical concentration cells (ECC's) and frost-point hygrometers, respectively. The retrieved-ozone profile was in good agreement with the correlative data. The retrieved values of water-vapor-mixing ratio, while close in magnitude to the correlative measurements, differed in their altitude dependence. Although the authors had no concurrent in-situ data for nitric acid and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, the retrieved profiles were consistent with measurements in the literature.

  9. Balloon-based infrared solar occultation measurements of stratospheric O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, HNO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 2/Cl(sub 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, M.P.; Chang, I.L.

    1987-09-01

    In July 1985 an infrared solar occultation experiment was performed with a balloon-borne, non-scanning, multi-detector grating spectrometer. From the data were retrieved simultaneous mixing ratio profiles of ozone, water vapor, nitric acid, and CFC-12 between 12 and 35 km. The retrieved ozone and water vapor profiles were compared with concurrent in-situ measurements with electrochemical concentration cells (ECCs) and frost-point hygrometers, respectively. The retrieved ozone profile was in good agreement with the correlative data. The retrieved values of water vapor mixing ratio, while close in magnitude to the correlative measurements, differed in their altitude dependence. Although there was no concurrent in-situ data for nitric acid and CFC-12, the retrieved profiles were consistent with measurements in the literature.

  10. Long-term trends in the concentrations of SF6, CHClF2, and COF2 in the lower stratosphere from analysis of high-resolution infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term trends in the concentrations of SF6, CHClF2 in the lower stratosphere are derived using results from analyses of the 1980 and of several more recently obtained IR solar occultation spectra. Results show that the increase rates of SF6 and CHClF2 were about 7.4/yr and 9.4/yr, respectively, which correspond to cumulative increases by factors of about 1.7 and 2.0 in the concentrations of these gases over the 7.2 yr measurement period. The average increase rate for COF2 was 10.3/yr over the same time period. The present results are compared with previously reported observations and trends and with one-dimensional model calculations.

  11. A Digital Video System for Observing and Recording Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, M. A. Tony; Gault, Dave; Pavlov, Hristo; Hanna, William; McEwan, Alistair; Filipović, Miroslav D.

    2015-09-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids and outer solar system bodies can offer ground based observers with modest telescopes and camera equipment the opportunity to probe the shape, size, atmosphere, and attendant moons or rings of these distant objects. The essential requirements of the camera and recording equipment are: good quantum efficiency and low noise; minimal dead time between images; good horological faithfulness of the image timestamps; robustness of the recording to unexpected failure; and low cost. We describe an occultation observing and recording system which attempts to fulfil these requirements and compare the system with other reported camera and recorder systems. Five systems have been built, deployed, and tested over the past three years, and we report on three representative occultation observations: one being a 9 ± 1.5 s occultation of the trans-Neptunian object 28978 Ixion (m v =15.2) at 3 seconds per frame; one being a 1.51 ± 0.017 s occultation of Deimos, the 12 km diameter satellite of Mars, at 30 frames per second; and one being a 11.04 ± 0.4 s occultation, recorded at 7.5 frames per second, of the main belt asteroid 361 Havnia, representing a low magnitude drop (Δm v = ~0.4) occultation.

  12. Radio occultation bending angle anomalies during tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, R.; Neubert, T.; Syndergaard, S.; Nielsen, J.

    2011-02-01

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The aim of this work is to better understand these processes and to investigate if severe storms leave a significant signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS radio occultation missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 h and a space window of 300 km from the eye of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS radio occultation signal is typically larger than the climatology in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and that a double tropopause during deep convection can easily be detected using this technique. Comparisons with co-located radiosondes, climatology of tropopause altitudes and GOES analyses are also shown to support the hypothesis that the bending angle anomaly can be used as an indicator of convective towers. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) payload on the International Space Station.

  13. Radio occultation bending angle anomalies during tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, R.; Neubert, T.; Syndergaard, S.; Nielsen, J. K.

    2011-06-01

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The aim of this work is to better understand these processes and to investigate if severe storms leave a significant signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS radio occultation missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 h and a space window of 300 km from the eye of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS radio occultation signal is typically larger than the climatology in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and that a double tropopause during deep convection can easily be detected using this technique. Comparisons with co-located radiosondes, climatology of tropopause altitudes and GOES analyses are also shown to support the hypothesis that the bending angle anomaly can be used as an indicator of convective towers. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) payload on the International Space Station.

  14. Occult intrasacral meningocoele

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Roma A.; McKenzie, Thomas

    1970-01-01

    A case is reported of the rare lesion occult intrasacral meningocoele in a 27-year-old woman who developed symptoms for the first time shortly after the birth of her fourth child. The terminology of the condition is discussed and its pathogenesis, mode of presentation, and treatment reviewed. Images PMID:5528202

  15. Forthcoming Occultations of Astrometric Radio Sources by Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    L'vov, Victor; Malkin, Zinovy; Tsekmeister, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Astrometric observations of radio source occultations by solar system bodies may be of large interest for testing gravity theories, dynamical astronomy, and planetary physics. In this paper, we present an updated list of the occultations of astrometric radio sources by planets expected in the coming years. Such events, like solar eclipses, generally speaking can only be observed in a limited region. A map of the shadow path is provided for the events that will occurr in regions with several VLBI stations and hence will be the most interesting for radio astronomy experiments.

  16. The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Matthew J.; Wang, S.; Alcock, C. A.; Cook, K. H.; Furesz, G.; Geary, J. C.; Hiriart, D.; Ho, P. T.; Norton, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Yen, W.; Zhang, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small ( 1 km diameter) objects in the Solar System and beyond. Such events are very rare (<0.001 events per star per year) and short in duration ( 200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir in Baja California, México. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and a high speed camera comprising CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a readout cadence of 20 Hz.

  17. The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Matthew J.; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Alcock, Charles A.; Cook, Kem H.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Hiriart, David; Ho, Paul T.; Lee, William; Melsheimer, Frank; Norton, Timothy; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Richer, Michael; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Yen, Wei-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Wei

    2012-09-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small ( 1 km diameter) objects in the Solar System and beyond. Such events are very rare (< 10-3 events per star per year) and short in duration ( 200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astrońomico Nacional at San Pedro Martir in Baja California, Mexico. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and a high speed camera comprising CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a readout cadence of 20 Hz.

  18. Diverse Applications of Occultation Data in Ozone Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Uttley, P.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone profiles from solar occultation instruments provide invaluable information that can be used to evaluate the quality of assimilated ozone fields, from case studies to long-term phenomena. Occultation data can also be applied to include physical constraints while developing components of an assimilation system. Conversely, assimilation of occultation data can help in their validation, and it provides a framework for evaluation of the impact of occultation data on constraining global ozone fields within models. We illustrate these diverse applications by a series of examples using the ozone assimilation system at NASA/Goddard. In a case study, low ozone in the lower stratosphere due to transport of air from the Tropics to northern high latitudes that was captured by assimilation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) data, was found to agree with SAGE III data. For long-term monitoring, the quality of a multi-year SBUV-only assimilation was evaluated using monthly-mean time series of POAM, HALOE, and SAGE I1 data. We found realism in the representation of the annual cycle in ozone and in some aspects of interannual variability. Assimilation of POAM data was shown to improve the representation of lower stratospheric ozone, especially over Antarctica. More recently, we assimilated ILAS II ozone data in order to help in their validation. Solar occultation data are used to estimate parameters in a new model for forecast error variances that is being developed. These examples demonstrate the importance of occultation data for ozone assimilation, and potential of assimilation to increase the impact and the value of occultation data.

  19. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Jenke, P.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Haynes, R. H.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/ soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels.

  20. Characterization and evolution of distant planetary atmospheres using stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L. A.

    2008-09-01

    Ground-based or near-Earth (e.g., HST) stellar occultations of every atmosphere in our solar system has been observed: Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, Uranus, Neptune, Triton, and Pluto [1]. These observations probe the atmospheres at roughly 0.1 to 100 microbar. I will talk about three aspects of stellar occultations: one-dimensional vertical profiles of the atmosphere, two- or three-dimensional atmospheric states, and the time evolution of atmosphere. In all three, I will draw on recent observations, with an emphasis on Pluto. Occultations are particularly important for the study of Pluto's atmosphere, which is impossible to study with imaging, and extremely difficult to study with spectroscopy. It was discovered by stellar occultation in 1988 [2]. No subsequent Pluto occultations were observed until two events in 2002 [3]. Pluto is now crossing the galactic plane, and there have been several additional occultations observed since 2006. These include a high signal-to-noise observation from the Anglo Australian Observatory in 2006 [4] (Fig 1), densely spaced visible and infrared observations of Pluto's upper atmosphere from telescopes in the US and Mexico in March, 2007 [5] (Fig. 2), and a dualwavelength central flash observation from Mt. John in July, 2007 [6] (Fig 3). The flux from a star occulted by an atmosphere diminishes primarily due to the increase in refraction with depth in the atmosphere, defocusing the starlight, although absorption and tangential focusing can also contribute. Because the atmospheric density, to first order, follows an exponential, it is feasible to derive a characteristic pressure and temperature from isothermal fits to even low-quality occultation light curves. Higher quality light curves allow fits with more flexible models, or light curve inversions that derive temperatures limited by the resolution of the data. These allow the derivation of one-dimensional profiles of temperature and pressure vs. altitude, which are critical

  1. An analysis of the Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer occultation data at Uranus - Inferring heat sources and model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Herbert, Floyd

    1993-01-01

    Heat source information is derived here from the Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer occultation data of Uranus. Analytic functions for the local heat dependence on altitude are used to obtain a temperature profile by solving the heat equation. The stellar entrance and exit occultation and a solar occultation are used to infer the thermal and density structure of the atmosphere. The least squares fit solution to the solar occultation data gives one source located at 1.8 x 10 exp -5 microbar with a strength of 0.056 +/- 0.01 erg/sq cm/s. Latitudinal temperature gradients are obtained.

  2. Solar Cycle comparison of Nitric Oxide in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, P. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Thurairajah, B.; Yonker, J. D.; Venkataramani, K.; Russell, J. M.; Hervig, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    represent the previous solar minimum between the solar cycles 22 and 23 following Jian et al 2010. We will use the data from HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment instrument), ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) and SOFIE for our analysis. We will also discuss the factors influencing the changes seen in our analysis. We show no significant change in the concentration of NO at the equator, but a significant change at higher latitudes.

  3. Stellar Occultations by Transneptunian and Centaurs Objects: results from more than 10 observed events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga-Ribas, F.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Transneptunian objects (TNOs) are small fossils of the Solar System orbiting beyond Neptune. We use stellar occultations to derive their size and shape. This work summarizes the main results derived, so far, from all detected TNO occultations (excluding Pluto system). We have developed a process, constructing astrometric star catalogues to make long-term reliable predictions (Camargo et al. 2014). Information about their physical properties are invaluable to the understanding of the dynamical evolution of the Solar System.

  4. Clouds in the Tropical Lowermost Stratosphere Observed by ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, J. J.; Galkina, I.; Sioris, C. E.; Nowlan, C. R.; McElroy, T.; Zou, J.; Hu, J.; Drummond, J. R.; McLinden, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    Evidence for the occurrence of cloud particles in the tropical lowermost stratosphere in the 2004-2007 period is presented. This study is based on measurements by the three Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) instruments onboard SCI-SAT. The Vis & NIR Imagers are used to determine the presence of clouds and their top height. The Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations are used to determine the size distribution and composition of the aerosols. The FTS has a 4 km field-of-view. Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) provide more precise altitude determination of the thermal tropopause and the cloud tops by virtue of its smaller FOV (~1 km). Clouds in the tropical lower stratosphere are a rare occurrence but April 2005 produced a few such cases, consistent with previous observations by OSIRIS. We discuss several individual case studies that demonstrate the presence of large particles (mode radius of ~8 microns) clearly above the tropopause.

  5. A search for stellar occultations by Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and their satellites: 1990-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mink, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    A search for occultations of stars by Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto between 1990 and 1999 was carried out by combining ephemeris information and star positions using very accurate occultation modeling software. Stars from both the Space Telescope Guide Catalog and photographic plates taken by Arnold Klemola at Lick Observatory were compared with planet positions from the JPL DE-130 ephemeris, with local modifications for Pluto and Charon. Some 666 possible occultations by the Uranian ring, 143 possible occultations by Neptune, and 40 possible occultations by Pluto and/or Charon were found among stars with visual magnitudes as faint as 16. Before the star positions could be obtained, the occultation prediction software was used to aid many observers in observing the occultation of 28 Sagitarii by Saturn in July 1989. As a test on other outer solar system objects, 17 possible occultations were found in a search of the Guide Star Catalog for occultations by 2060 Chiron, and interesting object between Saturn and Uranus which shows both cometary and asteroidal properties.

  6. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  7. Heavy Ion Temperatures As Observed By ACE/Swics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, P.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Shearer, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Alterman, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy ions observed near 1 AU, especially in fast solar wind, tend to have thermal speeds that are approximately equal, indicative of a mass proportional temperature. Additionally, observations near 1 AU have shown a streaming of heavy ions (Z>4) along the magnetic field direction at speeds faster than protons. The differential velocities observed are of the same order but typically less than the Alfven speed. Previous analysis of the behavior of ion thermal velocities with Ulysses-SWICS, focusing on daily average properties of 35 ion species at 5 AU, found only a small systematic trend with respect to q2/m. Utilizing improved data processing techniques, results from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shed new light on the thermal properties of the heavy ion population at 1 AU. A clear dependence of heavy ion thermal behavior on q2/m has now been found in the recent ACE-SWICS two hour cadence data set at 1 AU. Examining the thermal velocities of about 70 heavy ion species relative to alpha particles (He2+) shows a distinct trend from equal thermal speed toward equal temperature with increasing q2/m. When examined for solar winds of different collisional ages, the observations indicate the extent of thermal relaxation present in different solar wind types. We explore this collisional dependence with a model for the collisional thermal relaxation of the heavy ions as the solar wind propagates out to 1 AU. This model is used to subtract out the collisional effects seen in the ACE-SWICS data, providing an estimate for the temperature distribution among heavy ions at the corona to be compared to remote sensing observations that have shown that heavy ions are preferentially heated at the corona. We will discuss how this new analysis elucidates the thermal behavior and evolution of heavy ions in the solar wind, along with implications for the upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions.

  8. GPS-LEO orbiter occultation orbital analyses and event determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rashid, Z. A.; Cheng, P. P.

    2003-04-01

    A good knowledge of the vertical profiles of temperature and humidity throughout the atmosphere are crucial to understand the present state of the Earth's atmosphere and it's modeling. The application of radio occultation technique has a heritage of over 2 decades in NASA's planetary exploration program to study the atmosphere of most of the major bodies in the solar system. Results from NASA's planetary program experiment have proven to be very effective at characterizing the atmosphere of a planet. However, the use of radio occultation technique to remote sensing the Earth's atmosphere is only practical to be implemented recently with the advent of the matured Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS occultation technique is well suited to observe the Earth's atmosphere, due to it excellent geographical coverage, all weather capability, long-term stability, self-calibration and high vertical resolution. The GPS/MET (GPS Meteorology) experiment launched in April 1995 is the proof-of-concept of this technique. The results from this experiment is appealing and shown that the GPS occultation technique is a promising candidate to monitor the Earth's atmosphere. With the advancement of receiver technologies and lower system cost, the GPS occultation technique is a promising tool to predict the long-term climatic changes and numerical weather modeling of the Earth's atmosphere at a higher precision. This paper briefly describes the radio occultation concept and the GPS satellite systems, which form the basis understanding of this subject matter. This is followed by a detail description of the occultation geometries between the GPS satellites and a LEO orbiter. A method to determine the occultation event is discussed and thoroughly analyzed in terms of orbit inclinations, altitudes, receiver sampling rates, antenna positioning (aft and fore pointing), and antenna mask angles. A simulator is developed using MATLAB for the orbital analyses and occultation determination in

  9. Stellar Occultation Studies of Pluto, Triton, Charon, and Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Bodies inhabiting the outer solar system are of interest because, due to the colder conditions, they exhibit unique physical processes. Also, some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. The thin atmospheres of Pluto and Triton have structure that is not yet understood, and they have been predicted to undergo cataclysmic seasonal changes. Charon may have an atmosphere - we don't know. Chiron exhibits cometary activity so far from the sun (much further than most comets), so that H2O sublimation cannot be the driving mechanism. Probing these bodies from Earth with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers can be accomplished only with the stellar occultation technique. In this program we find and predict stellar occultation events by small outer-solar system bodies and then attempt observations of the ones that can potentially answer interesting questions. We also develop new methods of data analysis for occultations and secure other observations that are necessary for interpretation of the occultation data.

  10. Galilean satellites - Observations of mutual occultations and eclipses in 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.; Veverka, J.; Liller, W.

    1976-01-01

    Seven Galilean satellite mutual events, two occultations and two eclipses of Europa and three eclipses of Io, were observed at three wavelengths (0.35, 0.50, 0.91 micrometers) with a time resolution of 0.1 sec. Preliminary model fits to the light curves are presented. Model satellites with different albedo distributions (uniform disk, bright solar caps, bright quadrant) are used in generating model occultation and eclipse curves to demonstrate the sensitivity of observed light curves to the brightness distribution on the surface of the occulted or eclipsed satellite. At the present the observations yield no conclusive information of the limb-darkening of Io. The best data for Europa indicate that the satellite is limb-darkened at both 0.50 and 0.91 micrometers.

  11. The Delta II with ACE aboard is prepared for liftoff from Pad 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle carrying the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) undergoes final preparations for liftoff in the predawn hours of Aug. 25, 1997, at Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. This is the second Delta launch under the Boeing name and the first from Cape Canaveral. The first launch attempt on Aug. 24 was scrubbed by Air Force range safety personnel because two commercial fishing vessels were within the Delta's launch danger area. ACE with its combination of nine sensors and instruments will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of solar corona, solar flares and acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was built for NASA by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and is managed by the Explorer Project Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The lead scientific institution is the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Search for serendipitous Oort cloud object occultation in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jie-Rou; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Serendipitous occultation search is a way to study small objects in the outer Solar system like trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) by extracting and analyzing the diffraction pattern in the occultation lights. There are already some reported detections in both optical and X-ray bands in this kind of search. Except for KBOs, this method also has the potential to extend the search to a distance as far away as the Oort cloud region (beyond a few thousands AU). As the distance is larger, a shorter wavelength is needed to have a smaller Fresnel scale, with which occultation may be more easily detected. Here we introduce the serendipitous occultation method we used in searching Oort cloud objects occultation, and present the results of using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array data of Sco X-1 taken from 1996 February to 2012 January.

  13. Uranus occults SAO158687. [stellar occultation and planetary parametric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Veverka, J.; Millis, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in obtaining atmospheric parameters, oblatenesses, and diameters of Jupiter and Mars from recent stellar occultations by these planets is used to predict what can be learned from the March 1977 occultation of the star SAO158687 by Uranus. The spectra of this star and Uranus are compared to indicate the relative instrument intensities of the two objects, the four passbands where the relative intensities are most nearly equal are listed, and expected photon fluxes from the star are computed on the assumption that it has UBVRI colors appropriate for a K5 main-sequence object. It is shown that low photon noise errors can be achieved by choosing appropriate passbands for observation, and the rms error expected for the Uranus temperature profiles obtained from the occultation light curves is calculated. It is suggested that observers of this occultation should record their data digitally for optimum time resolution.

  14. Pinhole occulter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Jeff; Pflug, John

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs and charts from a briefing summarize the accomplishments, results, conclusions, and recommendations of a feasibility study using the Pinhole Occulter Facility (POF). Accomplishments for 1986 include: (1) improved IPS Gimbal Model; (2) improved Crew Motion Disturbance Model; (3) use of existing shuttle on-orbit simulation to study the effects of orbiter attitude deadband size on POF performance; (4) increased understanding of maximum performance expected from current actuator/sensor set; (5) use of TREETOPS nonlinear time domain program to obtain system dynamics describing the complex multibody flexible structures; (6) use of HONEY-X design tool to design and evaluate multivariable compensator for stability, robustness, and performance; (7) application of state-of-the-art compensator design methodology Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR); and (8) examination of tolerance required on knowledge of the POF boom flexible mode frequencies to insure stability, using structure uncertainty analysis.

  15. KPNO LUNAR OCCULTATION SUMMARY. III

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Africano, J. L.

    2011-01-15

    The results for 251 lunar occultation events recorded at Kitt Peak National Observatory are presented, including 20 observations of known or suspected double stars and five measurements of stars with resolved angular diameters.

  16. The Occult: Diabolica to Alchemists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Oliver J.

    1971-01-01

    The 91 items in this bibliography deal with works of occult science. The material is subdivided into biographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, noteworthy histories, indices, annuals, and a few miscellany works with treatises. (95 references) (Author)

  17. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  18. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  19. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. |||

    1995-02-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  20. The Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network: A System for Coordinated TNO Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Keller, John M.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a new system and method for collecting coordinated occultation observations of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). Occultations by objects in the outer solar system are more difficult to predict due to their large distance and limited span of the astrometric data used to determine their orbits and positions. This project brings together the research and educational community into a unique citizen-science partnership to overcome the difficulties of observing these distant objects. The goal of the project is to get sizes and shapes for TNOs with diameters larger than 100 km. As a result of the system design it will also serve as a probe for binary systems with spatial separations as small as contact systems. Traditional occultation efforts strive to get a prediction sufficiently good to place mobile ground stations in the shadow track. Our system takes a new approach of setting up a large number of fixed observing stations and letting the shadows come to the network. The nominal spacing of the stations is 50 km so that we ensure two chords at our limiting size. The spread of the network is roughly 2000 km along a roughly north-south line in the western United States. The network contains 56 stations that are committed to the project and we get additional ad hoc support from International Occultation Timing Association members. At our minimum size, two stations will record an event while the other stations will be probing the inner regions for secondary events. Larger objects will get more chords and will allow determination of shape profiles. The stations are almost exclusively sited and associated with schools, usually at the 9-12 grade level. We present a full description of the system we have developed for the continued exploration of the Kuiper Belt.

  1. Search for serendipitous TNO occultation events in X-rays with Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Shang, Jie-Rou

    2015-09-01

    Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), which include Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and yet-to-discover Oort Cloud Objects, are an important population of members of the solar system. Its population properties, such as size distribution, carry information imprinted during the early epoch of the solar system formation. TNOs smaller than about ten kilometers are not directly observable. Their existence, however, may be detected through occultation events of background targets that they cause. Search for such serendipitous occultation events have been conducted in optical and X-ray bands. Since the Fresnel scale is about 30 times smaller in X-rays, using X-ray occultation events one may explore TNOs smaller than that can be done in optical bands. Here I will report X-ray sources suitable for such a study with Athena observations. The estimated Athena detection rate of occultation events, based on different model assumptions of TNO size distribution, will also be presented.

  2. The IMACS Occultation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew John; Holman, Matthew; Alcock, Charles; Osip, David; Schlichting, Hilke

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of our extended campaign to search for occultations of background stars by small (sub-km) Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) using the IMACS instrument on the Magellan Telescope.We implemented a novel shutterless continuous readout mode on the IMACS instrument, with custom-made aperture masks, permitting simultaneous high-speed (~40 Hz) photometry for numerous stars, while minimizing the effects of stellar crowding and sky background. Observing in the southern hemisphere allows us to target the intersection of the ecliptic and galactic planes, where hundreds of stars can be monitored with a single field of view.We observed for a total of ~28 hours spread over eight nights, obtaining over 10,000 star-hours of light curves with per-point SNR > 10. This represents an order of magnitude increase in star hours compared to the previous best ground-based survey by Bianco et al. (2009). Our results allow us to place strong constraints on the surface density of sub-km objects in the Kuiper-Belt, as well as to complement the HST FGS results of Schlichting et al. (2009, 2012).

  3. ACE VET Linkages: Provider, Student and Industry Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    In recent years, Australia's system of adult and community education (ACE) has broadened to include vocational learning as well as the hobby, enrichment, and personal development traditionally provided by ACE in the past. A study examined the views of ACE providers, ACE students, and industry organizations regarding ACE vocational education and…

  4. Chlorine activation in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 analyzed by combined use of JEM/SMILES and ACE-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuji, T.; Saitoh, N.; Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) equipped in the Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" on board the International Space Station (ISS) had observed atmospheric minor constituents including ClO in the stratosphere and mesosphere from October 12, 2009 to April 21, 2010 with more than ten times the precision of other existing sensors due to its unprecedented high sensitivity with superconducting technology. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), which is on board SCISAT-1, has been observing atmospheric minor constituents in the upper troposphere and stratosphere since March 11, 2004 by solar occultation technique. We have analyzed the SMILES Level 2 (L2) V2.1.5 research products and the ACE-FTS L2 V3.0 products to discuss the relationship between temperature and stratospheric minor gases related to ozone depletion and the time variation of 'Cl partitioning' in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010. The correlation between the SMILES L2r ClO concentration and temperature on 475 K and 525 K from mid-January to early February showed that the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv at equivalent latitudes higher than 70° and solar zenith angles lower than 96°, where the temperatures were well lower than 200 K; the ClO concentrations and the solar zenith angles had a positive correlation in the region where the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv. However, some data with high ClO concentration also occurred under relatively warmer conditions where PSCs were not expected to exist. The temperature histories of those data showed that they had experienced near ice frost point of ~187 K at 2-4 days before the observations, and then the temperatures drastically increased as much as 20 degrees just before the observations. We have analyzed a time-series of 'Cl partitioning' by using ClO, HOCl, and HCl observed by SMILES and HCl and ClONO2 observed by ACE-FTS inside the polar vortex in 2009/2010. HCl

  5. Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) optical filter characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1989-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is a solar occultation experiment that will fly on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite to measure mixing ratio profiles of O3, H2O, NO2, NO, CH4, HCl, and HF. The inversion of the HALOE data will be critically dependent on a detailed knowledge of eight optical filters. A filter characterization program was undertaken to measure in-band transmissions, out-of-band transmissions, in-band transmission shifts with temperature, reflectivities, and age stability. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers were used to perform measurements over the spectral interval 400/cm to 6300/cm (25 micrometers to 1.6 micrometers). Very high precision (0.1 percent T) in-band measurements and very high resolution (0.0001 percent T) out-of-band measurements have been made. The measurements revealed several conventional leaks at 0.01 percent transmission and greatly enhanced (1,000) leaks to the 2-element filters when placed in a Fabry-Perot cavity. Filter throughput changes by 5 percent for a 25 C change in filter temperature.

  6. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  7. Antarctic Stratospheric Ozone from the Assimilation of Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Ozone data from the solar occultation Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument are included in the ozone assimilation system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, which uses Solar Backscatter UItraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument data. Even though POAM data are available at only one latitude in the southern hemisphere on each day, their assimilation leads to more realistic ozone distribution throughout the Antarctic region, especially inside the polar vortex. Impacts of POAM data were evaluated by comparisons of assimilated ozone profiles with independent ozone sondes. Major improvements in ozone representation are seen in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during austral Winter and spring in 1998. Limitations of assimilation of sparse occultation data are illustrated by an example.

  8. Home Use Tests: Fecal Occult Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Fecal Occult Blood Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... test kit to measure the presence of hidden (occult) blood in your stool (feces). What is fecal ...

  9. The 2010, February 19 stellar occultation by Varuna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Colas, F.; Maquet, L.; Vachier, F.; Doressoundiram, A.; Roques, F.; Widemann, T.; Ortiz, J.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Andrei, A.; da Silva Neto, D.; Behrend, R.; Hund, F.; Hauser, M.; Wagner, S.; Slotegraaf, A.; Willasch, D.; Costa, M. de Jesus; Melo Sousa, P.; Faustino, E.; Prazeres, A.; Machado, S.; Dias do Nascimento, J.; Souza Barreto, E.; Amorim, A.; da Rocha Poppe, P.; Pereira, M. Geraldete; Jacques, C.; Loureiro Giacchini, B.; Collucci, A.; Ferreira da Costa, W.; Martins de Morais, V.

    2010-10-01

    On 2010, February 19, Varuna occulted UCAC2 star 41014042, as seen from regions in southern Africa and north-eastern Brazil. No occultation was observed neither from the station deployed in South Africa, nor from three other stations in Namibia. Out of twelve stations deployed in Brazil, seven had clouds or instrument malfunctions. Three were negative, one possibly positive (visual) is still being analyzed, and one is definitely positive from Sao Luis (CCD). This makes Varuna the most remote solar system object observed to date through a stellar occultation, with a geocentric distance of 6.4 billions km. The Sao Luis occultation has a duration of 52.5 +/- 0.5 sec, corresponding to a chord length of 1003 +/- 9 km projected in the plane of the sky. No atmospheric signature is apparent in the light curve. Since the closest observation to Sao Luis is negative at a transversal distance of 225 km (Quixada, CCD), a significantly elongated shape is required for Varuna. We will discuss our results in view of current independent estimations of Varuna's diameter combining IR thermal and visible data, with a typical value of 1050 km +/- 200 km (Lellouch et al. 2002, Stansberry et al., 2008). We will also discuss the fact that the occultation occurred near Varuna's maximum brightness along its 6.4 hr rotational (0.4-mag amplitude) light curve. Thus Varuna was observed at maximum apparent surface area, which also corresponds to maximum apparent oblateness for an ellipsoidal shape. Lellouch et al, Astron. Astrophys. 391, 1133-1139 (2002). Stansberry et al., in The Solar System beyond Neptune (eds Barucci, M. A.,Boehnhardt, H., Cruikshank, D. P. & Morbidelli, A.) 161-179 (Univ. Arizona Press, 2008). This work is partially supported by french ANR 08-BLAN-0177 "Beyond Neptune".

  10. Manned Mars mission sunlight and communication occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, Jack

    1986-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the 1999 opposition class mission and a procedure for obtaining singlar occultation data for any other given Mars mission is given. Occultation data for a Mars orbiter in a 24.5 hour parking orbit and a Mars base were calculated for: sunlight occultation - the time in darkness; and radio communication occultation - the communication losses between the lander and the orbiter, the lander and Earth, and orbiter and Earth.

  11. The Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Project at PEARL: Validating Satellite Observations Over the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley A.; Strong, Kimberly; Fogal, Pierre F.; Drummond, James R.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of atmospheric trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. As of February 2016, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for nearly twelve years and Canada's Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite has been operating for fourteen years. As ACE and OSIRIS operations have extended beyond their planned two-year missions, there is an ongoing need to validate the trace gas data profiles from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) and OSIRIS. In particular, validation comparisons are needed during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, thirteen Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2016) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80N, 86W). For the past decade, these campaigns have been undertaken in collaboration with the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The spring period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two CANDAC zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer

  12. Testing for Occult Heartworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stogdale, L.

    1984-01-01

    Heartworm infection in dogs is endemic in southern Ontario but occurs only sporadically throughout the remainder of Canada. The disease may either be associated with microfilariae in the patient's blood, a patent infection, or it may be occult. This paper describes a case of occult dirofilariasis in a dog, with emphasis on the diagnosis. A patent infection could be missed if the clinician tests an insufficient amount of blood. He should perform multiple concentration tests using either the modified Knott's technique or a filtration method. Occult infections occur in prepatent or unisexual infections, when the worms become sterile following therapy, or when the host produces antibodies that result in the destruction of the microfilariae. The recent release of a kit which detects the presence of antibodies to the adult heartworms now enables veterinarians to make an accurate diagnosis in the vast majority of dogs. PMID:17422386

  13. Occult Participation: Its Impact on Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant-Clark, Cynthia M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated relationship between occult participation, substance abuse, and level of self-esteem among 25 clinical (alcohol or drug treatment) and 25 nonclinical adolescents. Results indicated that adolescent substance abuse and occult participation were significantly related. Found significant differences between high versus low occult groups…

  14. Predicted occultations by Uranus - 1981-1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemola, A. R.; Mink, D. J.; Elliot, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Predictions are presented for 11 occultations by and appulses to Uranus and its ring system for ten stars from 1981 through 1984. The brightest stars are occulted on April 26, 1981 (BD - 19 deg 4222) and on April 22, 1982 (Hyd - 20 deg 51699). The ring system occults the same star twice during March 1983 (Hyd - 21 deg 64352).

