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Sample records for acetaldehyde metabolism influence

  1. Acetaldehyde

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetaldehyde ; CASRN 75 - 07 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Daidzin suppresses ethanol consumption by Syrian golden hamsters without blocking acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Keung, W M; Lazo, O; Kunze, L; Vallee, B L

    1995-01-01

    Daidzin is a potent, selective, and reversible inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) that suppresses free-choice ethanol intake by Syrian golden hamsters. Other ALDH inhibitors, such as disulfiram (Antabuse) and calcium citrate carbimide (Temposil), have also been shown to suppress ethanol intake of laboratory animals and are thought to act by inhibiting the metabolism of acetaldehyde produced from ingested ethanol. To determine whether or not daidzin inhibits acetaldehyde metabolism in vivo, plasma acetaldehyde in daidzin-treated hamsters was measured after the administration of a test dose of ethanol. Daidzin treatment (150 mg/kg per day i.p. for 6 days) significantly suppresses (> 70%) hamster ethanol intake but does not affect overall acetaldehyde metabolism. In contrast, after administration of the same ethanol dose, plasma acetaldehyde concentration in disulfiram-treated hamsters reaches 0.9 mM, 70 times higher than that of the control. In vitro, daidzin suppresses hamster liver mitochondria-catalyzed acetaldehyde oxidation very potently with an IC50 value of 0.4 microM, which is substantially lower than the daidzin concentration (70 microM) found in the liver mitochondria of daidzin-treated hamsters. These results indicate that (i) the action of daidzin differs from that proposed for the classic, broad-acting ALDH inhibitors (e.g., disulfiram), and (ii) the daidzin-sensitive mitochondrial ALDH is not the one and only enzyme that is essential for acetaldehyde metabolism in golden hamsters. PMID:7568058

  3. Pharmacological recruitment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) to assist ALDH2 in acetaldehyde and ethanol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Cruz, Leslie A.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Correcting a genetic mutation that leads to a loss of function has been a challenge. One such mutation is in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2. This mutation is present in ∼0.6 billion East Asians and results in accumulation of toxic acetaldehyde after consumption of ethanol. To temporarily increase metabolism of acetaldehyde in vivo, we describe an approach in which a pharmacologic agent recruited another ALDH to metabolize acetaldehyde. We focused on ALDH3A1, which is enriched in the upper aerodigestive track, and identified Alda-89 as a small molecule that enables ALDH3A1 to metabolize acetaldehyde. When given together with the ALDH2-specific activator, Alda-1, Alda-89 reduced acetaldehyde-induced behavioral impairment by causing a rapid reduction in blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol intoxication in both wild-type and ALDH2-deficient, ALDH2*1/*2, heterozygotic knock-in mice. The use of a pharmacologic agent to recruit an enzyme to metabolize a substrate that it usually does not metabolize may represent a novel means to temporarily increase elimination of toxic agents in vivo. PMID:25713355

  4. Acetaldehyde as an underestimated risk factor for cancer development: role of genetics in ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Helmut K; Stickel, Felix

    2010-06-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a strong risk factor for the development of certain types of cancer including those of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the large intestine and the female breast. Multiple mechanisms are involved in alcohol-mediated carcinogenesis. Among those the action of acetaldehyde (AA), the first metabolite of ethanol oxidation is of particular interest. AA is toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments. AA binds to DNA and forms carcinogenic adducts. Direct evidence of the role of AA in alcohol-associated carcinogenesis derived from genetic linkage studies in alcoholics. Polymorphisms or mutations of genes coding for AA generation or detoxifying enzymes resulting in elevated AA concentrations are associated with increased cancer risk. Approximately 40% of Japanese, Koreans or Chinese carry the AA dehydrogenase 2*2 (ALDH2*2) allele in its heterozygous form. This allele codes for an ALDH2 enzyme with little activity leading to high AA concentrations after the consumption of even small amounts of alcohol. When individuals with this allele consume ethanol chronically, a significant increased risk for upper alimentary tract and colorectal cancer is noted. In Caucasians, alcohol dehydrogenase 1C*1 (ADH1C*1) allele encodes for an ADH isoenzyme which produces 2.5 times more AA than the corresponding allele ADH1C*2. In studies with moderate to high alcohol intake, ADH1C*1 allele frequency and rate of homozygosity was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, the liver, the colon and the female breast. These studies underline the important role of acetaldehyde in ethanol-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19847467

  5. Blood and liver acetaldehyde concentration in rats following acetaldehyde inhalation and intravenous and intragastric ethanol administration

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hobara, N.; Nagashima, H.

