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Sample records for acetabular dysplasia cup

  1. A tribological study of UHMWPE acetabular cups and polyurethane compliant layer acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    A novel design of polyurethane compliant layer acetabular cup has been developed through a series of friction, creep and wear tests. Friction tests were initially conducted on ABG standard form, polyurethane acetabular cups and an ABG standard form, UHMWPE acetabular cup for comparison. The polyurethane cups showed lower friction than the UHMWPE cup with maximum friction factors between 0. 008 and 0.02 compared with 0.035 for the UHMWPE cup. This indicated that, in the polyurethane cups, more of the load across the joint was carried by the fluid entrapped in the joint space rather than with asperity contact, compared with the UHMWPE cup. The inherent compliance of the polyurethane is used to promote elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. However, this compliance raised concerns over excessive creep, which may in turn adversely affect tribological performance. Therefore, creep tests were undertaken on the ABG standard form, polyurethane acetabular cups followed by further friction tests. Small amounts of creep occurred in the polyurethane cups at ambient temperature, which reduced the friction slightly (maximum friction factors of 0.009) due to increased conformity between the head and the cup. However, at 37 degrees C, greater creep occurred causing pinching of the femoral head by the acetabular cup resulting in lubricant starvation and higher friction (maximum friction factors of 0.035). The design of the polyurethane cups was subsequently modified to incorporate a flared rim to eliminate the possibility of fluid starvation through pinching. Creep in polyurethane acetabular cups is also affected by the method of fixation of the cups, due to the conformity with and the stiffness of the cup backing. Hence, a one-million-cycle wear test was performed on five ABG flared form, polyurethane acetabular cups on the Mk. I Durham Hip Joint Wear Simulator to evaluate the best method of fixation for the polyurethane cups. The smallest amount of penetration, due to creep and wear

  2. Profile Measurement of Worn Acetabular Cup by Holographic Contouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Tohoru; Sakurai, Daisuke; Aota, Yuuki; Shelton, Julia

    Wear in a polyethylene acetabular cup is dependent on the history of the cup, namely on the sterilization treatment, initial mounting situation, the patient's lifestyle and length of time in vivo. Understanding wear patterns is essential in order to prevent inflammation and prosthesis failure. This study describes the profile measurement of a worn acetabular cup by holographic contouring, which can provide non-contact measurement over the entire visual field. Experiments were performed to verify the method, and measurements of cups worn in vivo were carried out. Cup profile was investigated using holograms obtained in three directions and changes in cup profile were evaluated using fringe patterns in which the interval range was adjusted from tens of microns to several millimeters.

  3. Dissociation of a polyethylene liner from an acetabular cup.

    PubMed

    Cameron, H U

    1993-10-01

    A polyethylene linear dissociated from a metal acetabular shell that could not be removed at the time of hip revision because the hexagonal hole in its screw head had become rounded off. A high-speed metal cutting burr was used to remove the screw and allow cup revision. PMID:8265224

  4. Increased risk of revision of acetabular cups coated with hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Lazarinis, Stergios; Kärrholm, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Background Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main inorganic component of bone, and HA coating is widely used on acetabular cups in hip arthroplasty. It has been suggested that this surface finish improves cup survival. Methods All patients registered in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register between 1992 and 2007 with an uncemented acetabular implant that was available either with or without HA coating were identified. 8,043 total hip arthroplasties (THAs) with the most common cup types (Harris-Galante, Romanus, and Trilogy) were investigated. A Cox regression model including type of coating, age, sex, primary diagnosis, cup type, and type of stem fixation was used to calculate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) for the risk of revision. Results HA coating was a risk factor for cup revision due to aseptic loosening (adjusted RR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3–2). Age at primary arthroplasty of < 50 years, a diagnosis of pediatric hip disease, the use of a cemented stem, and the Romanus and Harris-Galante cup types were also associated with statistically significantly increased risk of cup revision due to aseptic loosening. Interpretation Our findings question the routine use of HA-coated cups in primary total hip arthroplasty. With some designs, this practice may even increase the risk of loosening—resulting in revision surgery. PMID:19968603

  5. Cross table lateral radiography for measurement of acetabular cup version

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Ragnhild Beate

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate orientation of the acetabular cup is an important factor for long-term results of total hip arthroplasty. For measurement of cup version cross-table lateral radiography is frequently used, but the reliability has been questioned. We compared cross table lateral radiography with computed tomography in patients that had undergone primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods The study was prospectively done in 117 patients (117 hips). At 3 months after total hip replacement the acetabular version was measured by cross table lateral radiography and compared to measurements by computed tomography. Results By cross table lateral radiography acetabular anteversion was on mean 13.9° with a standard deviation of 10.1° as compared to 17.8°±12.6° by computed tomography. Mean difference was −3.8 with a distribution of measurements of ±13 degrees for 95% of the cases. Conclusions Our study shows that cross table radiography provides acceptable information for clinical use, but has limited use for precise analysis of acetabular cup version. PMID:27275482

  6. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications.

  7. Acetabular rim and surface segmentation for hip surgery planning and dysplasia evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.; Ward, Michael M.

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge of the acetabular rim and surface can be invaluable for hip surgery planning and dysplasia evaluation. The acetabular rim can also be used as a landmark for registration purposes. At the present time acetabular features are mostly extracted manually at great cost of time and human labor. Using a recent level set algorithm that can evolve on the surface of a 3D object represented by a triangular mesh we automatically extracted rims and surfaces of acetabulae. The level set is guided by curvature features on the mesh. It can segment portions of a surface that are bounded by a line of extremal curvature (ridgeline or crestline). The rim of the acetabulum is such an extremal curvature line. Our material consists of eight hemi-pelvis surfaces. The algorithm is initiated by putting a small circle (level set seed) at the center of the acetabular surface. Because this surface distinctively has the form of a cup we were able to use the Shape Index feature to automatically extract an approximate center. The circle then expands and deforms so as to take the shape of the acetabular rim. The results were visually inspected. Only minor errors were detected. The algorithm also proved to be robust. Seed placement was satisfactory for the eight hemi-pelvis surfaces without changing any parameters. For the level set evolution we were able to use a single set of parameters for seven out of eight surfaces.

  8. Improving acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty by using smartphone technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Frank M; Greeff, Richard; Goldstein, Neal; Frey, Chris T

    2012-08-01

    Acetabular cup placement in total hip arthroplasty is often difficult to assess, especially in the lateral position and using the posterior approach. Conventional techniques and computer-assisted surgery are the 2 most popular methods for proper placement of the acetabular cup in Lewinnek's safe zone of orientation (anteversion 15° ± 10° and lateral inclination 40° ± 10°). We developed a system that uses the accelerometer and camera function of the iPhone. A level indicator application and protractor application were downloaded to the iPhone and used to improve acetabular cup placement. This system has proven to be accurate and quick. Our series of 50 prospective cases showed good results with all our acetabular cups being placed within a narrow range in the safe zone and with less than 5% difference between the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative acetabular inclinations. PMID:22245126

  9. Uncemented acetabular components with femoral head autograft for acetabular reconstruction in developmental dysplasia of the hip: a concise follow-up report at a mean of twenty years.

    PubMed

    Abdel, Matthew P; Stryker, Louis S; Trousdale, Robert T; Berry, Daniel J; Cabanela, Miguel E

    2014-11-19

    We previously reported the five to twelve-year results of total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented acetabular component and an autogenous femoral head graft in forty-four consecutive hips with developmental dysplasia. The goal of the present study was to report the implant survival rate, status of bone grafts, and clinical outcomes in thirty-five of these hips (in twenty-nine patients) followed for a mean of 21.3 years. Functional, radiographic, and survivorship results were examined. Radiographic analysis revealed an average cup inclination angle of 43° and a mean arc of cup coverage by the graft of 30°. The twenty-year survivorship free from acetabular revision was 66% (twelve acetabular revisions; eight since our previous report). Of the twelve revisions, nine were for liner wear and/or osteolysis, one was for a liner fracture, one was for aseptic loosening, and one was for instability. All bone grafts healed to the pelvis. The graft facilitated revision cup placement as no additional structural grafts or metal augments were required. We concluded that an uncemented porous-coated socket used in conjunction with a bulk femoral head autograft provides good long-term fixation and restores bone stock. PMID:25410505

  10. Using acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Gao, Xu; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Yanru

    2015-01-01

    Positions of acetabular implant generally are considered to be major causative factors of dislocation. Accurate and consistent achievement of the preoperatively anticipated orientation of the acetabular cup is a great challenge in total hip replacement (THR). In the present study, we investigated the surgical application of acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup, and evaluated its accuracy as an anatomic reference for achieving the preoperatively anticipated abduction of the acetabular cup in comparison with traditional device method on cadaveric specimens. Sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens were collected. On each of the sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens, acetabular fossa related anatomic sites were marked and studied on pelvic radiographs. Our results showed that there is close correlation between most medial aspect of acetabular sourcil and central axis of the acetabular cup at anticipated inclination of 40° ± 5°. And the fossa group can achieve the preoperatively anticipated cup abduction more accurately than the device group. The current results demonstrated that acetabular fossa can be a reasonable alternative, or as a complement to the currently used methods guiding total hip replacement. PMID:25784987

  11. Effect of acetabular reinforcement ring with hook for acetabular dysplasia clarified by three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Chosa, Etsuo; Yamako, Go; Watanabe, Shinji; Deng, Gang; Totoribe, Koji

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to biomechanically determine the effect of the severity of acetabular dysplasia, number and positions of screws and type of bone graft material used on the initial fixation strength of the acetabular reinforcement ring with hook (Ganz ring) using the finite element method. Relative micromotion increased as the severity of acetabular dysplasia increased and tended to decrease as the number of screws increased, but varied according to screw placement position. Increased strength of the bone graft material led to decreased relative micromotion. Biomechanically, the Ganz ring can be placed securely using 3 screws in patients with Crowe 1 dysplasia. However, in patients with Crowe 2 or higher dysplasia, it is necessary to spread at least 4 screws across an area of good host bone. PMID:23993349

  12. Hip Arthroscopy in the Presence of Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Aprato, Alessandro; Villar, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Hip arthroscopy is a well established therapeutic intervention for an increasing number of painful hip conditions. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is commonly associated with intra-articular hip pathology. However, some surgeons perceive patients with hip dysplasia as poor candidates for hip arthroscopy. Our aim was to describe early outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for patients with DDH, who also had femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treated when necessary, and to compare these outcomes against a control group of patients without DDH. Methods : Prospective case-control study of 68 consecutive hip arthroscopy patients assessed with a modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) preoperatively and at six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. Presence of DDH was determined using a standard anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph to measure the centre-edge angle (CEA) of Wiberg, with a CEA < 20º used as threshold for diagnosis of DDH. Results : 12 patients (eight female and four male) with acetabular dysplasia and mean CEA of 15.4º (9º to 19º). The control, nondysplastic group comprised 54 patients (23 females and 31 males) with a mean CEA of 33.1º (22º to 45º). All patients in the dysplastic group had a labral tear and 11 (91.7%) had associated femoral cam impingement lesion addressed at arthroscopy. Our study demonstrates a significant (p=0.02) improvement in outcome in the dysplastic group at one year using the mHHS. Conclusion : Hip arthroscopy in the presence of DDH is effective in relieving pain for at least one year after surgery although does not address underlying acetabular abnormality. PMID:26069512

  13. Computer-Assisted Rotational Acetabular Osteotomy for Patients with Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is a well-established surgical procedure for patients with acetabular dysplasia, and excellent long-term results have been reported. However, RAO is technically demanding and precise execution of this procedure requires experience with this surgery. The usefulness of computer navigation in RAO includes its ability to perform three-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning, enable safe osteotomy even with a poor visual field, reduce exposure to radiation from intraoperative fluoroscopy, and display the tip position of the chisel in real time, which is educationally useful as it allows staff other than the operator to follow the progress of the surgery. In our results comparing 23 hips that underwent RAO with navigation and 23 hips operated on without navigation, no significant difference in radiological assessment was observed. However, no perioperative complications were observed in the navigation group whereas one case of transient femoral nerve palsy was observed in non-navigation group. A more accurate and safer RAO can be performed using 3D preoperative planning and intraoperative assistance with a computed tomography-based navigation system. PMID:26929806

  14. Displacement and Stress Analysis around the Artificial Acetabular Cup in a Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Abo, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Hiroo

    In order to improve the service life of the artificial acetabular cup in a total hip replacement, it is important to determine the best material and design, and to assess the mechanical behavior around the cup. In this study, electronic speckle interferometry (ESPI) and the two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior. The influence of the cancellous bone and cup thickness on mechanical behavior around the cup was investigated. Good agreement of the cup model was found between the ESPI measurements and FEM predictions. The following results were obtained. (1) Cancellous bone with a porous structure can be measured by the ESPI method. (2) There are discontinuities of the displacement distribution in the transverse direction in each boundary region of the cup, bone cement and cancellous bone. (3) The maximum shear stress exists in the boundary region of the cup and bone cement.

  15. A technique to remove a well-fixed titanium-coated rm acetabular cup in revision hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A major concern during revision hip arthroplasty is acetabular bone loss and bleeding during the extraction of well-fixed cementless acetabular cup, because no interface exists between the host bone and the cup. Forceful removal of such component using curved gouges and osteotomes often leads to extended bone loss and compromises reimplantation of a new socket. In the following case report, we removed a well-fixed polyethylene titanium-coated RM acetabular cup with 20 years of follow-up, by significant wear of the polyethylene layer. The isoelastic femoral stem was also removed by mechanical failure. We report a technique for removal of the cementless acetabular cup using powered acetabular reamers. The RM cup was sequentially reamed and when the polyethylene layer was thin enough, the remaining cup was removed easily by hand tools. The acetabular bone stock is preserved and the risks of bone fractures and bleeding are minimized. To our knowledge, these principles were applied only in cemented cups. We have used this technique in 10 cases with excellent results and no complications were noted. This is a simple, reproducible, non-costly, non-timing consuming, safe and successful technique to remove well-fixed titanium-coated RM acetabular cups. PMID:21689456

  16. Research synthesis of recommended acetabular cup orientations for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Claire L; Thomson, Avril I; Cutts, Steven; Rowe, Philip J; Riches, Philip E

    2014-02-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is regarded as one of the most successful surgical procedures of modern times yet continues to be associated with a small but significant complication rate. Many early failures may be associated with poor component positioning with, in particular, acetabular component orientation dependent on the subjective judgement of the surgeon. In this paper, we compare the manufacturers' instructions on acetabular cup orientation with the literature-based recommended safety zones and surgical technique, by transforming them onto a single, clinically-relevant framework in which the different reference systems, safety guidelines and current instrumentation surgical techniques can be evaluated. The observed limited consensus between results reflects ongoing uncertainty regarding the optimum acetabular component positioning. As malpositioning of the acetabular cup increases the risk of revision surgery, any ambiguity over the correct position can have a causal effect. Our analysis highlights the need for a surgical reference system which can be used to describe the position of the acetabular cup intra-operatively. PMID:23958234

  17. Evaluation of acetabular cup initial fixation by using resonance frequency principle.

    PubMed

    Henys, Petr; Capek, Lukas; Fencl, Jaroslav; Prochazka, Egon

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice shows that the loosening of acetabular cups is more frequent than stem loosening. With standard cups, the incidence of dislocation failure is highest in the first year after arthroplasty implantation. The aim of the study was to quantitatively evaluate the implant-bone stability of a cementless acetabular cup prosthesis by using a device based on resonance frequency analysis. The evaluation of this device was done by finite element analysis and in vitro experiments. It was shown that not all the resonance frequencies can be measured by our device. The resonance frequencies vary within the range of 500-3000 Hz. The proposed power spectrum measurement gives the information about the absolute stiffness of the press-fit implant. PMID:25655952

  18. Wear of gamma-crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups against roughened femoral balls.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; DiMaio, W; Lancaster, J G

    1999-12-01

    Crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene has been shown to markedly improve its wear resistance in clinical studies and laboratory tests using hip joint simulators. However, because most of the laboratory studies have been done under clean conditions using prosthesis-quality, highly polished counterfaces, there is concern regarding how well an intentionally crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cup will resist abrasion by a femoral ball that has been damaged by third-body abrasion in vivo. To investigate this, conventional and radiation crosslinked-remelted acetabular cups of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene were tested in a hip joint simulator bearing against smooth femoral balls and against balls with moderate and severe roughening. Cups were tested with and without aging to accelerate any oxidative degradation. The crosslinked cups were produced by exposing extruded GUR 4150 bar stock of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene to 5 Mrad gamma radiation under a partial vacuum and then the bars were remelted to extinguish residual free radicals. Artificial aging at 70 degrees C under 5 atm oxygen for 14 days induced negligible oxidation in the crosslinked and remelted material. Against smooth balls, the wear of the crosslinked cups, with or without aging, averaged approximately 15% of that of the conventional cups. Against the moderately rough balls, the wear rate of the conventional cups was unchanged, whereas the wear rate increased slightly for the nonaged and aged crosslinked cups, but was still only 26% and 20% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. Against extremely rough balls, the mean wear rates increased markedly for each material such that during the final 1 million cycle interval, the average wear rates of the nonaged and the aged crosslinked cups were 72% and 47% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. That is, the crosslinked polyethylene showed substantially better wear resistance than conventional polyethylene

  19. Implication of acetabular width on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2015-03-01

    Radiographic parameters that can help acetabular reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) are few. The radiographs of 138 dysplastic hips that had undergone cementless THA were evaluated regarding the acetabular width above the acetabular component and the coverage of the component by native bone. The acetabular reconstruction process was simulated using 3D models from CT data, and the acetabular component coverage was calculated in 3D space based on the measurement and algorithm we proposed. Significant positive correlation between the acetabular width and the acetabular component coverage was found. Our study introduced a useful parameter, which can mark the superior reference position of the acetabular component for acetabular reconstruction in DDH patients. PMID:25311162

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy study of the oxidation of Hylamer UHMWPE explanted acetabular cups sterilized differently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Matteo; Tinti, Anna; Visentin, Manuela; Stea, Susanna; Erani, Paolo; Fagnano, Concezio

    2007-05-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used for over 40 years for acetabular cups in total hip joint prosthesis. Hylamer is a hot isostatically pressed material with high crystallinity. Early loosening due to extensive oxidation and phase transformation has been observed for this material. To analyze the reasons for its high tendency to oxidize, we have examined by FT-IR spectroscopy explanted acetabular cups γ-sterilized in different ways. The oxidation and wear rate observed were: Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in air with a long shelf life > Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in air with short shelf life ⩾ Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in nitrogen. Our data indicate the important role of the shelf life on the oxidation of the cups: the samples γ-sterilized in air characterized by a shelf life greater than 3 years showed severe oxidation, a high wear rate, and marked debris production with delamination and the formation of a brittle zone in the more oxidated regions. In these regions we observed an increase in crystallinity, which was probably due to the decrease in the molecular weight of PE. The high oxidation was probably due to the modifications induced by the material treatment.

  1. Acute polyethylene fracture in an uncemented acetabular cup

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Allan E.; Dust, William N.

    1997-01-01

    The smaller acetabular components used in total hip replacement may have a polyethylene liner that is too thin, resulting in higher polyethylene stress and an increased potential for wear. The authors present a case that highlights the problem of acute polyethylene fracture. To compensate for the thinness of the polyethylene, the authors recommend the use of a smaller head size to allow polyethylene thickness of at least 8 mm. PMID:9267302

  2. Advanced material modelling in numerical simulation of primary acetabular press-fit cup stability.

    PubMed

    Souffrant, R; Zietz, C; Fritsche, A; Kluess, D; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2012-01-01

    Primary stability of artificial acetabular cups, used for total hip arthroplasty, is required for the subsequent osteointegration and good long-term clinical results of the implant. Although closed-cell polymer foams represent an adequate bone substitute in experimental studies investigating primary stability, correct numerical modelling of this material depends on the parameter selection. Material parameters necessary for crushable foam plasticity behaviour were originated from numerical simulations matched with experimental tests of the polymethacrylimide raw material. Experimental primary stability tests of acetabular press-fit cups consisting of static shell assembly with consecutively pull-out and lever-out testing were subsequently simulated using finite element analysis. Identified and optimised parameters allowed the accurate numerical reproduction of the raw material tests. Correlation between experimental tests and the numerical simulation of primary implant stability depended on the value of interference fit. However, the validated material model provides the opportunity for subsequent parametric numerical studies. PMID:22817471

  3. Early polyethylene wear and osteolysis with ABG acetabular cups (7- to 12-year follow-up)

    PubMed Central

    Livesley, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed 81 consecutive ABG I primary total hip replacements implanted in 72 patients between January 1993 and December 1998. The mean follow-up was 8.2 (range 7–12) years. There was significant polyethylene wear and osteolysis associated with the acetabular cup .The cumulative survival of the cup with revision being the end point at 8.2 years was 95.1% (95% CI: 92–97.6%). However, the cumulative survival of the cup with revision and aseptic loosening together was 72% (95% CI: 61–78%) and survival of the acetabular liner for wear was 62% (95% CI: 48–74%). Stem survival with revision being the end point was 100%. In spite of significant radiological failures of the cups, most patients remained asymptomatic. Though results of the ABG stems in this series were good, we advocate a regular follow-up of all these hips in view of the poor outcome of the cups. PMID:16283307

  4. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. PMID:25080896

  5. Constrained captive acetabular cup for recurrent dislocation of hemiarthroplasty in elderly: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Aysha; Banaszkiewicz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemiarthroplasty of the hip is one of the commonest procedures done for intracapsular fractures of the neck of femur in elderly. Dislocation of the hemiarthroplasty is a recognised and significant complication. This is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment options include closed manipulation, skin and skeletal traction, conversion to total hip replacement, exploration and open reduction and leaving it out of the acetabulum. Presentation of case A retrospective review of ten patients with recurrent and failed closed manipulative reduction of hemiarthroplasty who underwent revision using a cemented captive acetabular cup and cement to cement revision of femoral component with Exeter CDH stem was carried out. The follow up period was two years and the functional outcomes were assessed using Harris hip scores. Discussion The management of recurrent dislocations of hemiarthroplasty in elderly patient are very challenging. Even though various treatment options are described most of them are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and prevent these patients from early mobilisation. The use of captive acetabular avoid repeated dislocations, prolonged bed rest, wearing of a brace and all the complications associated with sustained immobilization. The drawbacks of using constrained cups are hip pain, limited hip movements and loosening. Conclusion We describe a new method of treatment of this difficult condition with a cemented constrained acetabular captive cup and cement to cement revision using a CDH femoral stem. This method prevents further dislocations and will give good functional outcomes thus reducing the high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27129135

  6. The effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of revision hip arthroplasty: a finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A T M; Pankaj; Usmani, A S; Howie, C R

    2004-01-01

    The study uses idealized two-dimensional finite element models to examine the behaviour of the acetabular construct following revision hip arthroplasty, carried out using the Slooff-Ling impaction grafting technique. The behaviour of bone graft was considered in detail, with non-linear elasticity and non-associated plasticity being adopted. Load was applied to the acetabular construct through a femoral head using smooth sliding surfaces. In particular, four models were subjected to two idealized cyclic load cases to investigate the effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of the acetabular construct. The study suggests that benefits may be gained by using the largest practical size of acetabular cup. PMID:15376726

  7. Long-term Radiographic Assessment of Cemented Polyethylene Acetabular Cups

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Graham; Porter, Neil; Fisher, John; Older, John

    2008-01-01

    In vitro studies demonstrating excessive wear in polyethylene cups sterilized using gamma irradiation and stored in air led to the abandonment of this sterilization technique. We evaluated the clinical wear performance of a metal femoral component on a polyethylene cup in a hip prosthesis from a selected subset of implants in a group of patients followed for at least 20 years and assessed the time dependency of variation in penetration rates. We measured penetration in 33 polyethylene cups in 25 patients who had a Charnley low-friction arthroplasty between 1982 and 1984. All patients had Charnley Ogee® cups implanted for more than 20 years and sterilized using the gamma irradiation in air technique. If degradation occurred over time in vivo, it was not reflected by an increased penetration rate with increasing time in vivo; even after 20 years of implantation, the degree of wear remained low. This suggests gamma irradiation affects wear on ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene by reducing wear secondary to the crosslinking, by increasing wear as shown through in vitro studies of heavily oxidized samples, or by oxidation resulting from prolonged shelf life. The effect of progressive oxidation in vivo does not appear to affect wear in vivo. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196419

  8. The biological approach in acetabular revision surgery: impaction bone grafting and a cemented cup.

    PubMed

    Colo, Ena; Rijnen, Wim H C; Schreurs, Berend Willem

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular impaction bone grafting (IBG) in combination with a cemented cup in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a proven and well-recognised technique which has been used in clinical practice for more than 35 years. Nowadays, with cemented prostheses tending to lose a larger part of the THA market every year in primary and revision cases, and many young surgeons being only trained in implanting uncemented prostheses, this technique is considered by many as technically demanding and time consuming, making its use less appealing. Despite this image and many new innovative techniques using uncemented implants in acetabular revisions over the last 25 years, IBG with a cemented cup is still one of the few techniques that really can reconstitute bone and respects human biology. In this era of many biologically-based breakthroughs in medicine, it is hard to explain that the solution of most orthopaedic surgeons for the extensive bone defects as frequently seen during acetabular revision surgery, consists of implanting bigger and larger metal implants. This review aims to put the IBG method into a historical perspective, to describe the surgical technique and present the clinical results. PMID:26044533

  9. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  10. The relationship between operative and radiographic acetabular component orientation: which factors influence resultant cup orientation?