  15. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Jenke, P.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. New sources are added to our catalog as they become active or upon request. In addition to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results will be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation.

  16. Development and Performance of the PHOT (Portable High-Speed Occultation Telescope) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. F.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Buie, M. W.; Shoemaker, K.; French, R. G.; Regester, J.

    2011-06-01

    The PHOT (Portable High-Speed Occultation Telescope) systems were developed for the specific purpose of observing stellar occultations by solar system objects. Stellar occultations have unique observing constraints: they may only be observable from certain parts of the globe; they often require a rapid observing cadence; and they require accurate time-stamp information for each exposure. The PHOT systems consist of 14 inch telescopes, CCD cameras, camera mounting plates, GPS-based time standards, and data acquisition computers. The PHOT systems are similar in principle to the POETS systems (Portable Occultation, Eclipse, and Transit Systems), with the main differences being (1) different CCD cameras with slightly different specifications and (2) a standalone custom-built time standard used by PHOT, whereas POETS uses a commercial time standard that is controlled from a computer. Since 2005, PHOT systems have been deployed on over two-dozen occasions to sites in the US, Mexico, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, France, Austria, Switzerland, Australia, and New Zealand, mounted on portable 14 inch telescopes or on larger stationary telescopes. Occultation light curves acquired from the 3.9 m AAT (Anglo-Australian Telescope) have produced photometric signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of 333 per scale height for a stellar occultation by Pluto. In this article we describe the seven PHOT subsystems in detail (telescopes, cameras, timers, and data stations) and present S/N estimates for actual and predicted occultations as functions of star brightness, telescope aperture, and frame rate.

  17. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program ; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX

  18. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program?; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX?

  19. Ozone Measurements from the Canadian Arctic Validation of ACE Campaign: 2004 and 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. A.; Strong, K.; Berman, R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Drummond, J. R.; Fast, H.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Harwood, M.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Loewen, P.; Macquarrie, K.; McElroy, C. T.; Midwinter, C.; Mittermeier, R.; Skelton, R.; Strawbridge, K.; Sung, K.; Walker, J.; Wu, H.

    2005-12-01

    Two springtime validation campaigns have been conducted in the Canadian Arctic to provide correlative measurements for validating results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission. The satellite has two instruments on-board: a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and a dual UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometer called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation). The validation campaigns took place at Environment Canada's Arctic Stratospheric Ozone (AStrO) Observatory in Eureka, Nunavut (80 N, 86 W) between February and April in both 2004 and 2005. Seven ground-based instruments were operated during the 2004 campaign: a ground-based adaptation of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a ground-based version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, a zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometer, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer, a Differential Absorption Lidar and a Brewer spectrophotometer. For the 2005 campaign, a Systeme d'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) instrument and a second Brewer were added to the instrument complement. Also, balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde sensors were flown frequently during both campaigns. This paper will focus on comparisons of ozone measurements made by the ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite-borne instruments during the two ACE Arctic Validation campaigns. Comparisons of both retrieved columns and profiles will be presented. Also, the results from the 2004 and 2005 campaigns will be intercompared to highlight the differences between the two years.

  20. Long-Term Trends in the Concentrations of SF6, CHClF2, and COF2 in the Lower Stratosphere from Analysis of High-Resolution Infrared Solar Occultation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Sze, N. D.; Massie, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term trends in the concentrations of SF6, CHClF2 (CFC-22), and COF2 in the lower stratosphere have been derived from analysis of ca. 1980 and more recent infrared solar occultation spectra recorded near 32 deg N latitude at approx. 0.02/ cm resolution. Consistent sets of line parameters and spectral calibration methods have been used in the retrievals to minimize systematic error effects. Quoted error limits are 1 sigma estimated precisions. The SF6 and CHClF2 results are based on spectra recorded by balloon-borne interferometers in March 1981 and June 1988 and a comparison of these results with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Experiment/Spacelab 3 measurements obtained in May 1985 near 30 deg N latitude. In the 13-18 km altitude range the mean measured SF6 mixing ratio in parts per trillion by volume (pptv) increased from 1.17 +/- 0.21 in March 1981 to 2.02 +/- 0.20 pptv in June 1988, and the CHClF2 mixing ratio below 15 km altitude increased from 51 +/- 8 pptv in March 1981 to 102 +/- 10 pptv in June 1988. The CHClF2 retrievals used new empirical CHClF2 line parameters derived from 0.03/cm resolution laboratory spectra recorded at six temperatures between 203 and 293 K; the derived mixing ratios are approx. 30% higher than obtained with earlier sets of line parameters, thereby removing a large discrepancy noted previously between IR and in situ measurements of CHClF2. Assuming an exponential growth model for fitting the trends, SF6 and CHClF2 mean increase rates of 7.4% +/- 1.9% and 9.4% +/- 1.3% /year, are obtained, respectively, which correspond to cumulative increases by factors of approx. 1.7 and -2.0 in the concentrations of these gases over the 7.2-year measurement period. Analysis of spectra recorded in October 1979 and April 1989 yields COF2 volume mixing ratios that are respectively 0.44 +/- 0.17 and 1.21 +/- 0.24 times the ATMOS/Spacelab 3 values, from which an average COF2 increase rate of 10.3 +/- 1.8%/ year over this time

  1. New Occultation Systems and the 2005 July 11 Charon Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L. A.; French, R. G.; Gregory, B.; Olkin, C. B.; Ruhland, C.; Shoemaker, K.; Young, E. F.

    2005-08-01

    Charon's density is an important input to models of its formation and internal structure. Estimates range from 1.59 to 1.83 g/cm3 (Olkin et al. 2003. Icarus 164, 254), with Charon's radius as the main source of uncertainty. Reported values of Charon's radius from mutual events range from 593±13 (Buie et al. 1992, Icarus 97, 211) to 621±21 km (Young & Binzel 1994, Icarus 108), while an occultation observed from a single site gives a lower limit on the radius of 601.5 km (Walker 1980 MNRAS 192, 47; Elliot & Young 1991, Icarus 89, 244). On 2005 July 11 UT (following this abstract submission date), Charon is predicted to occult the star C313.2. If successful, this event will be the first Charon occultation observed since 1980, and the first giving multiple chords across Charon's disk. This event is expected to measure Charon's radius to 1 km. Our team is observing from three telescopes in Chile, the 4.0-m Blanco and the 0.9-m telescopes at Cerro Tololo and the 4.2-m SOAR telescope at Cerro Pachon. At SOAR, we will be using the camera from our new PHOT systems (Portable High-speed Occultation Telescopes). The PHOT camera is a Princeton Instrument MicroMAX:512BFT from Roper Scientific, a 512×512 frame-transfer CCD with a readnoise of only 3 electrons at the 100 kHz digitization rate. The camera's exposures are triggered by a custom built, compact, stand-alone GPS-based pulse-train generator. A PHOT camera and pulse-train generator were used to observe the occultation of 2MASS 1275723153 by Pluto on 2005 June 15 UT from Sommers-Bausch Observatory in Boulder Colorado; preliminary analysis shows this was at best a grazing occultation from this site and a successful engineering run for the July 11 Charon occultation. The work was supported, in part, by NSF AST-0321338 (EFY) and NASA NNG-05GF05G (LAY).

  2. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  3. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  4. Screening for occult lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, T. H.; MacIntosh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot screening program for the early detection of lung cancer was carried out in Saskatchewan in 1968 using chest roentgenography and cytologic examination of sputum samples. The yield from 23 000 men aged 40 years and over was only 10 cases. Nine of the men had advanced disease. One had occult lung cancer. A period of 31 months elapsed between the discovery of malignant cells in this patient's sputum and roentgenographic localization of the tumour. Following pneumonectomy he has survived with no discernible residual or metastatic tumour for 12 years. The morphologic changes in the resected lung provided a basis for discussing the preclinical phase of squamous cancer of the lung, the treatment of occult cancer and multicentric primary pulmonary tumours. The survey would have been more successful with a narrower target group and more frequent examination. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6299495

  5. Triton stellar occultation candidates - 1992-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A search for Triton stellar occultation candidates for the period 1992-1994 has been completed with CCD strip-scanning observations. The search reached an R magnitude of about 17.4 and found 129 candidates within 1.5 arcsec of Triton's ephemeris during this period. Of these events, around 30 occultations are expected to be visible from the earth, indicating that a number of Triton occultation events should be visible from major observatories. Even the faintest of the present candidate events could produce useful occultation data if observed with a large enough telescope. The present astrometric accuracy is inadequate to identify which of these appulse events will produce occultations on the earth; further astrometry is needed to refine the predictions for positive occultation identification. To aid in selecting candidates for additional astrometric and photometric studies, finder charts and earth-based visibility charts for each event are included.

  6. General relativistic observables for the ACES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Yu, Nan; Toth, Viktor T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a high-precision model for relativistic observables of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). We develop all relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of ACES in Earth orbit and to compute observable quantities. We analyze the accuracy of the required model as it applies to the proper-to-coordinate time transformations, light-time equation, and spacecraft equations of motion. We consider various sources of nongravitational noise and their effects on ACES. We estimate the accuracy of orbit reconstruction that is needed to satisfy the ACES science objectives. Based on our analysis, we derive models for the relativistic observables of ACES, which also account for the contribution of atmospheric drag on the clock rate. We include the Earth's oblateness coefficient J2 and the effects of major nongravitational forces on the orbit of the ISS. We demonstrate that the ACES reference frame is pseudoinertial at the level of accuracy required by the experiment. We construct a Doppler-canceled science observable representing the gravitational redshift. We derive accuracy requirements for ISS navigation. The improved model is accurate up to <1 ps and ˜4 ×1 0-17 for time and frequency transfers, correspondingly. These limits are determined by the higher-order harmonics in Earth's gravitational potential.

  7. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  8. Revisiting the 1988 Pluto Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Amanda S.; Dunham, Edward W.; Young, Leslie A.; Slivan, Steve; Barba née Cordella, Linda L.; Millis, Robert L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Nye, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    In 1988, Pluto's atmosphere was surmised to exist because of the surface ices that had been detected through spectroscopy, but it had not yet been directly detected in a definitive manner. The key to making such a detection was the stellar occultation method, used so successfully for the discovery of the Uranian rings in 1977 (Elliot et al. 1989; Millis et al. 1993) and before that for studies of the atmospheres of other planets.On 9 June 1988, Pluto occulted a star, with its shadow falling over the South Pacific Ocean region. One team of observers recorded this event from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, while other teams captured the event from various locations in Australia and New Zealand. Preceding this event, extensive astrometric observations of Pluto and the star were collected in order to refine the prediction.We will recount the investigations that led up to this important Pluto occultation, discuss the unexpected atmospheric results, and compare the 1988 event to the recent 2015 event whose shadow followed a similar track through New Zealand and Australia.

  9. Cassini UVIS Results from Occultations of Stars by Saturn's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Hendrix, A.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed occultations of stars by Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and Iapetus. Stellar occultations are a sensitive probe for gases and have been extremely valuable for understanding the composition (predominantly water), flux and structure of Enceladus’ plume [1, 2]. More recently we have been looking for trace gases in the plume such as ethylene and methanol. A much-anticipated solar occultation will be observed next year to quantify the existence and amount of N2. At Tethys and Iapetus upper limits are set for the column densities of local volatiles (water, O2, CO2, and CO), all of which have absorption features at far ultraviolet wavelengths. The Rhea occultation data, in addition to setting upper limits on surrounding gases, have been analyzed to look for the presence of the debris disk reported by Cassini's MIMI instrument [3]. No material was detected with 2 sigma certainty, however the low optical depth of the material suggests that the probability of its detection by UVIS is < 1 in 1000. An occultation of epsilon Canis Majoris by Dione will take place in September 2009. Results of that occultation will be presented. This work was partially supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). [2] Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456 (2008). [3] Jones, G. H. et al., Science 319:1380 (2008).

  10. Scaling Relation for Occulter Manufacturing Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    An external occulter is a spacecraft own along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. The shape of an external occulter must be specially designed to optimally suppress starlight and deviations from the ideal shape due to manufacturing errors can result loss of suppression in the shadow. Due to the long separation distances and large dimensions involved for a space occulter, laboratory testing is conducted with scaled versions of occulters etched on silicon wafers. Using numerical simulations for a flight Fresnel occulter design, we show how the suppression performance of an occulter mask scales with the available propagation distance for expected random manufacturing defects along the edge of the occulter petal. We derive an analytical model for predicting performance due to such manufacturing defects across the petal edges of an occulter mask and compare this with the numerical simulations. We discuss the scaling of an extended occulter test-bed.

  11. Regional Aerosol Optical Depth Characteristics from Satellite Observations: ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K. E.; Smith, P. J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tomasi, C.; Vitale, V.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the aerosol properties during 3 recent international field campaigns ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 are described using satellite retrievals from NOAA AVHRR data. Validation of the satellite retrieval procedure is performed with airborne, shipboard, and land-based sunphotometry during ACE-2. The intercomparison between satellite and surface optical depths has a correlation coefficient of 0.93 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.92 for 860 nm wavelength, The standard error of estimate is 0.025 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.023 for 860 nm wavelength. Regional aerosol properties are examined in composite analysis of aerosol optical properties from the ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 regions. ACE-1 and ACE-2 regions have strong modes in the distribution of optical depth around 0.1, but the ACE-2 tails toward higher values yielding an average of 0.16 consistent with pollution and dust aerosol intrusions. The TARFOX region has a noticeable mode of 0.2, but has significant spread of aerosol optical depth values consistent with the varied continental aerosol constituents off the eastern North American Coast.

  12. Occultation Predictions Using CCD Strip-Scanning Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Ford, C. H.; Stone, R. P. S.; McDonald, S. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Elliot, J. L.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We are developing the method of CCD strip-scanning astrometry for the purpose of deriving reliable advance predictions for occultations involving small objects in the outer solar system. We are using a camera system based on a Ford/Loral 2Kx2K CCD with the Crossley telescope at Lick Observatory for this work. The columns of die CCD are aligned East-West, the telescope drive is stopped, and the CCD is clocked at the same rate that the stars drift across it. In this way we obtain arbitrary length strip images 20 arcmin wide with 0.58" pixels. Since planets move mainly in RA, it is possible to obtain images of the planet and star to be occulted on the same strip well before the occultation occurs. The strip-to-strip precision (i.e. reproducibility) of positions is limited by atmospheric image motion to about 0.1" rms per strip. However, for objects that are nearby in R.A., the image motion is highly correlated and their relative positions are good to 0.02" rms per strip. We will show that the effects of atmospheric image motion on a given strip can be removed if a sufficient number of strips of a given area have been obtained. Thus, it is possible to reach an rms precision of 0.02" per strip, corresponding to about 0.3 of Pluto or Triton's angular radius. The ultimate accuracy of a prediction based on strip-scanning astrometry is currently limited by the accuracy of the positions of the stars in the astrometric network used and by systematic errors most likely due to the optical system. We will show the results of . the prediction of some recent occultations as examples of the current capabilities and limitations of this technique.

  13. Asteroid Occultations V14.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Herald, D.; Frappa, E.; Hayamizu, T.; Talbot, J.; Timerson, B.

    2016-06-01

    This data set is intended to include all reported timings of observed asteroid, planet, and planetary satellite occultation events as well as occultation axes derived from those timings by David W. Dunham and David Herald. This version is complete through the end of 2015.

  14. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study. PMID:26661930

  15. A search for stellar occultations by Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and their satellites: 1990-1999. Final Report, 1 Jan. 1989 - 31 Dec. 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    A search for occultations of stars by Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto between 1990 and 1999 was carried out by combining ephemeris information and star positions using very accurate occultation modeling software. Stars from both the Space Telescope Guide Catalog and photographic plates taken by Arnold Klemola at Lick Observatory were compared with planet positions from the JPL DE-130 ephemeris, with local modifications for Pluto and Charon. Some 666 possible occultations by the Uranian ring, 143 possible occultations by Neptune, and 40 possible occultations by Pluto and/or Charon were found among stars with visual magnitudes as faint as 16. Before the star positions could be obtained, the occultation prediction software was used to aid many observers in observing the occultation of 28 Sagitarii by Saturn in July 1989. As a test on other outer solar system objects, 17 possible occultations were found in a search of the Guide Star Catalog for occultations by 2060 Chiron, and interesting object between Saturn and Uranus which shows both cometary and asteroidal properties.

  16. Thermal design, analysis and testing of the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Richard A.; Smith, Dewey M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and describes the thermal requirements in some detail. The thermal design of the HALOE is described, together with the design process and the analytical techniques used to arrive at this design. The flight hardware has undergone environmental testing in a thermal vacuum chamber to validate the thermal design. The HALOE is a unique problem in thermal control due to its variable solar loading, its extremely sensitive optical components and the high degree of pointing accuracy required. This paper describes the flight hardware, the design process and its verification.

  17. Seeing effects on occultation curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of seeing effects on the light curve of a stellar occultation by the moon. Some theoretical studies of Fried (1966) and Hulett (1967) on the linear size of the downward-looking seeing disk are cited, showing that the seeing blur amounts to a few centimeters for a star in the zenith and that the linear blur must grow approximately as (sec z) to the 3/2 power. For most observations the seeing blur will not exceed 8 to 10 cm. The limitation on angular resolution imposed by this seeing effect is calculated.

  18. Results from the SolACES instrument onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Eparvier, Francis; Brunner, Raimund; Woods, Thomas; Jacobi, Christoph; Thuillier, Gerard; Nikutowski, Bernd; Erhardt, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The SolACES instrument has to be seen in the context of more than 50 years of intensive research in EUV spectroscopy in space with solar, terrestrial and planetary airglow and auroral emissions included. The results from four years of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) recordings performed by SolACES will be presented. The first part will cover the instrumental performance with respect to the primary capability of frequent in-orbit re-calibration in the ISS environment. Among the advantages of the measuring system there are multiple instrumental possibilities to cross-check the results providing a high degree of reliability to the spectral irradiance derived. The results from an inter-comparison of the global TEC variability with modelled global TEC using TIMED/SEE and SolACES EUV data and modelled global TEC using F10.7 data will be presented beyond the last solar minimum. The correlation of global TEC data with models using EUV data is higher than the correlation of global TEC with models using F10.7. Deviations of the modelled global TEC data from the modelled ones with SSI EUV data are pointing to geomagnetic disturbances e.g. as caused by solar wind and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Similar to the short-term recordings exhibiting different temporal intensity changes in phase and amplitude with wavelength also the long-term SSI data show temporal shifts with wavelength during the extended solar minimum 2008-2009. Data from the ISS SOLAR instruments SOLSPEC and SolACES are suggesting that each solar emission reaches its own solar minimum. Finally a proposal will be explained to develop SSI indices from the data acquired so far. For the spectral region from 121-400 nm the reconstruction of SSI indices could be performed using the Mg II index and neutron-monitor measurements. The data available from the latest and still on-going space missions could provide the data sets to cover the wavelength range shorter than 121 nm. The path of the data analysis and the results

  19. Oh Glorious Geometry: Eclipses, Transits, and Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical objects are like a grand clockwork in the sky; they follow steady patterns in time. However, these bright objects we see are not just points of light but have finite dimensions and thus can get in each other's way. As a result, some stars puzzle us by brightening or dimming, or the Sun can frighten us by going out unexpectedly when something else blocks its light. There is nothing unusual about these eclipses, occultations, or transits—they are demonstrations of simple physics—and we take some for granted, like the rotation of Earth moving us into darkness each night. The periodic dimming of a bright star worried mankind for millennia and helped give astronomy a shove. And unexpected events, like a solar or lunar eclipse, can inspire awe and change the course of history. Now that we can observe through telescopes and travel by proxy throughout the solar system, we find the universe is rife with shadow and light shows. Those taking place within our solar system have been useful to astronomy (like the recent transits of Venus or the ever-present eclipses of the Jovian satellites), and were of considerable popular interest, allowing us to think beyond the confines of Earth. Now we detect distant exoplanets transiting their parent stars, announcing the presence of other solar systems in our corner of the Galaxy and changing the discussion about life elsewhere in the universe from mere speculation to plausible possibility. Distant galaxies can make visible ever-further galaxies by forming Einstein rings, allowing us to see behind them and make the structure of the universe more evident. This paper will discuss these phenomena, from those visible easily on Earth to those that can now be seen for the first time from probes in space. We will also discuss how this has expanded popular knowledge of the universe we live in. This paper is illustrated by a number of examples ranging from eclipses and transits throughout the solar system and the nearby stars to

  20. Signatures of interchange reconnection: STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Rouillard, A. P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Démoulin, P.; Harra, L. K.; Lavraud, B.; Davies, J. A.; Opitz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Galvin, A. B.

    2009-10-01

    Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) on 17 October 2007 from an active region (AR) inside a coronal hole (CH) into the heliosphere. This particular combination of "open" and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with "open" magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an "anemone" structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of interchange reconnection between closed loops of the CME originating from the AR and "open" field lines of the surrounding CH.

  1. TIME-GCM simulations of lower-thermospheric nitric oxide seen by the halogen occultation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Daniel; Roble, Ray

    2002-05-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) experiment, on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of nitric oxide (NO) up to an altitude of 130km. The influence of dynamics on both seasonal and diurnal time-scales is clearly seen in these observations. This study presents three-dimensional simulations of NO in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamic General Circulation Model. The effects of both the residual circulation and atmospheric tides are modeled, and compare well with HALOE observations. The results confirm that the sunrise/sunset asymmetries in HALOE data are predominantly the result of tidal vertical motions.

  2. Occult cocaine exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, N M; Meert, K L; Knazik, S R; Yee, H; Kauffman, R E

    1991-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of cocaine and cannabinoid exposure among young children presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department without signs or symptoms suggestive of the exposure. The study included 460 children between 1 and 60 months of age in whom urinalysis was required for investigation of routine pediatric complaints. Anonymously and without informed consent, an aliquot of urine was screened for cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) and 11- or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid with the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique. Positive specimens were rescreened with a radioimmunoassay and confirmed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, if a sufficient quantity of urine was available. Benzoylecgonine was identified in 25 patients (5.4%) by both screening techniques. Enough urine was available for confirmatory testing in eight patients, and all eight urine specimens contained benzoylecgonine. Neither 11- nor delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid was detected in any patient. We documented the magnitude of the problem of occult passive cocaine exposure in young children living in an urban environment. Such exposure has serious implications for the assessment of outcomes in postnatal follow-up studies of prenatally exposed children as well as potential risks to children living in household environments where occult cocaine exposure occurs. PMID:1669673

  3. Remarks on KERMA Factors in ACE files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, C.; Ochiai, K.; Takakura, K.; Sato, S.

    2014-04-01

    Some neutron KERMA factors in ACE files are negative and extremely large if nuclear data libraries do not keep energy-balance. The status of neutron KERMA factors in the official ACE file of ENDF/B-VII.1 is examined. As a result, it is found out that neutron KERMA factors of nuclei more than 200 in ENDF/B-VII.1 have some problems. Effects of the inadequate KERMA factor are also investigated, which are large for neutron heat while those are small for total (neutron + gamma) heat. Users who use only neutron KERMA factors should check if the factors are adequate or not before they use the factors.

  4. In situ Observations of CIRs on STEREO, Wind, and ACE During 2007 - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, G. M.; Desai, M. I.; Mall, U.; Korth, A.; Bucik, R.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Simunac, K. D.

    2009-05-01

    During the 2007 and 2008 solar minimum period, STEREO, Wind, and ACE observed numerous Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) over spatial separations that began with all the spacecraft close to Earth, through STEREO separation angles of ˜ 80 degrees in the fall of 2008. Over 35 CIR events were of sufficient intensity to allow measurement of He and heavy ion spectra using the IMPACT/SIT, EPACT/STEP and ACE/ULEIS instruments on STEREO, Wind, and ACE, respectively. In addition to differences between the spacecraft expected on the basis of simple corotation, we observed several events where there were markedly different time-intensity profiles from one spacecraft to the next. By comparing the energetic particle intensities and spectral shapes along with solar wind speed we examine the extent to which these differences are due to temporal evolution of the CIR or due to variations in connection to a relatively stable interaction region. Comparing CIRs in the 1996 - 1997 solar minimum period vs. 2007 - 2008, we find that the 2007 - 2008 period had many more CIRs, reflecting the presence of more high-speed solar wind streams, whereas 1997 had almost no CIR activity.

  5. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Three heliophysics missions -- the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Global Geoscience WIND -- have been orbiting the Sun-Earth interior libration point L1 continuously since 1997, 1996, and 2004, respectively. ACE and WIND (both NASA missions) and SOHO (an ESA-NASA joint mission) are all operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). While ACE and SOHO have been dedicated libration point orbiters since their launches, WIND has had also a remarkable 10-year career flying a deep-space, multiple lunar-flyby trajectory prior to 2004. That era featured 36 targeted lunar flybys with excursions to both L1 and L2 before its final insertion in L1 orbit. A figure depicts the orbits of the three spacecraft, showing projections of the orbits onto the orthographic planes of a solar rotating ecliptic frame of reference. The SOHO orbit is a quasi-periodic halo orbit, where the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are practically equal. Such an orbit is seen to repeat itself with a period of approximately 178 days. For ACE and WIND, the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are unequal, giving rise to the characteristic Lissajous motion. ACE's orbit is of moderately small amplitude, whereas WIND's orbit is a large-amplitude Lissajous of dimensions close to those of the SOHO halo orbit. As motion about the collinear points is inherently unstable, stationkeeping maneuvers are necessary to prevent orbital decay and eventual escape from the L1 region. Though the three spacecraft are dissimilar (SOHO is a 3-axis stabilized Sun pointer, WIND is a spin-stabilized ecliptic pole pointer, and ACE is also spin-stabilized with its spin axis maintained between 4 and 20 degrees of the Sun), the stationkeeping technique for the three is fundamentally the same. The technique consists of correcting the energy of the orbit via a delta-V directed parallel or anti-parallel to the Spacecraft-to-Sun line. SOHO

  6. Transits and Occultations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Korey

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy has rapidly progressed from the first discovery of an extrasolar planet less than two decades ago to today's age of abundant exoplanet characterization observations. However, interpretation of these observations remains challenging. Resolved spectra of exoplanets, particularly in the infrared, where strong features due to H2O, CO, CO2, and CH4 are expected, could break model degeneracies and answer many questions about C/O ratios and pressure-temperature atmospheric structures. While not the first, Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope is the only current space-based opportunity to study spectrally resolved exoplanet atmospheres in the infrared. We focus on hot Jupiter type exoplanets, and use WFC3 (as well as ancillary data from Spitzer and ground based facilities) to try to break degeneracies between models, resolve past observing conflicts, and determine these planets' atmospheric composition and structure. I report spectroscopic analysis of the transit of WASP-17 b, the occultation of WASP-4 b and WASP-33 b, and both the transit and occultation of WASP-12 b and WASP-19 b. I analyze the data for each planet using a strategy similar, in certain aspects, to the techniques used by Berta et al. (2012), but extend their methodology to allow for correction of channel- or wavelength-dependent instrumental effects by utilizing the band-integrated time series and measurements of the drift of the spectrum on the detector over time. For WASP-33 we find evidence for an oxygen rich atmosphere. The final transit spectra for all three objects in the study are consistent with the presence of a broad absorption feature at 1.4 μm most likely due to water. However, the amplitude of the absorption is less than that expected based on previous observations with Spitzer, possibly due to hazes absorbing in the NIR or non-solar compositions. The degeneracy of models with different compositions and temperature structures combined with the low amplitude of

  7. Applying artificial neural network to the short-term prediction of electron density structure using GPS occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhen; Hu, Xiong; Zhang, Xunjie

    2002-05-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) is used for assimilating of GPS ionospheric occulted data in order to take full advantage of the abundant GPS occulted data. A feedforward, full-connected network is chosen based on the back-propagation algorithm. Universal time, latitude, longitude, height, Kp index, and F10.7 solar flux are chosen as the input vectors of the network while the electron density as the output vectors. The GPS occultation data on May 24th, 1996 were taken as training samples to train an ANN, and then the well-trained ANN was used to predict the electron density on 25th. Comparison of the predicted results and observed data demonstrated that ANN is a promising method in assimilating the GPS occulted data to establish the ionospheric weather prediction model. Furthermore, the accurate and abundant observations are essential for ensuring the good performance of ANN.

  8. Early detection of occult atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Keach, Joseph Walker; Bradley, Steven M; Turakhia, Mintu P; Maddox, Thomas M

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common arrhythmia and significantly increases stroke risk. This risk can be mitigated with oral anticoagulation, but AF is often asymptomatic, or occult, preventing timely detection and treatment. Accordingly, occult AF may cause stroke before it is clinically diagnosed. Currently, guidelines for the early detection and treatment of occult AF are limited. This review addresses recent advancements in occult AF detection methods, identification of populations at high risk for occult AF, the treatment of occult AF with oral anticoagulation, as well as ongoing trials that may answer critically important questions regarding occult AF screening. PMID:25935765

  9. Fabrication of Soft-Edged Occulting Masks for Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, M. J.; Raja, S.

    2009-01-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is important for determining the properties of individual planets and to study multi-planet systems. Obtaining spectra of extra-solar planets enables us to constrain the composition of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, their climates, their evolution, and their rotation periods. The Lyot coronagraph is one of the important techniques to acquire these spectra. In its simplest design it consists of a telescope, an occulter mask in the first focal plane, a Lyot stop in the following pupil plane, and the detector in the final focal plane. The goal of ongoing research is to achieve the best possible performance from a Lyot coronagraph. Among the study objects is the occulter mask. We are studying a new manufacturing method to overcome the main problems of occulter masks: undesired chromatic effects and intolerable phase distortions. Our method utilizes substrates covered with highly absorbing dye mixtures (optical density of 1 per micron) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling of the mask profiles into these dyes. By combining several dyes with pre-determined mixing ratios, we are able to control the chromaticity of the mask from decreasing to flat to increasing absorptivity with wavelengths. Phase effects occur in these masks only at the transition from the dye to its surrounding medium. The idea is to control these phase effects by embedding the masks in clear, phase-matching glass. This poster will present the progress we made in finding and characterizing suitable materials and the results of first optical tests of FIB machined mask-like structures in dye-doped PMMA. This work was supported by NASA through grant NNG04GC57G and NSF through grant AST-0750222, through SAO IR&D funding and by Harvard University. Central facilities were provided by Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems.