    1986-10-01

    Ethanol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a highly reactive product of ethanol oxidation. Ethanol might be blended with gasoline and used as a fuel in the future; biohazard of acetaldehyde inhalation must be discussed. Recent improvements in our ability to measure acetaldehyde levels in blood and various tissues have made the assessment of acetaldehyde's role in alcoholic organ intoxication possible. Blood and liver acetaldehyde concentrations in rats were reported as being linearly correlated following intragastric ethanol administration. Acetaldehyde was administered by inhalation to study its toxicity. However, liver concentrations following the inhalation was not investigated. The present communication describes the relationship between blood and liver acetaldehyde concentrations in rats following acetaldehyde inhalation and different routes of ethanol administration.

  6. Replacement of the initial steps of ethanol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by ATP-independent acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; van Dijk, Marlous; Benjamin, Kirsten; Wu, Liang; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol dissimilation is initiated by its oxidation and activation to cytosolic acetyl-CoA. The associated consumption of ATP strongly limits yields of biomass and acetyl-CoA-derived products. Here, we explore the implementation of an ATP-independent pathway for acetyl-CoA synthesis from ethanol that, in theory, enables biomass yield on ethanol that is up to 40% higher. To this end, all native yeast acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDs) were replaced by heterologous acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD). Engineered Ald(-) strains expressing different A-ALDs did not immediately grow on ethanol, but serial transfer in ethanol-grown batch cultures yielded growth rates of up to 70% of the wild-type value. Mutations in ACS1 were identified in all independently evolved strains and deletion of ACS1 enabled slow growth of non-evolved Ald(-) A-ALD strains on ethanol. Acquired mutations in A-ALD genes improved affinity-Vmax/Km for acetaldehyde. One of five evolved strains showed a significant 5% increase of its biomass yield in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures. Increased production of acetaldehyde and other by-products was identified as possible cause for lower than theoretically predicted biomass yields. This study proves that the native yeast pathway for conversion of ethanol to acetyl-CoA can be replaced by an engineered pathway with the potential to improve biomass and product yields. PMID:26818854

  7. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies. PMID:21401890

  8. Acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity involves induction of spermine oxidase at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Higashi, Kyohei; Miyamori, Daisuke; Takasaka, Tomokazu; Nagano, Tatsuo; Toida, Toshihiko; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Igarashi, Kazuei; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol consumption causes serious liver injury including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Ethanol is metabolized mainly in the liver to acetic acid through acetaldehyde. We investigated the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on polyamine metabolism since polyamines are essential factors for normal cellular functions. We found that acetaldehyde induced spermine oxidase (SMO) at the transcriptional level in HepG2 cells. The levels and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT) were not affected by acetaldehyde. Spermidine content was increased and spermine content was decreased by acetaldehyde treatment. Knockdown of SMO expression using siRNA reduced acetaldehyde toxicity. Acetaldehyde exposure increased free acrolein levels. An increase of acrolein by acetaldehyde was SMO dependent. Our results indicate that cytotoxicity of acetaldehyde involves, at least in part, oxidation of spermine to spermidine by SMO, which is induced by acetaldehyde. PMID:23707493

  9. Pharmacological treatments and strategies for reducing oral and intestinal acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Ville

    2007-01-01

    Strong epidemiological, genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that local acetaldehyde exposure is a major factor behind gastrointestinal cancers especially associated with alcohol drinking and smoking. Thus, reducing the exposure to carcinogenic acetaldehyde either by decreasing the production or by eliminating acetaldehyde locally might offer a preventive strategy against acetaldehyde-induced gastrointestinal cancers. Thiol products, such as the amino acid cysteine, are known to be able to protect against acetaldehyde toxicity. Cysteine is able to bind acetaldehyde efficiently by forming a stable thiazolidine-carboxylic acid compound. Special cysteine preparations (such as lozenge and chewing gum) have already been developed to bind smoking and alcohol drinking derived acetaldehyde from the oral cavity. Most importantly, these type of drug formulations offer a novel method for intervention studies aimed to resolve the eventual role of acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of upper digestive tract cancers. Acetaldehyde exposure could also be influenced by modifying the acetaldehyde producing microbiota. With regard to the upper digestive tract, acetaldehyde production from ingested ethanol could be significantly reduced by using an antiseptic mouthwash, chlorhexidine. In the large intestine acetaldehyde production could be markedly decreased either by reducing the Gram-negative microbes by ciprofloxacin antibiotic or by lowering the intraluminal pH by lactulose. PMID:17590993