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, G; Pandit, H G; da Assunção, R; McLardy-Smith, P; De Smet, K A; Gill, H S; Murray, D W

    2014-10-01

    There is great variability in acetabular component orientation following hip replacement. The aims of this study were to compare the component orientation at impaction with the orientation measured on post-operative radiographs and identify factors that influence the difference between the two. A total of 67 hip replacements (52 total hip replacements and 15 hip resurfacings) were prospectively studied. Intra-operatively, the orientation of the acetabular component after impaction relative to the operating table was measured using a validated stereo-photogrammetry protocol. Post-operatively, the radiographic orientation was measured; the mean inclination/anteversion was 43° (sd 6°)/ 19° (sd 7°). A simulated radiographic orientation was calculated based on how the orientation would have appeared had an on-table radiograph been taken intra-operatively. The mean difference between radiographic and intra-operative inclination/anteversion was 5° (sd 5°)/ -8° (sd 8°). The mean difference between simulated radiographic and intra-operative inclination/anteversion, which quantifies the effect of the different way acetabular orientation is measured, was 3°/-6° (sd 2°). The mean difference between radiographic and simulated radiographic orientation inclination/anteversion, which is a manifestation of the change in pelvic position between component impaction and radiograph, was 1°/-2° (sd 7°). This study demonstrated that in order to achieve a specific radiographic orientation target, surgeons should implant the acetabular component 5° less inclined and 8° more anteverted than their target. Great variability (2 sd about ± 15°) in the post-operative radiographic cup orientation was seen. The two equally contributing causes for this are variability in the orientation at which the cup is implanted, and the change in pelvic position between impaction and post-operative radiograph. PMID:25274911

  11. Postural correction reduces hip pain in adult with acetabular dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Khuu, Anne; Marinko, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is often diagnosed in infancy, but less severe cases of acetabular dysplasia are being detected in young active adults. The purpose of this case report is to present a non-surgical intervention for a 31-year-old female with mild acetabular dysplasia and an anterior acetabular labral tear. The patient presented with right anterior hip and groin pain, and she stood with the trunk swayed posterior to the pelvis (swayback posture). The hip pain was reproduced with the anterior impingement test. During gait, the patient maintained the swayback posture and reported 6/10 hip pain. Following correction of the patient’s posture, the patient’s pain rating was reduced to a 2/10 while walking. The patient was instructed to maintain the improved posture. At the 1 year follow-up, she demonstrated significantly improved posture in standing and walking. She had returned to recreational running and was generally pain-free. The patient demonstrated improvement on self-reported questionnaires for pain, function and activity. These findings suggest that alteration of posture can have an immediate and lasting effect on hip pain in persons with structural abnormality and labral pathology. PMID:25731688

  12. Press-fit versus threaded acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty: Functional and radiological results after five years.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Bader, Rainer; Bergschmidt, Philipp; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Prospectively the outcome after total hip replacement with a new threaded acetabular cup design was compared to an established press-fit cup. After 1, 2 and 5 years, the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index and Harris Hip Score revealed no significant differences between the two groups (each group: n=42 patients), except for a higher Harris Hip Score in the threaded cup group after five years (p=0.02). After five years, one threaded cup had a mild radiolucent line without further signs of loosening. All other cups of both groups (98.6%) showed a full osseous integration. The cup inclination angle ranged from 41-58° (threaded cups) to 39-77° (press-fit cups). The new threaded cup provides equivalent clinical outcomes and osseous integration but more precise implant positioning compared to the press-fit design. No complications typically ascribed to threaded cups (acetabular fractures, bone resorption, nerve impairment) occurred. PMID:26984655

  13. Bipolar hip arthroplasty as salvage treatment for loosening of the acetabular cup with significant bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Glase, Almuth; Zajonz, Dirk; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Josten, Christoph; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Revision arthroplasty of the hip is becoming increasingly important in recent years. Early primary arthroplasty and longer life expectancy of the patients increases the number of revision surgery. Revision surgery of hip arthroplasty is major surgery for the patients, especially the elderly, with significant risks concerning the general condition of the patient. The aim of this work is to evaluate the outcome of bipolar hip arthroplasty as a salvage procedure for treatment of loosening of the acetabular cup with significant acetabular bone defects after total hip replacement (THR) in multi-morbid patients. Patients and methods: During the period from January 1st 2007 to December 31st 2011 19 revision hip surgeries were performed in 19 patients, in which the loosened acetabular cup was replaced by a bipolar head. The examined patient group consisted exclusively of female patients with an average of 75 years. The predominant diagnosis was “aseptic loosening” (84.2%). All patients in our study were multi-morbid. We decided to resort to bipolar hip arthroplasty due to the compromised general condition of patients and the major acetabular bone defects, which were confirmed intraoperatively. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 67 months (average 19.1 months). Results: Evaluation of the modified Harris Hip Score showed an overall improvement of the function of the hip joint after surgery of approximately 45%. Surgery was less time consuming and thus adequate for patients with significantly poor general health condition. We noticed different complications in a significant amount of patients (68.4%). The most common complication encountered was the proximal migration of the bipolar head. The rate of revision following the use of bipolar hip arthroplasty in revision surgery of the hip in our patients was high (21%). Despite the high number of complications reported in our study, we have noticed significant improvement of hip joint function as

  14. A hierarchy of computationally derived surgical and patient influences on metal on metal press-fit acetabular cup failure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S G; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J; Cobb, J P

    2012-06-01

    The impact of anatomical variation and surgical error on excessive wear and loosening of the acetabular component of large diameter metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties was measured using a multi-factorial analysis through 112 different simulations. Each surgical scenario was subject to eight different daily loading activities using finite element analysis. Excessive wear appears to be predominantly dependent on cup orientation, with inclination error having a higher influence than version error, according to the study findings. Acetabular cup loosening, as inferred from initial implant stability, appears to depend predominantly on factors concerning the area of cup-bone contact, specifically the level of cup seating achieved and the individual patient's anatomy. The extent of press fit obtained at time of surgery did not appear to influence either mechanism of failure in this study. PMID:22513086

  15. Relationship between developmental dislocation of the hip in infant and acetabular dysplasia at skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated 8-60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH.A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17-59 years).Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle.Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  16. Monitoring the press-fit insertion of an acetabular cup by impact measurements: influence of bone abrasion.

    PubMed

    Michel, Adrien; Bosc, Romain; Mathieu, Vincent; Hernigou, Philippe; Haiat, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Press-fit procedures used for the insertion of cementless hip prostheses aim at obtaining optimal implant primary stability. We have previously used the measurement of impact duration to follow the insertion of the acetabular cup implant within bone tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation of the value of the impact momentum due to successive insertions of the acetabular cup into bone tissue. The results obtained with impact momentum and contact duration measurements were compared. A total of 10 bovine bone samples were subjected to three successive procedures consisting of 10 reproducible impacts (3.5 kg falling 40 mm). Each procedure aimed at inserting the acetabular cup implant into the same bone cavity. The time variation of force during each impact was recorded by a force sensor, allowing the measurement of the impact duration (I 1) and momentum (I 2). The value of I 2 increased as a function of the impact number and reached a constant value after N 2 = 5.07 ± 1.31 impacts. Moreover, statistical analyses show that N 2 decreased significantly as a function of the number of experiments, which may be due to abrasion phenomena at the bone-implant interface. Abrasion phenomena led to a faster insertion of the acetabular cup when the implant had been previously inserted into the same bone cavity. An empirical analytical model considering a flat punch configuration to model the bone-implant contact conditions was used to understand the trend of the variation of I 2 during the insertion of the acetabular cup. The measurement of the force during impacts is useful to assess the bone-implant interface properties, but needs to be validated in the clinic to be useful for orthopaedic surgeons intra-operatively. PMID:25258009

  17. The effect of dynamic hip motion on the micromotion of press-fit acetabular cups in six degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2016-08-01

    The hip joint is subjected to cyclic loading and motion during activities of daily living and this can induce micromotions at the bone-implant interface of cementless total hip replacements. Initial stability has been identified as a crucial factor to achieve osseointegration and long-term survival. Whilst fixation of femoral stems achieves good clinical results, the fixation of acetabular components remains a challenge. In vitro methods assessing cup stability keep the hip joint in a fixed position, overlooking the effect of hip motion. The effect of hip motion on cup micromotion using a hip motion simulator replicating hip flexion-extension and a six degrees of freedom measurement system was investigated. The results show an increase in cup micromotion under dynamic hip motion compared to Static Flexion. This highlights the need to incorporate hip motion and measure all degrees of freedom when assessing cup micromotion. In addition, comparison of two press-fit acetabular cups with different surface coatings suggested similar stability between the two cups. This new method provides a basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of different cup designs. PMID:27210567

  18. Influence of acetabular cup rim design on the contact stress during edge loading in ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mathew; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stewart, Todd D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the contact stresses in 3 different acetabular cup rim designs (new, worn, chamfer) during edge loading, after microseparation of ceramic on ceramic hip prostheses. A 3-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted for a 28-mm diameter alumina ceramic bearing with a radial clearance of 40 μm using a normal load of 2500 N under edge loading. At a separation distance of 250 μm, the maximum tensile stress in the "new" design was of similar magnitude to the flexural strength of the alumina material that supports the localized breakdown (stripe wear) of the acetabular cup surface observed clinically. Introducing a 2.5-mm radius chamfer should reduce the maximum tensile stress in the region of 60%. PMID:20149581

  19. Assessment of accuracy of acetabular cup orientation in CT-free navigated total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Shigeo; Fukui, Tomokazu; Imamura, Fumiaki; Nishio, Shoji

    2008-10-01

    We have used the Orthopilot (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) computed tomography (CT)-free navigation system to ensure accurate and reproducible acetabular cup orientation. In this system, cup orientation is assessed with respect to bony configuration as determined by palpation of the anatomical landmarks (the bilateral anterosuperior iliac spines and the upper margin of the pubic symphysis). In this study, intraoperative cup orientation as presented by the OrthoPilot navigation system was compared with the value obtained through postoperative radiological assessment using CT Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data and Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization (MIPAV; National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland). Intra- and postoperative results obtained from 27 consecutive navigated total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were analyzed. For cup positioning, the desired inclination and anteversion angles were set within the "safe zone" proposed by Lewinnek. In the intraoperative evaluation, the mean inclination angle as determined by the navigation system was 43.5 degrees +/- 2.17 degrees (range, 39.9 degrees to 46.6 degrees ) after the final implantation. In contrast, the mean inclination angle determined by postoperative calculation using MIPAV was 44.9 +/- 3.3 degrees (range, 38.1 degrees to 55.0 degrees ). A discrepancy of >5 degrees was observed in only 1 hip. For the anteversion, the mean intra- and postoperative values were 11.1 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees (range, 0 degrees to 17.8 degrees ) and 13.5 degrees +/- 5.9 degrees (range, 5.1 degrees to 21.6 degrees ), respectively. Again, a discrepancy of >5 degrees was observed in 1 case. Mean differences between the intra- and postoperative values were 1.9 degrees +/- 1.9 degrees and 2.6 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees for inclination and anteversion, respectively. A good agreement between the intraoperative values presented by the navigation system

  20. Ex vivo estimation of cementless acetabular cup stability using an impact hammer.

    PubMed

    Michel, Adrien; Bosc, Romain; Sailhan, Frédéric; Vayron, Romain; Haiat, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Obtaining primary stability of acetabular cup (AC) implants is one of the main objectives of press-fit procedures used for cementless hip arthroplasty. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the AC implant primary stability can be evaluated using the signals obtained with an impact hammer. A hammer equipped with a force sensor was used to impact the AC implant in 20 bovine bone samples. For each sample, different stability conditions were obtained by changing the cavity diameter. For each configuration, the inserted AC implant was impacted four times with a maximum force comprised between 2500 and 4500 N. An indicator I was determined based on the partial impulse estimation and the pull-out force was measured. The implant stability and the value of the indicator I reached a maximum value for an interference fit equal to 1 mm for 18 out of 20 samples. When pooling all samples and all configurations, the implant stability and I were significantly correlated (R(2) = 0.83). The AC implant primary stability can be assessed through the analysis of the impact force signals obtained using an impact hammer. Based on these ex vivo results, a medical device could be developed to provide a decision support system to the orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26671784

  1. Increased migration of uncemented acetabular cups in female total hip arthroplasty patients with low systemic bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Finnilä, Sami; Moritz, Niko; SvedströM, Erkki; Alm, Jessica J; Aro, Hannu T

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Low bone mineral density (BMD) may jeopardize the initial component stability and delay osseointegration of uncemented acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We measured the migration of uncemented cups in women with low or normal BMD. Patients and methods We used radiostereometric analysis (RSA) to measure the migration of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium alloy cups with alumina-on-alumina bearings in THA of 34 female patients with a median age of 64 (41–78) years. 10 patients had normal BMD and 24 patients had low systemic BMD (T-score ≤ −1) based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Cup migration was followed with RSA for 2 years. Radiographic follow-up was done at a median of 8 (2–10) years. Results Patients with normal BMD did not show a statistically significant cup migration after the settling period of 3 months, while patients with low BMD had a continuous proximal migration between 3 and 12 months (p = 0.03). These differences in cup migration persisted at 24 months. Based on the perceived risk of cup revision, 14 of the 24 cases were “at risk” (proximal translation of 0.2 to 1.0 mm) in the low-BMD group and 2 of the10 cases were “at risk” in the normal-BMD group (odds ratio (OR) = 8.0, 95% CI: 1.3–48). The radiographic follow-up showed no radiolucent lines or osteolysis. 2 cups have been revised for fractures of the ceramic bearings, but none for loosening. Interpretation Low BMD contributed to cup migration beyond the settling period of 3 months, but the migrating cups appeared to osseointegrate eventually. PMID:26569616

  2. Patient-specific Analysis of Cartilage and Labrum Mechanics in Human Hips with Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R; Abraham, Christine L; Anderson, Andrew E; Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acetabular dysplasia is a major predisposing factor for development of hip osteoarthritis, and may result from alterations to chondrolabral loading. Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling can be used to evaluate chondrolabral mechanics in the dysplastic hip, thereby providing insight into mechanics that precede osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate chondrolabral contact mechanics and congruency in dysplastic hips and normal hips using a validated approach to subject-specific FE modeling. METHODS FE models of ten subjects with normal acetabula and ten subjects with dysplasia were constructed using a previously validated protocol. Labrum load support, and labrum and acetabular cartilage contact stress and contact area were compared between groups. Local congruency was determined at the articular surface for two simulated activities. RESULTS The labrum in dysplastic hips supported 2.8 to 4.0 times more of the load transferred across the joint than in normal hips. Dysplastic hips did not have significantly different congruency in the primary load-bearing regions than normal hips, but were less congruent in some unloaded regions. Normal hips had larger cartilage contact stress than dysplastic hips in the few regions that had significant differences. CONCLUSIONS The labrum in dysplastic hips has a far more significant role in hip mechanics than it does in normal hips. The dysplastic hip is neither less congruent than the normal hip, nor subjected to elevated cartilage contact stresses. This study supports the concept of an outside-in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in dysplastic hips and that the labrum in dysplastic hips should be preserved during surgery. PMID:24269633

  3. Failure of HA coating on a gritblasted acetabular cup: 155 patients followed for 7-10 years.

    PubMed

    Reikerås, Olav; Gunderson, Ragnhild B

    2002-01-01

    We report the outcome of 191 acetabular gritblasted titanium cups with a hemispherical design for press-fit insertion and coated with hydroxyapatite. The prosthesis was made of gritblasted titanium entirely coated with hydroxyapatite. 155 patients aged 15-78 years were operated on during the years 1991-1993 and followed for 7-10 years. During this period, 39 cups were revised because of mechanical loosening, a further 9 had radiolucent lines and 2 focal osteolysis. None of these 11 patients had clinical symptoms. Failure was associated with age, wear and radiolucency/osteolysis. At revision, we found that the soft tissues were discolored, and that most of the coating had disappeared. This design of hydroxyapatite-coated cups has a high rate of debonding and failure. PMID:11928902

  4. Difference in the acetabular cup orientation in standing and supine radiographs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munir; Beckingsale, Tom; Marsh, Martin; Holland, Jim

    2016-09-01

    Acetabular orientation changes with that of the pelvis during lying and standing. This study was designed to measure these changes. We assessed 17 BHR replacements using EBRA software. The mean acetabular anteversion was more (p = 0.02) on erect than supine radiographs. Linear regression analysis showed that anteversion and inclination increased in some while decreased in others, and Bland and Altman analysis showed wide limits of agreement. The changes in acetabular orientation are thus subject to significant variations between the patients. We suggest studying the factors affecting acetabular orientation in standing to help reduce joint reaction forces and improve outcomes. PMID:27408490

  5. The Divergence of Wear Propagation and Stress at Steep Acetabular Cup Positions Using Ceramic Heads and Sequentially Cross-Linked Polyethylene Liners.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Baum, Felix; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present wear simulator study was to assess the effect of steep acetabular cup positions on the wear propagation of highly cross-linked-PE (HX-PE) liners. Furthermore, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to calculate the stress within the HX-PE material in case of steep cup positions under physiological loadings. The higher stress in the HX-PE at a steep acetabular cup position did not result in increased wear in the present wear simulator study. The gravimetrical wear rates at normal (45°) and steep cup inclinations (75°) showed wear amounts of 3.15±0.27mg and 2.18±0.31mg per million cycles (p=0.028), respectively. However, FEA revealed clear increase in stress at the HX-PE liners with respect to steep cup positions. PMID:25770865

  6. Assessment of Accuracy and Reliability in Acetabular Cup Placement Using an iPhone/iPad System.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Kenji; Fukunishi, Shigeo; Fukui, Tomokazu; Nishio, Shoji; Fujihara, Yuki; Okahisa, Shohei; Takeda, Yu; Daimon, Takashi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Implant positioning is one of the critical factors that influences postoperative outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Malpositioning of the implant may lead to an increased risk of postoperative complications such as prosthetic impingement, dislocation, restricted range of motion, polyethylene wear, and loosening. In 2012, the intraoperative use of smartphone technology in THA for improved accuracy of acetabular cup placement was reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of an iPhone/iPad-guided technique in positioning the acetabular cup in THA compared with the reference values obtained from the image-free navigation system in a cadaveric experiment. Five hips of 5 embalmed whole-body cadavers were used in the study. Seven orthopedic surgeons (4 residents and 3 senior hip surgeons) participated in the study. All of the surgeons examined each of the 5 hips 3 times. The target angle was 38°/19° for operative inclination/anteversion angles, which corresponded to radiographic inclination/anteversion angles of 40°/15°. The simultaneous assessment using the navigation system showed mean±SD radiographic alignment angles of 39.4°±2.6° and 16.4°±2.6° for inclination and anteversion, respectively. Assessment of cup positioning based on Lewinnek's safe zone criteria showed all of the procedures (n=105) achieved acceptable alignment within the safe zone. A comparison of the performances by resident and senior hip surgeons showed no significant difference between the groups (P=.74 for inclination and P=.81 for anteversion). The iPhone/iPad technique examined in this study could achieve acceptable performance in determining cup alignment in THA regardless of the surgeon's expertise. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e621-e626.]. PMID:27322169

  7. Expertise modeling for automated planning of acetabular cup in total hip arthroplasty using combined bone and implant statistical atlases.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Itaru; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Okada, Toshiyuki; Nakamoto, Masahiko; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Takao, Masaki; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Tada, Yukio; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2009-01-01

    Intraoperative robotic and computer-guided assistances are now commonly used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) for accurate execution of the preoperative plan. Although the preoperative plan to be accurately executed is critical, it is still interactively prepared in a time-consuming and subjective manner. In this paper, atlas-based approach to automated surgical planning of the acetabular cup in THA is described to stabilize its quality as well as reduce its time-consuming nature. Surgeon's expertise is embedded in two types of statistical atlases, which are constructed from training datasets of CT-based 3D plans prepared by experienced surgeons. One is a statistical shape model which encodes global spatial relationships between the patient anatomy and implant. The other is the statistical map of residual bone thickness on the implant surface, which encodes local spatial constraints of the anatomy and implant. Given the 3D pelvis shape of the patient, we formulate a procedure to determine the best size and position of the acetabular cup which satisfy the constraints derived from the two statistical atlases. We validated the proposed planning method by retrospective study using the datasets which were actually used in the THA surgery. PMID:20426029

  8. The Relationship of Acetabular Dysplasia and Femoroacetabular Impingement to Hip Osteoarthritis: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Nathaniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) leads to significant functional limitations and economic burden. If modifiable risk factors for hip OA are identified, it may be possible to implement preventative measures. Bony abnormalities associated with acetabular dysplasia (AD) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) have been recently implicated as risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this focused review is to summarize the available evidence describing the relationship between bony abnormalities and hip OA. A librarian-assisted database search using PubMed, Embase and Central was performed. Relevant articles were identified and assessed for inclusion criteria. The authors reviewed cohort and case control studies that reported on the association between abnormal hip morphology and hip OA. The available literature suggests that an association exists between bony abnormalities found in AD and FAI and hip OA and preliminary evidence suggests that AD is a risk factor for OA, however these conclusions are based on limited evidence. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between abnormal hip morphology and the future development of hip OA. PMID:22108232

  9. Effect of molecular weight, calcium stearate, and sterilization methods on the wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in a hip joint simulator.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H A; Shen, F W; Campbell, P; Ota, T

    1999-05-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons must currently choose from several types of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups that differ in their material properties and in the methods used for their sterilization. Information on the wear resistance of these different cups may help in the selection process. This study included two separate tests for wear run on a hip simulator to investigate the effect of molecular weight, calcium stearate, and sterilization methods on the wear resistance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups. Test 1 revealed nearly identical wear rates for acetabular cups with molecular weights in two distinct ranges, as well as for cups with molecular weights in the same range but with or without calcium stearate added. In Test 2, cups that were sterilized in air with gamma irradiation exhibited lower rates of wear than those sterilized with ethylene oxide, presumably due to the crosslinking induced by the irradiation. In addition, cups that were irradiated while packed in a partial vacuum to minimize oxygen absorbed in the surface layer initially showed lower rates of wear than those irradiated in air, with the wear rates becoming similar as wear penetrated the more oxidized surface layer and the more crosslinked subsurface region. Because these tests were run a few months after the irradiation, the potential effects of long-term oxidation of any residual free radicals in the irradiated materials could not be taken into account. After artificial aging to accelerate oxidative degradation of the materials, the wear rates could be markedly different. Analyses performed after wear indicated that the irradiated (i.e., crosslinked) cups exhibited a smaller proportion of, as well as shorter, fibrils in the wear debris and an increased crystallinity and melting temperature and that gamma irradiation in the low-oxygen environment reduced the level of oxidation and increased the level of crosslinking in the surface region of the cups

  10. Early predictors of acetabular growth after closed reduction in late detected developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Li, YiQiang; Xu, HongWen; Li, JingChun; Yu, LingJia; Liu, YuanZhong; Southern, Edward; Liu, HongSheng

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates improvement of the acetabular index (AI) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip at 4 years after closed reduction, and determines the association between the final AI and a set of factors. Sixty-two patients (74 hips) treated with closed reduction were categorized into three groups according to age: group A (0-12 months, 18 hips), group B (13-18 months, 24 hips), and group C (>18 months, 32 hips). There was no difference in AI among the three groups before reduction (P=0.293). In groups A and C, the AI decreased significantly over time until 3 years after reduction and no differences were observed between the time points of 3 and 4 years. At 4 years after reduction, the AI of group C was significantly higher than that of groups A (P<0.001) and B (P=0.012). The overall AI improvement rate was 28.63%. The AI improvement rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group C (P=0.005). Pearson correlation analysis indicated no correlation between center-head distance discrepancy and the final AI (P=0.811). Linear regression suggested that age and initial AI correlated significantly with the final AI (R=0.617, F=15.031, P<0.001). Other factors, such as sex, center-edge angle of Wiberg, bilaterally involved, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head, showed no correlations with the final AI (P>0.05). According to the coefficients, initial AI (β1=0.432, P<0.001) had greater effect than age (β2=0.197, P=0.023) on the final AI. In conclusion, the AI decreases in all patients after reduction and stabilizes at 3 years after reduction. The AI improvement rate is correlated negatively with age. Age and initial AI are early predictors of the progress of AI after closed reduction in developmental dysplasia of the hip patients. PMID:25305044

  11. Basic considerations for determining the amount of press fit in acetabular cup endoprostheses as a function of the elastic bone behavior.