  10. Renal ACE immunohistochemical localization in NIDDM patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Miyagi, M; Kobayashi, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Aikawa, A; Ohara, T; Hasegawa, A

    1998-02-01

    A role of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy has been suggested. Immunohistochemical localization of ACE was studied in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic nephropathy and 17 healthy kidney transplant donors, with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism also examined in the latter. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that ACE staining was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced in glomeruli and slightly decreased in proximal tubules in diabetic patients. Glomeruli positive for ACE immunostaining were observed in 23.5% of the healthy subjects and in 80% of the diabetic patients. All patients with nodular lesions had ACE-positive glomeruli and showed significantly (P < 0.01) more intense glomerular ACE immunostaining than patients without nodular lesions. Among healthy controls, subjects with the DD genotype had ACE-positive glomeruli more frequently and tended to show slightly increased intensity on proximal tubule ACE immunostaining compared with subjects with other genotypes. These observations suggest that increased ACE localization in glomeruli is likely to be one of the factors in the increased renin-angiotensin system activity in glomeruli in patients with diabetic nephropathy. There is a possibility that ACE gene I/D polymorphism may be related to renal ACE immunohistochemical localization. PMID:9469501

  11. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  12. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  13. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  14. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  15. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. PMID:27542424

  16. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Richard S.

    2007-09-01

    The hard X-ray sky has tremendous potential for future discoveries and is one of the last electromagnetic regimes without a sensitive all-sky survey. A new approach to such a survey is to utilize the Moon as an occulting disk. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept, based on this Lunar Occultation Technique (LOT) and incorporating advanced inorganic scintillators as a detection medium, represents a sensitive and cost effective option for NASA's Beyond Einstein Black Hole Finder Probe or a future Explorer-class mission. We present the motivating factors for the LOT, outline developmental details and simulation results, as well as give preliminary estimates for source detection sensitivity.

  17. The variability of Saturn's thermosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Tommi; Sandel, Bill R.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-11-01

    We present temperature and density profiles that we retrieved from 17 stellar occultations obtained by the Cassini UVIS instrument. These results complement our previous analysis of 15 solar occultations by Saturn’s upper atmosphere. We find that the exospheric temperature ranges from 370 K to 550 K, in agreement with our previous results. The temperature appears to increase with latitude from the equator to the poles by 100 - 150 K, a trend that is also evident in the pressure level altitudes that we derive from the data. We also find evidence for the expansion of the thermosphere by about 500 km between 2005 and 2011 at low to mid northern latitudes. This expansion is probably caused by significant warming of the lower thermosphere that anti-correlates with solar activity. We also present a comparison of our results with the newly available reanalysis of the Voyager UVS results (Vervack and Moses, 2014), and discuss the results in the context of energy deposition and dynamics in Saturn’s upper atmosphere.

  18. Geometry of the Saturn system from the 3 July 1989 occultation of 28 SGR and Voyager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Elliot, J. L.; Matthews, Keith; Perkovic, Olga; Tollestrup, Eric; Harvey, Paul; Chanover, Nancy J.; Clark, Mary Ann; Dunham, Edward W.; Forrest, William; Harrington, Joseph; Pipher, Judith; Brahic, Andre; Grenier, Isabelle; Roques, Francoise; Arndt, Martina

    1993-06-01

    The pole direction and radius scale for the ring system of Saturn are presently determined by combining the July 3, 1989 observations of 28 Sgr's occultation by Saturn with Voyager 1 and 2 photopolarimeter occultation measurements. The computation of ring-orbit models is separately conducted via a sky-plane method and a solar system barycentric vector approach; the results obtained by both methods are in excellent agreement. If Voyager trajectory uncertainties are assumed to be negligible, these observations can be used to determine the precession rate of the pole of Saturn about the solar system's invariable pole.

  19. Reflective Occultation Mask for Evaluation of Occulter Designs for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Lyon, Richard; Shiri, Shahram; Roman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Advanced formation flying occulter designs utilize a large occulter mask flying in formation with an imaging telescope to block and null starlight to allow imaging of faint planets in exosolar systems. A paper describes the utilization of subscale reflective occultation masks to evaluate formation flying occulter designs. The use of a reflective mask allows mounting of the occulter by conventional means and simplifies the test configuration. The innovation alters the test set-up to allow mounting of the mask using standard techniques to eliminate the problems associated with a standard configuration. The modified configuration uses a reflective set-up whereby the star simulator reflects off of a reflective occulting mask and into an evaluation telescope. Since the mask is sized to capture all rays required for the imaging test, it can be mounted directly to a supporting fixture without interfering with the beam. Functionally, the reflective occultation mask reflects light from the star simulator instead of transmitting it, with a highly absorptive carbon nanotube layer simulating the occulter blocking mask. A subscale telescope images the star source and companion dim source that represents a planet. The primary advantage of this is that the occulter can be mounted conventionally instead of using diffractive wires or magnetic levitation.

  20. Sun sensor boresight alignment testing for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. S.; Laney, V. S.; Mauldin, L. E., III

    1987-01-01

    The boresight alignment testing for the sun sensor assembly on the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is described. The sun sensor assembly consists of three sensors that provide feedback signals for controlling dual axes gimbals. Two energy balancing silicon detectors are operated as wideband sensors in the azimuth and elevation axes. The third sensor is a silicon photodiode array operated as a narrow-band sensor in the elevation axis. These sensors are mounted on a common Invar structure which is mounted to the HALOE telescope. A blackbody was used as the stimulating source to perform the initial boresight alignment and this was checked with a heliostat solar look and a direct solar look. These tests are explained with a comparison between each source used.

  1. Probing the Dayside Magnetosphere: Measurements by ACE Soon After Launch, August 25, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, H.; Glines, T.; Farrugia, C. J.; Jordanova, V. K.; Smith, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Spacecraft ACE was launched on Aug. 25, 1997. In this poster we shall examine magnetic field data obtained by this spacecraft as it crossed through the dayside magnetosphere, entered a region around the magnetosphere called the magnetosheath (twice), and eventually crossed a weak bow shock. Then it entered the interplanetary medium characterized by a slow solar wind and a lower-than-usual magnetic field. Another craft called WIND was making measurements inside the solar wind. In this presentation we shall investigate the various regions of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere and magnetosheath encountered by ACE, highlighting their different magnetic properties. Finally we make comparisons between ACE magnetic field data and WIND solar wind data. The work represents the efforts of two New Hampshire high school students who participated in the UNH program Project SMART during the summer of 2004. Project SMART is an E/PO effort run by UNH to bring gifted high school students into the research environment and to motivate them to pursue a scientific career.

  2. McDonald's and the Occult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Barry

    1979-01-01

    Discusses "occult" and "paranormal" literature which is often mistaken for nonfiction. Suggests that most publishers are unwilling to publish scientific perspectives on the paranormal because such writings would be unmarketable. Journal availability: see SO 507 190. (KC)

  3. Triton stellar occultation candidates: 1995-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a search for candidates for stellar occultations by Triton over the years 1995-1999. CCd strip scan images provided star positions in the relevant sky area to a depth of about 17.5 R magnitude. Over this time period, we find that Triton passes within 1.0 arcsec of 75 stars. Appulses with geocentric minimum separations of less than 0.35 arcsec will result in stellar occultations, but further astrometry and photometry is necessary to refine individual predictions for identification of actual occultations. Finder charts are included to aid in further studies and prediction refinement. The two most promising potential occultations, Tr176 and Tr180, occur in 1997.

  4. PICO: Portable Instrument for Capturing Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Matthew; Person, Michael J.; Elliot, J. L.; Souza, Steven P.

    2010-10-01

    We describe a portable imaging photometer for the observation of stellar occultation events by Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and other small bodies. The system is referred to as the Portable Instrument for Capturing Occultations (PICO). It is designed to be transportable to remote observing sites by a single observer. A GPS timing system is used to trigger exposures of a Finger Lakes Instrumentation ML261E-25 camera to facilitate the combination of observational results from multiple sites. The system weighs a total of 11 kg when packed into its single rigid 55.1 × 35.8 × 22.6 cm container, meeting current airline size and weight limits for carry-on baggage. Twelve such systems have been constructed. Nine systems were deployed for observation of a stellar occultation by Kuiper Belt object 55636 in 2009 October. During the same month, one system was used to record a stellar occultation by minor planet 762 Pulcova.

  5. Study of the technique of stellar occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Graves, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Shah, A. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a study of the stellar occultation technique for measuring the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of starlight was monitored during the occultation using the Wisconsin stellar ultraviolet photometers aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-A2). A schematic diagram of an occultation is shown where the change in intensity at a given wavelength is illustrated. The vertical projection of the attenuation region is typically 60 km deep for molecular oxygen and 30 km deep for ozone. Intensity profiles obtained during various occultations were analyzed by first determining the tangential columm density of the absorbing gases, and then Abel inverting the column densities to obtain the number density profile. Errors are associated with each step in the inversion scheme and have been considered as an integral part of this study.

  6. Scaling Relation for Occulter Manufacturing Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For directly imaging exoplanets, NASA is considering space mission designs that use an external occulter as the principal starlight suppression system. These occulter designs range in diameter from 16 to 40 meters and separation distance from 8,000 to 60,000 kilometers for telescopes with primary diameters of 0.5 to 4 meters. Occulter shapes are solutions to an optimization problem which seeks to maximize suppression in the shadow subject to constraints such as size, separation, and wavelengths. These designs are based on scalar diffraction theory and must be verified experimentally to demonstrate predicted on-orbit performance. Due to the large sizes and separations involved the experiment must be scaled to lab size. We are currently expanding the existing experimental test-bed at Princeton to enable scaling of occulters operating at flight Fresnel sizes. Here we examine the effect on suppression performance of edge defects and their scaling to test-bed size.

  7. Cassini SOI Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Thomson, F.; McGhee, C.; Asmar, S.; Johnston, D.

    2004-11-01

    On July 1, 2005 at 01:12 SCET-UTC, Cassini started the engine burn required to insert the spacecraft into orbit around Saturn (SOI). Almost 30 minutes later, Cassini was occulted by Saturn's rings as seen from the Earth. The geometric ring occultation covered all main ring features, starting at the outer edge of Ring A at 01:42 and ending at the inner edge of Ring C at 02:40. From 01:12 to 03:07, Cassini X-band radio signal (3.6 cm-wavelength) was turned on, primarily to monitor the burn. The sinusoidal transmitted signal was referenced to the on board ultrastable oscillator, allowing measurement of the signal amplitude and phase at the 70-m ground receiving station of the Deep Space Network at Canberra, Australia. As a useful by-product, a complete ring occultation observation, including free-space baseline, was achieved. Because of the special orientation of the spacecraft during the burn, the Cassini low-gain antenna was used to transmit the signal. Nominal radio occultations are conducted using the high-gain antenna, hence have intrinsic free-space signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) higher by a factor of 10,000 than the SOI occultation. Nonetheless, clearly detectable signal was observed during occultation by features in Rings A, Cassini Division, and Ring C, but not Ring B. The measurements, after reconstruction to remove diffraction effects, may be used to obtain an optical-depth and phase-shift profiles of resolved ring features. Achievable radial resolution primarily depends on the ring-opening-angle B, available free-space SNR, and occultation geometry. We compare radial resolution achievable for the Cassini SOI occultation (B = 24.7 deg, SNR = 10 dB-Hz) with those of the Voyager ring occultation (B = 5.9 deg, SNR = 50 dB-Hz), and contrast the results with those expected from nominal radio occultations during the Cassini tour. Example optical depth profiles from the Cassini SOI occultation are presented.

  8. Evaluation for Occult Fractures in Injured Children

    PubMed Central

    French, Benjamin; Song, Lihai; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine variation across US hospitals in evaluation for occult fractures in (1) children <2 years old diagnosed with physical abuse and (2) infants <1 year old with injuries associated with a high likelihood of abuse and to identify factors associated with such variation. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study in children <2 years old with a diagnosis of physical abuse and in infants <1 year old with non-motor vehicle crash–related traumatic brain injury or femur fractures discharged from 366 hospitals in the Premier database from 2009 to 2013. We examined across-hospital variation and identified child- and hospital-level factors associated with evaluation for occult fractures. RESULTS: Evaluations for occult fractures were performed in 48% of the 2502 children with an abuse diagnosis, in 51% of the 1574 infants with traumatic brain injury, and in 53% of the 859 infants with femur fractures. Hospitals varied substantially with regard to their rates of evaluation for occult fractures in all 3 groups. Occult fracture evaluations were more likely to be performed at teaching hospitals than at nonteaching hospitals (all P < .001). The hospital-level annual volume of young, injured children was associated with the probability of occult fracture evaluation, such that hospitals treating more young, injured patients were more likely to evaluate for occult fractures (all P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variation in evaluation for occult fractures among young children with a diagnosis of abuse or injuries associated with a high likelihood of abuse highlights opportunities for quality improvement in this vulnerable population. PMID:26169425

  9. Radio occultation measurements of the lunar ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Maccaferri, G.; Cassaro, P.

    Radio occultation measurements by using interplanetary probes is a well known technique to obtain information on planetary atmospheres. To further understand the morphology of the lunar ionosphere we performed radio occultation experiments by using the radio sounding technique. This method mainly consists in the analisys of the effects produced on the radio wave transmitted from the spacecraft to the Earth when it crosses the atmosphere. The wave amplitude and phase undergo modifications that are correlated to the physical parameters - i.e. electron density - of the crossed medium. The first data set was obtained during the lunar occultations of the European probe SMART-1 shortly before impacting the lunar soil on September 3rd, 2006. During this experiment several radio occultation measurements of the signal transmitted by the spacecraft were performed in S and X band by using the 32 meters radiotelescopes (at Medicina and Noto) of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica. Further experiments were performed during lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus. On May 22nd and June 18th 2007 the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, and the Venus Express spacecraft, orbiting Venus, respectively were occulted by the Moon. The variation of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by our instruments (˜ 1013 el/m2) on this occasion is in agreement with values of the electron number density acquired by in situ measuments of the US Apollo missions and the USSR Luna 19 and 22 probes.

  10. Method of Modeling and Simulation of Shaped External Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Clampin, Mark (Inventor); Petrone, Peter, III (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to modeling an external occulter including: providing at least one processor executing program code to implement a simulation system, the program code including: providing an external occulter having a plurality of petals, the occulter being coupled to a telescope; and propagating light from the occulter to a telescope aperture of the telescope by scalar Fresnel propagation, by: obtaining an incident field strength at a predetermined wavelength at an occulter surface; obtaining a field propagation from the occulter to the telescope aperture using a Fresnel integral; modeling a celestial object at differing field angles by shifting a location of a shadow cast by the occulter on the telescope aperture; calculating an intensity of the occulter shadow on the telescope aperture; and applying a telescope aperture mask to a field of the occulter shadow, and propagating the light to a focal plane of the telescope via FFT techniques.

  11. Progress on an external occulter testbed at flight Fresnel numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunjong; Sirbu, Dan; Galvin, Michael; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    An external occulter is a spacecraft flown along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Laboratory verification of occulter designs is necessary to validate the optical models used to design and predict occulter performance. At Princeton, we have designed and built a testbed that allows verification of scaled occulter designs whose suppressed shadow is mathematically identical to that of space occulters. The occulter testbed uses 78 m optical propagation distance to realize the flight Fresnel numbers. We will use an etched silicon mask as the occulter. The occulter is illuminated by a diverging laser beam to reduce the aberrations from the optics before the occulter. Here, we present first light result of a sample design operating at a flight Fresnel number and the mechanical design of the testbed. We compare the experimental results with simulations that predict the ultimate contrast performance.

  12. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-05-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground

  13. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% for ozone and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.3 NO2. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground-based ozone total

  14. The ionospheres of Ganymede and Callisto from Galileo radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Anabtawi, A.; Nagy, A. F.; Galileo Radio Propagation Science Team

    2001-11-01

    The U.S. Galileo spacecraft, which has been in orbit around Jupiter since December, 1995, has provided opportunities to collect s-band radio occultation data using the 70 meter antennas of the NASA/JPL Deep Space Net(DSN) at Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia. Ganymede (J3) has been observed five times by Galileo radio occultation. The results are almost entirely negative, with only one measurement out of ten yielding a possible observation of an ionosphere having a maximum density of about 5,000 cm-3 at an altitude of about 16 km. The failure to observe an ionosphere on Ganymede is at first glance surprising, in view of the detection of oxygen and hydrogen above its surface (c.f., Hall, et al., Astrophys. J., 499, 1998; Barth, et al., GRL, 24, 1997), and it was thought to be due to the shielding effect of Ganymede's magnetic field upon the impinging particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. Callisto has occulted Galileo four times, and these observations have produced some interesting results. Of the eight individual measurements , two are negative, and six are positive. Two of those six show unmistakable classic ionospheric layers, having peak electron densities of 15,000 to 20,000 cm-3 . A closer examination of all of these results has revealed a plausible reason for why some observations yield positive results , and some do not. It appears that in order for an ionosphere to be observed, the trailing hemisphere of the satellite must be in sunlight. In that way, the atmosphere created by sputtering effects of the Jovian magnetosphere can be ionized by solar EUV to produce an observable ionosphere. The research described in this paper has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Michigan with support from NASA contracts and grants.

  15. ACES-PHARAO : Microwave link data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynadier, F.; Delva, P.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Laurent, P.; Wolf, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Atomic Clocks Ensemble in Space (PHARAO-ACES mission, te{Salomon2007}), which will be installed on board the International Space Station , uses a dedicated two-way microwave link in order to compare the timescale generated on board with those provided by many ground stations disseminated on the Earth. Phase accuracy and stability of this long range link will have a key role in the success of the PHARAO-ACES experiment. The SYRTE is heavily involved in the design and the development of the data processing software : from theoretical modelling and numerical simulations to the development of a software prototype. Our team is working on a wide range of problems that need to be solved in order to achieve high accuracy in (almost) real time. In this poster we present some key aspects of the measurement, as well as the current status of the software's development.

  16. The Pinhole/Occulter as a tool for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    The two X-ray transform telescopes on the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) will provide sub-arcsecond angular resolution, high sensitivity imaging in hard X-rays for the first time, as well as improved capabilities for timing studies and spectroscopy. Although the design was driven by solar observing requirements, the result is an instrument of major importance for astronomical as well as solar observations. Fundamental astrophysical measurements could be made on supernova remnants, clusters of galaxies, active galaxy cores, accreting binary systems, and active coronae of nearby stars. Ways in which astronomical observations will benefit solar research are discussed.

  17. Human Recombinant ACE2 Reduces the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y.; Liu, George C.; Zhong, JiuChang; Basu, Ratnadeep; Chow, Fung L.; Zhou, Joyce; Loibner, Hans; Janzek, Evelyne; Schuster, Manfred; Penninger, Josef M.; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Scholey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure. Inhibition of ACE2 function accelerates diabetic kidney injury, whereas renal ACE2 is downregulated in diabetic nephropathy. We examined the ability of human recombinant ACE2 (hrACE2) to slow the progression of diabetic kidney injury. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male 12-week-old diabetic Akita mice (Ins2WT/C96Y) and control C57BL/6J mice (Ins2WT/WT) were injected daily with placebo or with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 weeks. Albumin excretion, gene expression, histomorphometry, NADPH oxidase activity, and peptide levels were examined. The effect of hrACE2 on high glucose and angiotensin II (ANG II)–induced changes was also examined in cultured mesangial cells. RESULTS Treatment with hrACE2 increased plasma ACE2 activity, normalized blood pressure, and reduced the urinary albumin excretion in Akita Ins2WT/C96Y mice in association with a decreased glomerular mesangial matrix expansion and normalization of increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen III expression. Human recombinant ACE2 increased ANG 1–7 levels, lowered ANG II levels, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. mRNA levels for p47phox and NOX2 and protein levels for protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and PKCβ1 were also normalized by treatment with hrACE2. In vitro, hrACE2 attenuated both high glucose and ANG II–induced oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with hrACE2 attenuates diabetic kidney injury in the Akita mouse in association with a reduction in blood pressure and a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity. In vitro studies show that the protective effect of hrACE2 is due to reduction in ANG II and an increase in ANG 1–7 signaling. PMID:19934006

  18. Ring Orbits from Multiple Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; McGhee, C. A.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N.

    2006-09-01

    Planetary rings provide a remarkable laboratory for the investigation of a wide range of dynamical effects, including resonance-driven density and bending waves, satellite wakes, shepherding of narrow ringlets, and non-circular edges of gaps. Careful quantitative examination of these features requires a very accurate absolute radius scale and planetary pole direction, achievable by combining multiple stellar and radio occultation observations. Uncertainty in the location of the spacecraft (at the km level) introduces a fundamental uncertainty into the geometric solution for the ring radius scale, and in the end one must solve for corrections to the spacecraft trajectory as part of the overall determination of the ring orbital model. Using JPL's NAIF toolkit, we have developed accurate algorithms for computing the event time of a ring occultation during an Earth-based or spacecraft occultation, including the effects of spacecraft trajectory errors mapped in two orthogonal directions transverse to the line of sight, based on osculating orbital elements for the instantaneous spacecraft path. These are the fundamental building blocks for a global solution for the pole direction and orbits of the rings of Saturn and Uranus. For Uranus, our new orbit solution includes the full set of digitally recorded occultation data from 1977-2002, yielding a radius scale accurate at the 100 meter level. For Saturn, we explore the potential for highly accurate ring orbit determination as occultation observations from dozens of stellar and radio occultations become publicly available over the course of the ongoing Cassini orbital tour. Saturn's pole precession is also detectable from ring occultation data, and we set limits on the accuracy of the precession rate determination and the implications for our understanding of the mass distribution in Saturn's interior. This work was supported in part by the NASA PGG program.

  19. The ionosphere of Europa from Galileo radio occultations.

    PubMed

    Kliore, A J; Hinson, D P; Flasar, F M; Nagy, A F; Cravens, T E

    1997-07-18

    The Galileo spacecraft performed six radio occultation observations of Jupiter's Galilean satellite Europa during its tour of the jovian system. In five of the six instances, these occultations revealed the presence of a tenuous ionosphere on Europa, with an average maximum electron density of nearly 10(4) per cubic centimeter near the surface and a plasma scale height of about 240 +/- 40 kilometers from the surface to 300 kilometers and of 440 +/- 60 kilometers above 300 kilometers. Such an ionosphere could be produced by solar photoionization and jovian magnetospheric particle impact in an atmosphere having a surface density of about 10(8) electrons per cubic centimeter. If this atmosphere is composed primarily of O2, then the principal ion is O2+ and the neutral atmosphere temperature implied by the 240-kilometer scale height is about 600 kelvin. If it is composed of H2O, the principal ion is H3O+ and the neutral temperature is about 340 kelvin. In either case, these temperatures are much higher than those observed on Europa's surface, and an external heating source from the jovian magnetosphere is required. PMID:9219689

  20. Sporadic E Morphology from GPS-CHAMP Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Ao, Chi O.; Hajj, George A.; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    The scintillations of phase and amplitude in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPS radio occultation signal are caused by thin ionization layers. These thin irregular electron density layers in the E region ionosphere are often called sporadic E (Es). For a monthly retrieval of Es morphology we use the variances of the phase and SNR fluctuations of worldwide 6000 GPS/CHAMP occultations in the E region. The Es climatology is studied globally with the SNR and phase variances in terms of monthly zonal means, seasonal maps, and diurnal and long-term variations. The zonal mean variances reveal strong, extended Es activities at summertime midlatitudes but weak, confined activities in wintertime high latitudes, peaking at 105 km. Global maps at 105-km altitude show clear dependence of Es activities on the geomagnetic dip angle, where the summertime midlatitude Es occurs mostly at dip angles of 30 deg. - 60 deg. and the wintertime high-latitude enhancement occurs mostly at dip angles greater than 80 deg. The midlatitude Es variances exhibit a strong semidiurnal variation with peak hours near 0800 1000 and 2000 local solar time, respectively. The peak hours are delayed slightly with decreasing height, suggesting influences from the semidiurnal tide. To provide more insights on the observed SNR and phase variances, we model radio wave propagation for the CHAMP observing geometry under several perturbed cases in the E region ionosphere. The model simulations indicate that the SNR variance has the maximum response to Es perturbations at vertical wavelengths of 1.2 km, whereas the phase response maximizes at 2 km (for the 1-s variance analysis). The characteristic scale depends little on the truncation time used in the SNR variance analysis, but it increases with the truncation time for the phase variances. Initial studies show that reasonable global Es morphology can be produced on a monthly and seasonal basis with the CHAMP one-antenna occultations. Better results

  1. First Stellar Occultation Observation with SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Bida, T.; Bosh, A.; Collins, P.; Levine, S.; Person, M.; Pfueller, E.; Roeser, H.; Taylor, B.; Wiedemann, M.; Wolf, J.; Zuluaga, C.

    2012-01-01

    We successfully observed the 2011 June 23 UT stellar occultation by Pluto with the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) instrument from Lowell Observatory and the Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) from the Deutches SOFIA Institut (DSI) mounted on the SOFIA telescope. A major prediction astrometry effort focused at MIT combined with the willingness of the SOFIA project to entertain the idea of an in-flight change to the flight plan allowed us to target the center of the occultation shadow. This was accomplished by means of an in-flight prediction update by satellite telephone and a real-time onboard flight plan modification to accommodate the prediction update. We obtained excellent results with both channels of HIPO and the FDC with each light curve showing a small, extended brightening while the star was occulted. We will discuss analysis results as well as SOFIA's considerable potential for future occultation work. We thank the SOFIA program for its willingness to attempt this challenging observation at such an early stage of SOFIA science operations. Lowell's SOFIA work was supported by a grant from USRA, MIT's prediction work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and the National Science Foundation, and the FDC work was supported by the DSI. We thank the US Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station for allowing us to use their facilities to obtain our prediction astrometry observations.

  2. Experiment D005: Star occultation navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, R. M.; Jorris, T. R.; Vallerie, E. M., III

    1971-01-01

    The usefulness of star occultation measurements for space navigation and the determination of a horizon density profile which could be used to update atmospheric models for horizon-based measurement systems were studied. The time of occultation of a known star by a celestial body, as seen by an orbiting observer, determines a cylinder of position, the axis of which is the line through the star and the body center, and the radius of which is equal to the occulting-body radius. The dimming percentage, with respect to the altitude of this grazing ray from the star to the observer, is a percentage altitude for occultation. That is, the star can be assumed to be occulted when it reaches a predetermined percentage of its unattenuated value. The procedure used was to measure this attenuation with respect to time to determine the usefulness of the measurements for autonomous space navigation. In this experiment, the crewmembers had to accomplish star acquisition, identification, calibration, and tracking. Instrumentation was required only for measurement of the relative intensity of the star as it set into the atmosphere.

  3. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Pluto and Beyond: Stellar-Occultation Web Pages for Education and Observation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Brown, M. E.; Person, M. J.; Tam, Y. H. Ng

    2010-10-01

    The method of stellar occultation is a powerful way to investigate objects in the outer solar system, including their sizes, their shapes, their atmospheres, and, when present, rings. Following series of observations of outer-solar-system objects, including the dwarf planets Pluto and Haumea, satellites Charon and Nix, additional Kuiper-belt object 55636, and Triton, we have prepared web pages at Williams College describing the results and linking published papers and meeting abstracts as well as light curves, images, and expedition photographs. Brown's pages at Caltech (www.gps.caltech.edu/ mbrown/2003EL61/) discuss the mutual occultation and transit events of Haumea and its moon Namaka, showing predictions over the last couple of years, though no observations of the mutual events (from the Hale 5-m telescope at the Palomar Observatory on down) have yet been successful. This paper will include Haumea/Namaka predictions for the coming observation season. The MIT Planetary Astronomy Lab's web pages (occult.mit.edu) are more technical in nature, providing information useful for planning observations, which are usually made simultaneously with multiple telescopes to provide a variety of chords across the objects. For overall access to our occultation information, go to http://www.stellaroccultations.info or http://www.williams.edu/Astronomy/research/occultations. Observations have been supported in part by grants NNX08AO50G to Williams College, NNX10AB27G to MIT, and NNG05GI02G to Caltech from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Division. Student participation was supported in part by NASA's Massachusetts Space Grant.

  5. Systematic Variation in the Spectral Slope of the IMF at ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.

    Inferences on turbulence in interplanetary plasmas commonly depend on the slope of the power spectrum. We have studied the slopes of spectra of the interplanetary magnetic field and charged particles from the HISCALE and EPAM detectors on Ulysses and ACE and find that it is systematically nonstationary. As an example, when the spectra are estimated on time blocks varying between three hours and one day, the average slope on the ACE GSE Y component of the IMF is close to -5/3, but fluctuations about this average are not random. Using 1-minute data, the slopes made from three hour data blocks offset by one hour gives a new time series. Solar rotation and its first harmonic are nearly absent in the spectrum of this series, but there are a series of strong peaks that may be convection or gravity modes.

  6. Observations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in the upper troposphere by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereszchuk, K. A.; Moore, D. P.; Harrison, J. J.; Boone, C. D.; Park, M.; Remedios, J. J.; Randel, W. J.; Bernath, P. F.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3CO·O2NO2, abbreviated as PAN) is a trace molecular species present in the troposphere and lower stratosphere due primarily to pollution from fuel combustion and the pyrogenic outflows from biomass burning. In the lower troposphere, PAN has a relatively short life-time and is principally destroyed within a few hours through thermolysis, but it can act as a reservoir and carrier of NOx in the colder temperatures of the upper troposphere where UV photolysis becomes the dominant loss mechanism. Pyroconvective updrafts from large biomass burning events can inject PAN into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), providing a means for the long-range transport of NOx. Given the extended lifetimes at these higher altitudes, PAN is readily detectable via satellite remote sensing. A new PAN data product is now available for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) Version 3.0 data set. We report measurements of PAN in Boreal biomass burning plumes recorded during the Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS) campaign. The retrieval method employed and errors analysis are described in full detail. The retrieved volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles are compared to coincident measurements made by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument on the European Space Agency (ESA) ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT). Three ACE-FTS occultations containing measurements of Boreal biomass burning outflows, recorded during BORTAS, were identified as having coincident measurements with MIPAS. In each case, the MIPAS measurements demonstrated good agreement with the ACE-FTS VMR profiles for PAN. The ACE-FTS PAN data set is used to obtain zonal mean distributions of seasonal averages from ~5 to 20 km. A strong seasonality is clearly observed for PAN concentrations in the global UTLS. Since the

  7. Chasing shadows in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica

    The characteristics of the populations of objects that inhabit the outer solar system carry the fingerprint of the processes that governed the formation and evolution of the solar system. Occultation surveys push the limit of observation into the very small and distant outer solar system objects, allowing us to set constraints on the structure of the Kuiper belt, Scattered disk and Sedna populations. I collected, reduced, and analyzed vast datasets looking for occultations of stars by outer solar system objects, both working with the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS) collaboration and leading the MMT/Megacam occultation effort. Having found no such events in my data, I was able to place upper limits on the Kuiper belt, scattered disk and Sedna population. These limits and their derivation are described here.