  10. MUTAGENICITY ASSESSMENT OF ACETALDEHYDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaldehyde has been shown in studies by several different laboratories to be a clastogen and inducer of sister chromatid exchanges in cultured mammalian cells. Although there have been very few studies in intact mammals, the available evidence suggests that acetaldehyde produce...

  11. Olfaction Under Metabolic Influences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recently published work and emerging research efforts have suggested that the olfactory system is intimately linked with the endocrine systems that regulate or modify energy balance. Although much attention has been focused on the parallels between taste transduction and neuroendocrine controls of digestion due to the novel discovery of taste receptors and molecular components shared by the tongue and gut, the equivalent body of knowledge that has accumulated for the olfactory system, has largely been overlooked. During regular cycles of food intake or disorders of endocrine function, olfaction is modulated in response to changing levels of various molecules, such as ghrelin, orexins, neuropeptide Y, insulin, leptin, and cholecystokinin. In view of the worldwide health concern regarding the rising incidence of diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders, we present a comprehensive review that addresses the current knowledge of hormonal modulation of olfactory perception and how disruption of hormonal signaling in the olfactory system can affect energy homeostasis. PMID:22832483

  12. Acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Kurkivuori, Johanna; Salaspuro, Ville; Kaihovaara, Pertti; Kari, Kirsti; Rautemaa, Riina; Grönroos, Lisa; Meurman, Jukka H; Salaspuro, Mikko

    2007-02-01

    Alcohol is a well documented risk factor for upper digestive tract cancers. It has been shown that acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol is carcinogenic. The role of microbes in the production of acetaldehyde to the oral cavity has previously been described in several studies. In the present study, the aim was to investigate the capability of viridans group streptococci of normal oral flora to produce acetaldehyde in vitro during ethanol incubation. Furthermore, the aim was to measure the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity of the bacteria. Eight clinical strains and eight American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains of viridans group streptococci were selected for the study. Bacterial suspensions were incubated in two different ethanol concentrations, 11 mM and 1100 mM and the acetaldehyde was measured by gas chromatography. ADH-activity was measured by using a sensitive spectroscopy. The results show significant differences between the bacterial strains regarding acetaldehyde production capability and the detected ADH-activity. In particular, clinical strain of Streptococcus salivarius, both clinical and culture collection strains of Streptococcus intermedius and culture collection strain of Streptococcus mitis produced high amounts of acetaldehyde in 11 mM and 1100 mM ethanol incubation. All these four bacterial strains also showed significant ADH-enzyme activity. Twelve other strains were found to be low acetaldehyde producers. Consequently, our study shows that viridans group streptococci may play a role in metabolizing ethanol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde in the mouth. The observation supports the concept of a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of oral cancer. PMID:16859955

  13. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity). PMID:27163368

  14. A PBPK MODEL FOR EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE POLYMORPHISMS ON COMPARATIVE RAT AND HUMAN NASAL TISSUE ACETALDEHYDE DOSIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in chemical synthesis and a byproduct of normal oxidative metabolism of several industrially important compounds including ethanol, ethyl acetate and vinyl acetate. Chronic inhalation of acetaldehyde leads to degeneratio...

  15. A PBPK model for evaluating the impact of aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms on comparative rat and human nasal tissue acetaldehyde dosimetry*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in the chemical synthesis and normal oxidative metabolism of several industrially important compounds, including ethanol, ethyl acetate, and vinyl acetate. Chronic inhalation of acetaldehyde leads to degeneration of the olfactory and resp...