    PubMed

    Winter, Werner; Karl, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular cup endoprostheses are frequently placed in pelvic bone, employing the mechanical principle of press fit. While a sufficiently stable bone-implant connection is desirable, deformation of the cup and fracture of the pelvis should be avoided. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the importance of the elastic properties of bone on the amount of press fit achievable in a specific situation. On the basis of previous work describing the relation between relative bone mineral density and relative elastic modulus for cortical and trabecular bone, mechanical equations were used for analyzing the press-fit loading situation of an acetabular cup. Additionally, a two-dimensional finite element model was used for visualizing the stress and strain situation in the host bone occurring as a consequence of implant insertion, as well as the effect of moment loads acting on the acetabular cup. Given the fact that oversizing the implant for a specific recipient site is the only clinical means of optimizing press fit, knowledge of the elastic properties of the host bone before implant selection would be beneficial. Such information could, for instance, be derived from intraoperative compressive testing of the host bone. PMID:24937501

  12. Dilemmas in imaging for peri-acetabular osteotomy: the influence of patient position and imaging technique on the radiological features of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D; Cordier, T; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W

    2014-09-01

    Peri-acetabular osteotomy is an established surgical treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in young adults. An anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is commonly used to assess the extent of dysplasia as well as to assess post-operative correction. Radiological prognostic factors include the lateral centre-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and the acetabular version. Standing causes a change in the pelvis tilt which can alter certain radiological measurements relative to the supine position. This article discusses the radiological indices used to assess dysplasia and reviews the effects of patient positioning on these indices with a focus on assessment for a peri-acetabular osteotomy. Intra-operatively, fluoroscopy is commonly used and the implications of using fluoroscopy as a modality to assess the various radiological indices along with the effects of using an anteroposterior or posteroanterior fluoroscopic view are examined. Each of these techniques gives rise to a slightly different image of the pelvis as the final image is sensitive to the position of the pelvis and the projection of the x-ray beam. PMID:25183583

  13. The results of a press-fit-only technique for acetabular fixation in hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuo; Ohzono, Kenji; Sakai, Takashi; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the 6- to 11-year follow-up results of hemispherical porous-coated cups implanted into dysplastic hips using press-fit technique without screws focusing on the amount of host bone coverage. There were 87 patients who underwent 98 primary total hip arthroplasties. Bony coverage was measured as the angle between the vertical line and the line drawn from the cup center to the lateral edge of the acetabulum, which was named the cup center-edge angle (cup-CE angle). All 98 cups were judged to be bone ingrown. The minimum cup-CE angle was 8.4° (mean, 26.3°). Bone-cup contact of more than 8.4° of the cup-CE angle was large enough for press-fit cups to resist superior directed loads during this follow-up period. PMID:20647158

  14. Precision of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) of acetabular cup stability and polyethylene wear improved by adding tantalum beads to the liner

    PubMed Central

    Nebergall, Audrey K; Rader, Kevin; Palm, Henrik; Malchau, Henrik; Greene, Meridith E

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In traditional radiostereometric analysis (RSA), 1 segment defines both the acetabular shell and the polyethylene liner. However, inserting beads into the polyethylene liner permits employment of the shell and liner as 2 separate segments, enabling distinct analysis of the precision of 3 measurement methods in determining femoral head penetration and shell migration. Patients and methods The UmRSA program was used to analyze the double examinations of 51 hips to determine if there was a difference in using the shell-only segment, the liner-only segment, or the shell + liner segment to measure wear and acetabular cup stability. The standard deviation multiplied by the critical value (from a t distribution) established the precision of each method. Results Due to the imprecision of the automated edge detection, the shell-only method was least desirable. The shell + liner and liner-only methods had a precision of 0.115 mm and 0.086 mm, respectively, when measuring head penetration. For shell migration, the shell + liner had a precision of 0.108 mm, which was better than the precision of the shell-only method. In both the penetration and migration analyses, the shell + liner condition number was statistically significantly lower and the bead count was significantly higher than for the other methods. Interpretation Insertion of beads in the polyethylene improves the precision of femoral head penetration and shell migration measurements. A greater dispersion and number of beads when combining the liner with the shell generated more reliable results in both analyses, by engaging a larger portion of the radiograph. PMID:26012546

  15. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  16. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting. PMID:27478832

  17. [New instruments for preparation of the prosthesis socket and primary stability of the acetabular Press-fit cups].

    PubMed

    Pitto, R P; Hofmeister, V

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop surgical instruments necessary to achieve a precisely reamed surface and stable initial fixation. The instruments used to prepare the socket were a gauge-drill guide, a liner for the spigot hole and two spigotted reamers of different design and indentation intended to achieve a precisely reamed surface while preserving subchondral bone. For each reamer we implanted in a synthetic hip model 10 uncemented cups with 2 mm press-fit and loaded at 2.4 kN in the physiological axis (Mod. 8501, Instron, Canton, MA, USA). The micromotion between implant and bone socket was measured using an inductive micrometric measuring system (MultiNCDT-500, Micro-Epsilon, Ortenburg, Germany) and compared with that seen after using conventional instruments. The use of the new reamer of elliptical design significantly reduced the standard deviations of the measured values (p < 0.01 at the ischium and pubis) and also reduced maximum movement (p < 0.01 at the ischium); at the same time, all the components showed overall limited movement (< 150 microns at the ischium, pubis and ilium) under maximum loading (2.4 kN). Manufacturing tolerances, the quality and wear of the instruments, acetabular bone stock and surgical technique all impact on the degree of press-fit obtainable at surgery. The results of our study show that press-fit and initial stability can be optimized by using adequate instruments to prepare the socket. PMID:10379070

  18. Analysis of bone formation on porous and calcium phosphate-coated acetabular cups: a randomised clinical [18F]fluoride PET study.

    PubMed

    Ullmark, Gösta; Sörensen, Jens; Nilsson, Olle

    2012-01-01

    We present a study using Fluoride-Positron Emission Tomography (F-PET/CT) to analyse new bone formation in periacetabular bone adjacent to press fit cups following THA. In 16 THA (8 patients) with bilateral hip osteoarthritis simultaneous bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) was performed, employing electrochemically applied calcium phosphate coated (HA) cups or porous-coated (PC) cups allocated at random to compare the two sides. A reference group of 13 individuals with a normal healthy hip was used to determine 'normal' bone metabolism. [18F]fluoride -PET/CT was used to analyze bone formation adjacent to the cups 1 week, 4 months and 12 months after surgery. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed preoperatively, postoperatively and at 2 years. Bone forming activity had a mean of 5.71, 4.69 and 3.47 SUV around the HA- and 5.04, 4.80 and 3.50 SUV around the PC-cups at 1 week, 4 months and 12 months respectively. Normal bone metabolism was 3.68 SUV. After 1 year activity had declined to normal levels for both groups. The clinical results were good in all cases. HA coating resulted in higher uptake indicating higher bone forming activity after 1 week. F-PET/CT is a valuable tool to analyse bone formation and secondary stabilisation of an acetabular cup. PMID:22547382

  19. Acetabular cup liner and prosthetic head exchange to increase the head diameter for management of recurrent luxation of a prosthetic hip in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Roe, S C; Sidebotham, C; Marcellin-Little, D J

    2015-01-01

    Component malalignment and impingement are possible causes of recurrent luxation following total hip replacement in the dog. In the two cases presented in this report, luxation that was probably due to impingement was managed by exchanging the standard 17 mm prosthetic head for a 24 mm prosthetic head. This required removal of the original acetabular cup liner and placement of a new polyethylene liner that would accept the 24 mm head into the stable acetabular shell. In the first case, a 50 kg Malamute dog, recurrent luxation was initially managed by component alignment revision, iliofemoral suture, triple pelvic osteotomy and a novel lasso technique, without long-term success. After exchanging the head and cup liner, luxation did not recur over a 12-month period. In the second case, a 65 kg Newfoundland dog, impingement was suspected after a second luxation event. Luxation did not recur during the nine months after exchange of the head and cup liner. The larger prosthetic head used in these two cases increased the impingement-free range-of-motion of the joint and increased the translation distance required for luxation (jump distance). PMID:25448927

  20. Limitation of total hip arthroplasty of the acetabular roof by press-fit without screw fixation: discussion of a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Iwase, Hideaki

    2013-05-01

    In total hip arthroplasty of the acetabular roof fixed by press-fit without screw fixation, there is little possibility for loosening to occur, because it is difficult for wear debris to enter between the cup and the acetabular roof, as screw holes are not present. However, stability is provided only by contact. In the case of acetabular dysplasia, it is not well understood whether sufficient initial fixation power is provided. We performed a torsion test and a lever-out test. In the torsion test, in the case of a normal hip joint, as the cup grew bigger, the fixation power tended to increase in strength. In the acetabular dysplasia model, with cups of each size, as the protrusion angle increased, the fixation power of the cup tended to become weak. When the protrusion angle approaches 15 degrees, we must use a cup that is 4 mm larger than the original cup to achieve the same initial fixation power. Furthermore, when the protrusion angle is 15 degrees in cups that are over 48 mm in size, we obtain fixation power that is theoretically adequate, but when small cups, for example, 46 mm in size are set with protrusion, the initial fixation power decreases significantly, and we cannot obtain a fixation power that is theoretically adequate. PMID:23412291

  1. Effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy on the mechanical stress within the hip joint in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip: a subject-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ike, H; Inaba, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yukizawa, Y; Hirata, Y; Tomioka, M; Saito, T

    2015-04-01

    In this study we used subject-specific finite element analysis to investigate the mechanical effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) on the hip joint and analysed the correlation between various radiological measurements and mechanical stress in the hip joint. We evaluated 13 hips in 12 patients (two men and ten women, mean age at surgery 32.0 years; 19 to 46) with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) who were treated by RAO. Subject-specific finite element models were constructed from CT data. The centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular head index (AHI), acetabular angle and acetabular roof angle (ARA) were measured on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs taken before and after RAO. The relationship between equivalent stress in the hip joint and radiological measurements was analysed. The equivalent stress in the acetabulum decreased from 4.1 MPa (2.7 to 6.5) pre-operatively to 2.8 MPa (1.8 to 3.6) post-operatively (p < 0.01). There was a moderate correlation between equivalent stress in the acetabulum and the radiological measurements: CE angle (R = -0.645, p < 0.01); AHI (R = -0.603, p < 0.01); acetabular angle (R = 0.484, p = 0.02); and ARA (R = 0.572, p < 0.01). The equivalent stress in the acetabulum of patients with DDH decreased after RAO. Correction of the CE angle, AHI and ARA was considered to be important in reducing the mechanical stress in the hip joint. PMID:25820887

  2. A Comparison of the Contact Force Distributions on the Acetabular Surface Due to Orthopedic Treatments for Developmental Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Flórez, Kalenia M; Silva, Octavio; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2016-07-01

    We used a three-dimensional rigid body spring model (RBSM) to compare the contact force distributions on the acetabular surface of the infant hip joint that are produced by three orthopedic treatments for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We analyzed treatments using a Pavlik harness, a generic rigid splint, and a spica cast. The joint geometry was modeled from tomography images of a 1-year-old female. The articular cartilage was modeled as linear springs connecting the surfaces of the acetabulum and the femoral head, whereas the femur and the hip bone were considered as rigid bodies. The hip muscles were modeled as tensile-only preloaded springs. The treatments with the Pavlik harness and the generic rigid splint were modeled for an infant in supine position with a hip flexion angle of 90 deg. Also, since rigid splints are often recommended when children are initiating their gait phase, we modeled the treatment with the infant in standing position. For the spica cast, we only considered the infant in standing position with a flexion angle of 0 deg, and the fixation bar at two heights: at the ankle and at the knee. In order to analyze the effect of the hip abduction angle over the contact force distribution, different abduction angles were used for all the treatments modeled. We have found that the treatments with the infant in supine position, with a flexion angle of 90 deg and abduction angles between 60 deg and 80 deg, produce a more homogenous contact force distribution compared to those obtained for the treatments with the infant in standing position. PMID:27150210

  3. Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in a physiological hip joint simulator in the anatomical position using bovine serum as a lubricant.

    PubMed

    Bigsby, R J; Hardaker, C S; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    The Leeds physiological anatomical (PA) hip joint simulator was developed to apply three axes of loading and a complex three-dimensional motion so that the forces and motions can reproduce exactly the walking cycles defined by Paul. This paper presents the results of a study using the Leeds PA hip joint simulator to determine the wear of 32 mm ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cups against stainless steel and zirconia ceramic heads, using bovine serum as lubricant. These results have been compared with the results of a previous study that used water as the lubricant, which led to UHMWPE transfer film being formed on the stainless steel head. Comparisons are also made with clinical results and results from other simulators. The study indicates that it is preferable to use bovine serum in simulator studies. In addition, the results indicate that if the surface roughness of the metallic and femoral heads are similar, and they remain undamaged during the tests, the wear rates of the UHMWPE cups are likely to be similar. PMID:9256003

  4. PIRAC Ti nitride coated Ti-6AI-4V head against UHMWPE acetabular cup-hip wear simulator study.

    PubMed

    Gutmanas, E Y; Gotman, I

    2004-04-01

    Wear behaviour of TiN(titanium nitride)-coated Ti and Ti-6AI-4V alloy against UHMW polyethylene was studied in hip simulation test. Ti alloys possess an excellent combination of mechanical properties and biocompatibility, however, they suffer from inadequate wear resistance. Thus, their use as articulating components of total joint replacements requires surface hardening, e.g. by TiN. Thirty-two millimetre diameter cp-Ti and Ti-6AI-4V femoral heads were coated with several micrometre thick TiN layers employing an original PIRAC nitriding method based on interaction of Ti alloy substrate with highly reactive monatomic nitrogen. The heads were tested against UHMWPE cups at 37 degrees C in Ringer's solution or in distilled water. Simulator tests were performed at peak pressures of 1.5 and 2.0 MPa in a constant rotation mode at the frequency of 1.5 Hz. The wear of UHMWPE was estimated by weight loss, and the worn metallic and polyethylene surfaces were examined in SEM. The wear rate of UHMWPE cups articulating against PIRAC coated Ti and Ti-6AI-4V after up to 4 x 10(6) cycles was significantly lower than that of UHMWPE articulating against 316L stainless steel. No delamination of TiN coatings was observed after 4 x 10(6) cycles. These results suggest that TiN PIRAC coating on Ti-6AI-4V heads could minimise the wear of total hip replacements without compromising the mechanical properties of the femoral component. PMID:15332594

  5. Effect of acetabular cup design on metal ion release in two designs of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Savarino, Lucia; Baldini, Nicola; Mazzotti, Antonio; Greco, Michelina; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this observational prospective cohort study was to evaluate the serum concentrations of cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni) at a 2-year follow-up in patients operated on with a novel design of hip resurfacing: Romax resurfacing system (RRS). RRS is characterized by the presence of an acetabular notch which theoretically provides a wider range of motion and a reduced incidence of groin pain. The presence of radiolucencies and functional outcome, assessed using the Harris hip score (HHS) and the University of California Activity scale (UCLA), were secondary endpoints. Moreover, these results were compared with those obtained in our previous study from a similar cohort of patients implanted using the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) system. At a 2-year follow-up, the serum levels of Co in patients operated on using the RRS were five times higher (p = 0.0002) than those found before surgery (Co, means: 1.04 and 0.20 ng/mL, respectively); similarly, Cr levels were 13 times higher (p < 0.0001) at a 2-year follow-up than before surgery (Cr, means: 1.69 and 0.13 ng/mL, respectively). Ni concentrations (0.42 and 0.78 ng/mL) were not significantly different (p = 0.16), even if they increased 86% after surgery. In the RRS patients, an inverse correlation was found between Co and Cr concentrations and length of follow-up (Co: r = -0.64, p = 0.0096; Cr: r= -0.45, p = 0.08). The serum levels of Co and Cr were not significantly different between RRS (Co: 1.04 ng/mL and Cr: 1.69 ng/mL) and BHR (Co: 1.39 ng/mL and Cr: 2.30 ng/mL) patients at 2 years (p = 0.95 and 0.26 for Co and Cr, respectively). Our results showed that RRS patients achieved an excellent clinical outcome with limited metal ion release. PMID:24962936

  6. Relation of the Norberg angle and position of the femoral head centre to the dorsal acetabular edge in evaluation of canine hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Skurková, L; Hluchý, M; Lacková, M; Mihalová, M; Ledecký, V

    2010-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a locomotive-system disease in dogs, which in many countries is the target of screening programs aimed at reducing the prevalence of CHD among descendants of predisposed dog breeds. Despite the efforts to apply genetic testing or ultrasound diagnostics in diagnosing CHD (as is common in human medicine), the main diagnostic process in veterinary medicine is by radiographic examination. The main two parameters which are used in diagnosing HD are the Norberg angle (NA) and the position of femoral head centre to the dorsal acetabular edge (FHC/DAE). We examined the relationship between these two parameters in the process of the determination of CHD degree by evaluating 225 randomly selected radiographs which were made during the period from 1993 to 2008. The aim of our study was to examine the validity of these two parameters in CHD classification as used in three different classification programs. Using Pearson's correlation coefficient, the value of which was 0.85 (p <0.05), we observed a positive correlation. Comparing the three scoring systems for CHD evaluation, we found that the final degree of CHD was similar for 78% to 85% of cases using Flückiger's scoring system versus a modified scoring system of 5 parameters without FHC/DAE. Results were significant. PMID:20830451

  7. Morphometric assessment of the canine hip joint using the acetabular angle of retrotorsion.

    PubMed

    Doskarova, B; Kyllar, M; Paral, V

    2010-01-01

    Morphometric assessment of the canine hip joint using acetabular angle of retrotorsion was used in this study. The aim of our study was to compare the acetabular angle of retrotorsion (AAR) with values of the Norberg angle (NA) and the hip score (HS) in the Leonberger dog breed and to determine the cut-off point of AAR that distinguish between normal and dysplastic hip status on the basis of Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) hip evaluation. Retrospective analysis of NA and AAR was measured from standard ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs with extended femurs in 387 Leonberger dogs (141 males and 246 females) from 18 to 63 months of age, which were then divided into five age-groups. Through analysis of these radiographs, it was determined that the cut-off point for NA was 105°, AAR was 15°, and the acetabular angle of retrotorsion was positively correlated with Norberg angle and negatively correlated with hip score. The results of our study indicate that the acetabular angle of retrotorsion may represent a reliable morphometric assessment tool in evaluating acetabular cup conformation, and values of AAR may help to assess the FCI grade of canine hip dysplasia. PMID:20740259

  8. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  9. A Novel Method for Assessment of Polyethylene Liner Wear in Radiopaque Tantalum Acetabular Cups: Clinical Validation in Patients Enrolled in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Anders; Greene, Meridith E; Ayers, David C; Bragdon, Charles R; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Conventional radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for wear is not possible in patients with tantalum cups. We propose a novel method for wear analysis in tantalum cups. Wear was assessed by gold standard RSA and the novel method in total hip arthroplasty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial receiving either titanium or tantalum cups (n=46). The novel method estimated the center of the head using a model based on identification of two proximal markers on the stem and knowledge of the stem/head configuration. The novel method was able to demonstrate a pattern of wear that was similar to the gold standard in titanium cups. The novel method offered accurate assessment and is a viable solution for assessment of wear in studies with tantalum cups. PMID:26216229

  10. Upward and inward displacements of the acetabular component increase stress on femoral head in single endoprothesis models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqi; Kang, Yan; Chen, Yi; Liao, Weiming

    2009-01-01

    The centre of rotation of the hip can be displaced in hip dysplasia and revision arthroplasty. This study examined the effect of artificial femoral head load after acetabular component displacement in total hip arthroplasty. Sixteen total hip arthroplasty models of human cadaver specimens were reconstructed, and under different acetabular component position, the load around the femoral head was evaluated by strain gages. The results showed that the load was higher in the same specimens when the cup was moved 2 mm inward or upward, especially after the cup was moved more than 6 mm, and the load had an increasing effect in the inward group. In the upward group, an increasing effect happened at 8 mm upward displacement, but the stress value decreased from 4 mm to 6 mm upward displacement. In the same moving distance, the stress of inward displacement is obviously higher than upward displacement. Altogether, the results suggested that for both inward displacement and upward displacement of the acetabular cup, the load around the femoral head increased gradually, while the distance of the inward displacement and the superior displacement was increased. The greater the displacement, the bigger the loading contact stress. The upward displacement caused less stress change on the femoral head. The stress of the 6 mm upward position was lower than nearby positions; perhaps this site represented a stress buffering zone. PMID:19424694

  11. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  12. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  13. Spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvic in developmental dysplasia of the hip---a combined 3-dimentional computed tomography (3D-CT) study in patients and experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Cong; Liu, Tianjing; Xie, Hengcui; Li, Jianjun; Gao, Sizhe; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Few previous studies noticed the three bony structures that formed the acetabulum in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). This study aimed at investigating the spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvis in developmental dysplasia of the hip through radiological evaluation of the patients and experimental observations in rat models. 115 unilateral DDH patients were studied through 3D-CT. In reconstruction workstation, the iliopubic inner plate angle, ilioischial inner plate angle and ischialpubic inner plate angle were measured and compared. 58 neonatal Wistar rats were divided into two groups and the rats in experiment group were swaddled to establish DDH models. The hips were sectioned, stained. The same three angles were measured and compared. The ilioischial inner plate angle of the affected hip decreased while the ischialpubic inner plate angle increased compared to those of the contralateral side. The iliopubic inner plate angle showed no difference between the affected and unaffected hips. In animal models we observed the same pathological pattern. The three angles measured on the sections showed similar tendency as those in the patients with DDH. The ischium rotates up and forwardly around the posterior and vertical limbs of the triradiate cartilage complex in DDH, just as a lifted piece of Pizza. PMID:25663996

  14. Coralline hydroxyapatite in complex acetabular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, Ray C; Sheridan, Kate C; Lubbers, Melissa A

    2008-04-01

    This retrospective study examined whether a coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute adequately repaired bone defects during complex acetabular reconstructions. Seventeen patients who underwent acetabular revision using Pro Osteon 500 were assessed to determine whether any cups required re-revision, whether bone had incorporated into the coralline hydroxyapatite grafts, and whether the coralline hydroxyapatite grafts resorbed with time. At latest follow-up, no cups required re-revision, but 1 had failed. Radiographic evidence of bone incorporation was observed in every coralline hydroxyapatite graft. Graft resorption was not observed. PMID:19292282

  15. Importance of maintaining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome during acetabular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2016-07-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in press-fit acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty. However, information on the basic stress pathway and its impact factors remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the orientations and positions of the acetabular component on the basic stress pathway. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was defined as two parts: 3D basic trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified basic cortical bone stress level, using two subject-specific finite element normal hip models. The effects were then analysed by generating 32 reconstructed acetabular cases with different cup abduction and anteversion angles within a range of 35-50° and 10-25°, respectively, and 12 cases with different hip centre heights within a range of 0-15 mm above the acetabular dome. The 3D trabecular stress distribution decreased remarkably in all cases, while the 80% of the basic cortical bone stress level was maintained in cases when the acetabular component was positioned at 10° or 15° anteversion and 40° or 45° abduction angles. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was disturbed when the superior displacement of the hip centre exceeded 5 mm above the anatomical hip centre. Positioning the acetabular component correctly contributes to maintain the stress balance between the acetabular cup and the bone during acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants. PMID:26469561

  16. Evaluation of the hip center in total hip arthroplasty for old developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Flecher, Xavier; Parratte, Sebastien; Brassart, Nicolas; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2008-12-01

    We describe the problems with positioning the hip center according to the severity of dislocation in 97 cementless total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip. The mean location of the hip center from the interteardrop was 30.4 +/- 8.7 mm horizontally and 23.4 +/- 5.4 mm vertically. The presence of a limp correlated with a superior placement of the cup. Four cups were revised, 2 of which with a significant high hip center. The survival rate of the acetabular component was 95% at 12 years. Craniopodal repositioning was easy in class 1. In class 2, the cup was the largest. In class 3, the greatest variations of the hip center were found. In class 4, the smallest implants were necessary for positioning in the true acetabulum. PMID:18534475

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Trabecular Metal Acetabular Components for Failed Treatment of Acetabular Fractures: A Mid-term Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Hui; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Porous-coated cups have been widely used in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures, and good results have been reported with the use of these cups; however, the durability and functionality of modular trabecular metal (TM) acetabular components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures remain unclear. This study aimed to examine the radiographic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures to assess the durability and functionality of these components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures. Methods: A total of 41 patients (41 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures at our hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Among these patients, two were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 39 patients (39 hips) were finally included in this study. The Harris hip score before and after the surgery, satisfaction level of the patients, and radiographic results were assessed. Results: The mean Harris hip score increased from 34 (range, 8–52) before surgery to 91 (range, 22–100) at the latest follow-up examination (P < 0.001). The results were excellent for 28 hips, good for six, fair for three, and poor for two. Among the 39 patients, 25 (64%) and 10 (26%) were very satisfied and somewhat satisfied, respectively. All cups were found to be fully incorporated, and no evidence of cup migration or periacetabular osteolysis was noted. Conclusions: Despite the technically demanding nature of the procedure, THA using modular TM acetabular components showed good durability and functionality and may be an effective reconstruction option for failed treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27064033

  18. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-09-18

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author's treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during acetabular

  19. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-01-01

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author’s treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during

  20. Midterm survivorship of a press-fit, plasma-sprayed, tri-spike acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Mark A; Martínez-Villalobos, Mario; Pietrzak, William S; Mangino, Gerardo P; Guzman, Delfino Carranza

    2009-04-01

    Press-fit acetabular cups without screw holes can limit migration of particulate wear debris and reduce risk of acetabular osteolysis and device loosening. The Tri-Spike cup (Biomet, Inc, Warsaw, Ind) includes a titanium alloy plasma spray porous surface and does not require screw fixation. We retrospectively examined the incidence of cup loosening and acetabular osteolysis after implantation of 45 cups (44 patients) with mean follow-up of 7.3 years (range, 4-9 years). Only one patient (one cup) had evidence of less than 1 mm of retroacetabular radiolucency at 3 years (nonprogressive), which was found to remain firmly fixed during revision of the aseptically loosened femoral component. No cups were removed or revised at latest follow-up. Projected Kaplan-Meier survivorship at 9 years was 100% for cup loosening/revision and 97.8% for radiolucency. PMID:18534453

  1. The acetabular component: an elliptical monoblock alternative.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Thomas P

    2002-06-01

    The major failure mode of cemented or noncemented acetabular fixation is osteolysis produced by biologic reaction to polyethylene and metallic debris. A monoblock acetabular noncemented component offers advantages in reducing the failure mechanism of acetabular cups. First, there is no extra-articular back surface polyethylene wear. Second, locking rings that may generate metallic debris are eliminated. Third, screw-holes, which decrease the surface area for ingrowth, are not needed, and pelvic entrance points for wear debris are eliminated. Fourth, an elliptical configuration allows better coaptation of the shell to the dome of the acetabulum. I have implanted >2,400 elliptical monoblock acetabular cups with a short-term follow-up of 6.5 years, with >4 years of follow-up in 840 hips. There have been no mechanical failures requiring revision. Four patients have been revised for recurrent hip instability, and one has been revised for infection. The need to convert to an acetabular component with screw fixation because of poor press-fit is <1%. PMID:12068420

  2. Fixation strength analysis of cup to bone material using finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    Fixation of acetabular cup to bone material is an important initial stability for artificial hip joint. In general, the fixation in cement less-type acetabular cup uses press-fit and screw methods. These methods can be applied alone or together. Based on literature survey, the additional screw inside of cup is effective; however, it has little effect in whole fixation. Therefore, an acetabular cup with good fixation, easy manufacture and easy installation is required. This paper is aiming at evaluating and proposing a new cup fixation design. To prove the strength of the present cup fixation design, the finite element simulation of three dimensional cup with new fixation design was performed. The present cup design was examined with twist axial and radial rotation. Results showed that the proposed cup design was better than the general version.