  8. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  9. Occult primary, version 3.2014.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, David S; Handorf, Charles R; Agulnik, Mark; Bowles, Daniel W; Cates, Justin M; Cristea, Mihaela; Dotan, Efrat; Eaton, Keith D; Fidias, Panagiotis M; Gierada, David; Gilcrease, G Weldon; Godby, Kelly; Iyer, Renuka; Lenzi, Renato; Phay, John; Rashid, Asif; Saltz, Leonard; Schwab, Richard B; Shulman, Lawrence N; Smerage, Jeffrey B; Stevenson, Marvaretta M; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Zager, Jonathan S; Zhen, Weining Ken; Bergman, Mary Anne; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2014-07-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Occult Primary tumors provide recommendations for the evaluation, workup, management, and follow-up of patients with occult primary tumors (cancers of unknown primary). These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2014 NCCN Occult Primary panel meeting. The panel discussed gene expression profiling (GEP) for the identification of the tissue of origin and concluded that, although GEP has a diagnostic benefit, a clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. The panel recommends against GEP as standard management, although 20% of the panel believes the diagnostic benefit of GEP warrants its routine use. In addition, the panel discussed testing for actionable mutations (eg, ALK) to help guide choice of therapy, but declined to add this recommendation. PMID:24994917

  10. Close Double Stars from Occultation Video Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring Dunham, David; George, Anthony; Loader, Brian; Herald, David Russell

    2015-08-01

    Astronomers around the world, both amateur and professional, have been recording lunar and asteroidal occultations of close double stars during the past several years using inexpensive but quite sensitive video cameras that are now available. Several new double stars have been discovered, and the parameters of many close systems have been determined. Besides rather good measurements of the relative magnitudes of the components, the actual separations and position angles can be measured if observations of the same event are made from two or more separate stations. These observations collected by the International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) are published in the Journal of Double Star Observations. Recently, IOTA has encouraged the observation of occultations of stars in the Kepler 2 program, which is interested in data about close duplicity that affects their analyses for exoplanet transits.

  11. Occult chemical deposition to a Maritime forest

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Kowalski, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of chemical fluxes from the atmosphere to vegetated surfaces have suggested that, along with conventional wet and dry processes, an additional chemical input occurs when wind-blown cloud droplets are directly intercepted by vegetation. This cloud water deposition process has been sometimes termed {open_quote}occult deposition{close_quote} because the water fluxes cannot ordinarily be observed using rain gauges. Such occult deposition of cloud water has rarely been measured directly, in part because of the complexity of the governing turbulent transfer process. However, reviews by the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP SoS/T-2,6) have suggested that the chemical flux to be forest decline in the eastern USA. This paper presents direct field measurements occult chemical fluxes to a silver fir forest located in complex terrain on the Olympic Peninsula near the coast of Washington State, USA.

  12. Strong scintillations during atmospheric occultations Theoretical intensity spectra. [radio scattering during spacecraft occultations by planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Each of the two Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977 has completed a reconnaissance of the Jovian and Saturnian systems. In connection with occultation experiments, strong scintillations were observed. Further theoretical work is required before these scintillations can be interpreted. The present study is, therefore, concerned with the derivation of a theory for strong scattering during atmospheric occultation experiments, taking into account as fundamental quantity of interest the spatial spectrum (or spectral density) of intensity fluctuations. Attention is given to a theory for intensity spectra, and numerical calculations. The new formula derived for Phi-i accounts for strong scattering of electromagnetic waves during atmospheric occultations.

  13. A Fourier Optics Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves by Objects with Thin Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  14. A FOURIER OPTICS METHOD FOR CALCULATING STELLAR OCCULTATION LIGHT CURVES BY OBJECTS WITH THIN ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-15

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  15. An overview of the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III

    1991-01-01

    The HALOE experiment will fly on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in the last quarter of 1991. The experiment uses the solar occultation limb sounding approach, in combination with gas filter and broadband radiometry to provide measurements of temperature profiles and key gases in the ClO(y), NO(y), and HO(y) chemical families of the middle atmosphere. The instrument has been characterized in great detail to determine gains, spectral response, noise, crosstalk, field-of-view, and thermal drift characteristics. A final end-to-end test using a gas cell to simulate the atmosphere demonstrated measurement repeatability to about 1 percent and agreement between measured and calculated signals to within about 1 percent to 3 percent. This latter agreement provides confidence in knowledge of both the hardware as well as the software.

  16. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  17. TAOS: The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Dave, R.; Giammarco, J.; Goldader, J.; Lehner, M.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Wang, A.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.; Chen, W. P.; Cook, K.; Marshall, S.; Porrata, R.; Byun, Y.-I.; de Pater, I.; Rice, J.; Lissauer, J.

    2003-06-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) seeks to determine the number and size spectrum for small (~3 km) bodies in the Kuiper Belt. This will be accomplished by searching for the brief occultations of bright stars (R~14) by these objects. We have designed and built a special purpose photometric monitoring system for this purpose. TAOS comprises four 50 cm telescopes, each equipped with a 2048×2048 pixel CCD camera, in a compact array located in the central highlands of Taiwan. TAOS will monitor up to 3,000 stars at 5 Hz. The system will go into scientific operation at the end of 003.

  18. TAOS - The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M. J.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W.-P.; Cook, K. H.; Dave, R.; de Pater, I.; Giammarco, J.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Lissauer, J.; Marshall, S. L.; Mondal, S.; Nihei, T.; Rice, J.; Schwamb, M.; Wang, A.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-W.

    2006-09-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) seeks to determine the number and size spectrum for small (˜3 km) bodies in the Kuiper Belt. This will be accomplished by searching for the brief occultations of bright stars (R˜14) by these objects. We have designed and built a special purpose photometric monitoring system for this purpose. TAOS comprises four 50 cm telescopes, each equipped with a 2048×2048 pixel CCD camera, in a compact array located in the central highlands of Taiwan. TAOS will monitor up to 2 000 stars at 5 Hz. The system went into scientific operation in the autumn of 2005.

  19. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  20. Occultation of a compact radio source by Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linfield, R.

    1992-05-01

    An occultation of the compact radio source P 0507+17 by Venus on 19 Jul. 1988, was observed in Tidbinbilla, Australia at a frequency of 2.3 GHz. The purpose of this observation was to measure the position of Venus in the radio reference frame. When data from both ingress (Venus dayside) and egress (Venus nightside) were used to solve for the position of Venus in ecliptic longitude and latitude, the results were consistent with zero offsets from the nominal values, with an uncertainty of approximately 0.2 arcsec in both coordinates. By using the nightside data alone, a value of -0.026 +/- 0.04 arcsec was obtained for the linear combination delta(lambda) + 0.51delta(beta), where delta(lambda) and delta(beta) were the offsets from their nominal values of the ecliptic longitude and latitude of Venus. Distortion of a vacuum Fresnel fringe pattern by the Venus troposphere, and especially by the Venus ionosphere, was observed. The dayside ionosphere of Venus caused very large distortions; the amplitude of the first Fresnel fringe in the ingress data was eight times larger than was expected for an airless planet. The observed fringe patterns were modeled by using plausible ionospheres (i.e., consistent with spacecraft measurements of the Venus ionosphere and with solar extreme ultraviolet flux and solar wind pressure measurements at the occultation epoch). However, the range of Venus ionospheric profiles (electron density as a function of altitude) allowed by a priori constraints and by the occultation data was large (e.g., the ionopause height on the dayside was uncertain by a factor of two). This ionospheric uncertainty (particularly on the dayside) translated into a large position uncertainty (0.2 arcsec for the dayside and 0.04 arcsec for the nightside). If it was possible to calibrate the Venus ionosphere by some external means, the accuracy in delta(lambda) and delta(beta) would have been 0.01 arcsec or better.

  1. Validation of a Coupled Source Surface to MHD Model System at ACE and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T.; Fry, C. D.; Smith, Z.; Dryer, M.; Intriligator, D.

    2005-05-01

    The Potential Field Source Surface model [Wang and Sheeley, 1988] combined with the Current Sheet modification [Schatten, 1971] is now in routine operation at the NWS Space Environment Center of NOAA. We use the sequence of source surface current sheet (SSCS) maps so produced. We developed a set of relatively simple empirical relationships to translate the SSCS map parameters into time-dependent MHD model lower boundary conditions at 0.1 AU. This system provides the 3D time-dependent slowly evolving background solar wind conditions in the inner heliosphere. To this system we add shock initiation perturbations to the lower boundary condition based on observed solar flares, CMEs and Type II solar radio bursts. The necessary shock descriptive parameters are generated in near real-time from these data. We compare simulated results with ACE solar wind observations. We have retrospectively adjusted the shock initiation parameters to maximize agreement with ACE observations, and extended the MHD model outer boundary to 10 AU. We will show results and comparisons of model results with Ulysses observations during the 2003 Halloween epoch. This work was partially funded by a NASA Living With a Star (LWS) TR&T grant through NOAA Work Order No.W-10,118 (ZS and TRD) and NASA Grant NAG-12527 (CDF and MD), by University Partnering for Operational Support program (UPOS) sponsored jointly by the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army (CDF and MD), and by Carmel Research Center (DI).

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  3. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  4. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients. PMID:26354428

  5. Illinois occultation summary, 1. 1977 - 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R.; Lien, D.

    1980-01-01

    Instrumentation and data acquisition techniques used to record lunar occultations at the University of Illinois Prairie Observatory are described. Tables and graphs summarize data from 64 events which include 30 observations of stars brighter than 7th magnitude, 40 reappearances, 4 angular diameter measurements, 8 observations of binary stars, and 6 observations which may indicate multiplicity.

  6. Occult gunshot injury of the temporal bone.

    PubMed Central

    Geary, U M; Ritchie, D A; Luke, L C

    1997-01-01

    Increasing firearms violence has produced much public disquiet in recent months and Liverpool has seen a particularly well publicized spate of shootings. This is a case report of an initially occult intracranial injury which illustrates the unpredictable nature of missile trauma and the importance of computerised tomography in all cases of gunshot injury to the head. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9193993

  7. Photon counts from stellar occultation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using stars as radiation sources for Earth atmospheric occultation experiments is investigated. Exoatmospheric photon counts of the order of 10 to the 6th power photons/sq cm/sec are realized for the 15 visually brightest stars. Most photon counts appear to be marginally detectable unless photomultiplier or cascade detection devices can be used.

  8. The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M. J.; Wang, S.-Y.; Ho, P.; Lee, T.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Yen, W.-L.; Reyes Ruiz, M.; Hiriart, D.; Granados, A. P.; Torres, S.; Alcock, C.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Geary, J. C.; Norton, T.; Furesz, G.

    2012-05-01

    TAOS II is a successor survey to TAOS. TAOS II will measure the size distribution of KBOs by detecting and characterizing their occultations of distant stars. TAOS II will operate 3 1.3 m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Obsevatory in Mexico.

  9. ACE: A Collaborative School Consultation Program for Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Caroline; Massé, Line

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a description of ACE (Accompagnement collaboratif des enseignants (Collaborative teacher accompaniment)), a new program designed to guide secondary school teachers in integrating students with behavioral problems in their classrooms. ACE proposes collaborative accompaniment inspired by behavioral and mental health…

  10. An Inclusive ACE. Broadening Participation in Adult and Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Merilyn; Beatty, Dianne

    A project identified strategies to increase participation by community members who traditionally have not used adult and community education (ACE) in Australia. Methodology included a focus group, literature research, and interviews with 70 people. Government-supported ACE was seen as having a broad role in supporting lifelong learning. ACE…

  11. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  12. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  13. Interpretation of Voyager UVS observations of occultations by the atmosphere of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandel, Bill R.; Herbert, F.; Yelle, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    We propose to continue our investigation of the upper atmosphere of Neptune based primarily on the solar occultation measurements made by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS). The ultimate goal of this research is to understand the structure and composition of Neptune's upper atmosphere as encoded in the data base obtained by the UVS during the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune. The UVS occultations provide information essential to studies of atmospheric composition and structure, energy balance, photochemistry, global transport, ionospheric structure, and airglow production mechanisms. In conjunction with other research in progress at the University of Arizona and by our colleagues at other institutions, we not only analyze and interpret individual measurements or observations by the UVS, but also construct models of the upper atmosphere which are consistent with all available data obtained by the UVS. We derive constraints from measurements of the atmospheric emissions and we combine these with constraints derived from the occultation measurements. Principal sources for the atmospheric emissions include dayglow, resonance scattering and, at long wavelengths, the reflected solar spectrum. On the dark side of the planet, a weak H Ly alpha emission is due to resonance scattering of the sky background and perhaps another source. Thus a wide range of physical processes are at work, and each provides its own constraints on the atmosphere.

  14. Comparison of In Situ Aerosol Data from the ACE-Asia 2001 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Pietras, C.; Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Frouin, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Werdell, P. J.; Fargion, G. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) is an international, multidisciplinary project to further knowledge about atmospheric aerosols. ACE-Asia included an intensive field measurement campaign during the spring of 2001 off the coasts of China, Japan and Korea. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project participated in the ACE-Asia cruise of the R/V Ronald H. Brown, which departed from Hawaii on 2001/03/15, sailed west to the Sea of Japan, and finished in Yokosuka, Japan on 2001/04/19. The SIMBIOS Project compares and merges data projects from multiple ocean color missions. As In Situ data are essential for merger and comparison of satellite ocean color measurements, the Project is interested in instrumentation devopment and data base building. The SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) is the database used and maintained by the SIMBIOS project. The ACE-Asia cruise was an excellent opportunity to compare data from a variety of maritime sun photometers, as several aerosol conditions were experienced. These included low Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) maritime conditions near Hawaii and extremely high AOT dust conditions in the Sea of Japan. Concurrant measurements were made with the PREDE POM-01 Mark II radiometer, a Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD, a Laboratorie d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD-a, two Solar Light, Inc. Microtops II's, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (FRSR). In addition, a Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was deployed that provides vertical aerosol distributions. Data were processed utilizing new algorithms to screen errors due to improper pointing at the sun, a problem previously recognized for the Microtops II. Comparisons of AOT at 500nm and Angstrom Exponent were made for all the instruments. The hand held, direct solar sun photometers (Microtops II, SIMBAD and SIMBADa

  15. Heavy Ion Flux Comparison of MARIE and ACE/CRIS Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Andersen, V.; Atwell, W.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F.; Pinsky, L.; Saganti, P.; Turner, R.; Zeitlin, C.

    2003-01-01

    The charged particle spectrum for nuclei from protons to neon, (charge Z=10) has been observed during the cruise phase and in orbit around Mars by the MARIE charge particle spectrometer aboard the Odyssey spacecraft. The cruise data was taken between April 23, 2001 and August 11, 2001. The Mars orbit data was taken from March 5, 2002 through December 2002. Both the cruise data set and the orbital data set are compared with the simultaneous observations made by the CRIS instrument aboard the ACE space-craft, located at L1. Any detectable differences between the two spacecraft data sets could lead to the understanding of the radial dependence of solar modulation.

  16. SOHO/ACE observations of two consecutive CMEs from the same source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, G.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Poletto, G.; Romoli, M.

    2010-03-01

    On June 2, 2003, SOHO/LASCO coronagraph observed two CMEs at the West limb of the Sun, at 00.30 and 08:54 UT, respectively, which appeared to originate from the same source region. Both CMEs show the typical three-part structure. These events have been also observed by SOHO/UVCS, allowing us to infer their physical parameters. We also looked for interplanetary signatures of the CMEs in ACE `in situ' observations but we did not find evidence of the ejected flux rope; however, the solar wind appeared significantly distorted, probably as a consequence of the influence of both CMEs on their surrounding interplanetary plasma.

  17. Estimates of Temperatures in Saturn's Upper Atmosphere from Cassini Radio Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L.

    2015-10-01

    The effective or slab thickness (? of an ionosphere is defined as the ratio between local total electron content (TEC) and peak electron density (N MAX). In a photochemical ionosphere this parameter is approximately four times the scale height (H=kT/mg) of the ionized neutral gas. We use the 59 radio occultations of Saturn's ionosphere obtained by Cassini's RSS instrument in order to estimate thermospheric temperatures, and we compare these estimates with temperatures derived from solar and stellar occultations. The globally averaged slab thickness in Saturn's ionosphere is roughly 1500 km. Given certain assumptions, such slab thicknesses translate into average temperatures of 400-600K, with a slight increase at higher latitudes . In addition, slab thickness values below 1000 km are found only at low latitudes, within 20o of Saturn's equator, perhaps indicative of relatively cooler equatorial temperatures.

  18. Building and operating the Automated Telescope Array for the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S.; Cook, K.; Porrata, R.; Alcock, C.; Dave, R.; Giammarco, J.; Lehner, M.; Chen, W.-P.; Lee, T.; King, S.-K.; Wang, A.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.; Byun, Y.-I.; de Pater, I.; Liang, C.; Rice, J.; Lissauer, J.

    2003-05-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) is a program dedicated to performing a survey of small objects (<10 km) in the trans-Neptunian Region of the Solar System by detecting the occultations of bright stars by these objects. To carry this out, we have developed an automated observatory, based on an array of four small, (50 cm), telescopes, each equipped with a 2048x2048 pixel CCD camera. The telescopes will operate in tandem fashion, coupled to a real-time analysis pipeline designed to monitor ˜ 2000 stars simultaneously at ˜ 5 Hz. This system is partially installed at a site in the central highlands of Taiwan. An overview of the system components, software architecture, and some of the challenges encountered will be presented. This project is supported by DOE (at LLNL), NASA (at UPenn), Academia Sinica (at ASIAA), NSC (at NCU), and KRF (at Yonsei).

  19. An exploration of the trans-Neptunian region through stellar occultations and MIOSOTYS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doressoundiram, A.; Maquet, L.; Roques, F.; Liu, C. Y.; Chang, H. K.; Shih, I. C.

    2015-12-01

    MIOSOTYS (Multi-object Instrument for Occultations in the SOlar system and TransitorY Systems) is a multi-fiber positioner coupled with a fast photometry camera. This is a visitor instrument mounted on the 193 cm telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France, and on the 123 cm telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. Our immediate goal is to characterize the spatial distribution and extension of the Kuiper Belt, and the physical size distribution of Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). We present the observation campaigns during 2010-2014, objectives and observing strategy. We report the detection of potential candidates for occultation events of TNOs. We discuss more specifically the method used to process the data and the modelling of diffraction patterns. The size distribution of sub-kilometer TNOs is then discussed and compared with current models of the Kuiper Belt.

  20. Stellar Occultation Probe of Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were (i) to better characterize Triton's atmospheric structure by probing a region not well investigated by Voyager and (ii) to begin acquiring baseline data for an investigation of the time evolution of the atmosphere which will set limits on the thermal conductivity of the surface and the total mass of N2 in the atmosphere. Our approach was to use observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Triton that was predicted to occur on 1993 July 10. As described in the attached reprint, we achieved these objectives through observation of this occultation and a subsequent one with the KAO in 1995. We found new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of the two occultations observed with the KAO and ground-based data. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and infrared, have good spatial coverage of Triton including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the 20-100 km altitude level on Triton. The small-planet light curve model of Elliot and Young (AJ 103, 991-1015) was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements. However, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogeneous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent-isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 +/- 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 +/- 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989 (Strobel et al, Icarus 120, 266-289). The atmospheric

  1. ACE inhibition in the treatment of children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arbeiter, Klaus; Pichler, Andrea; Stemberger, Regina; Mueller, Thomas; Ruffingshofer, Dagmar; Vargha, Regina; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there are no data available on long-term effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) on graft function in children after renal transplantation. We therefore analyzed all children who were transplanted at our institution between 1989 and 1998 and followed for at least 2 years. Those treated with ACE-I, mainly because of failure of other antihypertensive medications, were compared to those without ACE-I. The ACE-I-treated children ( n=19) showed significantly better blood pressure control during the 1st year of follow-up ( p<0.05). In children with chronic allograft dysfunction ( n=8), treatment with ACE-I stabilized graft function, with improvement in creatinine clearance in 50% ( p<0.01). Serum potassium and hemoglobin levels remained stable. One patient discontinued ACE-I because of renal artery stenosis. Taken together, ACE-I were effective and safe in the treatment of hypertension in children following renal transplantation. Children with chronic allograft dysfunction experienced a stabilizing effect on graft function. PMID:14673630

  2. Eclipses and occultations on binary Trojan asteroid (617) Patroclus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, Franck; Berthier, Jerome; Descamps, Pascal; Emery, Josh; Harris, Alan; Hestroffer, Daniel; Mottola, Stefano; Mueller, Michael; Vachier, Frederic

    2006-05-01

    We propose to observe a combined eclipse- and occultation event of the binary asteroid system (617) Patroclus, a member of the intriguing population of Jupiter Trojans. This will be the first thermal-IR observation of such a rare event. Patroclus, the only known Trojan binary, is a particularly well-suited target because its orbital parameters are well known (Marchis et al. 2006) and both components are of roughly equal size, which maximizes the observable effects of the eclipse event. Observing a nearly total eclipse allows the surface thermal inertia, which depends on key physical properties such as the surface porosity, to be determined in a uniquely direct way. Also, occultations allow one component to be studied without significant contamination from the other, thereby facilitating the determination of possible differences between their surface compositions. Note that the angular distance between the components does not exceed 0.15". The proposed Spitzer IRS observations will allow us to clarify the physical nature of the Patroclus system and constrain its mineralogy by providing measurements of the thermal inertia, size and albedo of each component, and the spectral silicate features around 10microns. From spatially resolved Keck imaging Marchis et al. (2006) have recently determined the orbital parameters of the Patroclus system. From these they determined the total mass of the system which, combined with a previous estimate of Patroclus' size, implies a bulk mass density of only 0.8 g cm-3, indicative of a composition dominated by water ice. This supports the idea that large Jupiter Trojans, such as Patroclus, are among the most primordial bodies in the solar system accessible to observations, and that they are basically collisionally unaltered since their formation.

  3. Saturn's upper atmosphere during the Voyager era: Reanalysis and modeling of the UVS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, Ronald J.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2015-09-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) solar and stellar occultation dataset represents one of the primary, pre-Cassini sources of information that we have on the neutral upper atmosphere of Saturn. Despite its importance, however, the full set of occultations has never received a consistent, nor complete, analysis, and the results derived from the initial analyses over thirty years ago left questions about the temperature and density profiles unanswered. We have reanalyzed all six of the UVS occultations (three solar and three stellar) to provide an up-to-date, pre-Cassini view of Saturn's upper atmosphere. From the Voyager UVS data, we have determined vertical profiles for H2, H, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6, as well as temperature. Our analysis also provides explanations for the two different thermospheric temperatures derived in earlier analyses (400-450 K versus 800 K) and for the unusual shape of the total density profile noted by Hubbard et al. (1997). Aside from inverting the occultation data to retrieve densities and temperatures, we have investigated the atmospheric structure through a series of photochemical models to infer the strength of atmospheric mixing and other physical and chemical properties of Saturn's mesopause region during the Voyager flybys. We find that the data exhibit considerable variability in the vertical profiles for methane, suggesting variations in vertical winds or the eddy diffusion coefficient as a function of latitude and/or time in Saturn's upper atmosphere. The results of our reanalysis will provide a useful baseline for interpreting new data from Cassini, particularly in the context of change over the past three decades.

  4. CASSINI UVIS STELLAR OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Pettis, D.; Bradley, E. T.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2010-12-15

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high-speed photometer (HSP) that has observed more than 100 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings. Here, we document a standardized technique applied to the UVIS-HSP ring occultation datasets delivered to the Planetary Data System as higher level data products. These observations provide measurements of ring structure that approaches the scale of the largest common ring particles ({approx}5 m). The combination of multiple occultations at different viewing geometries enables reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the rings. This inversion of the occultation data depends on accurate calibration of the data so that occultations of different stars taken at different times and under different viewing conditions can be combined to retrieve ring structure. We provide examples of the structure of the rings as seen from several occultations at different incidence angles to the rings, illustrating changes in the apparent structure with viewing geometry.

  5. Asteroid Sizing by Radiogalaxy Occultation at 5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Bach, U.; Muinonen, K.; Poutanen, M.; Petrov, L.

    2016-05-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids observed at visual wavelengths have been an important tool for studying the size and shape of asteroids and for revising the orbital parameters of asteroids. At radio frequencies, a shadow of an asteroid on the Earth is dominated by diffraction effects. Here, we show, for the first time, that a single observation of an occultation of a compact radio source at a frequency of 5 GHz can be used to derive the effective size of the occulting object and to derive the distance between the observer and the center of the occultation path on the Earth. The derived diameter of the occulting object, asteroid (115) Thyra, is 75 ± 6 km. The observed occultation profile shows features that cannot be explained by diffraction of a single asteroid.

  6. The JWST/NIRCam coronagraph flight occulters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Muller, Richard E.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Serabyn, Eugene; Mao, Yalan; Echternach, Pierre M.; Trauger, John T.; Liewer, Kurt M.

    2010-07-01

    The NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope will have a Lyot coronagraph for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks at λ=2 - 5 μm. Half-tone patterns are used to create graded-transmission image plane masks. These are generated using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching of a metal layer on an antireflection coated sapphire substrate. We report here on the manufacture and evaluation of the flight occulters.

  7. Potential KBO Stellar Occultations: 2011-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda; Zuluaga, C. A.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of an occultation candidate search of the UCAC2 catalog for over 30 Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs [not including (134340) Pluto]. KBOs were selected based on absolute magnitude, distance from the sun and the number of oppositions observed. This search identified occultation candidate stars within 2.5 arcseconds of each minor planet's path from 2011-2015. As typical UCAC2 catalog uncertainties ranged from 0.05 to 0.5 arcseconds, and KBO ephemeris uncertainties for a well-observed object ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 arcseconds, this study seeks to identify the most promising potential occultations for further astrometric follow-up. Additional observations of stars and the potentially occulting body help determine the necessary star offsets and ephemeris corrections. Events have been grouped into the following categories: near-geocentric (any brightness), near-misses, stars of magnitude 13 or brighter (the dimmest star feasible with a large portable telescope), slow events, and events observable from telescope-rich regions of the Earth. These categories allow for planning campaigns involving wide-spread portable and fixed telescopes, or an airborne telescope (such as SOFIA). The two most promising events are an encounter of (28978) Ixion with a 10.63 magnitude star on 2012-04-16 and (84922) 2003 VS2 with a 14.83 magnitude star on 2011-11-01. KBOs such as (50000) Quaoar, (28978) Ixion, (55638) 2002 VE95, and (84922) 2003 VS2 encounter over 50 UCAC2 stars in the next five years and should be most carefully monitored. This work was supported, in part by NASA Grant NNX10AB27G.

  8. The JWST/NIRCam Coronagraph Flight Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Muller, Richard E.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Serabyn, Eugene; Mao, Yalan; Echternach, Pierre M.; Trauger, John T.; Liewer, Kurt M.

    2010-01-01

    The NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope will have a Lyot coronagraph for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks at lambda = 2 - 5 micrometers. Half-tone patterns are used to create graded-transmission image plane masks. These are generated using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching of a metal layer on an antireflection coated sapphire substrate. We report here on the manufacture and evaluation of the flight occulters.

  9. Studies of planetary upper atmospheres through occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The structure, composition, dynamics and energy balance of planetary upper atmospheres through interpretation of steller occultation data from Uranus is discussed. The wave-optical problem of modelling strong scintillation for arbitrary turbulent atmospheres is studied, as well as influence of turbulence. It was concluded that quasi-global features of atmospheric structure are accurately determined by numerical inversion. Horizontally inhomogeneous structures are filtered out and have little effect on temperature profiles.

  10. Occultation Modeling for Radiation Obstruction Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Carufel, Guy; Li, Zu Qun; Harvey, Jason; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A geometric occultation model has been developed to determine line-of-sight obstruction of radiation sources expected for different NASA space exploration mission designs. Example applications includes fidelity improvements for surface lighting conditions, radiation pressure, thermal and power subsystem modeling. The model makes use of geometric two dimensional shape primitives to most effectively model space vehicles. A set of these primitives is used to represent three dimensional obstructing objects as a two dimensional outline from the perspective of an observing point of interest. Radiation sources, such as the Sun or a Moon's albedo is represented as a collection of points, each of which is assigned a flux value to represent a section of the radiation source. Planetary bodies, such as a Martian moon, is represented as a collection of triangular facets which are distributed in spherical height fields for optimization. These design aspects and the overall model architecture will be presented. Specific uses to be presented includes a study of the lighting condition on Phobos for a possible future surface mission, and computing the incident flux on a spacecraft's solar panels and radiators from direct and reflected solar radiation subject to self-shadowing or shadowing by third bodies.

  11. OCCULT-ORSER complete conversational user-language translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Young, K.

    1981-01-01

    Translator program (OCCULT) assists non-computer-oriented users in setting up and submitting jobs for complex ORSER system. ORSER is collection of image processing programs for analyzing remotely sensed data. OCCULT is designed for those who would like to use ORSER but cannot justify acquiring and maintaining necessary proficiency in Remote Job Entry Language, Job Control Language, and control-card formats. OCCULT is written in FORTRAN IV and OS Assembler for interactive execution.

  12. On the reduction of occultation light curves. [stellar occultations by planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L.; Veverka, J.

    1973-01-01

    The two basic methods of reducing occultation light curves - curve fitting and inversion - are reviewed and compared. It is shown that the curve fitting methods have severe problems of nonuniqueness. In addition, in the case of occultation curves dominated by spikes, it is not clear that such solutions are meaningful. The inversion method does not suffer from these drawbacks. Methods of deriving temperature profiles from refractivity profiles are then examined. It is shown that, although the temperature profiles are sensitive to small errors in the refractivity profile, accurate temperatures can be obtained, particularly at the deeper levels of the atmosphere. The ambiguities that arise when the occultation curve straddles the turbopause are briefly discussed.

  13. Several Well-observed Asteroidal Occultations in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Abramson, H.; Brooks, J.; Caton, D.; Clark, D.; Conard, S.; Cooke, B.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J.; Edberg, S.; Ellington, C.; Faircloth, J.; Herchak, S.; Iverson, E.; Jones, R.; Lucas, G.; Lyzenga, G.; Maley, P.; Martinez, L.; Menke, J.; Mroz, G.; Nolan, P.; Peterson, R.; Preston, S.; Rattley, G.; Ray, J.; Scheck, A.; Stamm, J.; Stanton, R.; Suggs, R.; Tatum, R.; Thomas, W.

    2011-10-01

    During 2010 IOTA observers in North America reported about 190 positive observations for 106 asteroid occultation events. For several asteroids, this included observations with multiple chords. For two events, an inversion model was available. An occultation by 16 Psyche on 2010 August 21 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 235.4 x 230.4 km. On 2010 December 24, an occultation by 93 Minerva produced a best-fit ellipse of 179.4 x 133.4 km. An occultation by 96 Aegle on 2010 October 29 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 124.9 x 88.0 km. An occultation by 105 Artemis on 2010 June 24 showed a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 x 92.0 km. An occultation by 375 Ursula on 2010 December 4 produced a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 km x 135.0 km. Of note are two events not summarized in this article. On 2010 August 31, an occultation by 695 Bella yielded a new double star. That event will be summarized in the JDSO. Finally, on 2010 April 6, an occultation of zeta Ophiuchi by 824 Anastasia was observed by 65 observers at 69 locations. Unfortunately a large shift in the path yielded only 4 chords. Results of that event, and all the events mentioned here, can be found on the North American Asteroidal Occultation Results web page.