  16. Purity Determination of Acetaldehyde in an Acetaldehyde Certified Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Taichi; Watanabe, Takuro; Nakamura, Satoe; Kato, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is regulated as a toxic substance in various fields, and the method for monitoring or analysis of acetaldehyde is important. However, handling is difficult because of the high reactivity and low boiling point of acetaldehyde. Therefore, a reference material for high purity acetaldehyde with high accuracy was not available. Although the measuring method of acetaldehyde as a reagent is published in the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) where the specification of acetaldehyde purity is more than 80%, the analytical method described in JIS is not enough for an accuracy purity determination method. In this research, the high precision purity determination method for development of a certified reference material (CRM) of acetaldehyde was examined. By controlling the volatility and reactivity of acetaldehyde, we established the purity determination method of acetaldehyde with a relative standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. Furthermore, this method was applied to develop a high purity acetaldehyde CRM with an expanded uncertainty of 0.005 kg kg(-1) (k = 2). PMID:26063006

  17. Acetaldehyde: A Chemical Whose Fortunes Have Changed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittcoff, Harold A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes industrial acetaldehyde synthesis/uses, explaining why acetaldehyde usage is declining in industry. Includes a discussion of the reaction chemistry, equations, and molecular structure diagrams. (JM)

  18. Influence of metabolic pathways on dam longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolism is an ever-changing dynamic system that can influence various physiological conditions including reproductive performance. It has been established that use of caloric restriction can enhance lifespan. But, it is also a well known fact that high energy demands in tandem with moderate to ...

  19. Human ALDH1B1 polymorphisms may affect the metabolism of acetaldehyde and all-trans retinaldehyde – in vitro studies and computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Brian C.; Reigan, Philip; Miller, Bettina; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate additional substrate specificities of ALDH1B1 and determine the effect that human ALDH1B1 polymorphisms will have on substrate specificity. Methods Computational-based molecular modeling was used to predict the binding of the substrates propionaldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, nitroglycerin, and all-trans retinaldehyde to ALDH1B1. Based on positive in silico results, the capacity of purified human recombinant ALDH1B1 to metabolize nitroglycerin and all-trans retinaldehyde was explored. Additionally, metabolism of 4-HNE by ALDH1B1 was revisited. Databases queried to find human polymorphisms of ALDH1B1 identified three major variants: ALDH1B1*2 (A86V), ALDH1B1*3 (L107R), and ALDH1B1*5 (M253V). Computational modeling was used to predict the binding of substrates and of cofactor (NAD+) to the variants. These human polymorphisms were created and expressed in a bacterial system and specific activity was determined. Results ALDH1B1 metabolizes (and appears to be inhibited by) nitroglycerin and has favorable kinetics for the metabolism of all-trans retinaldehyde. ALDH1B1 metabolizes 4-HNE with higher apparent affinity than previously described, but with low throughput. Recombinant ALDH1B1*2 is catalytically inactive, whereas both ALDH1B1*3 and ALDH1B1*5 are catalytically active. Modeling indicated that the lack of activity in ALDH1B1*2 is likely due to poor NAD+ binding. Modeling also suggests that ALDH1B1*3 may be less able to metabolize all-trans retinaldehyde and that ALDH1B1*5 may bind NAD+ poorly. Conclusions ALDH1B1 metabolizes nitroglycerin and all-trans-retinaldehyde. One of the three human polymorphisms, ALDH1B1*2, is catalytically inactive, likely due to poor NAD+ binding. Expression of this variant may affect ALDH1B1-dependent metabolic functions in stem cells and ethanol metabolism. PMID:25413692

  20. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H; Sweet, Ian R; Hurley, James B

    2016-02-26

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5'-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. PMID:26677218

  1. Variability of ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, R. J.; Tatum, S.; Willey, J. D.; Avery, G. B.; Mead, R. N.

    2014-02-01

    Ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were measured in 52 rain events collected between January 25, 2011 and March 4, 2012 in Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. Ethanol concentrations ranged from 23 nM to 908 nM with a volume weighted average concentration of 192 ± 20 nM while acetaldehyde ranged from 23 nM to 909 nM with a volume weighted average concentration of 193 ± 25 nM. There was a great deal of variability in the abundance of ethanol and acetaldehyde between rain events driven primarily by temporal and air mass back trajectory influences. The ratio of ethanol to acetaldehyde was at a minimum during periods of peak solar intensity underscoring the importance of alcohol oxidation by a photochemically generated oxidant such as hydroxyl radical in the gas and/or aqueous phase. Ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations were not strongly correlated with rain amount suggesting that gas-phase concentrations were not significantly depleted during the storm or that they were resupplied during the course of the rain event. The concentration of ethanol and acetaldehyde were correlated with nitrate and non-sea salt sulfate suggesting the importance of terrestrial and anthropogenic inputs at this location. Comparison of future ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in rainwater to the data presented in this study will help delineate potential consequences of these labile oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) on the chemistry of the troposphere as the United States transitions to more ethanol blended fuels. Aqueous phase impacts of increasing ethanol concentrations will be particularly significant to the oxidizing capacity of atmospheric waters because of its reactivity with OH and HO2 radicals in solution. Increased rainwater concentrations could also have significant ramifications on receiving watersheds because of the biogeochemical lability of the alcohol.