  3. Acetabular component deformation with press-fit fixation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Matthew; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Peindl, Richard D; Odum, Susan

    2006-09-01

    Acetabular component deformation secondary to forces encountered during insertion is a potential consequence of the press-fit technique. This study characterized the stiffness of Pinnacle 100 cups (DePuy, Warsaw, Ind) via mechanical testing and used this information with intraoperative measurements of cup deformation to calculate the in vivo forces acting on cups inserted during hip arthroplasty in 21 patients. We found that 90.5% of cups had measurable compression deformity, averaging 0.16 +/- 0.16 mm. The corresponding forces acting on these cups averaged 414 +/- 421 N. For hard-on-hard bearing surfaces, such in vivo deformation of acetabular shells may result in negative clinical consequences such as equatorial loading with increased wear and potential seizing of components, chipping of ceramic inserts, or locking mechanism damage. PMID:16950065

  4. Unsatisfactory results with the cementless Omnifit acetabular component due to polyethylene and severe osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Jeroen J; Malefijt, Jan de Waal; Hendriks, Jan C M; Gosens, Taco; Bonnet, Michel

    2005-06-01

    A high incidence of acetabular osteolysis (43%), associated with osteolytic lesions in the proximal femur (22.6%) and leading to a high revision rate, was experienced with the Omnifit total hip prosthesis. We reviewed the clinical and radiological results with 429 Omnifit total hips in 356 patients after a mean follow-up of 60 months. Time to revision and wear of the polyethylene liner with different acetabular shell types were specifically analysed. Pelvic osteolysis first became manifest in the acetabular bone opposite to the holes in the metal shell. Osteolysis occurred predominantly adjacent to the central hole in the metal shell of threaded cups; widespread and larger defects were found in press fit cups with peripheral screw holes. Kaplan Meier survival analysis demonstrated a higher probability for retaining the threaded cup at 6 years (96%; 95%-confidence interval: 93-99%) compared to the survival of the press fit cup (66%; 95%-CI: 56-77%). The results suggest a negative relationship between backside wear, the larger number of holes in the cup, the extent of osteolysis and survival rate of the press fit cups. Based on these findings and supported by similar reports about osteolysis related to the same cup design, it was hypothesised that backside wear due to the insufficient locking mechanism of the Omnifit acetabular cup was the major cause of the unsatisfactory results in our patients. For this reason we discontinued using this type of uncemented socket. PMID:16035702

  5. The Results of Long-term Follow-up of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Hydroxyapatite-coated Cups

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang-Dong; Shin, Keun-Young; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Yang, Ick-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to report the long-term outcome and the failure mechanism of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated acetabular cup. Materials and Methods From January 1992 to May 1994, a total of 123 consecutive cementless primary THAs were performed using a HA-coated acetabular cup with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. We retrospectively evaluated 66 hips available for follow-up at a mean 18.3 years (range, 10.4-23.6 years). The survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We defined end point as any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Results Thirty-nine of 66 hips (59.1%) were defined as a failure for progressive acetabular osteolysis or aseptic loosening of the cup. Acetabular osteolysis was observed in 47 hips (71.2%) and 33 hips (50.0%) were revised because of cup loosening. The Kaplan-Meier method showed the survival rate of the acetabular cup to be 46.3% at 15 years and 34.8% at 20 years for any failure that required a reoperation of acetabular component. Conclusion The long-term survival rate of THA using HA-coated acetabular cup was unsatisfactory, and it was attributed to vulnerable property of HA coating and progressive osteolysis. PMID:27536628

  6. Polyethylene wear in uncemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J R; Keating, E M; Faris, P M; Meding, J B; Ritter, M A

    1994-03-01

    We measured polyethylene wear in 231 porous-coated uncemented acetabular cups. We divided the hips into two groups according to the fixation of the femoral component, by cementing (n = 97) or press-fit (n = 134). Follow-up was from three to five years. The patients in two sub-groups were matched for weight, diagnosis, sex, age and length of follow-up. The linear wear rate of cups articulated with uncemented femoral components (0.22 mm/year) was significantly higher than the wear rate (0.15 mm/year) of cups articulated within cemented femoral components (p < 0.05). These results can be compared with previously reported wear rates of 0.08 mm/year for cemented all-polyethylene cups and 0.11 mm/year for cemented metal-backed cups. The higher wear rates of uncemented arthroplasties could jeopardize the long-term results of this type of hip replacement. PMID:8113288

  7. Pelvic and acetabular fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, D.C.; Rubash, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This treatise focuses primarily on the clinical aspects of diagnosis and treatments of pelvic and acetabular fractures. However, considerable attention is also paid to the radiographic diagnosis of trauma and postoperative effects. The book begins with a succinct review of pelvic and acetabular anatomy and pelvic biomechanics. It continues with a radiographic classification of pelvic injury, which will represent the major source of the book's interest for radiologists. The remainder of the book is concerned with clinical management of pelvic and acetabular trauma, including preoperative planning, surgical approaches, techniques of reduction, internal fixation, eternal fixation, post-operative care, and late problems. Even throughout this later portion of the book there are extensive illustrations, including plain radiographs, computed tomographic (CT) scans, reconstructed three-dimensional CT scans, and schematic diagrams of diverse pelvic and acetabular fractures and the elementary surgical techniques for their repair.

  8. Uncemented acetabular components. Histologic analysis of retrieved hydroxyapatite-coated and porous implants.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T W; Stulberg, B N; Ming, J; Geesink, R G

    1993-04-01

    Histologic sections of five hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular components retrieved at autopsy (2 dual geometry and 3 threaded cup designs) were analyzed, and the extent and pattern of bone apposition were compared with that of an uncoated, porous (beaded) dual geometry acetabular cup that had been removed for repeated dislocations. The results show hydroxyapatite and bone apposition most prominent in areas of likely load transmission, primarily around the peripheral rim of the dual-geometry cups and at the peaks of the threads of the screw cups. Hydroxyapatite and bone may have been removed by remodeling from the grooves between the threads. Although no significant wear debris was identified, the screw holes were incompletely covered by bone. The dual-geometry designs generally showed somewhat more bone apposition than the threaded cups, but all implants demonstrated less bone than might have been predicted from radiographs. PMID:8386747

  9. Traumatic medial displacement of Rotalok uncemented acetabular component. A case report.

    PubMed

    Charnley, G J; Ridge, J; Ribbans, W J

    1994-04-01

    The failure of uncemented acetabular components has been described in association with component wear, disassembly, and proximal migration. The authors report a case of medial displacement following minor trauma some 18 months after surgery. The component involved differs in design from both press-fit, porous-coated or screw-in, fully threaded acetabular cups. The authors suggest that additional screws should be inserted to enhance long-term stability. PMID:8014654

  10. Role of the Acetabular Labrum in Load Support Across the Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Harris, Michael D.; Anderson, Andrew E.; Peters, Christopher L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The relatively high incidence of labral tears among patients presenting with hip pain suggests that the acetabular labrum is often subjected to injurious loading in vivo. However, it is unclear whether the labrum participates in load transfer across the joint during activities of daily living. This study examined the role of the acetabular labrum in load transfer for hips with normal acetabular geometry and acetabular dysplasia using subject-specific finite element analysis. Models were generated from volumetric CT data and analyzed with and without the labrum during activities of daily living. The labrum in the dysplastic model supported 4-11% of the total load transferred across the joint, while the labrum in the normal model supported only 1-2% of the total load. Despite the increased load transferred to the acetabular cartilage in simulations without the labrum, there were minimal differences in cartilage contact stresses. This was because the load supported by the cartilage correlated to the cartilage contact area. A higher percentage of load was transferred to the labrum in the dysplastic model because the femoral head achieved equilibrium near the lateral edge of the acetabulum. The results of this study suggest that the labrum plays a larger role in load transfer and joint stability in hips with acetabular dysplasia than in hips with normal acetabular geometry. PMID:21757198

  11. Protrusio After Medial Acetabular Wall Breach in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medial protrusio is a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, but it is not known if a medial wall breach during cup implantation increases the risk. We thus investigated the effect of up to a 2 cm defect in the medial acetabular wall in a cadaveric model. Separately, we investigated the ability of acetabular screws to rescue the construct. Methods Nine human fresh-frozen hemipelves were reamed medially to create the defect, implanted with acetabular cups, and then loaded to failure. The nine contralateral hemipelves were reamed in a standard fashion and served as controls. Separately, nine hemipelves with a medial defect were augmented with two acetabular screws each, then loaded to failure, with the contralateral side as a control. Load-to-failure, stiffness, and energy were recorded. Findings The presence of a medial wall defect decreased the load-to-failure by a mean of 26% (5710 v. 4221 N, p=0.024). The addition of two acetabular screws did not rescue the construct (mean 27% decrease, 4082 v. 2985 N, p=0.024). The majority of specimens failed in a supra-physiologic range of force. Bone density correlated with failure loads (R2 range of 0.54-0.78), and osteoporotic specimens were more likely to fail at a physiologic range, consistent with forces experienced during minor stumbles or falls. Interpretation Osteoporotic patients with a medial wall defect after hip arthroplasty may be susceptible to fracture during activities of daily living. Protected weight bearing with an assistive device may be reasonable in order to minimize fall risk until cup ingrowth is achieved. PMID:26361450

  12. Initial Results of an Acetabular Center Axis Registration Technique in Navigated Hip Arthroplasty with Deformed Acetabular Rims

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Mishima, Hajime; Yoshizawa, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Background In cementless total hip arthroplasty, imageless computer-assisted navigation is usually used to register the anterior pelvic plane (APP). The accuracy of this method is influenced by the subcutaneous tissues overlying the registration landmarks. On the other hand, the acetabular center axis (ACA) is determined from the acetabular rim. Precise registration of the ACA is possible because of direct palpation using a pointer. Imageless navigation using the ACA usually targets patients with normal acetabular morphology. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of imageless navigation using the ACA instead of the APP in patients with normal or deformed acetabular rims. Methods The intraoperative cup position was compared with that obtained from the postoperative computed tomography (CT) images in 18 cases. Results The inclination angle derived from the navigation system was 3.4 ± 5.3 degrees smaller and the anteversion angle was 1.4 ± 3.1 degrees larger than those derived from the CT images. Conclusion The inclination cup angle of the navigation system was significantly inferior to the true value, particularly in cases with large anterior osteophytes. PMID:27073586

  13. Ten-year results with the Morscher press-fit cup: an uncemented, non-modular, porous-coated cup inserted without screws.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Guido; Lübbeke, Anne; Barea, Christophe; Roussos, Constantinos; Peter, Robin; Hoffmeyer, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) with well designed cementless acetabular implants has shown excellent results. The purpose of this study was to assess our clinical and radiological outcomes using an uncemented cup. We conducted a prospective cohort study including all consecutive primary THAs performed with the Morscher press-fit cup, an uncemented non-modular acetabular component, between March 1996 and December 1998. Patients were evaluated at ten years with clinical and radiological follow-up, patient satisfaction and questionnaire assessment using the Harris hip score (HHS), Merle d'Aubigné and Postel score, the UCLA score, the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12) and a visual analog scale. Five hundred sixty-one THAs were performed in 518 patients. At 120 months (± 7.3 months), 303 patients with 335 THAs were still available for follow-up. None of the patients had required cup revision for aseptic loosening. At ten years, the cup survivorship was 98.8% (95% CI 97.4-99.5) with cup revision for any cause as an endpoint. No radiolucencies were seen around the cups, but osteolytic defects involved 21 stems (8.3%). Mean total linear polyethylene wear was 0.9 mm. The Morscher acetabular replacement cup provides excellent results at ten years. There were no revisions for aseptic loosening of the cup, and no osteolytic defects were found around the cup. Patient satisfaction was high and the clinical results were very good. PMID:20524114

  14. Quantification of clearance and creep in acetabular wear measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Thomas; Vandenbussche, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to measure femoral head penetration before occurrence of real wear, and to quantify the portions attributable respectively to clearance and plastic deformations in various acetabular designs. Methods We analyzed CT scans from 15 patients at ‘day five’ after total hip arthroplasty (THA). All patients received Exafit® femoral stems and 28 mm heads: 5 patients had cemented Durasul® all-PE cups, 5 patients had un-cemented Allofit® metal-backed cups, and 5 patients had un-cemented Stafit® dual-mobility cups. We also analyzed CT scans of samples of the three head-cup combinations to compare in vivo and in vitro measurements. Results The mean femoral head penetration measured on ‘day five’ was lower for all-PE cups (0.196 mm) than for metal-backed cups (0.551 mm) and dual-mobility cups (0.634 mm). Conclusions The present study indicates that isolated measurements of femoral head penetration include 0.15–0.46 mm of radial clearance and 0.05–0.27 mm of creep, and confirms that the majority of so-called bedding-in observed in the first post-operative months is not entirely due to wear. PMID:27162781

  15. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery. PMID:22793261

  16. Massive acetabular bone loss: Limits of trabecular metal cages

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Martínez, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Diaz-Mauriño, Juán

    2011-01-01

    Massive acetabular bone loss (more than 50% of the acetabular area) can result in insufficient native bone for stable fixation and long-term bone ingrowth of conventional porous cups. The development of trabecular metal cages with osteoconductive properties may allow a more biological and versatile approach that will help restore bone loss, thus reducing the frequency of implant failure in the short-to-medium term. We report a case of massive bone loss affecting the dome of the acetabulum and the ilium, which was treated with a trabecular metal cage and particulate allograft. Although the trabecular metal components had no intrinsic stability, they did enhance osseointegration and incorporation of a non-impacted particulate graft, thus preventing failure of the reconstruction. The minimum 50% contact area between the native bone and the cup required for osseointegration with the use of porous cups may not hold for new trabecular metal cups, thus reducing the need for antiprotrusio cages. The osteoconductive properties of trabecular metal enhanced allograft incorportation and iliac bone rebuilding without the need to fill the defect with multiple wedges nor protect the reconstruction with an antiprotrusio cage. PMID:21221229

  17. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Debridement for Hip Dysplasia--The More Things Change, the More Things Stay the Same.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Klaud

    2016-02-01

    A systematic review of arthroscopic debridement versus open osteotomy for acetabular dysplasia documented essentially equivalent results; however, with much shorter follow-up and many fewer cases in the arthroscopic series. PMID:26814400

  18. Lateral acetabular labral length is inversely related to acetabular coverage as measured by lateral center edge angle of Wiberg

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Brian D.; Wolf, Bryan; Lambert, Jeffrey R.; Clayton, Carolyn W.; Glueck, Deborah H.; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip often have compensatory labral hypertrophy, which presumably lends stability to an unstable joint. Conversely, patients with acetabular overcoverage may have small or ossified labra. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of labral length with the degree of acetabular hip coverage. A retrospective cohort of patients with hip pain presenting to a hip preservation center, who had undergone hip magnetic resonance imaging and AP pelvis radiographs were studied. General linear multivariate models were used to assess the association between three measures of labral length (lateral, anterior and anterior inferior locations along the acetabular rim) and the X-ray derived lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of Wiberg. Of the three acetabular labral locations measured, only the lateral labrum was associated with LCEA Wiberg (P = 0.0008). Lateral labral length increases as LCEA of Wiberg decreases. The anterior and anterior inferior labral locations did not show a predictable increase in labral length as LCEA Wiberg decreased. PMID:27583157

  19. Lateral acetabular labral length is inversely related to acetabular coverage as measured by lateral center edge angle of Wiberg.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Brian D; Wolf, Bryan; Lambert, Jeffrey R; Clayton, Carolyn W; Glueck, Deborah H; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-08-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip often have compensatory labral hypertrophy, which presumably lends stability to an unstable joint. Conversely, patients with acetabular overcoverage may have small or ossified labra. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of labral length with the degree of acetabular hip coverage. A retrospective cohort of patients with hip pain presenting to a hip preservation center, who had undergone hip magnetic resonance imaging and AP pelvis radiographs were studied. General linear multivariate models were used to assess the association between three measures of labral length (lateral, anterior and anterior inferior locations along the acetabular rim) and the X-ray derived lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of Wiberg. Of the three acetabular labral locations measured, only the lateral labrum was associated with LCEA Wiberg (P = 0.0008). Lateral labral length increases as LCEA of Wiberg decreases. The anterior and anterior inferior labral locations did not show a predictable increase in labral length as LCEA Wiberg decreased. PMID:27583157

  20. Acetabular Paralabral Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Femoral Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Raj S.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Ihnat, Daniel; Aoki, Stephen K.; Maak, Travis G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a known cause of hip pain in the young, active patient. Labral tears can be due to trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, dysplasia, and degenerative pathology. Paralabral cysts are relatively common in association with labral tears of the hip, with cysts seen on magnetic resonance imaging studies in as many as 50% to 70% of patients with labral tears. In some cases the cysts can become sizeable and cause neurovascular compression. Nonoperative interventions for the management of paralabral cysts in the shoulder and knee have shown high recurrence rates. In the shoulder and knee, arthroscopic debridement of paralabral cysts has shown good results with lower recurrence rates and resolution of neurovascular function. In the hip there is limited literature regarding surgical management of paralabral cysts. We present a surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of acetabular paralabral cysts combined with labral repair. PMID:25973371

  1. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical dysplasia is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV. Some types lead to cervical dysplasia or cancer. ...

  2. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  3. Patient-specific acetabular shape modelling: comparison among sphere, ellipsoid and conchoid parameterisations.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, Pietro; Manzotti, Alfonso; Baroni, Guido

    2014-04-01

    The shape of the human acetabular cup was commonly represented as a hemisphere, but different geometries and patient-specific shapes have been recently proposed in the literature. Our aim was to test the limits of the sphericity assumption by comparing three different parameterisations, namely the sphere, the ellipsoid and the rotational conchoid. Models of hip surfaces, reconstructed from CT scans taken from Caucasian race cadavers and patients, were automatically processed to extract the acetabular surface. Two separate analyses were carried out on the overall acetabular shape, including both the acetabular fossa and the lunate surface (case A) and acetabular cup represented by the lunate surface only (case B). Nonlinear gradient-based and evolutionary computation approaches were implemented for the fitting process. Minor differences from the three idealised geometries were detected (median values of the fitting errors < 1 mm). Nonetheless, the sphere fitting was found to be statistically different from both the ellipsoid (p < 2.50e - 10) and the conchoid (p < 1.07e - 09), whereas no statistical difference was detected between the ellipsoid and the conchoid for case A. Significance of the difference between ellipsoid and sphere (p < 4.55e - 12) and between conchoid and sphere (p < 1.93e - 11) was found for case B as well. Interestingly, for case B statistical difference was detected between the ellipsoid and the conchoid. In conclusion, we synthesise that the morphology of the overall acetabular cup can be parameterised both with an ellipsoid shape and with a conchoid shape as well with superior quality than the simple sphere. Differently, if one considers just the lunate surface, better fitting results are expected when using the ellipsoid. PMID:22789071

  4. A histological study of retrieved Cambridge acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Roger A; Field, Richard E; Jones, Eric; Sood, Asheesh; Rushton, Neil

    2010-01-01

    A new uncemented acetabular component, the Cambridge cup, has been designed to mimic the anatomy and physiology of subchondral bone in order to minimise stress shielding and enhance long-term component stability. Cambridge cups were implanted in a cohort of 50 women who presented with displaced sub-capital fracture of the femoral neck. The cups were manufactured with an hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Twenty six cups were implanted after removal of the HA. Twelve Cambridge cups were retrieved post-mortem between two and 84 months after implantation. Histological and histomorphometric testing was undertaken to analyse the residual HA coating thickness, bone apposition to the implant surface and particulate wear debris in the surrounding tissues. The HA-coated implants showed significantly greater bone apposition to the implant surface with significantly less fibrous tissue formation than the uncoated implants. Where HA resorption occurred, bone and bone marrow was seen adjacent to the implant. Excessive wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene liner was not seen. The HA-coated components demonstrated good initial bone implant bonding and the flexible carbon polymer appeared to maintain stability following HA resorption. The uncoated implants showed little or no bony apposition but had a fibrous membrane apposed to the implant surface. This may be explained by a combination of micro-motion at the bone implant interface and having a component surface finish that was poorly suited to osseous attachment. Hydroxyapatite coated acetabular components can provide reliable osseous attachment. Subsequent HA resorption need not compromise medium-term osseous fixation to an appropriate implant surface. PMID:20235075

  5. Residual dysplasia after successful Pavlik harness treatment: early ultrasound predictors.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Venelin Alexandrov; Harcke, H Theodore; Kumar, S Jay

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group of children treated with Pavlik harness for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) to determine early ultrasound characteristics that predict poor acetabular development after walking age. From a group of 487 infants with DDH, 55 met inclusion criteria of (1) ultrasound documentation of major neonatal hip instability, (2) treatment with Pavlik harness, and (3) a minimum of 4 years of follow-up. These 55 infants had 100 abnormal hips. Harness treatment alone was successful in treating 87 of 100 hips. Persistent or late acetabular dysplasia was defined from serial radiographs. At a mean follow-up of 5.3 years, 5 of the 87 (6%) were found to have sequelae (late acetabular dysplasia, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, or both). Three sonographic findings present on the initial ultrasound predicted late sequelae: (1) dynamic coverage index of 22% or less, (2) alpha angle less than 43 degrees, and (3) abnormal echogenicity of the cartilaginous roof on initial ultrasound. Abnormal echogenicity was the most specific single predictor of residual dysplasia (sensitivity 100% and specificity 88%). The structurally normal cartilaginous roof is non-echogenic except for a short triangular fibrous tip (the labrum). Pathologic cartilage becomes echogenic beyond the tip as hyaline cartilage becomes fibrous and deformed. In unstable hips that respond well to Pavlik harness treatment, it would appear that midterm acetabular development can be affected when early transformation of roof cartilage accompanies displacement and instability. PMID:16439895

  6. Porous Tantalum Buttress Augments for Severe Acetabular Posterior Column Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hull, Jason R; Russo, Glenn S; Lieberman, Jay R; Jiranek, William A

    2015-11-01

    In revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), consensus is lacking regarding the optimal method for reconstruction of the most severe acetabular defects. Porous tantalum (TM) buttress augments were designed for the most severe postero-superior defects. The purpose of this study was to report the results of a consecutive series of acetabular reconstructions utilizing TM buttress augments. Eight complex acetabular reconstructions utilizing a TM buttress augment were performed at two centers. All were Paprosky 3A or Paprosky 3B bone loss classification, with severe superior and posterior column deficiency where wedge augments were insufficient for mechanical support. The acetabular cup sizes ranged from 64-78, and a buttress shim was used in 7 of 8 cases. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 16.5 months (range, 10-28) and no cases were lost to follow-up. There were no cases of clinical or radiographic loosening, and no case had required reoperation or revision. All patients except one were ambulating with either no assist device or a single cane at final follow-up. There was one complication of an iliac wing fracture noted incidentally on postoperative x-rays in the lone patient in whom a buttress shim was not used. At short-term follow-up, TM acetabular buttress augments appear to effectively substitute for the use of structural allografts or cages, which would otherwise be used in this challenging setting. The potential for biologic fixation is promising for the durability of these reconstructions; however, longer-term follow-up is required for full evaluation. PMID:26680404

  7. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  8. Migration of the Duraloc cup after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Stihsen, Christoph; Pabinger, Christof; Radl, Roman; Rehak, Peter; Windhager, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    The Duraloc cup is a frequently used metal-backed, porous-coated, hemispherical, press-fit acetabular component. Published data on loosening rates are contradictory. In this study we investigated migration patterns with computer-assisted Einzel-Bild-Roentgen-Analyse (EBRA) of 67 Duraloc 100 cups. Cup migration and clinical scores were analysed over a 5-year follow-up period. Median total migration of the Duraloc 100 cup was 1.21 mm at 5 years. Seventy-five percent of implants were radiologically stable at 2 years and 90% at 4 years. One cup loosened aseptically at 60 months, requiring revision. Cup diameters > or = 54 mm migrated significantly more than cups < 54 mm in diameter (p = 0.029 at 4 years). There was a significant correlation between high polyethylene wear and further migrating cups within the first post-operative year (p = 0.035 at 12 months). Our analysis revealed significantly higher wear in males (p = 0.029 at 4 years). Radiological loosening at two years could be calculated using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, and 1.2 mm as an adequate threshold value (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 89%). PMID:17609953