  14. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  15. High-Time-Resolution White-Light Observations of Pluto's Occultation of P131.1 in 2002 August

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Elliot, J. L.; Babcock, B. A.; Ticehurst, D. R.; Tholen, D. J.; Person, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    We observed a 304-s FWHM occultation of the 15th magnitude (R) star P131.1 by Pluto on 2002 August 21 (UT) with the University of Hawaii's 2.2-m telescope on Mauna Kea. We used a Princeton Instruments/Roper front-illuminated CCD in frame-transfer mode at a 0.5 s cadence, with no filter in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Seeing was 0.4 arcsec; Charon was distinctly visible throughout alongside Pluto. We obtained images with our 0.2 arcsec pixels for astrometric purposes at various times before and after the occultation on the night of the occultation and on the preceding night. In our occultation run of 20 min, we binned 5x5 and obtained 2400 images. A nearby double star allowed monitoring of the sky transparency. The light curve shows the occultation at a higher cadence than the visible and infrared light curves obtained at adjacent telescopes. We discuss the fully reduced and calibrated light curve, the implications for models of haze in Pluto's atmosphere from the lack of complete occultation even at full depth, and the interpretation of positive spikes in the light curve during the emersion as waves or turbulence in Pluto's atmosphere. We compare these white-light observations with the infrared results obtained simultaneously and discuss implications for Pluto's current atmospheric structure. This work was supported by Research Corporation, by NASA through its New Horizons project, and by Williams College. The CCD is part of NSF-supported solar-eclipse research. We thank A. Pickles for assistance with scientific arrangements at Mauna Kea and S. P. Souza for help with preliminary data reduction and other aspects of the expedition.

  16. Role of homocysteinylation of ACE in endothelial dysfunction of arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, An; Pinto, John T.; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Wolin, Michael S.; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The direct impact of de novo synthesis of homocysteine (Hcy) and its reactive metabolites, Hcy-S-S-Hcy and Hcy thiolactone (HCTL), on vascular function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that Hcy synthesized within endothelial cells affects activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by direct homocysteinylation of its amino- and/or sulfhydryl moieties. This covalent modification enhances ACE reactivity toward angiotensin II (ANG II)-NADPH oxidase-superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction. Mesenteric and coronary arteries isolated from normal rats were incubated for 3 days with or without exogenous methionine (Met, 0.1–0.3 mM), a precursor to Hcy. Incubation of arteries in Met-free media resulted in time-dependent decreases in vascular Hcy formation. By contrast, vessels incubated with Met produced Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. There was a notably greater de novo synthesis of Hcy from endothelial than from smooth muscle cells. Enhanced levels of Hcy production significantly impaired shear stress-induced dilation and release of nitric oxide, events that are associated with elevated production of vascular superoxide. Each of these processes was attenuated by ANG II type I receptor blocker or ACE and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. In addition, in vitro exposure of purified ACE to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL resulted in formation of homocysteinylated ACE and an enhanced ACE activity. The enhanced ACE activity was confirmed in isolated coronary and mesenteric arteries that had been exposed directly to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL or after Met incubation. In conclusion, vasculature-derived Hcy initiates endothelial dysfunction that, in part, may be mediated by ANG II-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase in association with homocysteinylation of ACE. PMID:25416191

  17. An Investigation of the Seasonal Changes of Neptune's Atmosphere via a July 2008 Stellar Occultation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckert, Kyle; Chanover, N.; Miller, C.; Olkin, C.; Young, L.; Hammel, H.; Bauer, J.

    2012-10-01

    We extract physical atmospheric parameters from a July 23, 2008 single-chord stellar occultation of the star USNO-B1.0 0759-0739128 by Neptune using both light curve model fitting and numerical inversion techniques. We observed the occultation event using the Agile CCD camera mounted on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We acquired a series of 13,340 0.5 second images from approximately 07:14 to 09:05 UT. Neptune was observed through an airmass ranging from 1.57 to 1.46, with atmospheric seeing of approximately 0.6" throughout the event. We used the Johnson I-band filter, which was chosen to reduce the contribution of scattered light from Neptune. Methane absorption at 0.89 μm in Neptune’s upper stratosphere causes Neptune to appear darker at this bandpass, reducing the amount of scattered light in the image. A 0.5 second integration time with negligible frame-transfer provides an atmospheric sampling at the microbar pressure level of approximately 4 samples per scale height. Stellar occultations of Neptune were observed extensively in the 1980's to search for evidence of a ring system around the planet prior to the arrival of Voyager 2. No new occultations of Neptune have been published since 1990, due in part to the diffuse star field the planet has been traveling though. We compare the stratospheric temperature derived from the 2008 occultation to published temperatures of Neptune at similar atmospheric pressures derived from previous stellar occultations and from mid-IR spectral data collected within the last decade. The two leading hypotheses for explaining the observed temperature variations of Neptune are seasonal variability and variations in the Lyman-alpha flux received at Neptune due to the 11-year solar cycle. We investigate the effect each of these mechanisms may have on the gradual changes of Neptune’s average stratospheric temperature. This work is supported by funds from NASA grant NAG5-1247.

  18. Particle Sizes in Saturn’s Rings from Diffraction Signals in Cassini UVIS Occultation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Attree, Nicholas O.; Murray, Carl D.

    2015-11-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has illuminated many aspects of the planet’s extensive ring system, including its vast range of particle sizes. Constraints on the particle size distribution are critical for understanding the evolution of the ring system. Our investigation focuses on modeling diffraction signals in occultation data from the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) to measure the population of the smallest particles in Saturn’s rings.Occultation data from Cassini’s Radio Science Subsystem and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer also provide measurements of the size distribution. The amount of light diffracted by the occulting particles is a reflection of the ratio of the wavelength of light and the radius of the particles. We can utilize the diffraction signals at different wavelengths measured by different instruments to describe the particle size distribution of Saturn’s rings.The UVIS wavelength bandpass, 51.2-180 nm, is the shortest of these instruments, making it most sensitive to the smallest particles. We model the diffraction signals detected in stellar occultation data at ring edges and find that Saturn’s outer A ring lacks any significant population of sub-mm particles, but the average size of the smallest particles decreases from ~1.5 cm at the Encke Gap to ~4 mm at the outer edge of the A ring. Diffraction spikes have also been identified at the edge of the B ring and at sharp edges of ringlets in the C ring and Cassini Division, suggestive of mm-sized particles throughout the rings. We analyze solar occultations by the F ring and sporadically detect diffracted light, indicating the population of sub-mm particles responsible for the diffraction is transient or spatially variable. Comparisons with images from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem suggest that these diffraction signals coincide with nearby collisional events in the F ring core. This may indicate that such events release

  19. Statistical Characteristics of Elemental Abundance Ratios: Observations from the ACE Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    2015-05-01

    We statistically analyze the elemental galactic cosmic ray (GCR) composition measurements of elements 5 ≤ Z ≤ 28 within the energy range 30-500 MeV/nucleon from the CRIS instrument on board the ACE spacecraft in orbit about the L1 Lagrange point during the period from 1997 to 2014. Similarly to the last unusual solar minimum, the elevated elemental intensities of all heavy nuclei during the current weak solar maximum in 2014 are ˜40% higher than that of the previous solar maximum in 2002, which has been attributed to the weak modulation associated with low solar activity levels during the ongoing weakest solar maximum since the dawn of space age. In addition, the abundance ratios of heavy nuclei with respect to elemental oxygen are generally independent of kinetic energy per nucleon in the energy region 60-200 MeV/nuc, in good agreement with previous experiments. Furthermore, the abundance ratios of most relatively abundant species, except carbon, exhibit considerable solar-cycle variation, which are obviously positively correlated with the sunspot numbers with about one-year time lag. We also find that the percentage variation of abundance ratios for most elements are approximately identical. These preliminary results provide valuable insights into the characteristics of elemental heavy nuclei composition and place new and significant constraints on future GCR heavy nuclei propagation and modulation models.

  20. A single sub-kilometre Kuiper belt object from a stellar occultation in archival data.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, H E; Ofek, E O; Wenz, M; Sari, R; Gal-Yam, A; Livio, M; Nelan, E; Zucker, S

    2009-12-17

    The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects. Small, sub-kilometre-sized, Kuiper belt objects elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with an approximately 500-metre radius at a distance of 45 astronomical units. The probability of this event arising from random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about two per cent. Our survey yields a surface density of Kuiper belt objects with radii exceeding 250 metres of 2.1(-1.7)(+4.8) x 10(7) deg(-2), ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5sigma. The detection of only one event reveals a deficit of sub-kilometre-sized Kuiper belt objects compared to a population extrapolated from objects with radii exceeding 50 kilometres. This implies that sub-kilometre-sized objects are undergoing collisional erosion, just like debris disks observed around other stars. PMID:20016596

  1. New perspectives in occult hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Vicente; Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, defined as the presence of HCV RNA in liver and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable viral RNA in serum by standard assays, can be found in anti-HCV positive patients with normal serum levels of liver enzymes and in anti-HCV negative patients with persistently elevated liver enzymes of unknown etiology. Occult HCV infection is distributed worldwide and all HCV genotypes seem to be involved in this infection. Occult hepatitis C has been found not only in anti-HCV positive subjects with normal values of liver enzymes or in chronic hepatitis of unknown origin but also in several groups at risk for HCV infection such as hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV. This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Occult HCV infection seems to be less aggressive than chronic hepatitis C although patients affected by occult HCV may develop liver cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, anti-HCV negative patients with occult HCV may benefit from antiviral therapy with pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin. The persistence of very low levels of HCV RNA in serum and in PBMCs, along with the maintenance of specific T-cell responses against HCV-antigens observed during a long-term follow-up of patients with occult hepatitis C, indicate that occult HCV is a persistent infection that is not spontaneously eradicated. This is an updated report on diagnosis, epidemiology and clinical implications of occult HCV with special emphasis on anti-HCV negative cases. PMID:22736911

  2. FIRE_ACE_C130_RAMS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... NCAR C-130 Instrument:  Radiation Measurement System Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the ... Parameters:  Upwelling and Downwelling Total Solar Flux Infrared Flux and Narrowband Flux Order Data:  ...

  3. The Treatment of the Occult in General Encyclopedias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnenfeld, Gary F.

    This paper is a content analysis of three general encyclopedias, "Encyclopedia Americana" (EA), "Encyclopaedia Brittanica" (EB), and "World Book Encyclopedia" (WBC), which quantifies the treatment of the occult. Entries are selected from each by starting with the article "Occultism" and tracing all cross-references. Cross-references are likewise…

  4. Asteroidal Occultation by 82 Alkmene and the Inversion Model Match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Beard, T.; McPartlin, C.; Morgan, W.; Schindler, K.; Wolf, J.; Bardecker, J.; Anderson, W.; Arrowsmith, C.; Gimple, B.; Coburn, C.; Hill, H.; Smoot, T.

    2015-04-01

    On 2014 September 18, the asteroid 82 Alkmene occulted HIP 99229 for observers in the western United States. Four well-spaced chords allowed matching these observations with one of the two convex shape models available for this asteroid. Results of this event can be found on the North American Asteroidal Occultation Results webpage.

  5. Occultations by Uranus and Neptune - 1991-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemola, Arnold R.; Mink, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a photographic plate search are presented for stars as faint as mv = 14 which may be occulted by Uranus or Neptune or their rings between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 1999. Circumstances for the closest approach of Uranus to 76 stars and Neptune to 18 stars are presented. Occultations by Neptune's ring 'arcs' are predicted in 1992, 1997, and 1999.

  6. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test....

  7. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test....

  8. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test....

  9. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test....

  10. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test....

  11. Application of the Langley plot for calibration of sun sensors for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Mauldin, L. ED, III; Stump, Charles W.; Reagan, John A.; Fabert, Milton G.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) sun sensor is described. This system consists of two energy-balancing silicon detectors which provide coarse azimuth and elevation control signals and a silicon photodiode array which provides top and bottom solar edge data for fine elevation control. All three detectors were calibrated on a mountaintop near Tucson, Ariz., using the Langley plot technique. The conventional Langley plot technique was modified to allow calibration of the two coarse detectors, which operate wideband. A brief description of the test setup is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that is now being developed for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  12. An observational study of the nightside ionospheres of Mars and Venus with radio occultation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Kliore, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Using nightside electron density profiles obtained with radio occultation data from the Viking orbiters, the nightside ionospheres of Mars and Venus are investigated. It is shown that the Mars nightside ionosphere is generally weaker than the Venus nightside ionosphere, and, when it is present, the peak altitude is higher. Otherwise, there is considerable similarity. In particular, the dependence of peak density on solar zenith angle in the range of the Viking nightside observations (90-130 deg) is found to be similar for both planets.

  13. Retrieval Algorithms for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert E.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2009-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) provided high quality measurements of key middle atmosphere constituents, aerosol characteristics, and temperature for 14 years (1991-2005). This report is an outline of the Level 2 retrieval algorithms, and it also describes the great care that was taken in characterizing the instrument prior to launch and throughout its mission life. It represents an historical record of the techniques used to analyze the data and of the steps that must be considered for the development of a similar experiment for future satellite missions.

  14. Radio occultation experiments with INAF-IRA radiotelescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.

    The Radio Occultation research program performed at the Medicina and Noto Radioastronomical Stations of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF) - Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA) includes observations of spacecraft by satellite and satellite by satellite events. The Lunar Radio Occultation (LRO) part of the program consists in collecting data of the lunar Total Electron Content (TEC), at different limb longitudes and at different time, in order to study long term variation of the Moon's ionosphere. The LRO program started at Medicina in September 2006 with the observation of the European probe SMART-1 during its impact on the lunar soil. It proceeded in 2007 with the observation of the lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus, and with the observation of Mars in 2008. On this occasion the probes Cassini, Venus Express, Mars Express, Mars Reconaissance Orbiter and Mars Odissey were respectively occulted by the moon. On Dec 1st 2008 a Venus lunar occultation occurred. On that occasion we performed the first Italian-VLBI (I-VLBI) tracking experiment by detecting the carrier signals coming from the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft with both the IRA radiotelescopes together with the Matera antenna of the Italian Space Agency. The second part of the radio occultation program includes the observation of satellite by satellite occultation events, as well as mutual occultations of Jupiter satellites. These events are referred to as mutual phenomena (PHEMU). These observations are aimed to measure the radio flux variation during the occultation and to derive surface spatial characteristics such as Io's hot spots. In this work preliminary results of the Radio Occultation program will be presented.

  15. Scientific tradeoffs in pinhole/occulter facility accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1988-01-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) consists of state-of-the-art instruments for the study of particle acceleration in the solar corona, and uses a large structure to obtain very high angular resolution. P/OF has been studied in the past as an attached payload for the Space Shuttle, and has been the subject of study by a NASA Science Working Group (P/OFSWG). Appendix A lists various technical studies and reports carried out under the auspices of P/OFSWG and the Program Development Office of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Under the rationalization of NASA flight opportunities following the Challenger disaster, and the beginning of the Space Station Freedom program, the sortie-mode deployment of P/OF seemed less efficient and desirable. Thus, NASA decided to reconsider P/OF for deployment on the Space Station Freedom. The technical studies for this deployment continue at the present and will evolve as our knowledge of Space Station architecture and capabilities increase. MSFC contracted with Teledyne Brown Engineering for these technical studies.

  16. Scientific tradeoffs in pinhole/occulter facility accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1988-12-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) consists of state-of-the-art instruments for the study of particle acceleration in the solar corona, and uses a large structure to obtain very high angular resolution. P/OF has been studied in the past as an attached payload for the Space Shuttle, and has been the subject of study by a NASA Science Working Group (P/OFSWG). Appendix A lists various technical studies and reports carried out under the auspices of P/OFSWG and the Program Development Office of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Under the rationalization of NASA flight opportunities following the Challenger disaster, and the beginning of the Space Station Freedom program, the sortie-mode deployment of P/OF seemed less efficient and desirable. Thus, NASA decided to reconsider P/OF for deployment on the Space Station Freedom. The technical studies for this deployment continue at the present and will evolve as our knowledge of Space Station architecture and capabilities increase. MSFC contracted with Teledyne Brown Engineering for these technical studies.

  17. Artificial solar eclipse experiment MA-148

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuli, R. T.; Jenness, M. D.; Lunde, A. N.; Young, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    On July 19, 1975, the Apollo spacecraft successfully occulted the solar disk from the field of view of a camera mounted in the Soyuz spacecraft while performing a spacecraft separation maneuver to permit the outer solar corona to be viewable by the Soyuz camera. The camera operated automatically, and 55 frames were developed for scientific analysis.

  18. ACE inhibitor potentiation of bradykinin-induced venoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Markus; Blaukat, Andree; Bara, Agnieszka T; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Busse, Rudi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors exert their cardiovascular effects not only by preventing the formation of angiotensin II (AII), but also by promoting the accumulation of bradykinin in or at the vessel wall. In addition, certain ACE inhibitors have been shown to augment the vasodilator response to bradykinin, presumably by an interaction at the level of the B2 receptor. We have investigated whether this is a specific effect of the ACE inhibitor class of compounds in isolated endothelium-denuded segments of the rabbit jugular vein where bradykinin elicits a constrictor response which is exclusively mediated by activation of the B2 receptor. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat (⩽ 3 nM) enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin three to four fold. Captopril and enalaprilat were less active by approximately one and quinaprilat by two orders of magnitude. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat, on the other hand, had no effect on the constrictor response to AII or the dilator response to acetylcholine. The bradykinin-potentiating effect of the ACE inhibitors was not mimicked by inhibitors of amino-, carboxy-, metallo- or serine peptidases or the synthetic ACE substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, at a concentration which almost abolished the residual ACE activity in the vessel wall. In contrast, angiotensin-(1–7) (10 μM), an angiotensin I metabolite, significantly enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin. Ramiprilat did not alter the binding of [3H]-bradykinin to a membrane fraction prepared from endothelium-denuded rabbit jugular veins or to cultured fibroblasts, and there was no ACE inhibitor-sensitive, bradykinin-induced cleavage of the B2 receptor in cultured endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that ACE inhibitors selectively potentiate the B2 receptor-mediated vascular effects of bradykinin. Their relative efficacy appears to be independent of their ACE-inhibiting properties and might be related to differences in molecule structure

  19. Measurements of Heavy Ion Differential Streaming with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF and ACE/SWICS at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janitzek, Nils; Berger, Lars; Taut, Andreas; Drews, Christian; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Helios measurements in the early 1980s showed the existence of a systematic velocity difference, called "differential streaming", between solar wind bulk protons and alpha particles with the alphas streaming faster than the protons. The absolute differential speed between these species decreases with radial distance to the Sun and decreasing proton speed. In the fast wind it was measured to be approximately half of the local Alfvén speed. However, the detailed processes of acceleration and regulation of differential streaming are still not well understood. A proposed key process is resonant wave particle interaction between the ions and Alfvén waves near the ion-cyclotron frequency which is able to accelerate the alphas preferentially due to their higher mass-per-charge ratio. Measuring the differential speed of a wide set of solar wind heavy ions and therefore extending the mass-per-charge range significantly can provide additional information on the underlying processes that we cannot infer from the alphas and protons alone. We analysed data measured at L1 by SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF in 1996 and ACE/SWICS from 2001 to 2010. Both instruments are linear time-of-flight mass spectrometers which measure the ions' radial 1D velocity distributions with a cadence of 5 and 12 minutes, respectively. Comparing the mean ion speed, with the mean proton speed measured routinely by the SOHO/CELIAS/MTOF/PM and ACE/SWEPAM, respectively, we obtain the differential streaming for major charge states of solar wind carbon, oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon and iron. In the case of the SWICS data the magnetometer on-board ACE (ACE/MAG) allows us to directly relate the differential streaming to the ambient Alfvén velocity while the lack of in-situ magnetic field measurements on SOHO is compensated by a B-field extrapolation from the WIND spacecraft (WIND/MAG) to the SOHO site. Both instruments show a similar result: significant differential streaming between heavy ions and protons on the

  20. Contemplating Synergistic Algorithms for the NASA ACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David O.; Marchand, Roger; Ackerman, Steven A.; Platnick, Steven E.; Fridlind, Ann; Cooper, Steven; Vane, Deborah G.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2013-01-01

    ACE is a proposed Tier 2 NASA Decadal Survey mission that will focus on clouds, aerosols, and precipitation as well as ocean ecosystems. The primary objective of the clouds component of this mission is to advance our ability to predict changes to the Earth's hydrological cycle and energy balance in response to climate forcings by generating observational constraints on future science questions, especially those associated with the effects of aerosol on clouds and precipitation. ACE will continue and extend the measurement heritage that began with the A-Train and that will continue through Earthcare. ACE planning efforts have identified several data streams that can contribute significantly to characterizing the properties of clouds and precipitation and the physical processes that force these properties. These include dual frequency Doppler radar, high spectral resolution lidar, polarimetric visible imagers, passive microwave and submillimeter wave radiometry. While all these data streams are technologically feasible, their total cost is substantial and likely prohibitive. It is, therefore, necessary to critically evaluate their contributions to the ACE science goals. We have begun developing algorithms to explore this trade space. Specifically, we will describe our early exploratory algorithms that take as input the set of potential ACE-like data streams and evaluate critically to what extent each data stream influences the error in a specific cloud quantity retrieval.

  1. Processing GPS Occultation Data To Characterize Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Kursinski, Emil; Leroy, Stephen; Lijima, Byron; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Romans, Larry; Ao, Chi

    2005-01-01

    GOAS [Global Positioning System (GPS) Occultation Analysis System] is a computer program that accepts signal-occultation data from GPS receivers aboard low-Earth-orbiting satellites and processes the data to characterize the terrestrial atmosphere and, in somewhat less comprehensive fashion, the ionosphere. GOAS is very robust and can be run in an unattended semi-operational processing mode. It features sophisticated retrieval algorithms that utilize the amplitudes and phases of the GPS signals. It incorporates a module that, using an assumed atmospheric refractivity profile, simulates the effects of the retrieval processing system, including the GPS receiver. GOAS utilizes the GIPSY software for precise determination of orbits as needed for calibration. The GOAS output for the Earth s troposphere and mid-to-lower stratosphere consists of high-resolution (<1 km) profiles of density, temperature, pressure, atmospheric refractivity, bending angles of signals, and water-vapor content versus altitude from the Earth s surface to an altitude of 30 km. The GOAS output for the ionosphere consists of electron-density profiles from an altitude of about 50 km to the altitude of a satellite, plus parameters related to the rapidly varying structure of the electron density, particularly in the E layer of the ionosphere.

  2. Faster Processing for Inverting GPS Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ao, Chi

    2004-01-01

    A document outlines a computational method that can be incorporated into two prior methods used to invert Global Positioning System (GPS) occultation data [signal data acquired by a low-Earth-orbiting satellite as either this or the GPS satellite rises above or falls below the horizon] to obtain information on altitude-dependent properties of the atmosphere. The two prior inversion methods, known as back propagation and canonical transform, are computationally expensive because for each occultation, they involve numerical evaluation of a large number of diffraction-like spatial integrals. The present method involves an angular-spectrum-based phase-extrapolation approximation in which each data point is associated with a plane-wave component that propagates in a unique direction from the orbit of the receiving satellite to intersect a straight line tangent to the orbit at a nearby point. This approximation enables the use of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs), which apply only to data collected along a straight-line trajectory. The computation of the diffraction-like integrals in the angular-spectrum domain by use of FFTs takes only seconds, whereas previously, it took minutes.

  3. Saturn's shape from Cassini radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F.; Schinder, P. J.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.; Kliore, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    We report the shape of Saturn's isobaric surfaces between 0.1 mbar and ~1 bar determined from more than thirty Cassini radio-occultation soundings between 70 S and 60 N. The retrieval of pressure vs. planetary radius requires knowledge of the shape of the atmosphere. To do this, we use the gravitational coefficients given by Jacobson et al. (2006) and the angular velocities at the cloud-top level from the Voyager winds reported by Sanchez-Lavega et al. (2000). To keep the ray-tracing inversions tractable, we assume that the atmosphere is locally axisymmetric and that its angular velocity is a function of the distance from the planetary rotation axis; except for near the equator, the latter is equivalent to assuming that the winds are barotropic. Note that the "barotropic" assumption--which permits the use of a geopotential incorporating both gravity and differential rotation--need only apply in the atmospheric shell probed by the occultations. The retrieved isobaric surfaces show evidence of moderate baroclinicity. For example, the deviations of the 1-bar and 100-mbar surfaces from the geopotential surface assumed in the ray tracing are of order 10-20 km, less than a pressure scale height.

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    accessible with the availability of the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on ISS. To meet these goals, the ACE experiment is being built-up in stages, with the availability of confocal microscopy being the ultimate objective. Supported by NASAs Physical Sciences Research Program, ESAESTEC, and the authors respective governments.

  5. Coherence between interplanetary magnetic field at ACE and geomagnetic observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.

    µnullDespite considerable evidence that oscillations in geomagnetic observatory data are driven by oscillations in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the subject remains contentious. At least two of the reasons for this are physical: first, geomagnetic data consists of background components plus local effects due to ionospheric currents and convection so that the data is complicated; second, at frequencies below about 10 uHz, gas pressure in the solar wind is usually larger than magnetic pressure and, because most of the power is at low frequencies, the more easily observed effects of the gas pressure dominates. The third reason is that much of the analysis of these effects has been done using statistical techniques that are poorly matched to the task. Here we use long sections of data at one-minute resolution from the St. John's, Ottawa, and Victoria observatories together with IMF data from the ACE spacecraft. It is well established that solar p-modes, (approximately 5 minutes period) of a given degree are spaced by approximately 136 uHz and, as one cannot separate the various degrees in magnetic field data, long data sections - more than ten days - are required to obtain adequate frequency resolution. Using the nine series of geomagnetic data as one group and the three from ACE as a second, we compute canonical coherences between the two groups. The peak coherences, mostly corresponding to low degree solar modes, are so high that they cannot occur by chance. These peaks are superimposed on a coherent background, possibly from unresolved modes or from a fossil turbulence signature. The coherences are higher at high frequencies, 5 mHz and above, than they are at low frequencies.

  6. [Job satisfaction among the professionals of AceS Baixo Vouga II].

    PubMed

    Santana, Silvina; Cerdeira, José

    2011-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a measure of quality of life at work and is related to emotional states. The interest for this theme is increasing and, in the last years, many studies have attempted to demonstrate its relation with professional performance. Primary care professionals are in the first line of the Serviço Nacional de Saúde (SNS). Therefore, it is necessary that they feel satisfaction with their jobs, in order to perform the tasks with the quality required. Several factors seem to have impact in the satisfaction of these professionals, such as payment, promotion, recognition from supervisors and peers, physical conditions at work and available resources, opportunities for personal development, among others. Insatisfaction may lead to absentism and in the limit to job quit. The main objective of this work is to study job satisfaction among the professionals working at the health centers of ACeS Baixo Vouga II, namely, the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between job characteristics and considering job quit as a serious option. All the professionals working in the four health centers were inquired. Results show that job characteristics are defined by six dimensions: leadership and supervision, task characteristics and autonomy, payment, personal and professional development and promotion, peers and relations inside the organization and work environment. Globally, payment and opportunities for personal and professional development and promotion are perceived at low level by all the professional groups. Results also show that there are differences by gender and professional groups regarding job satisfaction and the will to quit job. Considering the specificity of the tasks performed by these professionals, measures should be taken in order to improve job satisfaction in the Portuguese health centers. PMID:22849951

  7. Air-cooling mathematical analysis as inferred from the air-temperature observation during the 1st total occultation of the Sun of the 21st century at Lusaka, Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.; Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze mathematically air temperature measurements made near the ground by the Williams College expedition to observe the first total occultation of the Sun [TOS (commonly known as a total solar eclipse)] of the 21st century in Lusaka, Zambia, in the afternoon of June 21, 2001. To do so, we have revisited some earlier and contemporary methods to test their usefulness for this analysis. Two of these methods, based on a radiative scheme for solar radiation modeling and that has been originally applied to a morning occultation, have successfully been combined to obtain the delay function for an afternoon occultation, via derivation of the so-called instantaneous temperature profiles. For this purpose, we have followed the suggestion given by the third of these previously applied methods to calculate this function, although by itself it failed to do so at least for this occultation. The analysis has taken into account the limb-darkening, occultation and obscuration functions. The delay function obtained describes quite fairly the lag between the solar radiation variation and the delayed air temperature measured. Also, in this investigation, a statistical study has been carried out to get information on the convection activity produced during this event. For that purpose, the fluctuations generated by turbulence has been studied by analyzing variance and residuals. The results, indicating an irreversible steady decrease of this activity, are consistent with those published by other studies. Finally, the air temperature drop due to this event is well estimated by applying the empirical scheme given by the fourth of the previously applied methods, based on the daily temperature amplitude and the standardized middle time of the occultation. It is demonstrated then that by using a simple set of air temperature measurements obtained during solar occultations, along with some supplementary data, a simple mathematical analysis can be achieved by applying of the four

  8. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  9. Asteroid occultations today and tomorrow: toward the GAIA era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Delbo, M.

    2007-11-01

    Context: Observation of star occultations is a powerful tool to determine shapes and sizes of asteroids. This is key information necessary for studying the evolution of the asteroid belt and to calibrate indirect methods of size determination, such as the models used to analyze thermal infrared observations. Up to now, the observation of asteroid occultations is an activity essentially secured by amateur astronomers equipped with small, portable equipments. However, the accuracy of the available ephemeris prevents accurate predictions of the occultation events for objects smaller than ~100 km. Aims: We investigate current limits in predictability and observability of asteroid occultations, and we study their possible evolution in the future, when high accuracy asteroid orbits and star positions (such as those expected from the mission Gaia of the European Space Agency) will be available. Methods: We use a simple model for asteroid ephemeris uncertainties and numerical algorithms for estimating the limits imposed by the instruments, assuming realistic CCD performances and asteroid size distribution, to estimate the expected occultation rate under different conditions. Results: We show that high accuracy ephemerides which will be available in the future will extend toward much smaller asteroids the possibility of observing asteroid occultations, greatly increasing the number of events and objects involved. A complete set of size measurements down to ~10 km main belt asteroids could be obtained in a few years, provided that a small network of ground-based 1m telescopes are devoted to occultation studies.

  10. Science and software support for spacecraft solar occultation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hessameddin, G.; Becher, J.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature dependence of absorption coefficients of ozone was studied between 7567 A and 3630 A. When the gas was cooled from room temperature to -108 C, an overall increase in the absorption coefficients was noticed. The maximum increase of 5% occurred at lambda = 6020 A. In general, the absorption is linearly dependent on temperature.