  2. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  3. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  4. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content (as acetaldehyde). Not less than 95.0 percent by weight. (b)...

  5. Studies on the mechanism of acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of rat liver transaminases.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L R

    1987-09-30

    Incubation of mitochondria-depleted rat liver homogenates with 5 mmol/l acetaldehyde at 37 degrees C for 1 h inhibited both aspartate and alanine aminotransferases by 30%. Inhibition was prevented by decreasing temperature to 4 degrees C or by preincubating homogenates with cyanate but was unaffected by cyanamide and methylpyrazole which block acetaldehyde oxidation and reduction respectively. Cyanate-sensitive acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of purified porcine heart transaminases was also demonstrated in the presence of rat liver homogenate but not in Tris/sucrose medium. Moreover, porcine transaminases were inhibited by trichloroacetic acid extracts of rat liver homogenates previously incubated with acetaldehyde but not by extracts of homogenates incubated with both acetaldehyde and cyanate. These findings suggest that acetaldehyde-mediated transaminase inhibition requires further non-oxidative metabolism of acetaldehyde. Since transaminase activities were not restored by addition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to the assay systems, acetaldehyde-induced transaminase inhibition does not appear to be mediated by displacement or depletion of this B6 coenzyme. PMID:3677417

  6. [Biological actions of acetaldehyde].

    PubMed

    Ijiri, I

    1999-11-01

    Acetaldehyde (AcH), the first metabolite of ethanol (EtOH), is a chemically reactive and pharmacologically active compound. The author has been engaged in the study of AcH in cooperation with many researchers for three decades. We have found many biological actions of AcH which cause cardiovascular symptoms after drinking and also inhibited EtOH absorption via the canine and rat intestinal tract. This report covers the following five points. 1. The subjects were classified into a non-flushing group and a flushing group, according to the degree of facial flushing after drinking 200 ml of Sake (Japanese rice wire) at a rate of 100 ml per 5 min. Blood EtOH profile was much the same in both groups, yet peak blood AcH concentration in the flushing group was significantly higher than that in the non-flushing group. All subjects in the flushing group showed marked flushing and an increase in pulse rate after drinking, but these symptoms were not apparent in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that cardiovascular symptoms were caused by AcH itself. 2. Urinary excretions of both norepinephrine and epinephrine increased in the flushing cases after drinking Sake in comparison with those who drank the same volume of water. However, these catecholamines did not change in the non-flushing group. These results suggested that it is catecholamines released from the sympathetic nerve end or the adrenal medulla by AcH which caused an increase in pulse rate. 3. Bradykinin is released from high molecular kininogen by activated kallikrein and acts to dilate distal blood vessels and raise permeability in tissues. On the other hand, kallidin is released from low molecular kininogen by activated glandular kallikrein and its action is weaker than that of bradykinin. Blood low molecular kininogen levels in the flushing group decreased gradually after drinking and were mutually related to the blood AcH concentrations. But levels in the non-flushing group showed no difference

  7. Production of acetaldehyde by Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Wecker, M.S.A.; Zall, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    Mutants of Zymomonas mobilis were selected for decreased alcohol dehydrogenase activity by using consecutively higher concentration of allyl alcohol. A mutant selected by using 100 mM allyl alcohol produced acetaldehyde at a level of 4.08 g/liter when the organism was grown in aerated batch cultures on a medium containing 4.0% (wt/wt) glucose. On the basis of the amount of glucose utilized, this level of acetaldehyde production represents nearly 40% of the maximum theoretical yield. Acetaldehyde produced during growth was continuously air stripped from the reactor. Acetaldehyde present in the exhaust stream was then trapped as the acetaldehyde-bisulfite addition product in an aqueous solution of sodium bisulfite and released by treatment with base. Acetaldehyde was found to inhibit growth of Z. mobilis at concentrations as low as 0.05% (wt/wt) acetaldehyde. An acetaldehyde-tolerant mutant of Z. mobilis was isolated after both mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine and selection in the presence of vapor-phase acetaldehyde. The production of acetaldehyde has potential advantages over that of ethanol: lower energy requirements for production separation, efficient separation of product from dilute feed streams, continuous separation of product from the reactor, and a higher marketplace value.