  9. The John Charnley Award: Risk Factors for Cup Malpositioning: Quality Improvement Through a Joint Registry at a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Callanan, Mark C.; Jarrett, Bryan; Bragdon, Charles R.; Zurakowski, David; Rubash, Harry E.; Freiberg, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined factors that affect acetabular cup positioning. Since cup positioning has been linked to dislocation and increased bearing surface wear, these factors affecting cup position are important considerations. Question/purposes We determined the percent of optimally positioned acetabular cups and whether patient and surgical factors affected acetabular component position. Methods We obtained postoperative AP pelvis and cross-table lateral radiographs on 2061 consecutive patients who received a THA or hip resurfacing from 2004 to 2008. One thousand nine hundred and fifty-two hips had AP pelvic radiographs with correct position of the hip center, and 1823 had both version and abduction angles measured. The AP radiograph was measured using Hip Analysis Suite™ to calculate the cup inclination and version angles, using the lateral film to determine version direction. Acceptable ranges were defined for abduction (30°–45°) and version (5°–25°). Results From the 1823 hips, 1144 (63%) acetabular cups were within the abduction range, 1441 (79%) were within the version range, and 917 (50%) were within the range for both. Surgical approach, surgeon volume, and obesity (body mass index > 30) independently predicted malpositioned cups. Comparison of low versus high volume surgeons, minimally invasive surgical versus posterolateral approach, and obesity versus all other body mass index groups showed a twofold (1.5–2.8), sixfold (3.5–10.7), and 1.3-fold (1.1–1.7) increased risk for malpositioned cups, respectively. Conclusions Factors correlated to malpositioned cups included surgical approach, surgeon volume, and body mass index with increased risk of malpositioning for minimally invasive surgical approach, low volume surgeons, and obese patients. Further analyses on patient and surgical factors’ influence on cup position at a lower volume medical center would provide a valuable comparison. Level of Evidence Level II, prognostic

  10. Contemporary Concepts in the Young Adult Hip Patient: Periacetabular Osteotomy for Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Coobs, Benjamin R; Xiong, Ao; Clohisy, John C

    2015-07-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, as originally described by Dr. Reinhold Ganz, is an effective treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in the pre-arthritic young adult hip. This technique has experienced several recent modifications in an attempt to optimize the clinical outcomes of these patients. We will review the clinical presentation of acetabular dysplasia, indications for surgery, contemporary refinements in technique and clinical results following periacetabular osteotomy. In well-selected patients, this reconstructive osteotomy should be considered safe and effective in alleviating pain and improving hip function. PMID:25865812

  11. Migration pattern of cementless press fit cups in the presence of stabilizing screws in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zilkens, C; Djalali, S; Bittersohl, B; Kälicke, T; Kraft, C N; Krauspe, R; Jäger, Marcus

    2011-03-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial acetabular implant stability and late acetabular implant migration in press fit cups combined with screw fixation of the acetabular component in order to answer the question whether screws are necessary for the fixation of the acetabular component in cementless primary total hip arthroplasty. One hundred and seven hips were available for follow-up after primary THA using a cementless, porous-coated acetabular component. A total of 631 standardized radiographs were analyzed digitally by the "single-film-x-ray-analysis" method (EBRA). One hundred and one (94.4 %) acetabular components did not show significant migration of more than 1 mm. Six (5.6%) implants showed migration of more than 1 mm. Statistical analysis did not reveal preoperative patterns that would identify predictors for future migration. Our findings suggest that the use of screw fixation for cementless porous-coated acetabular components for primary THA does not prevent cup migration. PMID:21486725

  12. Exploring Volumetrically Indexed Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2011-01-01

    This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically indexed; that is to say, the volume of cup "n" is equal to "n" times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically indexed cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to…

  13. The effect of cup outer sizes on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-10-01

    One important loosening mechanism of the cemented total hip arthroplasty is the mechanical overload at the bone-cement interface and consequent failure of the cement fixation. Clinical studies have revealed that the outer diameter of the acetabular component is a key factor in influencing aseptic loosening of the hip arthroplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the cup outer diameter on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of a cemented total hip replacement (THR) with different wear penetration depths and under different cup inclination angles using finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional FE model was developed based on a typical Charnley hip prosthesis. Two acetabular cup designs with outer diameters of 40 and 43 mm were modelled and the effect of cup outer diameter, penetration depth and cup inclination angle on the contact mechanics and cement fixation stresses in the cemented THR were studied. The results showed that for all penetration depths and cup inclination angles considered, the contact mechanics in terms of peak von Mises stress in the acetabular cup and peak contact pressure at the bearing surface for the two cup designs were similar (within 5%). However, the peak von Mises stress, the peak maximum principal stress and peak shear stress in the cement mantle at the bone-cement interface for the 43 mm diameter cup design were predicted to be lower compared to those for the 40 mm diameter cup design. The differences were predicted to be 15-19%, 15-22% and 18-20% respectively for different cup penetration depths and inclination angles, which compares to the clinical difference of aseptic loosening incidence of about 20% between the two cup designs. PMID:26343226

  14. Hydroxyapatite coating of an acetabular prosthesis. Effect on stability.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, T; Stocks, G W; Freeman, M A; Scott, G; Goodier, W D; Evans, S J

    1996-03-01

    We report the radiological and clinical outcome of a press-fit (SLF) acetabular component at two to three years in two groups of patients having primary total hip replacement. In 69 the implant was coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) and in 40 it was uncoated. The stability of the cup was assessed by measurement of proximal migration and change in the angle of inclination. The clinical results in the two groups did not differ significantly, and the mean proximal linear wear was similar in both. Fewer radiolucent lines (RLLs) were seen on the radiographs of cups coated with HA. The mean proximal migration was studied by calculating regression lines for each patient using migration measurements: for the SLF+HA group the mean slope was 0.06 mm/year and for the SLF-HA group 0.20 mm/year (p = 0.22). The change in the angle of inclination during follow-up was also consistently smaller in HA-coated cups. Using regression methods the SLF+HA group had a mean slope of 0.08 degrees/year and the SLF-HA group 0.44 degrees/year and the SLF-HA group 0.44 degrees/year (p = 0.023). Partial HA coating appeared to have no effect on the clinical outcome or on the rate of wear of polyethylene, but there was a trend towards a reduced rate of proximal migration, and a significant reduction in rotational migration and the number of radiolucent lines. This suggests that HA coating enhances the stability of this acetabular component. PMID:8666624

  15. Cross-sectional Anatomy of Ilium for Guiding Acetabular Component Placement Using High Hip Center Technique in Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian-Lin; Zuo, Jian-Lin; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan-Guo; Li, Xue-Zhou; Liu, Tong; Gao, Zhong-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many clinical studies have been published involving the use of a high hip center (HHC), achieved good follow-up. However, there is a little anatomic guidance in the literature regarding the amount of bone stock available for initial implant coverage in this area of the ilium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thickness and width of the human ilium and related acetabular cup coverage for guiding acetabular component placement in HHC. Methods: A total of 120 normal hips in 60 cases of adult patients from lower extremities computer tomographic angiography Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were chosen for the study. After importing the data to the mimics software, we chose the cross sections every 5-mm increments from the rotational center of the hip to the cephalic of the ilium according the body sagittal axis, then we measured the thickness and width of the ilium for each cross section in axial plane, calculated the cup coverage at each chosen section. Results: At the acetabular dome, the mean thickness and width of the ilium were 49.71 ± 4.88 mm and 38.92 ± 3.67 mm, respectively, whereas at 1 cm above the dome, decreased to 41.35 ± 5.13 and 31.13 ± 3.37 respectively, and 2 cm above the dome, decreased to 31.25 ± 4.04 and 26.65 ± 3.43, respectively. Acetabular cup averaged coverage for 40-, 50-, and 60-mm hemispheric shells, was 100%, 89%, and 44% at the acetabular dome, 100%, 43.7%, and 27.5% for 1 cm above the dome, and 37.5%, 21.9%, and 14.2% for 2 cm above the dome. Conclusions: HHC reconstructions within 1 cm above the acetabular dome will be an acceptable and smaller diameter prosthesis would be better. PMID:26063357

  16. Hip Dysplasia in the Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Gala, Luca; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a leading precursor of osteoarthritis and is seen in 20% to 40% of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. An increase in mechanical stress on the cartilage matrix with failure of the acetabular labrum represents the major pathomechanism of degeneration. Because the prevalence of associated femoral deformities is high (>50%), the structural anatomy of the dysplastic hip must be assessed in multiple planes using radiographs and, if needed, advanced imaging modalities. Acetabular osteotomy (periacetabular and/or rotational) is the most commonly used procedure for the treatment of the majority of dysplastic hips in adults. Modern total hip replacement remains an excellent option for the more arthritic joints. Difficulties can arise from anatomical abnormalities and previous operations. PMID:26738905

  17. Ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, or sweat glands. Causes There are many different types of ... equally. Symptoms People with ectodermal dysplasia may not sweat or may have decreased sweating because of a ...

  18. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); Precancerous changes of the cervix; Cervical cancer - dysplasia ... lesion (SIL). On the Pap smear report, these changes will be described as: Low-grade (LSIL) High- ...

  19. Options for acetabular fixation surfaces.

    PubMed

    Klika, Alison K; Murray, Trevor G; Darwiche, Hussein; Barsoum, Wael K

    2007-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common cause for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). Due to poor long-term results with cemented acetabular components, cementless implants that rely on biologic fixation became popular in the United States for both primary and revision procedures in the early 1980s. Cementless acetabular components used in THA have been reported to have superior radiographic performance compared with cemented fixation, although the optimal method of acetabular fixation remains controversial. Cementless acetabular components require initial implant stability to allow for bone ingrowth and remodeling into the acetabular shell, providing long-term durability of the prosthesis. Many improved implant materials are available to facilitate bone growth and remodeling, including the 3 most common surface treatments; fibermesh, sintered beads, and plasma spray coatings. Recently added to these are porous metal surfaces, which have increased porosity and optimal pore sizes when compared with titanium fibermesh. The most studied of these materials is the titanium fibermesh fixation surface, which has demonstrated a mechanical failure rate of 1% at 10 to 15 years. This technology utilizes the diffusion bonding process to attach fiber metal pads to a titanium substrate using heat and pressure. The sintered bead fixation surface offers a porous coating of various sizes of spherical beads, achieved by the sintering process, and has been shown to provide long-term fixation. While there are less long-term published data regarding the titanium plasma spray surface, its early results have provided evidence of its durability, even in the face of significant osteolysis. The most recently added alternative fixation surface is porous tantalum metal, which offers potentially greater bone ingrowth and bone graft incorporation due to its high porosity (80%) and low modulus of elasticity (3 MPa). Porous tantalum implants have shown early favorable clinical results and have

  20. Uncemented Porous Tantalum Acetabular Components: Early Follow-Up and Failures in 599 Revision Total Hip Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Long, William J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Mabry, Tad M.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Lewallen, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the early outcomes of 599 cases of revision THA performed using a porous tantalum cup. Methods Clinical and radiographic data was sought in all patients at a minimum two years follow-up, after acetabular revision performed with a porous tantalum cup. Results Of the 599 cases identified, there were 51 re-operations in 47 patients (7.8 percent). Cup removal was required in 14 of these cases (2.3 percent). The most common cause for cup removal was a septic joint (12). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening during the study period. There was one case of early cup migration. There were 17 incomplete lucencies not initially seen on post-operative films, but identified later, all were non-progressive on subsequent x-rays. Conclusions Early results of porous tantalum acetabular components in the revision setting demonstrate good initial stability and low re-operation rates at two years follow-up. Level of Evidence Level 4: Case series PMID:26361451

  1. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  2. Exploring volumetrically indexed cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2011-03-01

    This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically indexed; that is to say, the volume of cup n is equal to n times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically indexed cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to geometry, algebra and differential calculus. Students with an understanding of these topics should be able to complete the analysis and related exercises contained herein.

  3. Long-term results of the threaded Mecron cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian; Raiss, Patric

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, high failure rates of cemented acetabular components, especially in young patients, in the middle- and long-term prompted a search for alternatives. The Mecring was one of the most popular first generation uncemented, threaded cups widely used in the 1980s for arthroplasty of the hip. First generation threaded cups commonly had smooth surface treatment and showed unacceptably high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 209 patients, 221 threaded uncemented acetabular cups with smooth surface treatment (Mecring) had been implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. The mean time of follow-up was 17 (range 15–20) years. In 91 (41%) hips the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision: two hips for infection and 84 (38%) for aseptic loosening. Five hips were awaiting revision. The survival rate for all revisions including hips awaiting revision was 49% (95% CI: 41–57%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. Patients with these components must be closely monitored as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629481

  4. Impaction grafted bone chip size effect on initial stability in an acetabular model: Mechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Colin; Bobak, Peter; Wilcox, Ruth; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acetabular bone defect reconstruction is an increasing problem for surgeons with patients undergoing complex primary or revision total hip replacement surgery. Impaction bone grafting is one technique that has favourable long-term clinical outcome results for patients who undergo this reconstruction method for acetabular bone defects. Creating initial mechanical stability of the impaction bone graft in this technique is known to be the key factor in achieving a favourable implant survival rate. Different sizes of bone chips were used in this technique to investigate if the size of bone chips used affected initial mechanical stability of a reconstructed acetabulum. Methodology Twenty acetabular models were created in total. Five control models were created with a cemented cup in a normal acetabulum. Then five models in three different groups of bone chip size were constructed. The three groups had an acetabular protrusion defect reconstructed using either; 2–4 mm3, 10 mm3 or 20 mm3 bone chip size for impaction grafting reconstruction. The models underwent compression loading up to 9500 N and displacement within the acetabular model was measured indicating the initial mechanical stability. Results This study reveals that, although not statistically significant, the largest (20 mm3) bone chip size grafted models have an inferior maximum stiffness compared to the medium (10 mm3) bone chip size. Interpretations Our study suggests that 10 mm3 size of bone chips provide better initial mechanical stability compared to smaller or larger bone chips. We dismissed the previously held opinion that the biggest practically possible graft is best for acetabular bone graft impaction. PMID:24396238

  5. [Fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A C; Koskas, F; Cacoub, P

    2015-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is a segmentary, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease that may result in stenosis, occlusion, aneurysms or dissection of medium arteries. Renal involvement is the most frequent location, described in 60-100% of patients. Renal stenosis can be asymptomatic or complicated with arterial hypertension or less frequently with renal insufficiency. Carotid and vertebral involvements are less frequent (10-35%). Surgical management of fibromuscular dysplasia is now less common because of the better efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thus, histologic characteristics are no longer relevant prognostic criteria. Clinical features and outcome vary according to angiographic presentation (focal or multifocal disease), with an increased recovery rate of hypertension with focal lesions. In the presence of renal fibromuscular dysplasia, only symptomatic patients are revascularized (recent or resistant hypertension) or patients with asymmetric renal size or impaired renal function. Transluminal angioplasty is the first-line treatment except for patients with complex lesions or stenosis associated with aneurysm. PMID:25455952

  6. Ten-year results of a press-fit, porous-coated acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Grobler, G P; Learmonth, I D; Bernstein, B P; Dower, B J

    2005-06-01

    We retrospectively reviewed, ten years after surgery, 100 consecutive total hip replacements in which the Duraloc 300 cup had been used. Post-operative radiographs were analysed for placement of the cup and interface gaps and follow-up radiographs for lucent lines, osteolysis, wear and migration. All the components were found to be stable with no evidence of loosening. The mean rate of wear was 0.12 mm/year. Three hips developed acetabular osteolysis at the level of the apex hole. Two have successfully undergone bone grafting without removal of the implants and one patient is awaiting surgery. The Duraloc 300 cup has a survival of 100% at ten years with no aseptic loosening and a low incidence of pelvic osteolysis. PMID:15911659

  7. Endoscopic Shelf Acetabuloplasty Combined With Labral Repair, Cam Osteochondroplasty, and Capsular Plication for Treating Developmental Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Soshi; Wada, Takahiko; Sakoda, Shinsuke; Ariumi, Akihiro; Sakai, Akinori; Iida, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the underlying shallow acetabular deformity, a patient with hip dysplasia has a greater risk of development of a labral tear, a cam lesion, and capsular laxity. This combination of abnormalities exacerbates joint instability, ultimately leading to osteoarthritis. Unsurprisingly, only repairing the acetabular labrum remains controversial, and the outcome is unpredictable. In this technical note, with video, we demonstrate an entirely endoscopic approach for simultaneously repairing the most common mechanical abnormalities found in moderate hip dysplasia: labral repair, cam osteochondroplasty, capsular plication, and shelf acetabuloplasty using an autologous iliac bone graft. PMID:24749043

  8. Morphometric assessment of the canine hip joint using the dorsal acetabular rim view and the centre-edge angle.

    PubMed

    Meomartino, L; Fatone, G; Potena, A; Brunetti, A

    2002-01-01

    The dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) view of the hip joint can be used to assess the weightbearing portion of the acetabulum and the acetabular coverage, providing an adjunct to the conventional ventrodorsal (VD) view in the radiographic evaluation of hip dysplasia in the dog. A quantitative index of acetabular coverage in the DAR view, the acetabular slope (AS) angle, was originally proposed in 1990. The aim of the present study was to make a prospective, comparative assessment of a new parameter, the centre-edge (CE) angle, with the AS angle, for the evaluation of the acetabular coverage of the femoral head in the DAR view. The reliability and repeatability of the two parameters was assessed using the r(I) value of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) in a prospective study of 208 hip joints in large and giant breed dogs. An estimation of the added value of using the DAR view, compared with that of the VD standard view alone, was also assessed. The CE angle showed a higher r(I) value compared with the AS angle; in 26 per cent of hips of FCI classes A, B and C, the DAR view provided additional diagnostic information compared with the VD view, with respect to lateralisation and/or initial changes to the dorsal rim. It is concluded that the CE angle is more reliable than the AS angle in the evaluation of acetabular coverage, and that the DAR view provides valuable data compared with the VD view alone in the early stages of canine hip dysplasia. PMID:11833819

  9. The role of cages in the management of severe acetabular bone defects at revision arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T J; Fichman, S G; Watts, E; Kuzyk, P R T; Safir, O A; Gross, A E

    2016-01-01

    An uncemented hemispherical acetabular component is the mainstay of acetabular revision and gives excellent long-term results. Occasionally, the degree of acetabular bone loss means that a hemispherical component will be unstable when sited in the correct anatomical location or there is minimal bleeding host bone left for biological fixation. On these occasions an alternative method of reconstruction has to be used. A major column structural allograft has been shown to restore the deficient bone stock to some degree, but it needs to be off-loaded with a reconstruction cage to prevent collapse of the graft. The use of porous metal augments is a promising method of overcoming some of the problems associated with structural allograft. If the defect is large, the augment needs to be protected by a cage to allow ingrowth to occur. Cup-cage reconstruction is an effective method of treating chronic pelvic discontinuity and large contained or uncontained bone defects. This paper presents the indications, surgical techniques and outcomes of various methods which use acetabular reconstruction cages for revision total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26733646

  10. Placement of the acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Beverland, D E; O'Neill, C K J; Rutherford, M; Molloy, D; Hill, J C

    2016-01-01

    Ideal placement of the acetabular component remains elusive both in terms of defining and achieving a target. Our aim is to help restore original anatomy by using the transverse acetabular ligament (TAL) to control the height, depth and version of the component. In the normal hip the TAL and labrum extend beyond the equator of the femoral head and therefore, if the definitive acetabular component is positioned such that it is cradled by and just deep to the plane of the TAL and labrum and is no more than 4mm larger than the original femoral head, the centre of the hip should be restored. If the face of the component is positioned parallel to the TAL and psoas groove the patient specific version should be restored. We still use the TAL for controlling version in the dysplastic hip because we believe that the TAL and labrum compensate for any underlying bony abnormality. The TAL should not be used as an aid to inclination. Worldwide, > 75% of surgeons operate with the patient in the lateral decubitus position and we have shown that errors in post-operative radiographic inclination (RI) of > 50° are generally caused by errors in patient positioning. Consequently, great care needs to be taken when positioning the patient. We also recommend 35° of apparent operative inclination (AOI) during surgery, as opposed to the traditional 45°. PMID:26733639

  11. Fibrous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Fibrous dysplasia is a bone disease that destroys and replaces normal bone with fibrous ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  12. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dimes National Kidney Foundation Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Kidney Dysplasia Page Content On this page: What is ...

  13. Accuracy considerations in navigated cup placement for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Langlotz, U; Grützner, P A; Bernsmann, K; Kowal, J H; Tannast, M; Caversaccio, M; Nolte, L-P

    2007-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) technology has recently been introduced to overcome problems resulting from acetabular component malpositioning in total hip arthroplasty. Available navigation modules can conceptually be categorized as computer tomography (CT) based, fluoroscopy based, or image-free. The current study presents a comprehensive accuracy analysis on the computer assisted placement accuracy of acetabular cups. It combines analyses using mathematical approaches, in vitro testing environments, and an in vivo clinical trial. A hybrid navigation approach combining image-free with fluoroscopic technology was chosen as the best compromise to CT-based systems. It introduces pointer-based digitization for easily assessable points and bi-planar fluoroscopy for deep-seated landmarks. From the in vitro data maximum deviations were found to be 3.6 degrees for inclination and 3.8 degrees for anteversion relative to a pre-defined test position. The maximum difference between intraoperatively calculated cup inclination and anteversion with the postoperatively measured position was 4 degrees and 5 degrees, respectively. These data coincide with worst cases scenario predictions applying a statistical simulation model. The proper use of navigation technology can reduce variability of cup placement well within the surgical safe zone. Surgeons have to concentrate on a variety of error sources during the procedure, which may explain the reported strong learning curves for CAOS technologies. PMID:18019461

  14. Is labral hypotrophy correlated with increased acetabular depth?

    PubMed

    Toft, Felix; Anliker, Elmar; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Labral hypertrophy is a distinct feature in hip dysplasia. Occasionally, very small, hypotrophic labra are observed. However, there is no literature concerning this pathology. We investigated if the size of the labrum correlated with any radiologic parameters reflecting the amount of acetabular coverage. It was hypothezised that there is a negative correlation between labrum size and acetabular coverage. Labra were categorized into three groups depending on the relation between length of the articular sided surface and height of bony attachment. Labra with a height:length ratio of 2 were classified as hypotrophic, with a height:length ratio of 1 as normal and with a ratio of 0.5 as hypertrophic. Labral cross-sectional areas (CSA) were measured on radial magnetic resonance imaging-arthrography slices using the measuring tool of the PACS system of 20 hips with hypotrophic labra (group 1), 20 hips with normal labral appearance (group 2) and 10 hips with hypertrophic labra (group 3). These values were then analyzed against following parameters: neck-shaft-angle (NSA), lateral center-edge angle (LCE), acetabular index (AI), femoral extrusion index (FEI) and acetabular retroversion index (ARI). Analyses of variance were used to determine differences in mean values between the three groups. Mean labral CSA differed significantly between all groups (group 1: 12.1 ± 2.9 mm(2); group 2: 25.2 ± 6.2 mm(2); group 3: 41.1 ± 12.3 mm(2); P < 0.001). NSA, LCE, AI and FEI all showed a significant difference between group 3 and 1 or 2. The ARI showed no difference between groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between LCE angle and labral CSA with a corrected R (2)-value of 0.301. Labral CSA correlates with the LCE. No statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 concerning the LCE, AI or FEI could be identified. Nevertheless, group 1 had the highest mean coverage of all groups, hips with hypertrophic

  15. Is labral hypotrophy correlated with increased acetabular depth?

    PubMed Central

    Toft, Felix; Anliker, Elmar; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Labral hypertrophy is a distinct feature in hip dysplasia. Occasionally, very small, hypotrophic labra are observed. However, there is no literature concerning this pathology. We investigated if the size of the labrum correlated with any radiologic parameters reflecting the amount of acetabular coverage. It was hypothezised that there is a negative correlation between labrum size and acetabular coverage. Labra were categorized into three groups depending on the relation between length of the articular sided surface and height of bony attachment. Labra with a height:length ratio of 2 were classified as hypotrophic, with a height:length ratio of 1 as normal and with a ratio of 0.5 as hypertrophic. Labral cross-sectional areas (CSA) were measured on radial magnetic resonance imaging-arthrography slices using the measuring tool of the PACS system of 20 hips with hypotrophic labra (group 1), 20 hips with normal labral appearance (group 2) and 10 hips with hypertrophic labra (group 3). These values were then analyzed against following parameters: neck-shaft-angle (NSA), lateral center-edge angle (LCE), acetabular index (AI), femoral extrusion index (FEI) and acetabular retroversion index (ARI). Analyses of variance were used to determine differences in mean values between the three groups. Mean labral CSA differed significantly between all groups (group 1: 12.1 ± 2.9 mm2; group 2: 25.2 ± 6.2 mm2; group 3: 41.1 ± 12.3 mm2; P < 0.001). NSA, LCE, AI and FEI all showed a significant difference between group 3 and 1 or 2. The ARI showed no difference between groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between LCE angle and labral CSA with a corrected R2-value of 0.301. Labral CSA correlates with the LCE. No statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 concerning the LCE, AI or FEI could be identified. Nevertheless, group 1 had the highest mean coverage of all groups, hips with hypertrophic labra

  16. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Overview What is arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (say: “uh-rith-mo-jen-ic right ven-trick- ...

  17. Influence of cup-center-edge angle on micro-motion at the interface between the cup and host bone in cementless total hip arthroplasty: three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Tomonori; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We verified the index cup position required for bulk bone grafting instead of morcellized grafting immediately after cementless total hip arthroplasty. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to evaluate changes in the volume of the slippage of the cup-host bone interface as micro-motion of the cup at the acetabular bone defect site depending on the cup-center-edge (CE) angle. The conditions of bulk bone grafts were similar to those of cortical bone. Slippage increased with decreasing cup-CE angle. A bulk bone graft tightly fixed to the host bone prevented considerably larger slippage between the cup and host bone. A smaller cup-CE angle increased the impact of the bulk bone graft on slippage. When the cup-CE angle was 0° or -10°, the criterion for slippage in favorable initial fixation in all conditions was <40 μm. Even if transplanted bulk bone is used, unless good fixation is obtained between the host bone, and the cup and bone graft, it is impossible to obtain reliable fixation of the cup with a cup-CE angle <-10° and slippage exceeding 40 μm. Bulk bone grafting tightly fixed to the host bone improves initial the cup-host bone fixation, especially when the cup-CE angle is small, such as <-10°. In clinical practice, negative factors are implicated in the initial fixation of various cups, and sufficient fixation between the host bone and cup or bulk bone graft using a screw is effective when the cup-CE angle is extremely small. PMID:26319002

  18. A 10-year minimum follow-up of hydroxyapatite-coated threaded cups: clinical, radiographic and survivorship analyses with comparison to the literature.