  11. Haplotypes extending across ACE are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Feuk, Lars; Bennet, Anna M; Johansson, Boo; Wiman, Björn; de Faire, Ulf; Cairns, Nigel J; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brookes, Anthony J; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2003-04-15

    Numerous genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but, with the exception of a demonstrated association with the epsilon 4 allele of APOE, findings have not been consistently replicated across populations. One of the most widely studied is the gene for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE ). A meta-analysis of published data on a common Alu indel polymorphism in ACE was performed which indicated highly significant association of the insertion allele with AD (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19 - 1.41; P=4 x 10(-8)). To further explore the influence of ACE on AD, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in five independent populations represented by over 3100 individuals. Analyses based upon single markers and haplotypes revealed strong evidence of association in case-control models and also in a model examining the influence of variation in ACE upon cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta42 peptide (Abeta42). The most significant evidence for association with AD was found for an SNP, A-262T, located in the ACE promoter (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.33 -1.94; P=2 x 10(-5)). Estimates of population attributable risk for the common allele of this SNP suggest that it, or an allele in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it, may contribute to as much as 35% of AD in the general population. Results support a model whereby decreased ACE activity may influence AD susceptibility by a mechanism involving beta-amyloid metabolism. PMID:12668609

  12. The occultation of Kappa Geminorum by Eros. [stellar occultation observed for asteroid size and shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleary, B.; Marsden, B. G.; Dragon, R.; Hauser, E.; Mcgrath, M.; Backus, P.; Robkoff, H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses predictions and observations of the occultation of Kappa Gem by (433) Eros on January 24, 1975. Several positive and negative observations made in western New England are described. Local circumstances for the occultation are reconstructed, and the size and shape of Eros are determined analytically as well as graphically. The calculations yield two extremes for the cross section: a circle 23 km in diameter or a somewhat irregular figure 20 km by 6 or 7 km. Arguments based on the expected albedo of the asteroid suggest that the circle should be warped into an ellipse 21 by 13 km or that the irregular figure might be one component of a dumbbell-like profile.

  13. Flight System Implementation of the Spacecraft Occulter System for Theia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; Theia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the Theia program is to characterize Earth-like planets around nearby stars. Theia utilizes two formation-flying spacecraft in an L2 orbit - an observatory and a free flying occulter. Characterization involves looking for signs of life by observing molecular signatures and the presence of water vapor. A free flying occulter spacecraft provides starlight suppression by blocking the starlight while allowing planet light to pass. A diffraction limited monolithic optical telescope is provided for observing planet light passed by the occulter spacecraft. The occulter spacecraft and observatory are flown with a separation of 38, 700 km to 72,000 km (depending on telescope aperture). The Theia system design greatly simplifies design, manufacturing, modeling, and testing requirements compared to a stand-alone high performance internal coronagraph. Design advantages include having thermal/mechanical specifications approaching those of a conventional telescope requiring minimal actuator count. Standard materials and manufacturing approaches apply. End-to-end testing and facilities requirements are standard. The occulter is comprised of up to 30 petals constructed of a dimensionally stable material. Each petal is structurally reinforced for ground handling and testing purposes. An electro-mechanically actuated deployment utilizes standard space qualified mechanism designs to achieve up to a 50m deployed diameter. Multiple layers ensure performance over 5 years of micro-meteroid degradation. The occulter spacecraft is a modular design built of dimensionally stable composite material with 6 bays mounted to a propulsion sub-assembly. The occulter spacecraft uses ion thrusters to achieve its required delta-V over its lifetime and to maintain a position tolerance of 1 m with respect to the observatory. A traditional reaction wheel system is used to maintain orientation. The occulter and occulter spacecraft are compatible with the Atlas 5 launch vehicle.

  14. Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

    2002-02-14

    The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

  15. Defective intestinal amino acid absorption in Ace2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Dustin; Camargo, Simone M R; Ramadan, Tamara; Schäfer, Matthias; Mariotta, Luca; Herzog, Brigitte; Huggel, Katja; Wolfer, David; Werner, Sabine; Penninger, Josef M; Verrey, François

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the main intestinal and kidney luminal neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19) lead to Hartnup disorder, a condition that is characterized by neutral aminoaciduria and in some cases pellagra-like symptoms. These latter symptoms caused by low-niacin are thought to result from defective intestinal absorption of its precursor L-tryptophan. Since Ace2 is necessary for intestinal B(0)AT1 expression, we tested the impact of intestinal B(0)AT1 absence in ace2 null mice. Their weight gain following weaning was decreased, and Na(+)-dependent uptake of B(0)AT1 substrates measured in everted intestinal rings was defective. Additionally, high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport of L-proline, presumably via SIT1 (Slc6a20), was absent, whereas glucose uptake via SGLT1 (Slc5a1) was not affected. Measurements of small intestine luminal amino acid content following gavage showed that more L-tryptophan than other B(0)AT1 substrates reach the ileum in wild-type mice, which is in line with its known lower apparent affinity. In ace2 null mice, the absorption defect was confirmed by a severalfold increase of L-tryptophan and of other neutral amino acids reaching the ileum lumen. Furthermore, plasma and muscle levels of glycine and L-tryptophan were significantly decreased in ace2 null mice, with other neutral amino acids displaying a similar trend. A low-protein/low-niacin diet challenge led to differential changes in plasma amino acid levels in both wild-type and ace2 null mice, but only in ace2 null mice to a stop in weight gain. Despite the combination of low-niacin with a low-protein diet, plasma niacin concentrations remained normal in ace2 null mice and no pellagra symptoms, such as photosensitive skin rash or ataxia, were observed. In summary, mice lacking Ace2-dependent intestinal amino acid transport display no total niacin deficiency nor clear pellagra symptoms, even under a low-protein and low-niacin diet, despite gross amino acid homeostasis alterations

  16. Stellar occultations by planetary rings: 3 July 1989 28 SGR occultation by Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.; Hubbard, B.

    1991-01-01

    The near infrared observations of the 3 Jul. 1989 occultation of 28 Sagittarii by Saturn and its rings made from seven different telescopes spread around the world were reduced and synthesized. These observations were combined with Voyager data to study the dynamical state of Saturn's rings. This unique event, which occurred eight years after the Voyager flybys, provides a temporal baseline over which kinematical and dynamical phenomena within the rings may be examined in detail.

  17. The occultation of HIP 107302 by Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, A. A.; Beisker, W.; Casas, R.; Schnabel, C.; Massallé, A.; Díaz-Martin, M. C.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Eppich, P.; Bath, K.-L.; Tsamis, V.; Tigani, K.; Farmakopoulos, A.; Douvris, A.; Liakos, A.; Eberle, A.; Farago, O.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: Occultations of bright stars by planets provide information on the state of their atmospheres. An occultation of the bright star 45 Capricornii (HIP 107302) by Jupiter occurred on the night of 3/4 August 2009. Methods: The event was observed at multiple sites in Europe, Africa and South America and with instruments ranging in aperture from 0.4 m to 2.2 m. All observations, except one, were carried out in methane absorption bands centred at 0.89 μm and 2.2 μm to minimise the planetary contribution to the measured stellar flux. Following the application of special post-processing techniques, differential photometry was performed. Nearby bright satellites were used as reference sources. Results: Fifteen lightcurves were obtained. The photometric time series for fourteen of these were fitted to a model atmosphere of constant scale height (H). Estimates of H for most lightcurves lie within the range 20-30 km with an inverse-variance weighted mean of 23.6 ± 0.4 km, in good agreement with previous works. A comparison between half-light times at ingress and at egress implies an astrometric offset of 10-15 mas in Jupiter's position relative to the star. Five lightcurves - two for ingress and three for egress - were numerically inverted into profiles of pressure versus temperature. Isothermal, mutually consistent behaviour is observed within the pressure range 3-10 μbar. The inferred temperature of 165 ± 5 K is consistent with, but slightly higher than, that measured by the Galileo Probe at 5° S latitude in 1995 at the same pressure level. Subtraction of isothermal models for nine cases show the presence of at least one, and possibly two, non-isothermal layers a few tens of km below the half-light datum. Their altitudes are similar to those of features previously reported during the occultation of HIP 9369 in 1999. Our temperature estimates are consistent with the expected small magnitude of the perturbation of the atmosphere following the impact event on Jupiter

  18. An investigation of the temperature variations in Neptune’s upper stratosphere including a July 2008 stellar occultation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckert, K.; Chanover, N. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Hammel, H. B.; Miller, C.; Bauer, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    We extracted physical atmospheric parameters from a 23 July 2008 single-chord stellar occultation of the star USNO-B1.0 0759-0739128 (I-band magnitude of 12.60) by Neptune using a light curve model fitting technique. We observed the occultation using the Agile CCD camera mounted on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We found isothermal temperatures of 116.5 ± 12.0 K and 154.0 ± 13.0 K for the immersion and emersion light curve profiles, respectively. We compare the stratospheric temperatures derived from the 2008 occultation to published temperatures of Neptune at similar atmospheric pressures derived from previous stellar occultations observed in the 1980s, and from long-term photometric measurements made routinely since the 1983-1990 occultation campaign. No obvious long-term temporal variation in stratospheric isothermal temperature is present. Fluctuations in the fitted isothermal temperature values, on the order of 20 K, is evident. We explore several hypotheses to explain the observed temperature variability of Neptune’s stratosphere, including seasonal variability, variations in the Lyman-α flux received at Neptune due to the 11-year solar cycle, diurnal variations, varying insolation due to heliocentric variability, IR and UV heating by hydrocarbons, aerosol precipitation, inertia-gravity wave dissipation, and effects due to atmospheric tidal perturbations by Triton. We investigate the effects of these mechanisms on the gradual temporal changes of Neptune’s stratospheric temperature and conclude that local variations in stratospheric temperature during each event, on the order of 20 K, are dominated by viscous dissipation of inertia-gravity waves.

  19. Occultations by Pluto and Charon - 1990-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mink, Douglas J.; Klemola, Arnold R.; Buie, Marc W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a photographic plate search for stars as faint as V = 16 which may be occulted by Pluto or Charon between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 1999 are presented. Circumstances for the closest approach of Pluto to 32 stars and Charon to 28 stars are presented. Photometric information is given for some of the brightest stars found in a search of the Space Telescope Guide Star Catalog for Pluto occultations. Finding charts from Space Telescope Guide Star plates are provided for some of the best events. The brightest star (V = 12.7) may be occulted by both Pluto and Charon on September 26, 1999.

  20. CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

    1984-11-01

    A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

  1. Bone scanning in the detection of occult fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Batillas, J.; Vasilas, A.; Pizzi, W.F.; Gokcebay, T.

    1981-07-01

    The potential role of bone scanning in the early detection of occult fractures following acute trauma was investigated. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained in patients with major clinical findings and negative or equivocal roentgenograms following trauma. Bone scanning facilitated the prompt diagnosis of occult fractures in the hip, knee, wrist, ribs and costochondral junctions, sternum, vertebrae, sacrum, and coccyx. Several illustrative cases are presented. Roentgenographic confirmation occurred following a delay of days to weeks and, in some instances, the roentgenographic findings were subtle and could be easily overlooked. This study demonstrates bone scanning to be invaluable and definitive in the prompt detection of occult fractures.

  2. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry: Modification of Participant Selection Criteria and... (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...) National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning Automated Commercial Environment...

  3. Ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron contents inferred from radio occultations and global ionospheric maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Casado, G.; Juan, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Rovira-Garcia, A.; Aragon-Angel, A.

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a methodology to extract the separate contributions of the ionosphere and the plasmasphere to the vertical total electron content, without relying on a fixed altitude to perform that separation. The method combines two previously developed and tested techniques, namely, the retrieval of electron density profiles from radio occultations using an improved Abel inversion technique and a two-component model for the topside ionosphere plus protonosphere. Taking measurements of the total electron content from global ionospheric maps and radio occultations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate/FORMOSAT-3 constellation, the ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron contents are calculated for a sample of observations covering 2007, a period of low solar and geomagnetic activity. The results obtained are shown to be consistent with previous studies for the last solar minimum period and with model calculations, confirming the reversal of the winter anomaly, the hemispheric asymmetry of the semiannual anomaly, and the existence in the plasmasphere of an annual anomaly in the South American sector of longitudes. The analysis of the respective fractional contributions from the ionosphere and the plasmasphere to the total electron content shows quantitatively that during the night the plasmasphere makes the largest contribution, peaking just before sunrise and during winter. On the other hand, the fractional contribution from the ionosphere reaches a maximum value around noon, which is nearly independent of season and geomagnetic latitude.

  4. Atmospheric Drag, Occultation `N' Ionospheric Scintillation (ADONIS) mission proposal. Alpbach Summer School 2013 Team Orange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Kempf, Yann; Perakis, Nikolaos; Górski, Jędrzej; Edl, Martina; Urbář, Jaroslav; Dósa, Melinda; Gini, Francesco; Roberts, Owen W.; Schindler, Stefan; Schemmer, Maximilian; Steenari, David; Joldžić, Nina; Glesnes Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine; Sarria, David; Volwerk, Martin; Praks, Jaan

    2015-02-01

    The Atmospheric Drag, Occultation `N' Ionospheric Scintillation mission (ADONIS) studies the dynamics of the terrestrial thermosphere and ionosphere in dependency of solar events over a full solar cycle in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The objectives are to investigate satellite drag with in-situ measurements and the ionospheric electron density profiles with radio occultation and scintillation measurements. A constellation of two satellites provides the possibility to gain near real-time data (NRT) about ionospheric conditions over the Arctic region where current coverage is insufficient. The mission shall also provide global high-resolution data to improve assimilative ionospheric models. The low-cost constellation can be launched using a single Vega rocket and most of the instruments are already space-proven allowing for rapid development and good reliability. From July 16 to 25, 2013, the Alpbach Summer School 2013 was organised by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), the European Space Agency (ESA), the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) and the association of Austrian space industries Austrospace in Alpbach, Austria. During the workshop, four teams of 15 students each independently developed four different space mission proposals on the topic of "Space Weather: Science, Missions and Systems", supported by a team of tutors. The present work is based on the mission proposal that resulted from one of these teams' efforts.

  5. Overview of Aircraft Operations during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinfeld, J. H.; Huebert, B.

    2001-12-01

    The NSF/NCAR C-130 flew 19 flights out of Iwakuni, Japan between March 31 and May 4, 2001, and data were collected on 7 ferry flights crossing the Pacific. Many of the instruments derived their air from low-turbulence inlets, which enabled studies of supermicron particles vs altitude. Several flights sampled two heavy dust outbreaks, where the aerosol mass concentration exceeded 1000 †g/m3. Size-dependent chemical measurements indicated that this dust did not dramatically change the sulfate size distribution (by causing SO2 to convert to sulfate on its alkaline surfaces), since the vast majority of the sulfate was still in a submicron accumulation mode. Similarly, while the scattering in dust was dominated by large particles, the particle absorption was almost exclusively submicron. We found extensive layering, with as many as 6 distinct dust layers (and clean layers between them) in one profile to 6 km. During ACE-Asia research missions were also conducted using a modified De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft operated by the California Institute of Technology and the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft studies (CIRPAS). A total of 19 research flights were conducted between March 31 and May 1, 2001 from the base of operations at the MCAS Iwakuni, Japan. The sampling area included portions of the Sea of Japan south and east of the Korean Peninsula, the East China Sea between China, Japan and Korea, and the Philippine Sea south of Japan. Collected aerosols were analyzed to determine their chemical composition and physical properties such as size distribution, hygroscopic growth, light scattering and absorption properties. Simultaneous radiative measurements were also made using the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14), which measured solar beam transmission at 14 wavelengths (353-1558 nm), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol

  6. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  7. Profiling Saturn's rings by radio occultation

    SciTech Connect

    Marouf, E.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Rosen, P.A.

    1986-10-01

    The development of reconstruction algorithms that correct for diffraction effects in radio occultation measurements is described. The reciprocal Fresnel transform relationship between the complex amplitude of the observed coherent signal and the complex microwave transmittance of the rings is derived using the Huygens-Fresnel formulation of the diffraction problem. The effects of the finite data segment width, the uncertainties in the Fresnel scale, systematic phase errors in the kernel of the inverse transform, reference oscillator instabilities, and random noise measurements on the resolution of the reconstructed transmittance are analyzed. Examples of reconstructed opacity profiles for some regions of Saturn's rings derived by applying the reconstruction theory to Voyager 1 at Saturn data are presented. 35 references.

  8. Profiling Saturn's rings by radio occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Rosen, Paul A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of reconstruction algorithms that correct for diffraction effects in radio occultation measurements is described. The reciprocal Fresnel transform relationship between the complex amplitude of the observed coherent signal and the complex microwave transmittance of the rings is derived using the Huygens-Fresnel formulation of the diffraction problem. The effects of the finite data segment width, the uncertainties in the Fresnel scale, systematic phase errors in the kernel of the inverse transform, reference oscillator instabilities, and random noise measurements on the resolution of the reconstructed transmittance are analyzed. Examples of reconstructed opacity profiles for some regions of Saturn's rings derived by applying the reconstruction theory to Voyager 1 at Saturn data are presented.

  9. Halogen occultation experiment intergrated test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Butterfield, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The test program plan is presented for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument, which is being developed in-house at the Langley Research Center for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This comprehensive test program was developed to demonstrate that the HALOE instrument meets its performance requirements and maintains integrity through UARS flight environments. Each component, subsystem, and system level test is described in sufficient detail to allow development of the necessary test setups and test procedures. Additionally, the management system for implementing this test program is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that measures vertical distribution of eight upper atmospheric constituents: O3, HC1, HF, NO, CH4, H2O, NO2, and CO2.

  10. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  11. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  12. Pluto Stellar Occultation on 2008 Aug 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Young, L. A.; Young, E. F.; Olkin, C. B.; Terrell, D.; Parker, J. W.; Durda, D.; Stansberry, J. A.; Reitsema, H.; French, R. G.; Shoemaker, K.; Brown, M. E.; Schaller, E. L.; Bauer, J. M.; Young, J. W.; Wasserman, L. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Lust, N.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Dellinger, J. A.; Garossino, P. G. A.; Grigsby, B.; Stone, R. P. S.; Dillon, W. G.; Mezzalira, F.; Ryan, E. V.; Ryan, W.; Souza, S. P.; Williams, R.; Sexton, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a successful occultation of a star by Pluto that was observable over much of the south and western United States. The centerline was close to WIRO. We will present seven complete lightcurves from Crossley/Lick, WIRO, SBO/CU, Palomar, JPL/TMO, Sierra Stars Obs., and Magdalena Ridge Observatory. We have 2 partial lightcurves from Lowell Obs. and McDonald Obs. where data loss was caused by clouds. There were attempts at the Steward 90", George Observatory, and New Mexico Skies that were clouded out. The UCF station near Orlando was clearly an appulse. A number of other amateurs also succeeded in collecting data. Our presentation will provide a final geometric solution for the event as well as baseline fits to the atmospheric structure. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNX08AO626 and NNX08AO50G.

  13. Theory of radio occultation by Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    The radio occultation technique, as applied to Saturn's rings, is developed as a new method for the study of the physical properties of planetary ring systems. The rings are treated as a Doppler-spread radar target composed of an ensemble of discrete scatterers. The mathematical formulation of the received signal as a random-phasor-sum process is carried out following a conventional radar theory approach, providing a convenient starting point for deriving coherent signal parameters. A classical result is rederived for the equivalent refractive index of the medium. The analysis is generalized to include ringlets of arbitrary width and it is shown that when the width is such that two adjacent rays are differentially perturbed in phase, ray bending that causes focusing of the coherent signal may result. The diffuse component is also treated in detail.

  14. Intensity Scintillations in Planetary Ring Occultations: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.

    2003-12-01

    A combined analytical and numerical simulation approach is used to investigate the first, second, and fourth statistical averages of the signal observed during a ring occultation experiment. The rings are modeled as a randomly blocked diffraction screen. The field behind the screen (the rings) assumes binary values: zero if located in the shadow area cast by ring particles and the full incident field otherwise. The stochastic geometry of the union of shadow areas cast behind the rings defines a so-called Boolean model. Either the random wavefront formed behind the screen or it's statistical averages can be propagated to an observer (a detector) some distance away from the diffraction screen. The parabolic approximation of the wave equation is used to model near-forward diffraction effects over the free-space path from the ring plane to the observation plane. The first and second moments were previously shown to correspond to the well-known coherent and scattered signal components observed during radio occultation experiments. Of particular interest here is the fourth moment of the random field at the observer, which determines the intensity scintillation index. Numerical simulations are used to investigate its behavior as a function of relevant model parameters, in particular, the ring particle radius and the Fresnel scale of observation. A monodispersion of ring particles is assumed to keep the model as simple as possible so as to investigate conditions under which the particle size may be recoverable from the intensity scintillation measurements. The model is also idealized to one-dimensional diffraction screen in order to speed up the computations; however, simulations of the more realistic two-dimensional diffraction screen models are also carried out.

  15. Thermal structure of the atmosphere of Venus from Pioneer Venus radio occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Patel, I. R.

    1982-01-01

    The processing and analysis results from 87 radio occultation experiments performed with the Pioneer Venus Orbiter are detailed. Atmospheric structure data were obtained with S-band (2293 MHz) and X-band (8407 MHz) signals transmitted through the 40 and 85 km levels of the Venus atmosphere. Latitudes of -68 to 88 deg at solar zenith angles of 8-166 deg were explored. The conversion of the data into acceptable form for the barometric equation to use the perfect gas law to obtain the temperature profiles is described. The temperature structures were more dependent on latitude than solar illumination conditions, with the greatest changes occurring in the circumpolar region. The polar tropopause altitude was about 4.8 km above its value at lower altitudes, with a temperature drop of 60 K and a pressure drop of 240 mb.

  16. Nondimensional Representations for Occulter Design and Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, Eric

    2011-01-01

    An occulter is a spacecraft with a precisely-shaped optical edges which ies in formation with a telescope, blocking light from a star while leaving light from nearby planets una ected. Using linear optimization, occulters can be designed for use with telescopes over a wide range of telescope aperture sizes, science bands, and starlight suppression levels. It can be shown that this optimization depends primarily on a small number of independent nondimensional parameters, which correspond to Fresnel numbers and physical scales and enter the optimization only as constraints. We show how these can be used to span the parameter space of possible optimized occulters; this data set can then be mined to determine occulter sizes for various mission scenarios and sets of engineering constraints.

  17. Analysis from Stellar Occultation and Lightcurve Observation of 582 Olympia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Okamoto, R.; Sugimoto, S.; Mayu Shibata; Watanabe, D.

    2012-05-01

    Our aim is to estimate 3D shape of an asteroid. We tried to find the shape of 582 Olympia. We conducted two observations: stellar occulation and lightcurve of an asteroid. We have observed lightcurves and occultations of several asteroid.

  18. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  19. A smart capsule system of gastric occult blood detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongying; Qiao, Panpan; Wu, Xueli; Wang, Li; Ao, Yilu; Jia, Ziru; Pi, Xitian

    2014-01-01

    Prior research indicated that occult blood screening can be used to detect early gastric cancer. Based on capsule endoscopy and occult blood detection theory, an automatic detection capsule system for gastric occult blood (GOB) was proposed. This paper designed the detecting sensor, image acquisition system and wireless transmitter module respectively based on collaurum immune theory, the image sensor and radio frequency chip. In vitro experiments were conducted to testify the system, and the detecting result image information was acquired by the image acquisition (IMAQ) system and transmitted to the outside of the body through the wireless transmitter module. The receiver module received and displayed the information on the computer, from which doctors could diagnose whether there was occult blood (OB) or not. Therefore, this paper provides a new idea for the screening of early-stage gastric cancer with reliability and simplicity. PMID:24211935

  20. Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Occult Blood Test and Fecal Immunochemical Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Test Common Questions Ask Us Related Pages The Test How is it used? When is it ordered? ...

  1. Monochromatic verification of high-contrast imaging with an occulter.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Dan; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2013-12-30

    One of the most promising concepts of starlight suppression for direct imaging of exoplanets is flying a specially-shaped external occulter in formation with a space telescope. Here we present contrast performance verification of an occulter design scaled to laboratory-size using Fresnel numbers corresponding to the space design. Experimental design innovations include usage of an expanding beam to minimize phase aberrations, and an outer ring to minimize hard-edge diffraction effects. The apodizing performance of the optimized occulter edge is compared with a baseline case of a circular occulter and shown to result in contrast improvements. Experimental results in red monochromatic light show that the achieved laboratory contrast exceeds ten orders of magnitude, but with differences from the theoretical diffraction analysis limited by specular reflection from the mask edges. PMID:24514818

  2. Latest Results from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M. J.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Wang, J.-H.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F. B.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W. P.; Coehlo, N. K.; Cook, K. H.; de Pater, I.; Granados, A. P.; Kim, D.-W.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Lissauer, J. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Protopapas, P.; Rice, J. A.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2012-05-01

    TAOS operates four telescopes at Lulin Observatory in Central Taiwan to search for occultations of distant stars by small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). In this presentation, the TAOS project will be described and the latest results will be presented.

  3. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  4. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  6. Sizes, Shapes, and Satellites of Asteroids from Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; Herald, David; Preston, Steve; Timerson, Brad; Maley, Paul; Frappa, Eric; Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Talbot, John; Poro, Atila

    2016-01-01

    For 40 years, the sizes and shapes of many dozens of asteroids have been determined from observations of asteroidal occultations, and over a thousand high-precision positions of the asteroids relative to stars have been measured. Some of the first evidence for satellites of asteroids was obtained from the early efforts; now, the orbits and sizes of some satellites discovered by other means have been refined from occultation observations. Also, several close binary stars have been discovered, and the angular diameters of some stars have been measured from analysis of these observations. The International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) coordinates this activity worldwide, from predicting and publicizing the events, to accurately timing the occultations from as many stations as possible, and publishing and archiving the observations.

  7. Validation of ACE-FTS measurements of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 using ground-based FTIR spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Mahieu, E.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Conway, S. A.; Dan, L.; Griffin, D.; Harrett, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kagawa, A.; Lindenmaier, R.; Strong, K.; Whaley, C.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite datasets can be an effective global monitoring tool for long-lived compounds in the atmosphere. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT-1. The primary instrument on SCISAT-1 is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) which is capable of measuring a range of gases including key chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) species. These families of species are of interest because of their significant contribution to anthropogenic ozone depletion and to global warming. To assess the quality of data derived from satellite measurements, validation using other data sources is essential. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are particularly useful for this purpose. In this study, five FTIR spectrometers located at four sites around the world are used to validate the CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), and HCFC-22 (CHClF2) retrieved profiles from ACE-FTS measurements. These species are related because HCFC-22 was the primary replacement for CFC-11 and CFC-12 in refrigerant and propellant applications. The FTIR spectrometers used in this study record solar absorption spectra at Eureka (Canada), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Poker Flat (USA), and Toronto (Canada). The retrieval of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 are not standard products for many of these instruments, and as such, a harmonization of retrieval parameters between the sites has been conducted. The retrievals of these species from the FTIR spectra are sensitive from the surface to approximately 20 km, while the ACE-FTS profiles extend from approximately 6 to 30 km. For each site, partial column comparisons between coincident measurements of the three species and a validation of the observed trends will be discussed.

  8. ACES Attitudes: Supervision Competencies and a National Certification Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Allen

    A survey was conducted to identify requisite supervisor knowledge and skills and to determine what procedures should be used in establishing a national "approved supervisor" certification program. Subjects surveyed were members of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES); all members were invited to participate and some 724…

  9. ACE TECH: The Fourth Year of CTE and Academic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Eileen Quinn; Donahue, John; Knight, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    It only takes an hour or two of roaming the halls of Architecture, Construction and Engineering (ACE) Tech Charter High School to detect an enduring attitude of accomplishment from both the teachers and the students. This atmosphere is intentional. The school, located in Chicago, was created specifically to hone the skills of individuals choosing…

  10. POMB/ACE chemotherapy for mediastinal germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Bower, M; Brock, C; Holden, L; Nelstrop, A; Makey, A R; Rustin, G J; Newlands, E S

    1997-05-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (MGCT) are rare and most published series reflect the experiences of individual institutions over many years. Since 1979, we have treated 16 men (12 non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and 4 seminomas) with newly diagnosed primary MGCT with POMB/ACE chemotherapy and elective surgical resection of residual masses. This approach yielded complete remissions in 15/16 (94%) patients. The median follow-up was 6.0 years and no relapses occurred more than 2 years after treatment. The 5 year overall survival in the non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) is 73% (95% confidence interval 43-90%). One patient with NSGCT developed drug-resistant disease and died without achieving remission and 2 patients died of relapsed disease. In addition, 4 patients with bulky and/or metastatic seminoma were treated with POMB/ACE. One died of treatment-related neutropenic sepsis in complete remission and one died of relapsed disease. Finally, 4 patients (2 NSGCT and 2 seminomas) referred at relapse were treated with POMB/ACE and one was successfully salvaged. The combination of POMB/ACE chemotherapy and surgery is effective management for MGCT producing high long-term survival rates. PMID:9291802

  11. The Clothes Line. Airing Equity Challenges for ACE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Ann

    1991-01-01

    Along with schooling, technical and further education, and higher education, adult and community education (ACE) forms part of the framework of lifelong education. It makes a major contribution to the social justice performance of postsecondary education by catering to adults who cannot gain access to or succeed in mainstream postsecondary…

  12. Linkages between ACE Vocational Provision and Mainstream VET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    A study investigated linkages between adult community education (ACE) and mainstream vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, which enable people to move between the two sectors in their pursuit of vocational learning, and the ways in which linkages might be improved or new ones developed. The data from the study were derived from 69…

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Prediction of stellar occultations 2008-2015 (Assafin+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assafin, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Andrei, A. H.; da Silva Neto, D. N.

    2012-03-01

    Each prediction table contains the date and instant of stellar occultation (UTC), the ICRS (J2000) star coordinates at the event date (that is, corrected by proper motion), the ICRS (J2000) geocentric right ascension and declination of the TNO at the occultation, the closest apparent geocentric distance between star and body, the position angle of the shadow across the Earth (clockwise, zero at North), the velocity in km/s, the distance to the Earth (AU), longitude of the sub-solar point, local solar time, ephemerides offsets in (RA, DEC) for the central instant (see JPL ephemeris version in Table 7 of the paper), the catalog proper motion, the catalog and multiplicity flags, the estimated star catalog position errors, the proper motions and the magnitudes R*, J*, H* and K*. Magnitudes are normalized to a reference shadow velocity v of 20km/s (the typical shadow velocity of a body at Pluto's distance at opposition). Magnormalized=mag+2.5log10(v/20). These normalized magnitudes may bring forward faint stars involved in slow events, thus allowing for longer integration time, and consequently reasonably good signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) without loss of spatial resolution in diameter measurements and in probing atmosphere altitudes in the light curves. This situation is further favored as the brightness of TNOs are usually smaller than that of the stars. In all, the overall contribution to the total recorded flux must be evaluated and a case by case estimation of the SNR must be done for those candidates. The prediction tables are divided by body and year, with entries in chronological order. The reference ephemerides used are listed in Table 7 of the paper. Besides star positions, the ICRS (J2000) geocentric right ascension and declination of the TNO at the occultation are also given (they are corrected by ephemeris offsets). This makes it easy for the reader to evaluate his/her own updates on the star position or on the ephemeris offsets of the TNOs. Notice that

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Prediction of stellar occultations 2012.5-2014 (Camargo+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Desmars, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Dias-Oliveira, A.