    PubMed

    Epinette, Jean-Alain; Manley, Michael T; D'Antonio, James A; Edidin, Avram A; Capello, William N

    2003-02-01

    We evaluated the clinical, radiographic, and survivorship outcomes in a series of 418 threaded hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups (Arc2f; Osteonics, Allendale, NJ) implanted in a consecutive series of 384 patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty. In all cases, the cup was screwed into the prepared acetabulum. Bone screws were used to provide secondary fixation. At a minimum 10-year follow-up, 304 cups were available for analysis. The cumulative survivorship (mechanical failure as endpoint) at that time was 99.43% +/- 0.0104. Two hundred seventy-six hips were available for full clinical and radiographic review at or after the tenth anniversary. No unstable implants were noted; all implant fixation interfaces were classified as "stable bone ingrown," and the cup migration rate was zero. Based on the survivorship achieved with this implant, our results compare favorably with survivorship reported for the best cemented and cementless acetabular implant designs. PMID:12629602

  19. Long-term results of the threaded Weill cup in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clarius, Michael; Jung, Alexander W.; Raiss, Patric; Streit, Marcus R.; Merle, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Uncemented, threaded acetabular components with smooth surface treatment were widely used in continental Europe in the 1970s and 1980s for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Previously published studies showed high failure rates in the mid-term. In a consecutive series of 116 patients, 127 threaded cups with smooth surface treatment (Weill cup; Zimmer, Winterthur, Switzerland) were implanted in combination with one type of uncemented stem. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically. Mean time of follow-up was 17 years (range 15–20). At the time of follow-up, the acetabular component had been revised or was awaiting revision in 30 hips (24%). Two hips were revised for infection and 23 for aseptic loosening. Four polyethylene liners were exchanged because of excessive wear. One hip was awaiting revision. The survival rate for all acetabular revisions including one hip awaiting revision was 75% (95%CI: 65–85%) at 17 years. These results support the view that smooth, threaded acetabular components do not provide satisfactory long-term fixation and should be abandoned. It is important to closely monitor patients with these components as the failure rate remains high in the long-term. PMID:19629480

  20. Good stability and minimal osteolysis with a biconical threaded cup at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Zweymüller, Karl A; Steindl, Martin; Schwarzinger, Ulrike

    2007-10-01

    In the literature there is no consensus on the value of threaded cementless cups. We primarily asked whether the newly constructed threaded double-cone cup without additional screw fixation would provide high survival at intermediate followup. We retrospectively reviewed 365 patients (376 hips) who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty using this cup made of pure titanium with ceramic-on-polyethylene articulating surfaces. At a minimum followup of 10.0 years (mean, 10.3 years; range, 10.0-13.1 years), 232 cups (61.7%) were available for analysis. We performed two revisions for early infection and cup breakage. No polyethylene liner was exchanged because of wear or instability. Three of the cup shells were radiographically loose at followup; one had periacetabular osteolysis. The mean liner wear rate was 0.13 mm per year. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year survivorship with revision of the cup shell for any reason was 99.3% (95% confidence interval, 96.9-99.8%) and with revision and radiographic loosening of the cup shell 98.6% (95% confidence interval, 96.0-99.5%). These intermediate results compare favorably with survivorship and periacetabular bone reaction data observed with the best cementless acetabular implant designs. PMID:17960675

  1. Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care, it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence, and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities, and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  2. Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Synoposis The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  3. Assessment of adult hip dysplasia and the outcome of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Hip dysplasia and hip joint deformities in general are recognized as possible precursors of osteoarthritic development. Early and correct identification of hip dysplasia is important in order to offer timely joint preserving treatment. In the contemporary literature, several controversies exist, and some of these were the focus of this doctoral thesis. Categorized into subjects, the major findings and their possible importance are listed below. DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA: A multi-observer study quantified the variability of different methods for diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis and resulted in general recommendations regarding diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia. Pelvic tilt was shown to differ significantly between the supine and weight-bearing positions in patients with dysplastic hip joints. This is a finding that adds controversy to the application of neutral pelvic positioning during assessment of hip deformities because pelvic tilt affects the appearance of acetabular version. Weight-bearing assessment of acetabular version showed the presence of retroversion in 33% of dysplastic hips. The establishment of retroversion as a rather frequent entity in dysplastic hips is contradictory to the historical finding that hip dysplasia is characterized by insufficient anterior and lateral coverage. In general, the findings have important implications for orthopedic surgeons and radiologists dealing with diagnostic assessment of painful hips in young adults, and for surgeons planning and performing joint-preserving periacetabular osteotomies. ASSESSMENT OF ACETABULAR LABRAL TEARS IN HIP DYSPLASIA: The roles of ultrasound and clinical tests in acetabular labral tear diagnostics were established. After overcoming an initial learning curve, ultrasound investigation was highly reliable in diagnosing labral tears, whereas only a positive impingement or FABER test was reliable in identifying a labral tear. It seems that non-invasive and

  4. The Zweymüller threaded cup: a choice in revision? Migration analysis and follow-up after 6 years.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Jörg Hartmut; Matziolis, Georg; Tuischer, Jens; Leutloff, Dirk; Duda, Georg Norbert; Perka, Carsten

    2006-06-01

    Excellent long-term results are reported for threaded cups with an osteointegrable surface in primary interventions. So far, little data are available on the use of such implants in revision cases. We investigated 30 loosened Aesculap PM threaded cups (Tuttlingen, Germany) with a smooth surface, revised with a conical, corundum-blasted Zweymüller threaded cup (Zweymüller Alloclassic CSF cup, Zimmer, Warsaw, Ind). Aseptic radiological loosening was seen in 8% of cases, and a survival rate of 95% was achieved after 6.1 years. Average migration was 1.4 mm cranially and 0.7 mm medially. The Harris hip score improved from 42 points preoperatively to 75 points at follow-up. Good medium-term results are possible after revision using a threaded cup with an osteointegrable surface, but not if segmental acetabular margin defects are present. PMID:16781400

  5. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  6. Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix is preceded by a series of premalignant changes described as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These premalignant states are identified by cervical cytology, diagnosed by colposcopy and if effectively treated, can prevent invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Because of the apparent biological variation of the premalignant states, even the most aggressive cervical screening program cannot be expected to eliminate all invasive squamous cancer of the cervix. Optimal results of a cervical screening program will be achieved when all women under 35 years of age and sexually active have an annual cytological smear; the cytology is screened by a laboratory with high quality control; the patient's positive cytology is accurately assessed by an experienced colposcopist, and the premalignant lesion is effectively treated. PMID:21283455

  7. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Tantalum Augment in Patients with Paprosky III or IV Acetabular Bone Defects: A Minimum 2-year Follow Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Lim, Seung-Jae; Moon, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the short-term outcomes of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) using tantalum augments in patients with severe acetabular bone defects. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 15 revision THAs performed in 15 patients using tantalum augments between June 2010 and December 2013. Acetabular bone defects were Paprosky type IIIA in 7 hips, type IIIB in 7, and type IV in 1. The causes of revision surgery were aseptic loosening in 12 hips and deep infection in 3. Revisions were first in 1 hip, second in 3, and third in 11. Six patients were male and 9 female with a mean age of 59 years (range, 48-75 years). Mean follow-up was 29 months (range, 24-48 months). Results Mean Harris hip score was improved from 34 points (range, 12-54 points) preoperatively to 84 points (range, 38-90 points) at final follow-up. On the final follow-up radiographs, there were 12 hips (80.0%) with stable fixation of the acetabular cup, 2 (13.3%) with secondary stability after mild acetabular protrusion, and 1 (6.7%) with radiolucency around the acetabular cup without mechanical symptoms. Complications included one patient with acute hematogenous infection managed by surgical debridement and long-term antibiotic therapy. There were no cases with nerve palsy or dislocation during the follow-up period. Conclusion The present study showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision THA using tantalum augments due to severe acetabular bone defects of Paprosky type III or IV at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. PMID:27536651

  8. The use of fibre-based demineralised bone matrix in major acetabular reconstruction: surgical technique and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Karoubi, Mathieu; Dumaine, Valérie; Courpied, Jean Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular osteolysis associated with socket loosening is one of the main long-term complications of total hip arthroplasty. In case of major bone loss, where <50% host bone coverage can be obtained with a porous-coated cementless cup, it is generally agreed that a metal ring or cage in association with a cemented component and allograft bone should be used. In order to promote allograft bone consolidation and incorporation, we have associated demineralised bone matrix (DBM, Grafton® A Flex) to the construct ion. Here we describe the technical details of major acetabular reconstruction using the Kerboull acetabular reinforcement device with allograft bone and DBM. This device has a hook that must be placed under the teardrop of the acetabulum and a plate for iliac fixation. The main advantages of this device are help in restoring the normal centre of hip rotation, guiding the reconstruction and partially unloading the graft. The Kerboull acetabular reinforcement device has provided a 92% survival rate free of loosening at 13-year follow-up in a consecutive series of 60 type III and IV deficiencies. Our preliminary results using DBM indicate faster allograft consolidation and remodelling. PMID:21057788

  9. Long-term porous-coated cup survivorship using spikes, screws, and press-fitting for initial fixation.

    PubMed

    Engh, Charles A; Hopper, Robert H; Engh, C Anderson

    2004-10-01

    This study examined the long-term outcome of a single institution's experience with 4,289 primary total hip arthroplasties using hemispheric porous-coated cups. Initial fixation was achieved with spikes (255 AML TriSpike cups), by press-fitting with rim screws (427 Arthropor cups) or by press-fitting the component (83 Harris-Galante, 391 ACS Triloc+, 2,537 Duraloc, and 596 Pinnacle cups). Among 203 revised hips, only 18 cups were found to be loose at the time of revision. Using revision for any reason as an end point, 15-year survivorship was 82.9% +/- 5.6% (95% confidence interval) for spiked components, 71.6% +/- 8.5% for press-fit cups with adjunctive rim screws, and 72.0% +/- 12.6% for press-fit components (P<.001, log rank). Using revision for aseptic loosening as an end point, 15-year survivorship was 94.7% +/- 3.4% for spiked cups, 98.4% +/- 1.9% for press-fit cups with screws and 100% +/- 0.1% for press-fit cups. Despite an increasing incidence of polyethylene wear-related revisions, porous-coated acetabular components have demonstrated excellent long-term fixation. PMID:15457419

  10. Explicit finite element modelling of the impaction of metal press-fit acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Hothi, H S; Busfield, J J C; Shelton, J C

    2011-03-01

    Metal press-fit cups and shells are widely used in hip resurfacing and total hip replacement procedures. These acetabular components are inserted into a reamed acetabula cavity by either impacting their inner polar surface (shells) or outer rim (cups). Two-dimensional explicit dynamics axisymmetric finite element models were developed to simulate these impaction methods. Greater impact velocities were needed to insert the components when the interference fit was increased; a minimum velocity of 2 m/s was required to fully seat a component with a 2 mm interference between the bone and outer diameter. Changing the component material from cobalt-chromium to titanium alloy resulted in a reduction in the number of impacts on the pole to seat it from 14 to nine. Of greatest significance, it was found that locking a rigid cap to the cup or shell rim resulted in up to nine fewer impactions being necessary to seat it than impacting directly on the polar surface or using a cap free from the rim of the component, as is the case with many commercial resurfacing cup impaction devices currently used. This is important to impactor design and could make insertion easier and also reduce acetabula bone damage. PMID:21485331

  11. A multiplanar radiography method for assessing cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shahram; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald; Anglin, Carolyn; Wilson, David R

    2012-10-01

    Correct orientation of the acetabular cup considering patient-specific functional pelvic angles is an important factor for improving outcomes and avoiding complications after total hip arthroplasty. This study introduces a new, noninvasive radiographic tool for accurately determining a patient's specific pelvic tilt angle preoperatively, as well as accurately assessing acetabular cup orientation with respect to bony landmarks intraoperatively and postoperatively. The method was validated by imaging a bone replica model of the pelvis with implanted hip components, in comparison to digitized references, and verified with a cadaveric specimen. Pelvic tilt was measured with an accuracy of 0.1 deg and SD of 0.4 deg. Operative cup inclination and anteversion showed accuracies of 0.6 deg and 2.5 deg, with SD of 0.4 deg and 0.6 deg, respectively; these could be improved further by subtracting systematic bias. The method shows accuracy advantages over existing radiographic and fluoroscopic methods and exposes the subjects to a lower radiation dose compared to the similar computed tomography methods. These results suggest that the proposed method is feasible for assessing cup placement with reference to the functional and anatomical references. Furthermore, the ability to reference the same bony landmarks preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively has important research and clinical advantages. PMID:23083199

  12. Oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-03-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  13. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  14. Cementless cup fixation in total hip arthroplasty after 5-8 years.

    PubMed

    Spicer, D D; Schaper, L A; Pomeroy, D L; Badenhausen, W E; Curry, J I; Suthers, K E; Smith, M W

    2001-01-01

    A series of 199 total hip arthroplasties was performed using a porous-coated, hemispherical press-fit acetabular cup. At a mean follow-up of 91.5 months 158 cups were available for clinical and radiological review. The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was 62.5 years. The mean Harris Hip score at final follow-up was 87.3. No shells were revised although eccentric polyethylene wear prompted liner replacement in two cases. Osteolysis was noted in six cases but predominantly in relation to the femoral stem. Focal pelvic osteolytic lesions were rare. All the cups were classified as stable on radiography. PMID:11794260

  15. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup. PMID:26253481

  16. Osteopathic diagnosis of an acetabular injury.

    PubMed

    Morthland, Tim; Cote, Nicholas S; Humphrey, Jon; Fulk, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Physical findings demarking pathologic somatovisceral reflex activity and fascial strain patterns may lead the osteopathic physician to diagnoses that are masked within the initial presentation of a patient. The authors present a case report that demonstrates the use of osteopathic principles in the diagnosis of a chronic acetabular fracture and acetabular labral tear in a 19-year-old man. The injuries resulted from a posterior hip dislocation sustained during a basketball game more than 1 year before presentation. Osteopathic manipulative treatment and diagnostic techniques also relieved the patient's persistent thoracic pain, nausea, and vomiting. Subsequent orthopedic repair had the potential to avert or delay degenerative hip disease in the patient. PMID:20538751

  17. Influence of anaesthesia on canine hip dysplasia score.

    PubMed

    Genevois, J-P; Chanoit, G; Carozzo, C; Remy, D; Fau, D; Viguier, E

    2006-10-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) scores, based on the five grades, as defined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, were compared between anaesthetized (group 1, n = 3839) and non-sedated non-anaesthetized dogs (group 2, n = 1517). Each dog was radiographed in the standard ventro-dorsal hip joint extended position. Each radiograph was evaluated by the same reader blinded regarding the dog's status of anaesthesia. Results showed that there was a significant difference in hip dysplasia prevalence between group 1 (22%) compared with group 2 (9%) (P < 0.005). This difference was the result of a lower rate of hip-joint laxity assessment and the measurement of Norberg-Olsson angle <105 degrees in group 2 compared with group 1. The acetabular and femoral morphologies were not significantly different between the groups. The data confirm that the scoring of dogs for HD on standard radiographs with the hip joints extended is influenced by anaesthesia. PMID:16970631

  18. Complementary Coffee Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  19. Cups and Downs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Martin Gardner wrote about a coin-flipping trick, performed by a blindfolded magician. The paper analyses this trick, and compares it with a similar trick using three cups flipped in pairs. Several different methods of analysis are discussed, including a graphical analysis of the state space and a representation in terms of a matrix. These methods…

  20. Nonmodular flexible press-fit cup in primary total hip arthroplasty: 15-year followup.

    PubMed

    Berli, Bernhard J; Ping, Gu; Dick, Walter; Morscher, Erwin W

    2007-08-01

    The key rationale for a nonmodular flexible press-fit cup was to maximize long-term stability with a cementless, porous metal-coated cup that is low in stiffness (no metal shell) and to achieve fixation solely through biradial eccentricity between the cup and the acetabular cavity. We asked whether the promising results achieved at 5 and 10 years would be maintained at 15 years. We reviewed 261 patients who received the first 280 Morscher Press-Fit Cups. One hundred twenty patients (126 hips) died. One hundred one patients (112 hips) had a clinical and radiographic followup after a minimum of 13.5 years (mean, 14.7 years; range, 13.5-17.0 years). Twenty-four patients with 26 hips were clinically examined or interviewed by telephone. Three of the 101 patients were lost to followup. We judged the results excellent or good in 96% of the hips. The 15-year overall survivorship was 95.3% and with the end point of aseptic loosening, the survivorship was 97.5%. Wear was greater in cups with an inclination greater than 45 degrees and in metal-polyethylene pairings compared with ceramic-polyethylene pairings. This cup design performs well over the long term. PMID:17415011

  1. Pseudoachondroplastic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jeff W

    1999-01-01

    Lamellar inclusions of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in growth plate chondrocytes, first identified (1972) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Iowa, has become the cytochemical hallmark for the pseudoachondroplastic dysplasia (PSACH) phenotype, linking an endoplasmic reticulum storage disorder with the osteochondrodysplasia. Since this original observation, great advances have been made, leading to the molecular understanding of this altered longitudinal bone growth anomaly. A PSACH canine model suggested that abatement of cumulative vertical growth of growth plate chondrocytes seen in PSACH results from (1) altered extracellular matrix constraints for horizontal growth and (2) uncoupling of endochondral and perichondral growth that causes metaphyseal flaring. PSACH, an autosomal dominant disease, is linked to mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene. Amino acid substitutions, deletions, or additions is proposed to alter COMP structure that cause its retention in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of growth plate chondrocytes, leading to (1) compositional and structural change of the extracellular matrix, and (2) altered cellular proliferation and volume expansion. Normal growth and development occurs in COMP gene knockout mice that do not synthesis COMP, demonstrating that a mutant COMP, not absence of COMP, is required for the PSACH phenotype. The mechanism by which mutant COMP induces a PSACH phenotype remains to be elucidated. At the University of Iowa a cell culture system has been developed whereby mutant COMP transgenes are introduced into chondrocytes and the expressed product COMP is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. This readily manipulated system makes it possible to decipher systematically the system's cellular secretory processing pathway, in order to clarify the mechanism(s) by which the mutant COMP is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. Concurrent with this is the development of transgenic mice

  2. The effect of the Rim Cutter on cement pressurization and penetration on cemented acetabular fixation in total hip arthroplasty: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, B N; Lee, A J C; Timperley, A J; Whitehouse, S L; Crawford, R W

    2010-01-01

    The Rim Cutter (Stryker Orthopedics, Mahwah, New Jersey) is a tool designed to cut a ledge inside the rim of the acetabulum, onto which a precisely trimmed, cemented, flanged cup can be fitted. The aim was to investigate the effect of the Rim Cutter on the intra-acetabular cement mantle pressure and the depth of cement penetration during cup insertion. The study had two parts. In the first part, hemi-pelvis models were fitted with pressure sensors. Pressure in the acetabulum was measured on insertion of a conventional cemented flanged cup with and without the use of a Rim Cutter to prepare the rim of the acetabulum. The second part assessed cement penetration when the same cups were inserted into a foam shell model. The shell was mounted in a jig and had holes drilled in it; the distance that cement penetrated into the holes was measured. A significant increase in cement pressure at the apex (p = 0.04) and the rim (p = 0.004) is seen when the Rim Cutter is used. Cement penetration in the Rim Cutter group was significantly increased at the rim of the acetabulum (p = 0.003). Insertion of a flanged cup after the acetabulum is prepared with the Rim Cutter leads to a significant increase in cement pressure and penetration during cup insertion in vitro when compared with conventional flanged cups. PMID:21053777

  3. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  4. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-09-10

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees from 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  5. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  6. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  7. Primary stability of two uncemented acetabular components of different geometry: hemispherical or peripherally enhanced?

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, G.; Smith, E. J.; Deakin, A. H.; Wearing, S. C.; Sarungi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study compared the primary stability of two commercially available acetabular components from the same manufacturer, which differ only in geometry; a hemispherical and a peripherally enhanced design (peripheral self-locking (PSL)). The objective was to determine whether altered geometry resulted in better primary stability. Methods Acetabular components were seated with 0.8 mm to 2 mm interference fits in reamed polyethylene bone substrate of two different densities (0.22 g/cm3 and 0.45 g/cm3). The primary stability of each component design was investigated by measuring the peak failure load during uniaxial pull-out and tangential lever-out tests. Results There was no statistically significant difference in seating force (p = 0.104) or primary stability (pull-out p = 0.171, lever-out p = 0.087) of the two components in the low-density substrate. Similarly, in the high-density substrate, there was no statistically significant difference in the peak pull-out force (p = 0.154) or lever-out moment (p = 0.574) between the designs. However, the PSL component required a significantly higher seating force than the hemispherical cup in the high-density bone analogue (p = 0.006). Conclusions Higher seating forces associated with the PSL design may result in inadequate seating and increased risk of component malpositioning or acetabular fracture in the intra-operative setting in high-density bone stock. Our results, if translated clinically, suggest that a purely hemispherical geometry may have an advantage over a peripherally enhanced geometry in high density bone stock. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:264–9. PMID:24326398

  8. Preliminary analysis on the MD-4® plasma-sprayed titanium acetabular component☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Loures, Elmano; Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Loures, Daniel Naya; Loures, Clarice Naya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the short-term performance of a type of implant manufactured in Brazil. Methods This study analyzed a cohort of 60 patients who underwent implantation of MD-4® acetabular components during primary hip arthroplasty procedures performed between January 1, 2010, and August 1, 2012. The patients were studied retrospectively with regard to clinical behavior, stability and radiological osseointegration. The patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 42 months (mean: 27) and were evaluated by means of the Harris Hip Score, SF-36 questionnaire and serial conventional radiographs. Results All the components were radiologically stable, without evidence of migration or progressive radiolucency lines. On average, the Harris Hip Score evolved from 36.1 to 92.1 (p < 0.001) and the SF-36 showed significant increases in all its domains (p < 0.001). No differences were observed among patients with osteoarthrosis, osteonecrosis, hip dysplasia or other conditions. Conclusions The short-term results showed clinical and radiological signs of stability and osseointegration of the implants, which may represent a predictive factor regarding medium-term survival of this acetabular component. PMID:26229918

  9. Finite element analysis of the impingement on the acetabular liner rim due to wear of the acetabular liner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Eko; Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    This workstudies the impingement on the rim of acetabular liner due to wear on the surface of acetabular liner using finite element simulation. A three dimensional contact model between a femoral head and an acetabular liner was developed. There are three steps in this simulation, i.e. creating the virtualwear on the surface of acetabular liner, applying the load at the femoral head, and rotating the femoral head from neutral position till the impingement occurrence. The virtualwear is created based on the data of wear depth which was obtained from literature. Results showed that the wear on the acetabular liner surface wouldaffected the impingement occurrence, in which the impingement angle becomes narrow. In addition, the failure possibility of the acetabular liner rimwould become higher.

  10. Measurement of lateral acetabular coverage: a comparison between CT and plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Chadayammuri, Vivek; Garabekyan, Tigran; Jesse, Mary-Kristen; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Strickland, Colin; Milligan, Kenneth; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the degree of absolute agreement between measurements of lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) on plain radiography (XR) and computed tomography (CT) in a consecutive cohort of 205 patients (410 hips) undergoing hip arthroscopy. Preoperative measurements of the LCEA were performed bilaterally utilizing standardized anteroposterior radiographs and coronal reformatted CT scans. Demographic variables including age, gender, height, weight, BMI and clinical diagnosis were recorded for all patients. Overall, measured values of the LCEA were 2.1° larger on CT compared with XR (32.9° versus 30.8°, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed the highest mean difference in hips with acetabular dysplasia and concomitant cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) [mean difference (CT–XR) 5.5°, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.7°–7.3°, P = 0.011], followed by hips with isolated acetabular dysplasia (mean difference [CT–XR] 4.9°, 95% CI 2.7°–7.0°, P < 0.001). In contrast, 119 (29.0%) of the hips demonstrated larger measurements of the LCEA on 25 XR relative to CT. Of these hips, 20 (16.8%) had pincer-FAI and 25 had cam-FAI (21.0%), representing a significantly higher proportion compared with all other clinical subgroups (P = 0.045 and 0.036, respectively). Our study demonstrates measured values of the LCEA are consistently inflated on CT relative to XR for a wide variety of hip pathologies, highlighting the need for standardization and validation of CT-based measurements to improve the quality of clinical decision making. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. PMID:27011864

  11. Wear versus Thickness and Other Features of 5-Mrad Crosslinked UHMWPE Acetabular Liners

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fu-Wen; Lu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background The low wear rates of crosslinked polyethylenes provide the potential to use larger diameters to resist dislocation. However, this requires the use of thinner liners in the acetabular component, with concern that higher contact stresses will increase wear, offsetting the benefits of the crosslinking. Questions/purposes We asked the following questions: Is the wear of conventional and crosslinked polyethylene liners affected by ball diameter, rigidity of backing, and liner thickness? Are the stresses in the liner affected by thickness? Methods Wear rates were measured in a hip simulator and stresses were calculated using finite element modeling. Results Without crosslinking, the wear rate was 4% to 10% greater with a 36-mm diameter than a 28-mm diameter. With crosslinking, wear was 9% lower with a 36-mm diameter without metal backing and 4% greater with metal backing. Reducing the thickness from 6 mm to 3 mm increased the contact stress by 46%, but the wear rate decreased by 19%. Conclusions The reduction in wear with 5 Mrad of crosslinking was not offset by increasing the diameter from 28 mm to 36 mm or by using a liner as thin as 3 mm. Clinical Relevance The results indicate, for a properly positioned 5-Mrad crosslinked acetabular component and within the range of dimensions evaluated, neither wear nor stresses in the polyethylene are limiting factors in the use of larger-diameter, thinner cups to resist dislocation. PMID:20848244

  12. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (CHARGE CUPS)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.W.

    1959-04-21

    The problems of confining a charge material in a calutron and uniformly distributing heat to the charge is described. The charge is held in a cup of thermally conductive material removably disposed within the charge chamber of the ion source block. A central thermally conducting stem is incorporated within the cup for conducting heat to the central portion of the charge contained within the cup.

  13. Longevity® constrained cup: an operative technical tip for prevention of metallic ring disassembly.

    PubMed

    Ferrero Manzanal, Francisco; Murcia Asensio, Antonio; Lax Pérez, Raquel; Gil Gómez, José Eduardo; Fernández Fairén, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Constrained liners are a salvage procedure for treating or preventing recurrent dislocations. The Longevity® constrained liner (Zimmer) has a special design with cut-outs on its circumference for avoiding impingement in certain areas and a metallic constraining ring that has to be impacted. The ring impaction may be technical demanding. We recommend preassembly with the head component prior to seating into the acetabular cup, thus avoiding the soft tissue or cement interference and malposition due to bad angle of incidence of impaction force. PMID:26980240

  14. Optimal acetabular orientation for hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, G; Pandit, H; Glyn-Jones, S; McLardy-Smith, P; Gundle, R; Whitwell, D; Gill, H S; Murray, D W

    2010-08-01

    Pseudotumours are a rare complication of hip resurfacing. They are thought to be a response to metal debris which may be caused by edge loading due to poor orientation of the acetabular component. Our aim was to determine the optimal acetabular orientation to minimise the risk of pseudotumour formation. We matched 31 hip resurfacings revised for pseudotumour formation with 58 controls who had a satisfactory outcome from this procedure. The radiographic inclination and anteversion angles of the acetabular component were measured on anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis using Einzel-Bild-Roentgen-Analyse software. The mean inclination angle (47 degrees, 10 degrees to 81 degrees) and anteversion angle (14 degrees, 4 degrees to 34 degrees) of the pseudotumour cases were the same (p = 0.8, p = 0.2) as the controls, 46 degrees (29 degrees to 60 degrees) and 16 degrees (4 degrees to 30 degrees) respectively, but the variation was greater. Assuming an accuracy of implantation of +/- 10 degrees about a target position, the optimal radiographic position was found to be approximately 45 degrees of inclination and 20 degrees of anteversion. The incidence of pseudotumours inside the zone was four times lower (p = 0.007) than outside the zone. In order to minimise the risk of pseudotumour formation we recommend that surgeons implant the acetabular component at an inclination of 45 degrees (+/- 10) and anteversion of 20 degrees (+/- 10) on post-operative radiographs. Because of differences between the radiographic and the operative angles, this may be best achieved by aiming for an inclination of 40 degrees and an anteversion of 25 degrees. PMID:20675749

  15. Comparison of open reduction alone and open reduction plus Dega osteotomy in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Issin, Ahmet; Öner, Ali; Koçkara, Nizamettin; Çamurcu, Yalkin

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip, concentric reduction of the femoral head into the acetabular cavity plays a key role in the natural development of the acetabulum. However, there is still debate on the need for additional acetabular osteotomies and their timing. In this study, we compared open reduction (OR) alone with OR plus Dega osteotomy for acetabular index (AI) development. Twenty patients, 10 in each group, who underwent either OR alone or OR plus Dega osteotomy were studied retrospectively. All patients were diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip and none of them received treatment previously. Preoperative, early postoperative, and follow-up radiographs were gathered, radiological grading was performed according to Tönnis, and AI angles were measured. The OR group had a mean age of 24.5 months, whereas the Dega group had a mean age of 24.8 months. The mean follow-up period of the OR group and Dega group was 57.8 and 66.6 months, respectively. In the OR group, the initial mean AI was 37.5° whereas in the Dega group it was 46°. After the follow-up, despite the acetabular development in the OR group being twice as fast, the final mean AI was 25.5, whereas it was 15.9 in the Dega group. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Using Tönnis' definition, the Dega group ended up with 70% normal hips, 20% mild dysplasia, and 10% severe dysplasia, whereas the OR group had 20% normal hips, 30% mild dysplasia, and 50% severe dysplasia at the final visit. There was no correlation between the initial radiological grading of dislocation and the final result. OR plus Dega osteotomy is a good option to regain acetabular coverage over the femoral head. It provides better radiographic results after a 5-year follow-up period in patients with a mean age of 25 months. OR alone should not be performed unless the child had mildly dysplastic acetabulum according to Tönnis' definition. PMID:26352104

  16. Gordon Bennett Airplane Cup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margoulis, W

    1921-01-01

    The characteristics of the airplanes built for the Gordon Bennet Airplane Cup race that took place on September 28, 1920 are described. The airplanes are discussed from a aerodynamical point of view, with a number of new details concerning the French machines. Also discussed is the regulation of future races. The author argues that there should be no limitations on the power of the aircraft engines. He reasons that in the present state of things, liberty with regard to engine power does not lead to a search for the most powerful engine, but for one which is reliable and light, thus leading to progress.

  17. Diagnosis and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip from triradiate closure through young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Siebenrock, Klaus A; Steppacher, Simon D; Albers, Christoph E; Haefeli, Pascal C; Tannast, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The current treatment of painful hip dysplasia in the mature skeleton is based on acetabular reorientation. Reorientation procedures attempt to optimize the anatomic position of the hyaline cartilage of the femoral head and acetabulum in regard to mechanical loading. Because the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy is a versatile technique for acetabular reorientation, it is helpful to understand the approach and be familiar with the criteria for an optimal surgical correction. The femoral side bears stigmata of hip dysplasia that may require surgical correction. Improvement of the head-neck offset to avoid femoroacetabular impingement has become routine in many hips treated with periacetabular osteotomy. In addition, intertrochanteric osteotomies can help improve joint congruency and normalize the femoral neck orientation. Other new surgical techniques allow trimming or reducing a severely deformed head, performing a relative neck lengthening, and trimming or distalizing the greater trochanter.  An increasing number of studies have reported good long-term results after acetabular reorientation procedures, with expected joint preservation rates ranging from 80% to 90% at the 10-year follow-up and 60% to 70% at the 20-year follow-up. An ideal candidate is younger than 30 years, with no preoperative signs of osteoarthritis. Predicted joint preservation in these patients is approximately 90% at the 20-year follow-up. Recent evidence indicates that additional correction of an aspheric head may further improve results. PMID:24720318

  18. World Cup Hopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    From May 31 to June 30 the biggest single-sport event in the world, the 2002 FIFA World Cup (tm), will be taking place in Asia. South Korea and Japan are acting as hosts for the event which is being held in Asia for the first time. This true-color image of the southern Korean peninsula and southern Japan was acquired on May 25, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Thirty-two nations are represented at this year's Finals including the 1998 champion France, European powers England and Italy, tournament favorite Argentina, and the United States. The finals are the culmination of a 2-year qualifying process which started with 132 nations competing in regional qualification tournaments. In the round-robin first round of the World Cup, the U.S. team will be competing against teams from Portugal, Poland, and South Korea. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  19. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  20. Welding torch gas cup extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a gas shielded electric arc welding torch having a detachable gas cup extension which may be of any desired configuration or length. The gas cup extension assembly is mounted on a standard electric welding torch gas cup to enable welding in areas with limited access. The gas cup assembly has an upper tubular insert that fits within the gas cup such that its lower portion protrudes thereform and has a lower tubular extension that is screwed into the lower portion. The extension has a rim to define the outer perimeter of the seat edge about its entrance opening so a gasket may be placed to effect an airtight seal between the gas cup and extension. The tubular extension may be made of metal or cermaic material that can be machined. The novelty lies in the use of an extension assembly for a standard gas cup of an electric arc welding torch which extension assembly is detachable permitting the use of a number of extensions which may be of different configurations and materials and yet fit the standard gas cup.

  1. Unusual Cause of Hip Pain: Intrusion of the Acetabular Labrum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se-Ang; Byun, Young-Soo; Jeong, Dae-Geun; Han, In-Ho; Kim, Min-Guek

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement and dysplatic hip joint is well known cause of osteoarthritis. In these diseases, labral tear and subsequent cartilage damage is thought to be main pathophysiology of development of osteoarthritis. If there are no known bony abnormalities, we called it as idiopathic osteoarthritis. Normal appearance of acetabular labrum is a continuous, usually triangular structure that attaches to the bony rim of the acetabulum and is completed at the inferior portion by the transverse acetabular ligament over the acetabular notch. A few authors reported intra-articular labrum and its relation to the development of osteoarthritis. But they didn't comment the primary bony abnormality especially acetabulum. We'd like to report x-ray, computed tomogram, magnetic resonance arthrogram and arthroscopic findings of a case had double contour sign of acetabular dome combined with intrusion of acetabular labrum.

  2. The jumbo acetabular component for acetabular revision: Curtain Calls and Caveats.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, P F; Watters, T S

    2016-01-01

    The 'jumbo' acetabular component is now commonly used in acetabular revision surgery where there is extensive bone loss. It offers high surface contact, permits weight bearing over a large area of the pelvis, the need for bone grafting is reduced and it is usually possible to restore centre of rotation of the hip. Disadvantages of its use include a technique in which bone structure may not be restored, a risk of excessive posterior bone loss during reaming, an obligation to employ screw fixation, limited bone ingrowth with late failure and high hip centre, leading to increased risk of dislocation. Contraindications include unaddressed pelvic dissociation, inability to implant the component with a rim fit, and an inability to achieve screw fixation. Use in acetabulae with < 50% bone stock has also been questioned. Published results have been encouraging in the first decade, with late failures predominantly because of polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening. Dislocation is the most common complication of jumbo acetabular revisions, with an incidence of approximately 10%, and often mandates revision. Based on published results, a hemispherical component with an enhanced porous coating, highly cross-linked polyethylene, and a large femoral head appears to represent the optimum tribology for jumbo acetabular revisions. PMID:26733644

  3. Arthroscopic Bone Grafting of Deep Acetabular Cysts Using a Curved Delivery Device

    PubMed Central

    Garabekyan, Tigran; Chadayammuri, Vivek; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular intraosseous cysts are frequently encountered in patients with dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement. Small cysts are typically addressed by removing the cyst lining and stimulating healing via microfracture or abrasion chondroplasty. In contrast, larger cysts involving 1-3 cm3 frequently require additional fortification with bone graft material to facilitate osseous ingrowth and cyst healing. Previous arthroscopic reports have described the use of rim trimming to access the extra-articular side of the cyst, with subsequent use of straight metal cannulas for delivery of bone graft material. The downsides of this technique include the requirement for rim trimming, which may be ill advised in patients with normal coverage or dysplasia, as well as the creation of a second breach in the cyst wall, precluding pressurization of the bone graft material. We describe an arthroscopic technique using a curved delivery device allowing for deeper penetration into the cyst cavity through the articular side and greater delivery of bone graft material. PMID:27073770

  4. Accuracy of navigation-assisted acetabular component positioning studied by computed tomography measurements: methods and results.

    PubMed

    Ybinger, Thomas; Kumpan, W; Hoffart, H E; Muschalik, B; Bullmann, W; Zweymüller, K

    2007-09-01

    The postoperative position of the acetabular component is key for the outcome of total hip arthroplasty. Various aids have been developed to support the surgeon during implant placement. In a prospective study involving 4 centers, the computer-recorded cup alignment of 37 hip systems at the end of navigation-assisted surgery was compared with the cup angles measured on postoperative computerized tomograms. This comparison showed an average difference of 3.5 degrees (SD, 4.4 degrees ) for inclination and 6.5 degrees (SD, 7.3 degrees ) for anteversion angles. The differences in inclination correlated with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the anterior superior iliac spine (r = 0.44; P = .007), whereas the differences in anteversion showed a correlation with the thickness of the soft tissue overlying the pubic tubercles (r = 0.52; P = .001). In centers experienced in the use of navigational tools, deviations were smaller than in units with little experience in their use. PMID:17826270

  5. Treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A

    2011-04-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common orthopaedic developmental disorder of dogs. This paper reviews the treatment options available for management of the condition in the skeletally immature and adult dog. PMID:21906059

  6. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  7. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  8. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  9. Hemispheric titanium porous coated acetabular component without screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dorr, L D; Wan, Z; Cohen, J

    1998-06-01

    One hundred fifteen hips in 108 patients with primary total hip arthroplasty using the anatomic porous replacement hemispheric acetabular component implanted without adjunctive screw fixation had a mean postoperative followup time of 6 years (range, 5-7.4 years). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Harris hip score and patient self assessment using a modified Short Form-36 questionnaire. Radiographs were measured for radiolucent lines, polyethylene wear, osteolysis, migration, and fractures. No acetabular metal shell had been revised for loosening or was radiographically loose with or without migration (more than 3 mm) at final followup. Reoperation was done in nine (8%) hips because of polyethylene insert wear or disassembly. No fracture of the acetabular bone occurred at the time of surgery or was observed on radiograph. Fixation of the metal shell was stable, with progressive radiolucent lines observed at final followup in 2% of the hips. Osteolysis was recorded in one patient with two acetabular components. The fixation of noncemented hemispheric porous coated acetabular components is more related to the technique of acetabular bone preparation and press fit implantation than to whether additional screws or peg fixation are used. Fixation of this acetabular component without screws at an average of 6 years after surgery is reproducible and predictable in primary hip arthroplasty. The design of modular polyethylene inserts has been improved and should reduce the wear rate of reoperations of the polyethylene insert. PMID:9646758

  10. [Analysis of the Basic Stress Pathway Above Acetabular Dome].

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Ma, Jun; Haung, Qiang; Hu, Qinsheng; Shi, Xiaojun; Pei, Fuxing

    2015-08-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to describe the basic stress pathway to provide evidence for clinical acetabular reconstruction guidance of THA. A subject-specific finite element (FE) model was developed from CT data to generate 3 normal hip models and a convergence study was conducted to determine the number of pelvic trabecular bone material properties using 5 material assignment plans. In addition, in the range of 0 to 20 mm above the acetabular dome, the models were sectioned and the stress pathway was defined as two parts, i.e., 3D, trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified cortical bone stress level. The results showed that using 100 materials to define the material property of pelvic trabecular bone could assure both the accuracy and efficiency of the FE model. Under the same body weight condition, the 3D trabecular bone stress distributions above the acetabular dome were consistent, and especially the quantified cortical bone stress levels were all above 20 MPa and showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Therefore, defining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome under certain body weight condition contributes to design accurate preoperative plan for acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants. PMID:26710451

  11. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop properly, causing a distinctive spotted appearance called moth-eaten bone, which is visible on x-ray ... Greenberg dysplasia is also called hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten skeletal dysplasia (HEM), which reflects the condition's ...

  13. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  14. Biomechanical modeling of acetabular component polyethylene stresses, fracture risk, and wear rate following press-fit implantation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kevin L; Rundell, Steve; Liepins, Imants; Laurent, Ryan; Markel, David; Kurtz, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    Press-fit implantation may result in acetabular component deformation between the ischial-ilial columns ("pinching"). The biomechanical and clinical consequences of liner pinching due to press-fit implantation have not been well studied. We compared the effects of pinching on the polyethylene fracture risk, potential wear rate, and stresses for two different thickness liners using computational methods. Line-to-line ("no pinch") reaming and 2 mm underreaming press fit ("pinch") conditions were examined for Trident cups with X3 polyethylene liner wall thicknesses of 5.9 mm (36E) and 3.8 mm (40E). Press-fit cup deformations were measured from a foam block configuration. A hybrid material model, calibrated to experimentally determined stress-strain behavior of sequentially annealed polyethylene, was applied to the computational model. Molecular chain stretch did not exceed the fracture threshold in any cases. Nominal shell pinch of 0.28 mm was estimated to increase the volumetric wear rate by 70% for both cups and peak contact stresses by 140 and 170% for the 5.9 and 3.8 mm-thick liners, respectively. Although pinching increases liner stresses, polyethylene fracture is highly unlikely, and the volumetric wear rates are likely to be low compared to conventional polyethylene. PMID:19489047

  15. Effect of augmented cup fixation on stability, wear, and osteolysis: a 5-year follow-up of total hip arthroplasty with RSA.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Stephan M; Nivbrant, Bosse; Ström, Håkan; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate different modes of cementless fixation of hemispherical cups, we operated on 87 hips in 81 patients using 4 different means of cup fixation. The hips were randomly assigned to fixation with press-fit technique only (PF), or with augmentation with screws (S), pegs (P), or hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. The patients were evaluated with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for cup migration and wear, conventional radiography for osteolysis, and Harris Hip Score for clinical outcome over 5 years. The fixation of the cups did not differ between the groups, but HA showed a tendency to decrease proximal migration. HA-coated cups displayed the best interface with hardly any signs of radiolucent lines, indicating a superior sealing effect of the HA coating. Cups with screws or pegs had more radiolucent lines and osteolytic lesions than the other groups. Radiolucent lines were correlated to higher proximal migration, young age, and female gender (r2=.2). The wear rate of the ethylene oxide-sterilized polyethylene liner was high (0.2 mm/y) but did not differ between the groups. Two cups with a perioperative fracture of the acetabular rim showed large initial migration but stabilized thereafter. PMID:15586331

  16. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  17. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-05-18

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  18. From Baby Bottle to Cup: Choose Training Cups Carefully, Use Them Temporarily

    MedlinePlus

    ... DENTAL PATIENT ... From baby bottle to cup Choose training cups carefully, use them temporarily T ooth decay ... you make the change from baby bottle to training cup, be very careful about d what kind ...

  19. World Cup Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  20. Bridging Suture Repair for Acetabular Chondral Carpet Delamination

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirose, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular chondral carpet delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but deboned from the subchondral bone, without a disruption at the chondrolabral junction. Arthroscopic anatomic repair of delaminated cartilage is challenging. We propose that a combination of microfracture and use of stitches to press the delaminated cartilage against the subchondral bone using a suture limb offers an effective method to provide an environment for cartilage repair. This article describes the technique of bridging suture repair for carpet delamination in detail; the technique enables the surgeon to stabilize the delaminated acetabular cartilage. Intra-articular soft anchors and an acetabular rim knotless anchor footprint provide a stable repair for delaminated cartilage. This technique is especially helpful in cases with acetabular cartilage carpet delamination. PMID:26759774

  1. Spoon-to-Cup Fading as Treatment for Cup Drinking in a Child with Intestinal Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Rebecca A.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Zeleny, Jason R.; Dempsey, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    We treated a child with intestinal failure who consumed solids on a spoon but not liquids from a cup. We used spoon-to-cup fading, which consisted of taping a spoon to a cup and then gradually moving the bowl of the spoon closer to the edge of the cup. Spoon-to-cup fading was effective for increasing consumption of liquids from a cup. (Contains 2…

  2. Comparison of clinical, radiographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging methods for early prediction of canine hip laxity and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ginja, Mário M D; Ferreira, António J; Jesus, Sandra S; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Bulas-Cruz, José; Orden, Maria A; San-Roman, Fidel; Llorens-Pena, Maria P; Gonzalo-Orden, José M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to use two palpation methods (Bardens and Ortolani), a radiographic distraction view, three computed tomography (CT) measurements (dorsolateral subluxation score, the lateral center-edge angle, and acetabular ventroversion angle) and two magnetic resonance (MR) imaging hip studies (synovial fluid and acetabular depth indices) in the early monitoring of hip morphology and laxity in 7-9 week old puppies; and in a follow-up study to compare their accuracy in predicting later hip laxity and dysplasia. The MR imaging study was performed with the dog in dorsal recumbency and the CT study with the animal in a weight-bearing position. There was no association between clinical laxity with later hip laxity or dysplasia. The dorsolateral subluxation score and the lateral center-edge angle were characterized by a weak negative correlation with later radiographic passive hip laxity (-0.26 < r < -0.38, P < 0.05) but its association with hip dysplasia was not significant. There was an association between early radiographic passive hip laxity and synovial fluid index with later passive hip laxity (0.41 < r < 0.55, P < 0.05) and this was significantly different in dysplastic vs. nondysplastic hips (P < 0.05). There was no association between the remaining variables and later hip laxity or dysplasia. The overlapping ranges of early passive hip laxity and synovial fluid index for hip dysplasia grades and the moderate correlations with the later passive hip laxity make the results of these variables unreliable for use in predicting hip laxity and dysplasia susceptibility. PMID:19400458

  3. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  4. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  5. Three-dimensional anatomy of the hip in osteoarthritis after developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Argenson, J-N; Ryembault, E; Flecher, X; Brassart, N; Parratte, S; Aubaniac, J-M

    2005-09-01

    Using radiography and computer tomography (CT) we studied the morphology of 83 hips in 69 Caucasian adults with osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). A previously published series of 310 hips with primary osteoarthritis was used as a control group. According to the Crowe classification, 33 of the dysplastic hips were graded as class I, 27 as class II and 23 as class III or class IV. The intramedullary femoral canal had reduced mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions in all groups compared with the control group. Only in Crowe class II hips was the femoral neck-shaft angle increased. The proximal femur had more anteversion in all the developmental dysplasia of the hip groups, ranging from 2 degrees to 80 degrees. Templated measurement of acetabular dimensions for plain radiography closely matched measurements taken by CT. The results of our study confirm the observations previously confined to the Japanese population. PMID:16129740

  6. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2015-09-18

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH. PMID:26163754

  7. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Nowlan, Niamh C.

    2015-01-01

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH. PMID:26163754

  8. Cutaneous manifestation of metallosis in a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty after acetabular liner dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sporer, Scott M; Chalmers, Peter N

    2012-09-01

    In this case report, we describe a cutaneous manifestation of extensive metallosis in a patient 4 months post-metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Pinnacle cup with dissociation of the liner from the shell and resultant stripe burnishing of the shell and notch wear of the femoral neck. Dissociation of a metal liner has not been previously reported with this implant. Cutaneous metallosis has only been reported once in the literature. Clinicians should heighten their suspicion for metallosis secondary to hardware failure when encountering patients with skin discoloration in the setting of a painful and poorly functioning hip arthroplasty. In patients with failure of a metal-on-metal prosthesis with a modular metal liner in the acetabular component, liner dissociation must be considered. PMID:22397858

  9. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  10. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute.

    PubMed

    Svacina, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  11. Visual intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position is not reliable in minimally invasive hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Michael; Sendtner, Ernst; Springorum, Robert; Craiovan, Benjamin; Worlicek, Michael; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - In hip arthroplasty, acetabular inclination and anteversion-and also femoral stem torsion-are generally assessed by eye intraoperatively. We assessed whether visual estimation of cup and stem position is reliable. Patients and methods - In the course of a subgroup analysis of a prospective clinical trial, 65 patients underwent cementless hip arthroplasty using a minimally invasive anterolateral approach in lateral decubitus position. Altogether, 4 experienced surgeons assessed cup position intraoperatively according to the operative definition by Murray in the anterior pelvic plane and stem torsion in relation to the femoral condylar plane. Inclination, anteversion, and stem torsion were measured blind postoperatively on 3D-CT and compared to intraoperative results. Results - The mean difference between the 3D-CT results and intraoperative estimations by eye was -4.9° (-18 to 8.7) for inclination, 9.7° (-16 to 41) for anteversion, and -7.3° (-34 to 15) for stem torsion. We found an overestimation of > 5° for cup inclination in 32 hips, an overestimation of > 5° for stem torsion in 40 hips, and an underestimation < 5° for cup anteversion in 42 hips. The level of professional experience and patient characteristics had no clinically relevant effect on the accuracy of estimation by eye. Altogether, 46 stems were located outside the native norm of 10-20° as defined by Tönnis, measured on 3D-CT. Interpretation - Even an experienced surgeon's intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position by eye is not reliable compared to 3D-CT in minimally invasive THA. The use of mechanical insertion jigs, intraoperative fluoroscopy, or imageless navigation is recommended for correct implant insertion. PMID:26848628

  12. Visual intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position is not reliable in minimally invasive hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Woerner, Michael; Sendtner, Ernst; Springorum, Robert; Craiovan, Benjamin; Worlicek, Michael; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose In hip arthroplasty, acetabular inclination and anteversion—and also femoral stem torsion—are generally assessed by eye intraoperatively. We assessed whether visual estimation of cup and stem position is reliable. Patients and methods In the course of a subgroup analysis of a prospective clinical trial, 65 patients underwent cementless hip arthroplasty using a minimally invasive anterolateral approach in lateral decubitus position. Altogether, 4 experienced surgeons assessed cup position intraoperatively according to the operative definition by Murray in the anterior pelvic plane and stem torsion in relation to the femoral condylar plane. Inclination, anteversion, and stem torsion were measured blind postoperatively on 3D-CT and compared to intraoperative results. Results The mean difference between the 3D-CT results and intraoperative estimations by eye was −4.9° (−18 to 8.7) for inclination, 9.7° (−16 to 41) for anteversion, and −7.3° (−34 to 15) for stem torsion. We found an overestimation of > 5° for cup inclination in 32 hips, an overestimation of > 5° for stem torsion in 40 hips, and an underestimation < 5° for cup anteversion in 42 hips. The level of professional experience and patient characteristics had no clinically relevant effect on the accuracy of estimation by eye. Altogether, 46 stems were located outside the native norm of 10–20° as defined by Tönnis, measured on 3D-CT. Interpretation Even an experienced surgeon’s intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position by eye is not reliable compared to 3D-CT in minimally invasive THA. The use of mechanical insertion jigs, intraoperative fluoroscopy, or imageless navigation is recommended for correct implant insertion. PMID:26848628

  13. Clinical outcomes, survivorship and adverse events with mobile-bearings versus fixed-bearings in hip arthroplasty-a prospective comparative cohort study of 143 ADM versus 130 trident cups at 2 to 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Epinette, Jean-Alain

    2015-02-01

    The principle of dual mobility cups, often called "tripolar", has been developed to overcome the problem of instability following primary hip arthroplasty. We prospectively compared two cohorts which differed only by the type of bearings, i.e." mobile bearing hip" (MBH) in a 143-study cohort of ADM cups versus "fixed bearing hip" (FBH) of 130 Trident PSL cups, at a follow-up at 2-6years. The survival rates at 4.13-years, with instability as endpoint was significantly (P=0.0176) in favor of mobile bearings at 100% with no dislocation reported, versus 94.8% with fixed bearings. These mobile bearings, matching both "modern" dual mobility cups and annealed highly crossed polyethylene, would appear to offer at longer follow-up a valuable solution to clinical outcomes in acetabular arthroplasty. PMID:25449593

  14. Does Cupping = Success for Olympic Athletes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160301.html Does 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes? Telltale red circles ... I have ever seen generated about it." But does cupping actually help? There's an Eastern and a ...