    2013-11-01

    Each prediction table contains the date and instant of stellar occultation (UTC), the ICRS (loosely J2000) star coordinates at the event date (that is, corrected by proper motion), the ICRS (J2000) geocentric right ascension and declination of the TNO at the occultation, the closest apparent geocentric distance between star and body, the position angle of the shadow across the Earth (clockwise, zero at North), the velocity in km/s, the distance to the Earth (AU), longitude of the sub-solar point, local solar time, ephemerides offsets in (RA, DEC) for the central instant (see JPL ephemeris version in Table 5 of the paper), the catalogue proper motion, the catalogue and multiplicity flags, the estimated star catalogue position errors, the proper motions and the magnitudes R*, J*, H* and K*. Magnitudes are normalized to a reference shadow velocity v of 20km/s (the typical shadow velocity of a body at Pluto's distance at opposition). Mag_normalized=mag+2.5log10(v/20). These normalized magnitudes may bring forward faint stars involved in slow events, thus allowing for longer integration time, and consequently reasonably good signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) without loss of spatial resolution in diameter measurements and in probing atmosphere altitudes in the light curves. This situation is further favored as the brightness of TNOs are usually smaller than that of the stars. In all, the overall contribution to the total recorded flux must be evaluated and a case by case estimation of the SNR must be done for those candidates. The prediction tables are divided by body and year, with entries in chronological order. The reference ephemerides used are listed in Table 5 of the paper. Besides star positions, the ICRS (J2000) geocentric right ascension and declination of the TNO at the occultation are also given (they are corrected by ephemeris offsets). This makes it easy for the reader to evaluate his/her own updates on the star position or on the ephemeris offsets of the TNOs

  15. Occultations of stars by asteroids in 1995 and 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L. H.; Millis, R. L.; Bowell, E.

    1995-01-01

    Predictions, based on a computerized comparison of asteroid ephemerides with the catalog positions of 567,500 stars, are given for 155 occultations of stars by asteroids in 1995 and 1996. On average, the predictions are expected to be more accurate than in earlier searches because of the use of more modern star catalogs. A number of very favorable occultations, visible in North America and elsewhere, are discussed.

  16. Lunar Occultation Observations of Double Stars – Report #5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loader, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Reports are presented of lunar occultations of close double stars observed using video techniques. Included are cases where a determination of the position angle and separation of the pair can be made as well as instances where no duplicity has been observed of known or reported double stars. A number of double stars discovered as a result of an occultation are also included together with the light curves for the discovery event.

  17. A photoelectric photometer for the observation of occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Shi, X.-Z.

    1980-03-01

    The paper describes a simple photoelectric photometer for the observation of occultation. Also discussed are some design problems, including the relation between measurable magnitude, signal-noise ratio and integrating time, the effect due to brightness of background, and the requirement of frequency bandwidth of the photometer. As a test, the instrument was used to observe the occulted event of star AGK+19 deg 0599 by asteroid (65) Cybele on Oct. 18, 1979 and a successful result was obtained.

  18. The rings of Uranus - Occultation profiles from three observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.; Frogel, J. A.; French, R. G.; Matthews, K.; Meech, K. J.; Mink, D. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Liller, W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Occultation profiles for the nine confirmed Uranian rings obtained from Las Campanas, the European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Tololo on 15-16 August 1980 are compared. The alpha ring shows a 'double-dip' structure; the eta ring shows a broad and narrow component (similar to Saturn's F ring); and the epsilon ring shows six features that appear in the data from all three observatories. Diffraction fringes appear at the edges of several of the occultation profiles.

  19. First Results from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.-W.; Bianco, F. B.; Lehner, M. J.; Coehlo, N. K.; Wang, J.-H.; Mondal, S.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W. P.; Cook, K. H.; Dave, R.; de Pater, I.; Porrata, R.; Kim, D.-W.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Protopapas, P.; Rice, J. A.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2008-10-01

    Results from the first 2 years of data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) are presented. Stars have been monitored photometrically at 4 or 5 Hz to search for occultations by small (~3 km) Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). No statistically significant events were found, allowing us to present an upper bound to the size distribution of KBOs with diameters 0.5 km < D < 28 km.

  20. Occulter Based Missions of Different Scales for Terrestrial Planet Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Spergel, D. N.; Vanderbei, R.; Shaklan, S.; Lisman, D. P.; Savransky, D.; Cady, E.; Soummer, R.

    2010-10-01

    Free flying occulters are an attractive option as a space mission architecture for imaging exosolar planets, particular ones in the habitable zone. Their appeal is two-fold: the inner working angle is largely decoupled from telescope diameter and, because they suppress starlight before entering the telescope, there is no need for wavefront control. We present the basic operating principles of occulters for high-contrast, including preliminary stationkeeping simulations, and a manufacturing approach being studied as part of NASA's Technology Demonstration for Exoplanet Missions. Our main focus is a comparison of mission architectures employing occulters at varying scales: large flagship observatories (THEIA, NWO), existing large aperture telescopes (JWST), small dedicated telescopes (O3), and small general purpose telescopes (such as a dark energy mission like EUCLID). THEIA, the Telescope for Habitable Exoplanets and Interstellar/Intergalactic Astronomy, is a multi-instrument space-telescope concept employing a 4-m diffraction-limited telescope operating at UV and Visible wavelengths that was developed as part of NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies in 2009 and presented to the US Academy's decadal survey review, Astro2010. By combining the telescope with a roughly 40 m occulter, operating at two different telescope-occulter separations, planets as small as Earth can be characterized over a broad band, including R>70 spectra. O3, the Occulting Ozone Observatory, is a smaller mission costing less than 1B that uses a 1 to 2 m telescope combined with a roughly 30 m occulter. O3 is capable of time-resolved photometry over 8 bands, focusing on biomarkers, such as detecting the strong ozone feature, and surface characterization. It also provides the capability for enough repeat visits to support orbit determination. We will compare the science yield and architecture and how different coronagraph and occulter approaches perform at these different mission

  1. First Results From The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z; Bianco, F B; Lehner, M J; Coehlo, N K; Wang, J; Mondal, S; Alcock, C; Axelrod, T; Byun, Y; Chen, W P; Cook, K H; Dave, R; de Pater, I; Porrata, R; Kim, D; King, S; Lee, T; Lin, H; Lissauer, J J; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, S; Wen, C

    2008-08-22

    Results from the first two years of data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) are presented. Stars have been monitored photometrically at 4 Hz or 5 Hz to search for occultations by small ({approx}3 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). No statistically significant events were found, allowing us to present an upper bound to the size distribution of KBOs with diameters 0.5 km < D < 28 km.

  2. [Trials with ACE-inhibitors in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, S

    1994-12-01

    In acute myocardial infarction, the results of the trials with ACE-inhibitors have not been always good, in contrast with what has been observed in chronic heart failure. The comparison of these compounds with the placebo has demonstrated lack of reduction of mortality in the study CONSENSUS II, favorable results on the survival as first endpoint and on the secondary endpoints, as reinfarction, heart failure and stroke in the studies SOLVD, AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4, and uncertain (interim report) results in the Chinese study. Nevertheless, the analysis of the recruitment of the patients with acute infarction and the way these patients have been treated seem to be the most important cause of the conflicting results. ACE-inhibitors have proved no efficacy in acute myocardial infarction without signs of left ventricular failure (CONSENSUS II), have worsened the clinical picture and the mortality in patients in shock or with severe heart failure in the acute phase. On the reverse, in presence of mild to moderate left ventricular dysfunction and failure, the use of ACE-inhibitors has been followed by reduction of mortality in the early (AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4), medium term (GISSI 3) and long-term follow-up (up to 4 years in the AIRE study). In parallel with the reduction of the primary endpoint, also secondary endpoints have been favorably influenced by the different ACE-inhibitors. No differences have been observed among the different class of compounds. ACE-inhibitors seem, therefore, to have a clear indication in acute myocardial infarction with mild or moderate signs and symptoms of heart failure. PMID:7634258

  3. Persistent change in cardiac fibroblast physiology after transient ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, K M; Biwer, L A; Madhavpeddi, L; Ramaiah, P; Shahid, W; Hale, T M

    2015-10-01

    Transient angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition induces persistent changes that protect against future nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor-induced cardiac fibrosis and inflammation. Given the role of fibroblasts in mediating these effects, the present study investigates whether prior ACE inhibition produced persistent changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with vehicle (C+L) or the ACE inhibitor, enalapril (E+L) for 2 wk followed by a 2-wk washout period and a subsequent 7-day challenge with the NOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. A third set of untreated SHRs served as controls. At the end of the study period, cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from control, C+L, and E+L left ventricles to assess proliferation rate, collagen expression, and chemokine release in vitro. After 7 days of NOS inhibition, there were areas of myocardial injury but no significant change in collagen deposition in E+L and C+L hearts in vivo. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from C+L but not E+L hearts were hyperproliferative, demonstrated increased collagen type I gene expression, and an elevated secretion of the macrophage-recruiting chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. These findings demonstrate that in vivo N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester treatment produces phenotypic changes in fibroblasts that persist in vitro. Moreover, this is the first demonstration that transient ACE inhibition can produce a persistent modification of the cardiac fibroblast phenotype to one that is less inflammatory and fibrogenic. It may be that the cardioprotective effects of ACE inhibition are related in part to beneficial changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. PMID:26371174

  4. Occult Intertrochanteric Fracture Mimicking the Fracture of Greater Trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Phil Hyun; Kang, Suk; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Young Sung; Back, In Hwa; Eom, Kyeong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Occult intertrochanteric fractures are misdiagnosed as isolated greater trochanteric fractures in some cases. We investigated the utility of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and outcome management of occult intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods This study involved 23 cases of greater trochanteric fractures as diagnosed using plain radiographs from January 2004 to July 2013. Until January 2008, 9 cases were examined with 3D-CT only, while 14 cases were screened with both 3D-CT and MRI scans. We analyzed diagnostic accuracy and treatment results following 3D-CT and MRI scanning. Results Nine cases that underwent 3D-CT only were diagnosed with isolated greater trochanteric fractures without occult intertrochanteric fractures. Of these, a patient with displacement received surgical treatment. Of the 14 patients screened using both CT and MRI, 13 were diagnosed with occult intertrochanteric fractures. Of these, 11 were treated with surgical intervention and 2 with conservative management. Conclusion Three-dimensional CT has very low diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing occult intertrochanteric fractures. For this reason, MRI is recommended to confirm a suspected occult intertrochanteric fracture and to determine the most appropriate mode of treatment.

  5. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  6. Possible occultation by Pluto from US East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-06-01

    We have been asked to help disseminate the news of a possible occultation by Pluto visible to observers on the US East coast. Although the AAVSO does not ordinarily issue announcements of upcoming occultations, in this case the object is Pluto and the NASA New Horizons mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html) will be visiting Pluto in 2015. The information below has been supplied by Dr. Leslie Young (Southwest Research Institute), who is coordinating this observing campaign on Pluto. Dr. Young is also Deputy Project Scientist for the New Horizons mission. ALERT: Possible Pluto occultation Wednesday night (2012/06/14 03:28 UT) from US East coast. CONTACT: Leslie Young (layoung@boulder.swri.edu; work: 303-546-6057; skype: drpluto). Also see our planning pages in progress at http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation. Pluto's thin, nitrogen atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with the surface ice, and changes seasonally. We've seen it double since 1988, and now we measure its pressure once or twice a year. The technique we use is stellar occultation, when a star passes behind Pluto's atmosphere. The atmosphere defocuses the starlight. By the timing of the fading of the star, we measure the pressure and temperature in Pluto's atmosphere at ~10 km resolution. MORE INFORMATION: See http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation.

  7. Optimal configuration of dual-spacecraft radio occultation observation for future lunar ionosphere exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Fuyuhiko; Matsumoto, Koji

    2014-05-01

    The lunar ionosphere is one of the remaining mysteries of the Moon. The lunar ionosphere was found by stellar radio occultation observations (Elsmore, 1957) and radio occultation observations of spacecraft, such as Luna 19, Luna 20, and SELENE (Vasilyev et al., 1974; Vyshlov et al., 1976; Imamura et al., 2012). However, the existence of the lunar ionosphere is still debated. The estimated electron densities of several hundreds to 1000 cm-3 are much larger than a theoretical estimate (Daily et al., 1977). Three different theories have been proposed to explain the existence of the lunar ionosphere. One is increase in the density of the neutral particle near the terminator, which is supply source of electrons (Daily et al., 1977). Second is existence of remnant magnetic fields which prevent the solar wind from stripping electrons of the lunar ionosphere (Savich 1976). Third is updraft of charged dust grains which are accompanied by electrons (Stubbs et al., 2011). The cause of the lunar ionosphere remains an open question because the quality and quantity of the present data are inadequate. Principal factor is the terrestrial ionosphere. The amplitude of fluctuation of total electron content (TEC) of the terrestrial ionosphere is similar to or larger than the expected TEC of the lunar ionosphere. The cause of the lunar ionosphere cannot be elucidated without removal of the terrestrial ionosphere. A dual-spacecraft radio occultation technique is one of the effective methods to remove the effect of the terrestrial ionosphere. By observing a target and a reference spacecraft simultaneously, the fluctuation of the terrestrial ionosphere which is common in two propagation paths can be canceled out. The dual-spacecraft technique has been used in the radio occultation experiment on SELENE mission (Ando et al., 2012). Although the enhancement of the electric density caused by the lunar ionosphere was detected, the number of successful observations was severely restricted

  8. Astr 101 Students' Attitudes Towards Essays On Transits, Eclipses And Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2012-05-01

    Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL offers a one semester introductory astronomy course each semester. We teach over 110 primarily non-science major students each semester. We use proven active learning strategies such lecture tutorials, think-pair-share questions and small group discussions to help these students develop and retain a good understanding of astrophysical concepts. Occasionally, we offer projects that allow students to explore course topics beyond the classroom. We hope that such projects will increase students' interest in astronomy. We also hope that these assignments will help students to improve their critical thinking and writing skills. In Spring 12, we are offering three short individual essay assignments in our face-to-face sections. The essays focus on transits, eclipses and occultations to highlight the 2012 transit of Venus. For the first essay, students will find images of transit and occultation events using the Astronomy Picture of the Day website and describe their chosen events. In addition, students will predict how variations in certain physical and orbital parameters would alter their particular events. The second essay involves transits, eclipses and occultations observed by spacecraft. Students will describe their transit event, their spacecraft's mission, orbital path, how the orbital path was achieved, etc. The third essay deals with transiting exoplanets. Students will choose at least two exoplanets from an exoplanet database, one of which has been discovered through the transit method. This essay will enable students to learn about detecting exoplanets and how they compare with our solar system. Details of the essay assignments and students' reactions to them will be presented at the meeting.

  9. Sizes, Shapes, and Satellites of Asteroids from Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring Dunham, David; Herald, David Russell; Preston, Steve; Timerson, Bradley; Maley, Paul; Frappa, Eric; Hayamizu, Tsutomu; Talbot, John; Poro, Atila

    2015-08-01

    For 40 years, the sizes and shapes of dozens of asteroids have been determined from observations of asteroidal occultations. Some of the first evidence for satellites of asteroids was obtained from the early efforts; now, the orbits and sizes of some satellites discovered by other means have been refined from occultation observations. Also, several close binary stars have been discovered, and the angular diameters of some stars have been measured from analysis of these observations. The International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) coordinates this activity worldwide, from predicting and publicizing the events, to accurately timing the occultations from as many stations as possible, and publishing and archiving the observations.The release of the Hipparcos and Tycho catalogs in 1997, from ESA’s Hipparcos space mission, revolutionized asteroidal occultation work, increasing the routine accuracy of the predictions and the annual number of observations by an order of magnitude. IOTA developed an efficient procedure for predicting the occultations using a combination of new star catalogs, based on Hipparcos and new star catalogs, generated mainly at the U. S. Naval Observatory (USNO), and new observations of asteroids relative to the improved astrometric nets mainly from USNO’s Flagstaff Astrometric Scanning Transit Telescope and JPL’s Table Mountain Observatory. In addition, many IOTA observers now use inexpensive low-light-level video cameras and specially built GPS video time inserters to accurately time the events. This automation has also allowed some observers to deploy multiple remote video stations across occultation paths. Then, one observer can record several “chords” across the asteroid. The cameras are sensitive enough that easily-hidden telescopes, many of which can be packed in standard air travel suitcases, can be used for many of the predicted occultations. IOTA’s network of regional coordinators collect and reduce the observations

  10. Stellar occultation studies of Saturn's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jeffrey Alan

    1999-10-01

    The properties of Saturn's upper atmosphere are not well- known despite several spacecraft flybys. However, the region of 1-100 μbar can be studied in detail by observing stellar occultations-when the planet passes in front of a star-from groundbased or Earth-orbiting telescopes. We use data from five such occultations: three observed in 1995 by the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), one observed in 1996 at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and one in 1989 observed by a different instrument at the IRTF. The data span latitudes from 52° south to 75° north. We fit isothermal models to each data set and also perform numerical inversions. These analyses show that temperatures in the 1-10 μbar range can vary significantly as a function of season and latitude, ranging from 121 to 160 K, in accordance with radiative transfer models for the atmosphere. We also search for evidence of gravity wave saturation in Saturn's upper atmosphere, as seen in other planetary atmospheres, by analyzing the power spectra of temperature and density data and by studying the temperature lapse rate in the atmosphere. Our analysis is consistent with saturated gravity waves for all data sets, although gravity wave saturation is not the sole explanation for the spectra. We take advantage of the wavelength-resolved HST FOS data to study the composition of Saturn's upper atmosphere. We measured the difference in feature times for data taken at two wavelengths, and use the different refractivities of hydrogen and helium, as a function of wavelength to compute the relative amounts of the two elements in the planet's atmosphere. We find that the helium mass fraction is 0.26 +/- 0.10, higher than that found using Voyager data, but marginally consistent with theoretical models for the evolution of Saturn's atmosphere, although the large error bars on the results make a definitive conclusion problematic. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm

  11. Design and performance of the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE) remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. L.; Mauldin, L. E., III; Russell, J. M., III

    1986-01-01

    HALOE is an optical remote sensor that measures extinction of solar radiation caused by the earth's atmosphere in eight channels, ranging in wavelength from 2.5 to 10.1 microns. These measurements, which occur twice each satellite orbit during solar occultation, are inverted to yield vertical distributions of middle atmosphere ozone (O3), water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and methane. A channel located in the 2.7 region is used to infer the tangent point pressure by measuring carbon dioxide absorption. The HALOE instrument consists of a two-axis gimbal system, telescope, spectral discrimination optics and a 12-bit data system. The gimbal system tracks the solar radiometric centroid in the azimuthal plane and tracks the solar limb in the elevation plane, placing the instrument's instantaneous field-of-view 4 arcmin down from the solar top edge. The instrument gathers data for tangent altitudes ranging from 150 km to the earth's horizon. Prior to an orbital sunset and after an orbital sunrise, HALOE automatically performs calibration sequences to enhance data interpretation. The instrument is presently being tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in preparation for launch on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite near the end of this decade. This paper describes the instrumenmt design, operation, and functional performance.

  12. From gene to protein—experimental and clinical studies of ACE2 in blood pressure control and arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheila K.; Velkoska, Elena; Freeman, Melanie; Wai, Bryan; Lancefield, Terase F.; Burrell, Louise M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary events, heart and renal failure, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in its pathogenesis. Within the RAS, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin (Ang) I into the vasoconstrictor Ang II. An “alternate” arm of the RAS now exists in which ACE2 counterbalances the effects of the classic RAS through degradation of Ang II, and generation of the vasodilator Ang 1-7. ACE2 is highly expressed in the heart, blood vessels, and kidney. The catalytically active ectodomain of ACE2 undergoes shedding, resulting in ACE2 in the circulation. The ACE2 gene maps to a quantitative trait locus on the X chromosome in three strains of genetically hypertensive rats, suggesting that ACE2 may be a candidate gene for hypertension. It is hypothesized that disruption of tissue ACE/ACE2 balance results in changes in blood pressure, with increased ACE2 expression protecting against increased blood pressure, and ACE2 deficiency contributing to hypertension. Experimental hypertension studies have measured ACE2 in either the heart or kidney and/or plasma, and have reported that deletion or inhibition of ACE2 leads to hypertension, whilst enhancing ACE2 protects against the development of hypertension, hence increasing ACE2 may be a therapeutic option for the management of high blood pressure in man. There have been relatively few studies of ACE2, either at the gene or the circulating level in patients with hypertension. Plasma ACE2 activity is low in healthy subjects, but elevated in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or cardiovascular disease. Genetic studies have investigated ACE2 gene polymorphisms with either hypertension or blood pressure, and have produced largely inconsistent findings. This review discusses the evidence regarding ACE2 in experimental hypertension models and the association between circulating ACE2 activity and ACE2 polymorphisms with blood pressure and arterial

  13. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  14. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  15. Comparison of nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from ACE-FTS, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, and SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Sinnhuber, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.; Funke, B.; López-Puertas, M.; Urban, J.; Pérot, K.; Walker, K. A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (60 to 150 km) from four instruments: the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), and the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR). We use the daily zonal mean data in that altitude range for the years 2004-2010 (ACE-FTS), 2005-2012 (MIPAS), 2008-2012 (SCIAMACHY), and 2003-2012 (SMR). We first compare the data qualitatively with respect to the morphology, focussing on the major features, and then compare the time series directly and quantitatively. In three geographical regions, we compare the vertical density profiles on coincident measurement days. Since none of the instruments delivers continuous daily measurements in this altitude region, we carried out a multi-linear regression analysis. This regression analysis considers annual and semi-annual variability in the form of harmonic terms and inter-annual variability by responding linearly to the solar Lyman-α radiation index and the geomagnetic Kp index. This analysis helps to find similarities and differences in the individual data sets with respect to the inter-annual variations caused by geomagnetic and solar variability. We find that the data sets are consistent and that they only disagree on minor aspects. SMR and ACE-FTS deliver the longest time series in the mesosphere, and they agree with each other remarkably well. The shorter time series from MIPAS and SCIAMACHY also agree with them where they overlap. The data agree within 30 % when the number densities are large, but they can differ by 50 to 100 % in some cases.

  16. Starshade Design for Occulter Based Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark W.; Lisman, P. Douglas; Helms, Richard; Walkemeyer, Phil; Kissil, Andrew; Polanco, Otto; Lee, Siu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    We present a lightweight starshade design that delivers the requisite profile figure accuracy with a compact stowed volume that permits launching both the occulter system (starshade and spacecraft) and a 1 to 2m-class telescope system on a single existing launch vehicle. Optimal figure stability is achieved with a very stiff and mass-efficient deployable structure design that has a novel configuration. The reference design is matched to a 1.1m telescope and consists of a 15m diameter inner disc and 24 flower-like petals with 7.5m length. The total tip-to-tip diameter of 30m provides an inner working angle of 75 mas. The design is scalable to accommodate larger telescopes and several options have been assessed. A proof of concept petal is now in production at JPL for deployment demonstrations and as a testbed for developing additional elements of the design. Future plans include developing breadboard and prototype hardware of increasing fidelity for use in demonstrating critical performance capabilities such as deployed optical edge profile figure tolerances and stability thereof.

  17. Not all occult papillary carcinomas are minimal

    SciTech Connect

    Allo, M.D.; Christianson, W.; Koivunen, D.

    1988-12-01

    Occult papillary carcinomas are characterized as small papillary tumors of less than 1.5 cm in maximum diameter, with or without bulky metastatic deposits in cervical nodes. The primary lesion is usually not palpable, and although the clinical behavior usually follows a benign course, tumors with unfavorable histologic features (invasiveness, multifocality) or extrathyroidal disease or a combination of both may not do so. In this report six cases are presented to illustrate this entity. No patient had a history of irradiation to the head or neck. All had primary lesions smaller than 1.5 cm. None had a palpable nodule or abnormal thyroid scan results, and the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was based on cervical lymph node or lung biopsy specimens, which revealed papillary thyroid cancer. All of the patients underwent total or near-total thyroidectomies and were found to have small, invasive papillary lesions with additional metastases to cervical nodes noted at the time of thyroidectomy. Adjunctive treatment consisted of a 5 mCi iodine-131 scan, ablative iodine-131 therapy, and suppression with L-thyroxine. Although distant metastasis to lung or other organs is uncommon and the mortality rate is low (as in larger papillary cancers), these invasive lesions--despite their small size--have a high propensity for recurrence and should be considered to behave more like encapsulated papillary tumors with extrathyroidal extension than like their small, unencapsulated intrathyroidal counterparts.

  18. Diagnose of occult bronchial foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wang, Xue-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Occult bronchial foreign body can be very difficult to diagnose early in an adult patient without acute symptoms. This report describes a rare case of undetected Chinese medicine “Coptis chinensis” aspiration for 10 long years. Methods: A case was reported that a female patient complained of a 10-year history of productive cough. A battery of tests were given to confirm the diagnosis. Results: Chest computed tomography (CT) showed extensive bronchiectasis and multiple nodules, along with stenosis of left lower lobar bronchus. An extensive solid lesion with surrounding inflammatory granulation tissue was seen on her first bronchoscopy and biopsy revealed chronic mucosal inflammation. A neglected history of Coptis chinensis regularly kept in-mouth while sleeping for the last 10 years in this patient provided clues for a final diagnosis. Confirmatory diagnosis of bilateral tracheobronchial foreign bodies caused by recurrent inhalation of Coptis chinensis was made by a second bronchoscopy. Conclusions: This case clearly demonstrates that a precise medical history is often overlooked. A high index of suspicion, a precise medical history, radiographic features of chronic respiratory symptoms not explained by other conditions were keys to diagnosing this case. PMID:27495017

  19. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  20. Parallel Signal Processing and System Simulation using aCe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular for both signal processing and system simulation. A new language is ideally suited for parallel signal processing applications and system simulation since it allows the programmer to explicitly express the computations that can be performed concurrently. In addition, the new C based parallel language (ace C) for architecture-adaptive programming allows programmers to implement algorithms and system simulation applications on parallel architectures by providing them with the assurance that future parallel architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of ace C and present a signal processing application (FFT).

  1. Statistical bounds and maximum likelihood performance for shot noise limited knife-edge modeled stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholl, Patrick J.; Crabtree, Peter N.

    2014-09-01

    Applications of stellar occultation by solar system objects have a long history for determining universal time, detecting binary stars, and providing estimates of sizes of asteroids and minor planets. More recently, extension of this last application has been proposed as a technique to provide information (if not complete shadow images) of geosynchronous satellites. Diffraction has long been recognized as a source of distortion for such occultation measurements, and models subsequently developed to compensate for this degradation. Typically these models employ a knife-edge assumption for the obscuring body. In this preliminary study, we report on the fundamental limitations of knife-edge position estimates due to shot noise in an otherwise idealized measurement. In particular, we address the statistical bounds, both Cramér- Rao and Hammersley-Chapman-Robbins, on the uncertainty in the knife-edge position measurement, as well as the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator. Results are presented as a function of both stellar magnitude and sensor passband; the limiting case of infinite resolving power is also explored.

  2. Compact echelle spectrometer for occultation sounding of the Martian atmosphere: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Korablev, Oleg; Montmessin, Franck; Trokhimovsky, Alexander; Fedorova, Anna A; Kiselev, Alexander V; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Goultail, Jean-Pierre; Belyaev, Denis A; Stepanov, Alexander V; Titov, Andrei Yu; Kalinnikov, Yurii K

    2013-02-10

    The echelle spectrometer TIMM-2 is the instrument developed for the unsuccessful Russian mission Phobos-Grunt. The instrument was dedicated to solar occultation studies of the Martian atmosphere by measuring the amount of methane, by sensitive measuring of other minor constituents, and by profiling the D/H ratio and the aerosol structure. The spectral range of the instrument is 2300-4100 nm, the spectral resolving power λ/Δλ exceeds 25,000, and the field of view is 1.5×21 arc min. The spectra are measured in narrow spectral intervals, corresponding to discreet diffraction orders. One measurement cycle includes several spectral intervals. To study the vertical profiles of aerosol, the instrument incorporates four photometers in the UV to near-IR spectral range. The mass of the instrument is 2800 g, and its power consumption is 12 W. One complete flight model remains available after the Phobos-Grunt launch. We discuss the science objectives of the occultation experiment for the case of Mars, the implementation of the instrument, and the results of ground calibrations. PMID:23400068

  3. The impact of spherical symmetry assumption on radio occultation data inversion in the ionosphere: An assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, M. M.; Notarpietro, R.; Nava, B.

    2014-02-01

    'Onion-peeling' is a very common technique used to invert Radio Occultation (RO) data in the ionosphere. Because of the implicit assumption of spherical symmetry for the electron density (N(e)) distribution in the ionosphere, the standard Onion-peeling algorithm could give erroneous concentration values in the retrieved electron density profile. In particular, this happens when strong horizontal ionospheric electron density gradients are present, like for example in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) region during high solar activity periods. In this work, using simulated RO Total Electron Content (TEC) data computed by means of the NeQuick2 ionospheric electron density model and ideal RO geometries, we tried to formulate and evaluate an asymmetry level index for quasi-horizontal TEC observations. The asymmetry index is based on the electron density variation that a signal may experience along its path (satellite to satellite link) in a RO event and is strictly dependent on the occultation geometry (e.g. azimuth of the occultation plane). A very good correlation has been found between the asymmetry index and errors related to the inversion products, in particular those concerning the peak electron density NmF2 estimate and the Vertical TEC (VTEC) evaluation.

  4. A SEARCH FOR OCCULTATIONS OF BRIGHT STARS BY SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING MEGACAM ON THE MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, F. B.; Lehner, M. J.; Protopapas, P.; McLeod, B. A.; Alcock, C. R.; Holman, M. J.

    2009-08-15

    We conducted a search for occultations of bright stars by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) to estimate the density of subkilometer KBOs in the sky. We report here the first results of this occultation survey of the outer solar system conducted in 2007 June and 2008 June/July at the MMT Observatory using Megacam, the large MMT optical imager. We used Megacam in a novel shutterless continuous-readout mode to achieve high-precision photometry at 200 Hz, which with point-spread function convolution results in an effective sampling of {approx}30 Hz. We present an analysis of 220 star hours of data at a signal-to-noise ratio of 25 or greater, taken from images of fields within 3 deg. of the ecliptic plane. The survey efficiency is greater than 10% for occultations by KBOs of diameter d {>=} 0.7 km, and we report no detections in our data set. We set a new 95% confidence level upper limit for the surface density {sigma} {sub N}(d) of KBOs larger than 1 km: {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 1 km) {<=} 2.0 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}, and for KBOs larger than 0.7 km {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 0.7 km) {<=} 4.8 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}.

  5. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Woods, W. W.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Retherford, K. D.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Tsang, C.; Versteeg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. Preliminary analysis yields a surface pressure of about 10 microbars, smaller than expected. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters.

  6. Crosslink Radio Occultation for the Remote Sensing of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Ao, C. O.; Asmar, S.; Edwards, C. D.; Kahan, D. S.; Paik, M.; Pi, X.; Williamson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Radio occultation utilizing deep space telecommunication signals has been used with great success in the profiling of planetary atmospheres and ionospheres since the 1960s. A shortcoming of this technique, however, is the limited temporal and spatial sampling that it provides. We consider a different approach where radio occultation measurements are taken between two spacecraft orbiting an extra-terrestrial body. Such "crosslink" radio occultations between the Global Positioning System satellites and low-earth orbiting spacecraft have been routinely acquired to provide global observations of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere that are used for weather forecast, climate analysis, and space weather applications. The feasibility of applying this concept to other planets has recently been demonstrated for the first time, where crosslink occultation measurements have been acquired between the Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. These measurements leverage the proximity link telecommunication payloads on each orbiter, which are nominally used to provide relay communication and navigation services to Mars landers and rovers. In this presentation, we will describe the Mars crosslink experiments and the corresponding data analysis in detail. In addition, we will discuss how the crosslink occultation concepts can be effectively applied in future space exploration missions.

  7. [Occultism, parapsychology and the esoteric from the perspective of psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, C

    1998-10-01

    The concepts and main themes of occultism, parapsychology and esoterics are set in comparison to religion, spirituality, mysticism. The cultural relativity of these concepts is emphasised. Occultism means dealing with phenomena, processes, and/or powers which are not accessible to "normal perception". The manipulation of such powers is effected via (white, black, grey) magic. Parapsychology, in its popular sense, deals with occult phenomena, whereas scientific parapsychology investigates them empirically. Esoterics is a complex of beliefs within a hermetic tradition about occult processes and about desting after death. Transpersonal psychology deals with these issues while calling them "spiritual". Effects of paranormal experiences and actions on the side of the actor as well as the adept are discussed: personality types, interpersonal effects, crises and psychoses (mediumistic psychoses). The concept of dissociation of subpersonalities (subselves) appears to be a viable perspective to explain these phenomena. In mediumistic psychoses, the splitting of non-ego parts of the psyche leads to a manifestation of schizophrenic symptoms. Dangers for mental health are an ego inflation by self-attribution of "superhuman" power. A personality disposition for parapsychological perception and/or action may be seen in schizotypia and similar near-psychotic "personalities up the border". Adepts of occultism may present with a "false self" in the sense of Winnicott. PMID:9825253

  8. A new approach to analyse radio-occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, Maxime; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Witasse, Olivier; Marchaudon, Aurelie

    2015-04-01

    Highly-valuable information on the planetary environments can be obtained using the radio-occultation technique. Since 2004, the Mars Express Radio-Science (MaRS) experiment has enabled to perform several hundreds of soundings of the Martian ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. To analyse such measurements, the classical method is based on an inversion which requires strong assumptions on the planetary environment and which provides partial information on the retrieved atmospheric and ionospheric profiles. In this work, we developed a novel method for radio-occultation data analysis based on a direct approach. It consists in simulating a given radio-occultation experiment performed by Mars Express using a numerical model of the Martian envelope and computing the propagation of the radio waves between the spacecraft and the ground station on Earth. Not only does this approach remove some of the limiting assumptions necessary to apply the classical inversion method, but it also couples the neutral and the ionised regions of the Martian environment, thus giving physical constrains on the retrieved profiles. We present our analysis obtained with this new method for different occultation configurations, and we discuss the interests and the remaining limitations of such a method compared to the standard analysis. Reference: Grandin, M., P.-L. Blelly, O. Witasse, and A. Marchaudon, (2014), Mars Express radio-occultation data: A novel analysis approach, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics,119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020698.

  9. ACES: An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Wuerl, Adam M.; Andrews, Jason E.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2004-02-01

    Andrews Space has developed the ``Alchemist'' Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES), a dual-mode propulsion system that enables safe, economical launch systems that take off and land horizontally. Alchemist generates liquid oxygen through separation of atmospheric air using the refrigeration capacity of liquid hydrogen. The key benefit of Alchemist is that it minimizes vehicle takeoff weight. All internal and NASA-funded activities have shown that ACES, previously proposed for hypersonic combined cycle RLVs, is a higher payoff, lower-risk technology if LOX generation is performed while the vehicle cruises subsonically. Andrews Space has developed the Alchemist concept from a small system study to viable Next Generation launch system technology, conducting not only feasibility studies but also related hardware tests, and it has planned a detailed risk reduction program which employs an experienced, proven contractor team. Andrews also has participated in preliminary studies of an evolvable Next Generation vehicle architecture-enabled by Alchemist ACES-which could meet civil, military, and commercial space requirements within two decades.

  10. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) -- A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new γ-ray astrophysics mission concept expected to have unprecedented sensitivity in the nuclear regime. Operating in lunar orbit, LOCO will utilize lunar occultation imaging to survey and probe the cosmos.

  11. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  12. Observation and Interpretation of Lunar Occultations. Ph.D. Thesis; [Uranus and beta Capricorni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of timings and high resolution astrometry in occultation observations is discussed as well as the occultation process itself. The design and operation of the telescope, photodetector, and data acquisition systems are described. Methods are presented for data analysis and model fitting. Observations of beta Capricorni and Uranus occultations are examined. General conclusions concerning occultation observations are explored and future activities at Prairie Observatory are discussed.

  13. Probing Planetary Formation and Evolution Through Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; KELT Team

    2016-01-01

    The circumstellar environments of young stellar objects (YSOs) involve complex dynamical interactions between dust and gas that directly influence the formation of planets. However, our understanding of the evolution from the material in the circumstellar disk to the thousands of planetary systems discovered to date, is limited. One means to better constrain the size, mass, and composition of this planet-forming material is to observe a YSO being eclipsed by its circumstellar disk. Through this dissertation project, we are discovering and characterizing both disk eclipsing systems and exoplanets using the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project. KELT is a photometric survey for transiting planets orbiting bright stars (8 < V < 11); such bright planet host targets are well-suited for atmospheric characterization of the planets. KELT has discovered 15 planets transiting stars brighter than V ~11 to date. I will present some of the recently discovered planets from the survey and discuss their potential to advance our understanding of planetary atmospheres. In addition, KELT provides photometric monitoring of ~3 million stars, presenting the opportunity to perform multi-year studies of stellar variability generally and rare disk occultations specifically. Using time-series photometry from KELT we are conducting the Disk Eclipse Search with KELT (DESK) survey to look for disk eclipsing events, specifically in young stellar associations. To date, the survey has discovered and analyzed four previously unknown large dimming events around the stars RW Aurigae, V409 Tau, AA Tau, and TYC 2505-672-1, the latter now representing the longest-period eclipsing object known (period ~ 69 years). I will describe our results for planet atmosphere characterization and for protoplanetary disk structure and composition, and discuss how to search for these kinds of systems in future surveys such as LSST.

  14. Probing the Martian atmosphere with MAVEN/IUVS stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröller, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Koskinen, T. T.; Montmessin, F.; Lacombe, G.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Jain, S. K.; Chaffin, M. S.; Crismani, M. M. J.; Stiepen, A.; Lefèvre, F.; McClintock, W. E.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The first campaign of stellar occultations with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission was executed between 24 and 26 March 2015. From this campaign 13 occultations are used to retrieve CO2 and O2 number densities in the altitude range between 100 and 150 km. Observations probe primarily the low-latitude regions on the nightside of the planet, just past the dawn and dusk terminator. Calculation of temperature from the CO2 density profiles reveals that the lower thermosphere is significantly cooler than predicted by the models in the Mars Climate Database. A systematically cold layer with temperatures of 105-120 K is seen in the occultations at a pressure level around 7 × 10-6 Pa.

  15. Simultaneous trace gas measurements using two Fourier transform spectrometers at Eureka, Canada during spring 2006, and comparisons with the ACE-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Walker, K. A.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Strong, K.; Sung, K.; Fast, H.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Daffer, W. H.; Fogal, P.; Kolonjari, F.; Loewen, P.; Manney, G. L.; Mikhailov, O.; Drummond, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    The 2006 Canadian Arctic ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) Validation Campaign collected measurements at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, 86.42° W, 80.05° N, 610 m a.s.l.) at Eureka, Canada from 17 February to 31 March 2006. Two of the ten instruments involved in the campaign, both Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs), were operated simultaneously, recording atmospheric solar absorption spectra. The first instrument was an ABB Bomem DA8 high-resolution infrared FTS. The second instrument was the Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the Infrared (PARIS-IR), the ground-based version of the satellite-borne FTS on the ACE satellite (ACE-FTS). From the measurements collected by these two ground-based instruments, total column densities of seven stratospheric trace gases (O3, HCl, ClONO2, HF, HNO3, NO2, and NO) were retrieved using the optimal estimation method and these results were compared. Since the two instruments sampled the same portions of atmosphere by synchronizing observations during the campaign and used consistent retrieval parameters, the biases in retrieved columns from the two spectrometers represent the instrumental differences. Mean differences in total column densities of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HF, HNO3, and NO2 from the observations between PARIS-IR and the DA8 FTS are 2.8 %, -3.2 %, -4.3 %, -1.5 %, -1.9 %, and -0.1 %, respectively. Partial column results from the ground-based spectrometers were also compared with partial columns derived from ACE-FTS version 2.2 (including updates for O3) profiles. Mean differences in partial column densities of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HF, HNO3, NO2, and NO from the measurements between ACE-FTS and the DA8 FTS are -5.9 %, -8.5 %, -11.8 %, -0.9 %, -6.6 %, -21.6 % and -7.6 % respectively. Mean differences in partial column densities of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HF, HNO3, NO2 from the measurements between ACE-FTS and the PARIS-IR are -5.2 %, -4.6 %, -2.3 %, -4.7 %, 5.7 % and -11

  16. Scintillations during occultations by planets. 1. An approximate theory. [fresnel region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    Scintillations observed during occultations of both stars and spacecraft by planetary atmospheres are discussed theoretically. The effects of severe flattening of the Fresnel zone or source image by defocusing on occultations are presented, along with temporal power spectra. Other topics discussed include atmospheric turbulence, saturation of scintillation, effects of saturation on occultation curves, and some methods for a more accurate determination of atmospheric structure.

  17. GRAS radio occultation on-board of Metop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Engeln, A.; Andres, Y.; Marquardt, C.; Sancho, F.

    2011-01-01

    The GRAS radio occultation instrument is flying on Metop-A and belongs to the EPS (EUMETSAT Polar System). GRAS observes GPS satellites in occultation. Within this work, validation of GRAS closed-loop bending angle data against co-located ECMWF profiles extracted from model fields and occultations from the COSMIC constellation of radio occultation instruments is shown. Results confirm the high data quality and robustness, where GRAS shows lower bending angle noise against ECMWF than COSMIC and in terms of occultations per day, one GRAS ≈ two COSMIC satellites. This is partly due to the operational setup of EPS. For the investigation we focus on two observation periods where updates in the ECMWF (March 2009) and COSMIC processing (October 2009) have improved the statistics further. Bending angles biases agree to within 0.5% against ECMWF and to within 0.1% against COSMIC after the updates for altitudes between 8 and 40 km. In addition, we also analyze the impact of the Metop orbit processing on the derived GRAS bending angle data, where different GPS and Metop orbit solutions are analyzed. Results show that a batch based orbit processing would improve in particular the bending angle bias behavior at higher altitudes. Requirements for the operational processing of GRAS data are briefly outlined, options to ease the use of other positioning system satellites in the near future are discussed. A simplified analysis on the observation of several of these systems, e.g. GPS and Galileo, from one platform shows that about 16% of occultations are found within 300 km, ±3 h, thus providing similar information. A constellation of 2 GRAS like instruments would have only about 10% close-by.

  18. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment Earth Occultation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Koshut, T. M.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Rubin, B. C.

    2002-01-01

    An Earth orbiting detector sensitive to gamma-ray photons will see step-like occultation features in its count rate when a gamma-ray point source crosses the Earth's limb. This is due to the change in atmospheric attenuation of the gamma rays along the line of sight. In an uncollimated detector, these occultation features can be used to locate and monitor astrophysical sources provided their signals can be individually separated from the detector background. We show that the Earth occultation technique applied to the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) is a viable and flexible all-sky monitor in the low-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray energy range (20 keV-1 MeV). The method is an alternative to more sophisticated photon imaging devices for astronomy and can serve well as a cost-effective science capability for monitoring the high energy sky. Here we describe the Earth occultation technique for locating new sources and for measuring source intensity and spectra without the use of complex background models. Examples of transform imaging, step searches, spectra, and light curves are presented. Systematic uncertainties due to source confusion, detector response, and contamination from rapid background fluctuations are discussed and analyzed for their effect on intensity measurements. A sky location-dependent average systematic error is derived as a function of Galactic coordinates. The sensitivity of the technique is derived as a function of incident photon energy and also as a function of angle between the source and the normal to the detector entrance window. Occultations of the Crab Nebula by the Moon are used to calibrate Earth occultation flux measurements independent of possible atmospheric scattering effects.

  19. Constraints on Pluto's Hazes from 2-Color Occultation Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Kara; Barry, T.; Carriazo, C. Y.; Cole, A.; Gault, D.; Giles, B.; Giles, D.; Hill, K. M.; Howell, R. R.; Hudson, G.; Loader, B.; Mackie, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Rannou, P.; Regester, J.; Resnick, A.; Rodgers, T.; Sicardy, B.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Watson, C. R.; Young, E. F.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M. W.; Nelson, M.

    2015-11-01

    The controversial question of aerosols in Pluto's atmosphere first arose in 1988, when features in a Pluto occultation lightcurve were alternately attributed to haze opacity (Elliot et al. 1989) or a thermal inversion (Eshleman 1989). A stellar occultation by Pluto in 2002 was observed from several telescopes on Mauna Kea in wavelengths ranging from R- to K-bands (Elliot et al. 2003). This event provided compelling evidence for haze on Pluto, since the mid-event baseline levels were systematically higher at longer wavelengths (as expected if there were an opacity source that scattered more effectively at shorter wavelengths). However, subsequent occultations in 2007 and 2011 showed no significant differences between visible and IR lightcurves (Young et al. 2011).The question of haze on Pluto was definitively answered by direct imaging of forward-scattering aerosols by the New Horizons spacecraft on 14-JUL-2015. We report on results of a bright stellar occultation which we observed on 29-JUN-2015 in B- and H-bands from both grazing and central sites. As in 2007 and 2011, we see no evidence for wavelength-dependent extinction. We will present an analysis of haze parameters (particle sizes, number density profiles, and fractal aggregations), constraining models of haze distribution to those consistent with and to those ruled out by the occultation lightcurves and the New Horizons imaging.References:Elliot, J.L., et al., "Pluto's Atmosphere." Icarus 77, 148-170 (1989)Eshleman, V.R., "Pluto's Atmosphere: Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor pressure equilibrium." Icarus 80 439-443 (1989)Elliot, J.L., et al., "The recent expansion of Pluto's atmosphere." Nature 424 165-168 (2003)Young, E.F., et al., "Search for Pluto's aerosols: simultaneous IR and visible stellar occultation observations." EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France (2011)

  20. Deriving Saturn's Zonal Winds from Cassini Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.

    2015-11-01

    Tracking cloud features from visible images have provided detailed maps of the meridional variation of the mean zonal winds on the giant planets, including Saturn. Filters at different wavelengths can provide information on the vertical structure of the zonal winds, but that is approximate, and the altitudes of winds observed with a given filter generally vary with location, because cloud heights do. Radio occultations provide vertical profiles of refractivity, pressure, and temperature vs. altitude. Zonal winds can be derived from the assumption of gradient wind balance, which relates the zonal wind to the change of geopotential height with latitude along an isobar. Occultations have the advantage that vertical profiles of winds can be obtained in the troposphere and stratosphere. There are, however, complicating factors. In general, the meridional distribution of occultation soundings is limited and unevenly distributed. Moreover, one needs to know the geometry of the occulting atmosphere to correctly account for the path of the refracted radio signal. The zonal winds matter, because they distort isobaric surfaces. For example, an inversion that includes Saturn's oblateness from uniform rotation, based on the Voyager System III period, would yield equatorial temperature profiles that are shifted by ~ 2 K relative to one that also includes the differential rotation associated with the cloud-tracked zonal winds. In retrieving vertical profiles of atmospheric variables from occultation soundings, one also needs an additional symmetry assumption to make the inversions tractable. Typically one uses the zonal winds based on cloud-tracking studies, and assumes they are axisymmetric and barotropic, so that both the gravitational and centrifugal forces are derivable from a potential, and the surfaces of constant geopotential height, pressure, and temperature coincide. This forms the basis for an iterative approach. The pressures and temperatures so retrieved from the

  1. Auto-Calibration of SOL-ACES in the EUV Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Brunner, R.; Eberhard, D.; Hofmann, A.; Klocke, U.; Knothe, M.; Konz, W.; Riedel, W.-J.; Wolf, H.

    The Sol-ACES (SOLAR Auto-Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrometers) experiment is prepared to be flown with the ESA SOLAR payload to the International Space Station as planned for the Shuttle mission E1 in August 2006. Four grazing incidence spectrometers of planar geometry cover the wavelength range from 16-220 nm with a spectral resolution from 0.5-2.3 nm. These high-efficiency spectrometers will be re-calibrated by two three-signal ionization chambers to be operated with 44 band pass filters on routine during the mission. Re-measuring the filter transmissions with the spectrometers also allows a very accurate determination of the changing second (optical) order efficiencies of the spectrometers as well as the stray light contributions to the spectral recording in different wavelength ranges. In this context the primary requirements for measurements of high radiometric accuracy will be discussed in detail. - The absorption gases of the ionization chambers are neon, xenon and a mixture of 10 % nitric oxide and 90 % xenon. As the laboratory measurements show that by this method secondary effects can be determined to a high degree resulting in very accurate irradiance measurements that is ranging from 5 to 3 % in absolute terms depending on the wavelegth range.

  2. First operations of the SOIR occultation infrared spectrometer in Venus orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevejans, D.; Neefs, E.; Vandaele, A. C.; Muller, C.; Fussen, D.; Berkenbosch, S.; Clairquin, R.; Korablev, O.; Federova, A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    Since May 2006, the Venus-Express spacecraft is in its nominal orbit around VENUS and the SPICAV optical package has begun to acquire spectra. The SOIR extension to SPICAV is an echelle spectrometer associated to an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) for the order selection, which performs solar occultation measurements in the IR region (2.2-4.3 µm) at a resolution of 0.1 cm-1 . The detailed optical study and design as well as the manufacturing were performed at the BIRA/IASB in collaboration with its industrial partners OIP and PEDEO. It was funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office under the ESA PRODEX programme. The wavelength range allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere above the cloud layer with an emphasis on vertical distribution of gases. The first results look promising and will be qualitatively presented.

  3. Tropical Tropopause Structure and Processes as Observed with GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre Juarez, Manuel; Schroder, Thomas M.; Ao, Chi O.

    2004-01-01

    The vertical temperature structure of the tropical atmosphere has been explained as controlled by the combined effect of three green house gases: water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone. Absorption by water vapor of the light reflected off the Earth's surface would determine the temperature lapse rate in the lower troposphere up to the bottom of the Tropical Transition Layer (TTL); radiative absorption by carbon dioxide would dominate the temperature lapse rate between the bottom of the TTL and the coldest point in the upper-troposphere, the cold point tropopause (CPT), and; absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone would control the temperature above the CPT. The TTL region can thus be very sensitive to changes in the relative abundances of these greenhouse gases. In this contribution we describe the seasonal evolution of temperature profiles in the TTL and their longitudinal structure using GPS radio occultation.

  4. Size, density, albedo and atmosphere limit of dwarf planet Eris from a stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Assafin, M.; Jehin, E.; Maury, A.; Lellouch, E.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Colas, F.; Lecacheux, J.; Roques, F.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Thirouin, A.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Gillon, M.; Manfroid, J.; Behrend, R.; Widemann, T.

    2011-10-01

    We report the observation of a multi-chord stellar occultation by the dwarf planet (136199) Eris. The event was observed on November 6, 2010 UT, from two sites in Chile. Our observation is consistent with a spherical Eris with radius RE=1163±6 km, density ?=2.52±0.05 g cm-3, and visible geometric albedo pV=0.96+0.09 -0.04. Besides being remarkably similar in size to Pluto, Eris appears as one of the intrinsically brightest objects of the solar system, with a density suggesting a mainly rocky interior. Upper limits of about 1 nbar are derived for the surface pressure of possible nitrogen, argon or methane atmospheres of the dwarf planet.

  5. Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) accommodations requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results of an accommodations analysis for the Advanced Solar Observatory on Space Station Freedom are reported. Concepts for the High Resolution Telescope Cluster, Pinhole/Occulter Facility, and High Energy Cluster were developed which can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom. It is shown that workable accommodations concepts are possible. Areas of emphasis for the next stage of engineering development are identified.

  6. Progress in extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in extra-solar planet detection is reviewed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the definition of a planet; (2) the weakness of planet signals; (3) direct techniques - imaging and spectral detection; and (4) indirect techniques - reflex motion and occultations.

  7. [Pitfalls in the diagnosis of occult elbow fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, A; Calvelli, N; Bourgeois, E; Eid, A; Griffet, J

    2016-08-01

    Elbow injuries are frequent but occult fractures are difficult to diagnose on x-rays. However, any delay in the diagnosis may severely impair the prognosis of some fractures. Simple tips may help the clinician read x-rays properly and avoid the classical pitfalls of elbow injuries in children. The chronology of appearance of ossification nuclei around the elbow is important to distinguish normal features from abnormality. Drawing simple geometric constructions on the x-rays may clarify most occult elbow fractures in children. PMID:27345552

  8. Corrections to fundamental constants from photoelectric observations of lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossello, G.

    1982-12-01

    A catalog of photoelectric occultations, which are more accurate than visual observations, is presented along with an analysis of the occultations intended to correct the FK4 stellar reference frame and lunar theory constants. A constant correction at the epoch 1969.0 of plus 0.87 plus or minus 0.06 to the FK4 system is consistent with those obtained by other authors, and the corrections to the semidiameter and parallactic inequality are in accord with values recently obtained by Morrison and Appleby (1981).

  9. GOMOS: Gobal Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leppelmeier, G. W.; Kyrola, E.; Pellinen, R.; Merat, P.; Korpela, S.; Bertaux, J. L.; Chassefiere, E.; Dalaudier, F.; Megie, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the progress and status of the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument, and imaging spectrometer under development for flight on the European Space Agency's Polar Orbiting Earth Mission (POEM-1) mission in 1998. Employing occultation of stars as a light probe of the Earth's atmosphere from a sun-sychronous polar orbit, the instrument will monitor ozone and other atmospheric trace gases over the entire globe. Atmospheric transmission resolution of approximately 1.7 km. When data are combined regionally, it will be possible to detect ozone concentration trends as small as 0.05 percent/year, depending on the degree of combination.

  10. IRTF observations of the occultation of 28 Sgr by Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Cooke, Maren L.; Forrest, William J.; Pipher, Judith L.; Dunham, Edward W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Mauna Kea IR Telescope Facility obtained an IR-imaging time series for the July 3, 1989 occultation of 28 Sgr by Saturn and its rings; the stellar signal is present in these images throughout the ring occultation event. These data are noted to vary systematically with respect to the Voyager data over large radius scales, perhaps due to stellar signal diffraction through the rings. The stellar diameter, which is projected to be about 20 km, placed most bending- and density-wave trains below measurable resolution. Masses and mean optical depths are presented for individual ring sections.

  11. Euraster an European Network for Asteroid Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, F.; Frappa, E.; Lecacheux, J.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Maquet, L.

    2011-10-01

    Except for in situ space missions, asteroid stellar occultations are the only way to measure asteroids at a sub kilometer level. To be scientifically relevant we need to get several positive chords in order to draw an accurate silhouette. These occultation data are the only way to fit the absolute size of 3D models obtained with light curves. At the end, it can be possible to get a good estimation of the volume and therefore if we know the mass, of the density. As we need a lot of observers, amateur contribution is crucial. We present here some statistics and results of the ten last years.

  12. Occult breast tumor reservoir: biological properties and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Santen, Richard J; Yue, Wei; Heitjan, Daniel F

    2013-08-01

    Small, occult, undiagnosed breast cancers are found at autopsy in up to 15.6 % of women dying from unrelated causes with an average of 7 % from eight separate studies. The mammographic detection threshold of breast tumors ranges from 0.88 to 1.66 cm in diameter based on the patient's age. Tumor growth rates, expressed as "effective doubling times," vary from 10 to >700 days. We previously reported two models, based on iterative analysis of these parameters, to describe the biologic behavior of undiagnosed, occult breast tumors. Our models facilitate interpretation of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and antiestrogen breast cancer prevention studies. A nude mouse xenograft model was used to validate our assumption that breast tumors grow in a log-linear fashion. We then used our previously reported occult tumor growth (OTG) and computer-simulated tumor growth models to analyze various clinical trial data. Parameters used in the OTG model included a 200-day effective doubling time, 7 % prevalence of occult tumors, and 1.16 cm detection threshold. These models had been validated by comparing predicted with observed incidence of breast cancer in eight different populations of women. Our model suggests that menopausal hormone therapy with estrogens plus a progestogen (E + P) in the WHI trial primarily promoted the growth of pre-existing, occult lesions and minimally initiated de novo tumors. We provide a potential explanation for the lack of an increase in breast cancer incidence in the subgroup of women in the WHI who had not received E + P prior to randomization. This result may have reflected a leftward skew in the distribution of occult tumor doublings and insufficient time for stimulated tumors to reach the detection threshold. Our model predicted that estrogen alone reduced the incidence of breast cancer as a result of apoptosis. Understanding of the biology of occult tumors suggests that breast cancer "prevention" with antiestrogens or aromatase

  13. Risk of Occult Uterine Sarcoma in Presumed Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rosa R; Wright, Jason D

    2016-03-01

    Symptomatic fibroids are a common indication for hysterectomy or myomectomy. Although rare, unexpected gynecologic malignancies in presumed fibroids have been documented. In cases where tissue retrieval is performed through morcellation, there is increasing concern that intra-abdominal dispersion of occult uterine malignancies may lead to peritoneal dissemination and worse outcomes. We examined the available literature to determine the prevalence of all uterine cancers in women undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy for benign uterine disease, with attention to the risk of morcellating occult uterine sarcomas. We also reviewed the available tools for preoperative discrimination between benign and malignant uterine disease. PMID:26645385

  14. The occultation of AG+29 deg 398 by 98 Minerva

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.; Franz, O. G.; Nye, R.; Osborn, W.; Klemola, A.

    1984-01-01

    On 22 Nov. 1982, the asteroid 93 Minerva occulted AG-29 deg 398 (= SAO 76O17A), a seventh magnitude star of AO spectral type. The data were best fitted by a circular limb profile having a diameter of 170.8 + or - 1.4 km, a value that agrees well with the published radiometric diameter for this asteroid. However, evidence of significant departure from a spherical shape is found in the occultation observations and in photometric measurements of Minerva. Additional observations are required to specify difinitively the three dimensional figure of Minerva.

  15. Occult laryngomalacia resulting in obstructive sleep apnea in an infant.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Karin P Q; Modi, Vikash K

    2013-09-01

    Classic laryngomalacia presents in the awake infant with progressive stridor when agitated. Occult laryngomalacia usually presents with stridor in children older than 2 years and is limited to sleep or exercise. There have been no documented cases of occult laryngomalacia causing obstructive sleep apnea in infants. We report the youngest documented case of an infant with state-dependent laryngomalacia resulting in severe obstructive sleep apnea. This patient was successfully treated with supraglottoplasty, with resolution of symptoms. In conclusion, state-dependent laryngomalacia resulting in obstructive sleep apnea may present in children younger than 12 months of age. In these individuals, supraglottoplasty should be considered. PMID:23911113

  16. Cassini First Diametric Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Kliore, A.; Flasar, M.; Nagy, A.; Ambrosini, R.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Thomson, F.; Wong, K.

    2005-05-01

    We present preliminary results expected from the first planned Cassini radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings, to be conducted on May 3rd, 2005. The path of Cassini as seen from Earth (the occultation track) has been designed to cross the rings from the west to the east ansa almost diametrically, allowing for occultation of all major ring features at two widely separated longitudes (about 180 deg apart). The duration of the geometric occultation is about 1.5 hours on each side. During the occultation, Cassini transmits through the rings three coherent monochromatic radio signals of wavelength 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-band respectively), a capability unique to Cassini. The perturbed signals received at the Earth are recorded at the NASA DSN complexes at Goldstone and Canberra. Both direct and forward-scattered components of the signal may be identified in spectrograms of the received signals. The time history of the extinction of the direct signal is expected to yield high-spatial-resolution optical depth and phase shift profiles of ring structure. The timing of the occultation was optimized to allow probing the rings when the ring-opening-angle B (the angle between the line-of-sight and the ring plane) is relatively large (B = 23 deg), hence maximizing chances of measuring for the first time the structure of the relatively optically thick Ring B. In a similar experiment by Voyager in 1980, excessive signal attenuation along the long path within the nearly closed rings (B = 5.9 deg) limited the utility of the observations in relatively thick ring regions, in particular the main Ring B. For the Cassini optimized occultation geometry, a large B, slow radial velocity along the occultation track, and much improved phase stability of the reference ultrastable oscillator (USO) on board Cassini combine to promise achievable radial resolution approaching 100 m over a good fraction of the rings. Measurement of the amplitude and phase of the diffracted

  17. Evolution of Solar Wind Heavy Ions over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2014-05-01

    Solar wind composition has been shown to effectively discriminate between different types of solar wind, including slow, fast and ICME related wind. The composition reflects the properties of the source regions of the wind in the corona and their evolution. We present the systematic and comprehensive analysis of the ionic and elemental composition observed on ACE over solar cycle 23 from 2000 until 2010. During this period, the Sun evolved through solar maximum to solar minimum. We find significantly lower C, O, and Fe charge states as well as a 50% decrease in heavy ion abundances (He, C, O, Si, Fe) relative to H during this transition towards solar minimum. We also examined the FIP bias. We consider the implications of these findings for solar wind models and for identification of the fast and slow wind.

  18. Comparisons between ACE-FTS and ground-based measurements of stratospheric HCl and ClONO2 loadings at northern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, E.; Zander, R.; Duchatelet, P.; Hannigan, J. W.; Coffey, M. T.; Mikuteit, S.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiacek, A.; Strong, K.; Taylor, J. R.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Fast, H.; Boone, C. D.; McLeod, S. D.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P. F.; Rinsland, C. P.

    2005-06-01

    We report first comparisons of stratospheric column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) derived from infrared solar spectra recorded in 2004 at selected northern latitudes by the spaceborne Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instruments at the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change)-affiliated sites of Thule (Greenland), Kiruna (Sweden), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), and Egbert and Toronto (Canada). Overall, and within the respective uncertainties of the independent measurement approaches, the comparisons show that the ACE-FTS measurements produce very good stratospheric volume mixing ratio profiles. Their internal precision allows to identify characteristic distribution features associated with latitudinal, dynamical, seasonal and chemical changes occurring in the atmosphere.

  19. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  20. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469