  15. Preliminary Biomechanical Study of Different Acetabular Reinforcement Devices for Acetabular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Lee, Po-Yi; Hsieh, Pang-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Background Acetabular reinforcement devices (ARDs) are frequently used as load-sharing devices to allow allograft incorporation in revision hip arthroplasty with massive acetabular bone loss. The key to a successful reconstruction is robust fixation of the device to the host acetabulum. Interlocking fixation is expected to improve the initial stability of the postoperative construct. However, all commercially available ARDs are designed with non-locking fixation. This study investigates the efficacy of standard ARDs modified with locking screw mechanisms for improving stability in acetabular reconstruction. Methods Three types of ARDs were examined to evaluate the postoperative compression and angular stability: i) standard commercial ARDs, ii) standard ARDs modified with monoaxial and iii) standard ARDs modified with polyaxial locking screw mechanisms. All ARDs were implanted into osteomized synthetic pelvis with pelvic discontinuity. Axial compression and torsion tests were then performed using a servohydraulic material testing machine that measured load (angle) versus displacement (torque). Initial stability was compared among the groups. Results Equipping ARDs with interlocking mechanisms effectively improved the initial stability at the device/bone interface compared to standard non-locked ARDs. In both compression and torsion experiments, the monoaxial interlocking construct demonstrated the highest construct stiffness (672.6 ± 84.1 N/mm in compression and 13.3 ± 1.0 N·m/degree in torsion), whereas the non-locked construct had the lowest construct stiffness (381.4 ± 117.2 N/mm in compression and 6.9 ± 2.1 N·m/degree in torsion) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of adding a locking mechanism to an ARD. Polyaxial ARDs provide the surgeon with more flexibility in placing the screws at the cost of reduced mechanical performance. This in vitro study provides a preliminary evaluation of biomechanical performance for ARDs

  16. Surgical treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Dennis R

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, developmental dysplasia of the hip is treated early in childhood by nonsurgical methods. If these methods are ineffective, surgical reduction in a nonambulating child is required. A young child (age 6 to 18 months) who requires surgical reduction can be treated by formal anterior open reduction or by the medial Ludloff approach to the hip. Additional bony procedures are usually not required in these young patients. Delayed diagnosis is still common, requiring surgical reduction for children of walking age. These older children usually require formal open reduction (anterior approach) plus an associated bony osteotomy (acetabular, proximal femoral, or, in some cases, both types of osteotomies) to better stabilize the hip. The addition of a proximal femoral derotational shortening osteotomy for open reduction in older children was first used in children older than 3 years, but now it is commonly used in children as young as 2 years. This osteotomy decreases the forces on the reduced hip and minimizes the chances for redislocation and osteonecrosis. In all surgical procedures for developmental dysplasia of the hip, the surgeon must avoid too great a focus on bony osteotomies because the management of soft-tissue abnormalities is critical in achieving a stable reduction. PMID:24720317

  17. 21 CFR 884.5400 - Menstrual cup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Menstrual cup. 884.5400 Section 884.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... cup. (a) Identification. A menstrual cup is a receptacle placed in the vagina to collect...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6290 - Prophylaxis cup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prophylaxis cup. 872.6290 Section 872.6290 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6290 Prophylaxis cup. (a) Identification. A prophylaxis cup is a device made of rubber intended to be held by a dental handpiece and used to apply...

  19. 21 CFR 884.5400 - Menstrual cup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Menstrual cup. 884.5400 Section 884.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... cup. (a) Identification. A menstrual cup is a receptacle placed in the vagina to collect...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6290 - Prophylaxis cup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prophylaxis cup. 872.6290 Section 872.6290 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6290 Prophylaxis cup. (a) Identification. A prophylaxis... agents during prophylaxis (cleaning). The dental handpiece spins the rubber cup holding the...

  1. Dummy Cup Helps Robot-Welder Programmers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1990-01-01

    Dummy gas cup used on torch of robotic welder during programming and practice runs. Made of metal or plastic, dummy cup inexpensive and durable. Withstands bumps caused by programming errors, and is sized for special welding jobs within limited clearances. After robot satisfactorily programmed, replaced by ceramic cup of same dimensions for actual welding.

  2. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  3. Treating the America's Cup Sailors.

    PubMed

    Miller, C

    1987-01-01

    Some physicians are taking part in efforts to win the America's Cup races, now taking place off the west coast of Australia, near Fremantle. But although 12-Meter yacht racing can be intense, sailors most often need treatment for minor injuries. PMID:27457013

  4. Are cam and pincer deformities as common as dysplasia in Japanese patients with hip pain?

    PubMed

    Mori, R; Yasunaga, Y; Yamasaki, T; Nakashiro, J; Fujii, J; Terayama, H; Ohshima, S; Ochi, M

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip secondary to acetabular dysplasia is very common, and there are few data concerning the pathogeneses and incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). We have attempted to clarify the radiological prevalence of painful FAI in a cohort of Japanese patients and to investigate the radiological findings. We identified 176 symptomatic patients (202 hips) with Tönnis grade 0 or 1 osteoarthritis, whom we prospectively studied between August 2011 and July 2012. There were 61 men (65 hips) and 115 women (137 hips) with a mean age of 51.8 years (11 to 83). Radiological analyses included the α-angle, centre-edge angle, cross-over sign, pistol grip deformity and femoral head neck ratio. Of the 202 hips, 79 (39.1%) had acetabular dysplasia, while 80 hips (39.6%) had no known aetiology. We found evidence of FAI in 60 hips (29.7%). Radiological FAI findings associated with cam deformity were the most common. There was a significant relationship between the pistol grip deformity and both the α-angle (p < 0.001) and femoral head-neck ratio (p = 0.024). Radiological evidence of symptomatic FAI was not uncommon in these Japanese patients. PMID:24493180

  5. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Chung, Woo Chull; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  6. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  7. Open-configuration MRI study of femoro-acetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Mitsuyoshi; Miki, Hidenobu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Murai, Masakazu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2007-12-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement has been proposed as a causative factor of primary hip osteoarthritis. However, primary osteoarthritis of the hip is infrequent in Japan and other Asian countries, even though the hips of Asians frequently sustain impingement, since the Asian lifestyle commonly requires a larger range of hip motion than the Western lifestyle. Therefore, using open-configuration MRI, we investigated whether impingement actually occurs during some traditional Japanese hip positions. The hips of 5 healthy Japanese females were examined in 5 sitting postures: 1) sitting straight; 2) bowing while sitting straight; 3) sitting cross-legged; 4) W-sitting; and 5) squatting. The impingement point was detected by multiple plane reconstructed (MPR) views along with the acetabular rim depicted circumferentially. Impingement was considered to have occurred when, on MRI, the anterior femoral head-neck junction approached the acetabular rim and the femoral head was seen to float from the bottom of the acetabulum with the acetabular rim acting as a fulcrum. Impingement was observed in all volunteers in the W-sitting position, and in 2 of 5 volunteers during squatting. These findings show that impingement occurs frequently during daily Japanese activities. Thus, depending on race, femoro-acetabular impingement might not always cause primary osteoarthritis of the hip. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 25:1582-1588, 2007. PMID:17600811

  8. Accuracy of the modified Hardinge approach in acetabular positioning

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Prateek; Lau, Adrian; McCalden, Richard; Teeter, Matthew G.; Howard, James L.; Lanting, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The surgical approach chosen for total hip arthroplasty (THA) may affect the positioning of the acetabular component. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy in orienting the acetabular component using the modified Hardinge approach. Methods We used our institutional arthroplasty database to identify patients with primary, press-fit, hemispherical acetabular components of a metal-on-polyethylene THA performed between 2003 and 2011. Patients with radiographs obtained 1–3 years after the index procedure were included for measurement of anteversion and inclination angles. Acceptable values of anteversion and abduction angles were defined as 15° ± 10° and 40° ± 10°, respectively. Results We identified 1241 patients from the database, and the modified Hardinge approach was used in 1010 of the patients included in our analysis. The acetabular component was anteverted in the acceptable zone in 54.1% of patients. The abduction angle was within the defined range in 79.2% of patients. Combined anteversion and abduction angles within the defined zone were present in 43.6% of patients. Conclusion Consistent with studies examining accuracy from other approaches, our study reveals that the modified Hardinge approach was only moderately accurate in positioning the acetabular component in the acceptable zone. PMID:27240130

  9. The submuscular sliding plate technique for acetabular posterior wall fractures extending to the acetabular roof.

    PubMed

    Kim, J J; Kim, J W; Oh, H K

    2014-12-01

    There is extension of the Kocher-Langenbeck approach using trochanteric osteotomy for posterior wall fracture extending to acetabular roof, but it exposes to complications such as nonunion, breakage, and heterotopic ossification. The current study introduces a submuscular sliding plate technique. We retrospectively analyzed 13 patients treated with this technique. It is based on conventional method for posterior wall fracture. After reduction of roof fragment with direct visualization, a pre-contoured plate was passed through a submuscular tunnel under the gluteus medius and minimus. A small split incision was performed on the muscles, and screws were inserted with a triple trocar complex safely under fluoroscopic imaging. All patients had fracture union without complications. X-rays results showed anatomical reduction in 10 cases and imperfect reduction in 3 cases. Our results were satisfactory, particularly without heterotopic ossifications despite no prophylactic regimen of NSAID was applied and no neurological complications, so we believe that this technique is a good option for posterior wall fractures extending to the acetabular roof. PMID:25453921

  10. Thanatophoric dysplasia: A review.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, H

    2016-01-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a well-known cause of potentially lethal short-limbed dwarfism in the newborn. The diagnosis is usually made by the recognition of characteristic radiological changes and confirmed at autopsy by demonstration of specific morphological and histological changes in the brain. This review is based upon the author's personal experience and archived data of 19 cases and concerns the clinical and radiographic manifestations, autopsy findings, molecular pathogenesis and the approach to antenatal diagnosis. PMID:27245526

  11. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  12. Mesenchymal dysplasia of placenta.

    PubMed

    Balachandran Nair, Krishna G; Srinish, Minu; Balan, Preesha; Sadasivan, Santha

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) in a 26-year-old patient is reported. Ultrasound scan at 17 weeks of gestation showed placenta with multiple cystic spaces and a normal appearing fetus. Following delivery of a term live baby, histological examination of the placenta was suggestive of PMD. The early recognition of this rare condition by characteristic ultrasonographic findings is herein emphasized and hence that PMD is distinguished from molar pregnancy. PMID:26275269

  13. Familial Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, MK; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or mutational dysostosis or cleidocranial dysostosis is a generalized skeletodental dysplastic disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The expression of this disorder can vary widely in severity, even within the same family. This is a relatively rare disease and has no standard effective treatment option as of yet. Here we present a case report of affected mother and son with classical manifestations of the disease.

  14. de la Chapelle dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Whitley, C B; Burke, B A; Granroth, G; Gorlin, R J

    1986-09-01

    Since the description by de la Chapelle and colleagues of two sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, two additional cases have occurred, one in the original Finnish family and one sporadic patient born to unrelated parents of Belgian descent. The original Finnish family has later had a fourth child, a normal daughter who was found to be unaffected upon radiographic examination in the 19th week of gestation. These additional findings are compatible with recessive inheritance. Physical features common to these four patients include cleft palate, small thorax, moderately severe micromelia with small hands, and equinovarus deformity. In each case, the ulnae and fibulae were reduced to an almost triangular osseous remnant. Other long bones were short and bowed. Neonatal death occurred in all cases and may be attributed to a consistent triad of respiratory tract malformations: laryngeal stenosis, tracheobronchomalacia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Clinical and radiographic features are sufficiently unique to distinguish de la Chapelle dysplasia from other disorders in the spectrum of neonatal lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Lacunar halos were identified as a distinctive histopathologic feature also observed in achondrogenesis but not in several other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:3799721

  15. VALIDATION OF FE MICROMOTIONS AND STRAINS AROUND A PRESS-FIT CUP: INTRODUCING A NEW MICROMOTION MEASURING TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S G; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis provides a useful tool with which to analyse the potential performance of implantations in a variety of surgical, patient and design scenarios. To enable the use of finite element analysis in the investigation of such implants, models must be experimentally validated. Validation of a pelvic model with an implanted press-fit cup in terms of micromotion and strain is presented here. A new method of micromotion has been introduced to better describe the overall movement of the cup within the pelvis. The method uses a digitizing arm to monitor the relative movement between markers on the cup and the surrounding acetabulum. Finite element analysis was used to replicate an experimental set up using a synthetic hemi-pelvis with a press-fitted all-metal cup was subject to the maximum loading observed during normal walking. The work presented here has confirmed the ability of finite element models to accurately describe the mechanical performance of the press-fitted acetabulum and surrounding bone under typical loading conditions in terms of micromotion and strain distribution, but has demonstrated limitations in its ability to predict numerical micromotion values. A promising digitizing technique for measuring acetabular micromotions has also been introduced. PMID:22350664

  16. Acetabular Labral Tears in Patients with Sports Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chan; Cha, Soo-Min

    2009-01-01

    Background We wanted to investigate acetabular labral tears and their correlation with femoroacetabular impingement in patients with sports injury. Methods Among 111 patients who were diagnosed with the acetabular labral tears after arthroscopic treatment from January 2004 to December 2007, we selected 41 patients with sports injury. There were 12 cases of Taekwondo injury, 5 of golf injury, 4 of soccer injury, 3 of gymnastics injury, 2 of Hapkido injury, 2 of aerobics injury, 2 of rock-climbing injury, 2 of fitness training injury and 9 of other sports injuries. We checked the subtypes of acetabular labral tears and the accompanying femoroacetabular impingement. For the cases with accompanying femoroacetabular impingement, we investigated the subtypes according to the types of sports, gender and age. At last follow-up, we checked the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) sports scale and the percentage of patients who returned to their sports activity. Results The average age of symptomatic onset was 26 years (range, 12 to 65 years). The ratio of males to females was 29 : 12. An average duration of the hip pain was 17 months (range, 1 to 60 months). The degenerative type of acetabular labral tears was the most prevalent with 32 cases (78%), and there were 9 cases (22%) of the partial tear type. Thirty cases (73%) were accompanied by femoroacetabular impingement. The average age of the 23 cases (56%) of the cam-type was 23 years (range, 12 to 48 years), and it was more likely to occur in men (87%) and for people practicing martial arts such as Taekwondo or Hapkido. An average age of the 5 cases (12%) of the pincer-type was 26 (range, 16 to 43 years), it usually occurred in women (60%) and for non-martial arts such as golf and gymnastics. There were 2 cases of the mixed type (cam + pincer-type). At 27 months follow-up, the HHS was 61 to 92 points, the HOS sports scale increased 43 to 75%, and the rate of returning to sports was 71%. Conclusions In

  17. Cross-Modality Validation of Acetabular Surface Models Using 3-D Ultrasound Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Normal and Dysplastic Infant Hips.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Chad; Heath, Alana; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; Zonoobi, Dornoosh; Kuntze, Gregor; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Mabee, Myles G; Ronsky, Janet L; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2016-09-01

    Current imaging diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in infancy relies on 2-D ultrasound (US), which is highly operator-dependent. 3-D US offers more complete, and potentially more reliable, imaging of infant hip geometry. We sought to validate the fidelity of acetabular surface models obtained by 3-D US against those obtained concurrently by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 3-D US and MRI scans were performed on the same d in 20 infants with normal to severely dysplastic hips (mean age, 57 d; range 13-181 d). 3-D US was performed by two observers using a Philips VL13-5 probe. Coronal 3-D multi-echo data image combination (MEDIC) magnetic resonance (MR) images (1-mm slice thickness) were obtained, usually without sedation, in a 1.5 T Siemens unit. Acetabular surface models were generated for 40 hips from 3-D US and MRI using semi-automated tracing software, separately by three observers. For each hip, the 3-D US and MRI models were co-registered to overlap as closely as possible using Amira software, and the root mean square (RMS) distances between points on the models were computed. 3-D US scans took 3.2 s each. Inter-modality variability was visually minimal. Mean RMS distance between corresponding points on the acetabular surface at 3-D US and MRI was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm, with 95% confidence interval <1 mm. Mean RMS errors for inter-observer and intra-observer comparisons were significantly less for 3-D US than for MRI, while inter-scan and inter-modality comparisons showed no significant difference. Acetabular geometry was reproduced by 3-D US surface models within 1 mm of the corresponding 3-D MRI surface model, and the 3-D US models were more reliable. This validates the fidelity of 3-D US modeling and encourages future use of 3-D US in assessing infant acetabulum anatomy, which may be useful to detect and monitor treatment of hip dysplasia. PMID:27209429

  18. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  19. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  20. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: usefulness of next generation genomic tools for characterizing the underlying genes - a mini review.

    PubMed

    Basit, S; Hannan, M A; Khoshhal, K I

    2016-07-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common skeletal anomalies. DDH encompasses a spectrum of the disorder ranging from minor acetabular dysplasia to irreducible dislocation, which may lead to premature arthritis in later life. Involvement of genetic factors underlying DDH became evident when several studies reported chromosomal loci linked to DDH in families with multiple affected individuals. Moreover, using association studies, variants in genes involved in chondrogenesis and joint formation have been shown to be associated with DDH. At least, one study identified a pathogenic variant in the chemokine receptor gene in DDH. No genetic analysis has been reported or carried out in DDH patients from the Middle East. Here, we review the literature related to genetics of DDH and emphasized the usefulness of new generation technologies in identifying genetic variants underlying DDH in consanguineous families. PMID:26842108

  1. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  2. Acetabular UHMWPE Survival and Wear Changes With Different Manufacturing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Keating, E. Michael; Davis, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Polyethylene wear may be affected by the type of polyethylene resin, manufacturing technique, degree of thermal stabilization, and sterilization technique. Questions/purposes We therefore compared femoral head penetration into the PE and cup survival using the same cup system with different PE resins, manufacturing, and sterilization techniques. Methods Our study group consisted of 1912 THAs performed using the same uncemented cup and identical 28-mm cobalt-chrome heads. The polyethylene varied as follows: Group 1 (94 cups), GUR 4150 resin, ram-extruded, sterilized in air, no barrier packaging; Group 2 (74 cups), same as Group 1 but sterilized in argon; Group 3 (75 cups), Himont 1900 resin, compression-molded bar stock, sterilized in argon, no barrier packaging; Group 4 (620 cups), same as Group 3 except with barrier packing; Group 5 (711 cups), GUR 1050 resin, compression-molded bar stock, sterilized in argon gas with barrier packaging; and Group 6 (338 cups), GUR 1050 resin, compression-molded bar stock, sterilized in argon with barrier packaging, irradiated with 50 kGy, heated below melting temperature, machined, and finally placed in nonbarrier packaging with gas plasma sterilization. Minimum followup was 2 years (average, 7 years; range, 2–17 years). Results Femoral head penetration averaged 0.05 mm per year for Groups 5 and 6 and was substantially lower than for Groups 1 to 4. Cup survival was higher at seven years in Groups 3, 4, and 5, and at 10 years in group 4 when compared to groups 1, 2, and 3. Conclusions We observed lower FHP rates and higher cup survival with polyethylene machined from direct compression-molded bar stock, sterilized in argon gas, with barrier packaging. Level of Evidence Level III Therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:20852973

  3. Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia: a potentially lethal bone dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Kamoda, T; Nakajima, R; Matsui, A; Nishimura, G

    2001-02-01

    We report a Japanese boy, who is considered as having Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia, a rare, as yet undefined, skeletal dysplasia. The diagnosis was warranted by the constellation of skeletal abnormalities - mild platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, broad proximal femora with prominent lesser trochanters, mild brachymetacarpalia and, most importantly, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs with lateral bowing, medial cortical thickening, and medial metaphyseal notching of the humeri. Our patient, unlike previously reported patients, had respiratory distress and died suddenly of unknown cause in late infancy. Our experience may imply the heterogeneity or phenotypic variability of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. PMID:11214690

  4. An occult acetabular fracture preceding a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Lasanianos, Nikolaos; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2009-08-01

    This article describes the case of a 69-year-old patient with an occult acetabular fracture complicated by an ipsilateral femoral neck fracture occurring within 2 months. The acetabular fracture remained undiagnosed at examination due to insufficient clinical and radiographic data interpretation. The patient was assured of early mobilization that led to a fall and subsequent hip fracture. We focus on the potential reasons for the nondiagnosis of the acetabular fracture. Acetabular fractures in the elderly may occur after low-energy injuries. The lack of history of violent injury may lead to an incorrect diagnosis. Plain anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs alone may prove an insufficient tool, especially in the hands of inexperienced personnel. As is characteristic, a retrospective review of the AP pelvis radiograph obtained after the first fall in our case revealed the undisplaced fracture of the anterior column that was missed initially. Combined fractures of the hip and the acetabulum are rarely described in the literature and are usually addressed by total hip arthroplasty (THA) alone. Similar fracture patterns that develop in 2 stages (2 injuries), as the 1 presented herein, are even more rare. The uniqueness of this combined fracture required a unique surgical treatment. The senior surgeon (P.V.G.) addressed the acetabular fracture separately to graft the anterior column fracture and facilitate union, as it was already 8 weeks old and the second fall had generated a further gap between the fragments. Stable fixation was felt appropriate prior to the THA. Thus, a double surgical approach was used. Six weeks postoperatively, the patient was able to perform full weight-bearing mobilization without an antalgic gait pattern. At 6-month follow-up, radiographs showed the metalwork to be in place with no displacement, and the fracture had progressed to union. PMID:19708620

  5. Validation of neck axis distance as a radiographic measure for acetabular anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Ashley; Petersen, Brian; Lambert, Jeffery R.; Glueck, Deborah H.; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Strickland, Colin; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Excessive acetabular anteversion is an important treatment consideration in hip preservation surgery. There is currently no reliable quantitative method for determining acetabular anteversion utilizing radiographs alone. The three main purposes of this study were to: (i) define and validate the neck axis distance (NAD) as a new visual and reproducible semi-quantitative radiographic parameter used to measure acetabular anteversion; (ii) determine the degree of correlation between NAD and computed tomography (CT)-measured acetabular anteversion; (iii) establish a sensitive and specific threshold value for NAD to identify excessive acetabular anteversion. This retrospective cohort study included all patients presenting to a single institution over a 14-month period who had undergone a dedicated musculoskeletal CT pelvis along with a standardized anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiograph. Trained observers measured the NAD on the AP pelvis radiograph and equatorial acetabular anteversion on CT for all hips. Mixed model analysis was used to find prediction equations, and ROC analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of NAD. NAD is a valid semi-quantitative predictor of acetabular anteversion and strongly correlates with CT-measured equatorial acetabular anteversion (P  <  0.0001). A NAD measurement of greater than 14 mm predicts excessive acetabular anteversion with 76% sensitivity and 78% specificity. NAD is an accurate radiographic predictor of acetabular anteversion, which may be readily used as an effective screening tool during the evaluation of patients with hip pain. PMID:27026824

  6. Cementless hemispheric acetabular component in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Schaper, L A; Pomeroy, D L; Badenhausen, W E; Curry, J I; Smith, M W; Suthers, K E

    2000-01-01

    A series of 198 total hip arthroplasties was performed using a porous-coated, hemispheric press-fit cup. One hundred and twenty-seven cups were available for clinical and radiological examination at mean follow-up of 10.6 years. The mean age at the index procedure was 61.2 years. The mean Harris hip score at final follow-up was 89.8. Three cups were revised for aseptic loosening and two liners were changed for eccentric wear and pelvic osteolysis. Nine additional patients showed mild or suspected osteolysis. Two cups were rated "fibrous" stable. There was no correlation between additional screw fixation of the press-fit cup and osteolysis or revision. PMID:10990381

  7. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, RK

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  8. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  9. Pagetoid polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Rashmi Maruti; Pathak, Jigna; Swain, Niharika; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign skeletal lesion occurring due to mutation of Gs α gene and involves one or multiple bones. We present a case of a 30-year-old female patient, with a 1-year history of swelling under her right eye that had gradually increased in size. Extraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling extending anteroposteriorly from preauricular region to nasolabial fold, frontonasal region and superoinferiorly from zygoma to body of mandible, causing ipsilateral proptosis and contralateral deviation of nose. Intraoral examination showed obliteration of right upper and lower buccal vestibule. CT disclosed expansile lytic lesions involving multiple skull bones, jaws, sternum, rib and thoracic vertebrae. Histopathology displayed broad and interconnected trabeculae connected to the host bone exhibiting reversal lines resembling the mosaic pattern of Paget's disease. These features suggested pagetoid polyostotic FD. The patient underwent cosmetic recontouring and is under regular follow-up postoperatively. PMID:25969488

  10. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.