  8. Production of Acetaldehyde by Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Wecker, Matt S. A.; Zall, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of Zymomonas mobilis were selected for decreased alcohol dehydrogenase activity by using consecutively higher concentrations of allyl alcohol. A mutant selected by using 100 mM allyl alcohol produced acetaldehyde at a level of 4.08 g/liter when the organism was grown in aerated batch cultures on a medium containing 4.0% (wt/wt) glucose. On the basis of the amount of glucose utilized, this level of acetaldehyde production represents nearly 40% of the maximum theoretical yield. Acetaldehyde produced during growth was continuously air stripped from the reactor. Acetaldehyde present in the exhaust stream was then trapped as the acetaldehyde-bisulfite addition product in an aqueous solution of sodium bisulfite and released by treatment with base. Acetaldehyde was found to inhibit growth of Z. mobilis at concentrations as low as 0.05% (wt/wt) acetaldehyde. An acetaldehyde-tolerant mutant of Z. mobilis was isolated after both mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine and selection in the presence of vapor-phase acetaldehyde. The production of acetaldehyde has potential advantages over that of ethanol: lower energy requirements for product separation, efficient separation of product from dilute feed streams, continuous separation of product from the reactor, and a higher marketplace value. PMID:16347497

  9. Effects of acetaldehyde on brush border enzyme activities in human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, T; Salaspuro, M

    1997-12-01

    The treatment of Caco-2 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line that closely resembles normal human small intestinal epithelial cells, with acetaldehyde resulted in significantly decreased activities of brush border enzymes sucrase, maltase, lactase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase; alkaline phosphatase activity was not affected. In the case of sucrase and maltase, the activities were also decreased by a combination of acetaldehyde and ethanol, although ethanol alone markedly increased them. The possibility that intraintestinal acetaldehyde, formed by intestinal microbes, might play a role in some small intestinal enzyme deficiencies observed earlier in alcoholics should therefore be considered. The mechanism by which acetaldehyde alters these enzyme activities remains unclear. The observation that acetaldehyde also disturbed cell polarization, an initial step in the process of differentiation in Caco-2 cells, indicates that acetaldehyde might decrease these enzyme activities by interfering with cell differentiation. Because ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolizing enzymes have not been previously studied from Caco-2 cells, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities were also measured from these cells, and their ALDH isoenzyme pattern was characterized. Like many cancerous cell lines, Caco-2 cells were found to express no ADH. They, however, possessed ALDH activity that was comparable with normal colonic mucosal activity and also expressed the same ALDH classes (ALDHs 1 to 3) than normal human colonic mucosa. PMID:9438518

  10. Genetic and metabolic influences on LDL subclasses

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.; Rotter, J.I.; Lusis, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence LDL particle size and density, and expression of an atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype (ALP) characterized by predominance of small, dense LDL particles. Linkage of ALP the LDL receptor locus has been reported previously. Quantitative sib-pair relative-pair linkage methodologies were used to test for linkage of LDL particle size to candidate loci in 25 large pedigrees with familial coronary artery disease. Linkage to the LDL receptor gene locus was confirmed (p=0.008). Evidence was also obtained for linkage to the genes for apoCIII, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The results suggest multiple genetic determinants of LDL particle size that may involve different metabolic mechanisms giving rise to small, dense LDL and increased atherosclerosis risk.

  11. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  12. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  13. Proton transfer in acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters: Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization experiment and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2015-03-01

    Acetaldehyde, a probable human carcinogen and of environmental importance, upon solvation provides a test bed for understanding proton transfer pathways and catalytic mechanisms. In this study, we report on single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of small acetaldehyde and acetaldehyde-water clusters. Appearance energies of protonated clusters are extracted from the experimental photoionization efficiency curves and compared to electronic structure calculations. The comparison of experimental data to computational results provides mechanistic insight into the fragmentation mechanisms of the observed mass spectra. Using deuterated water for isotopic tagging, we observe that proton transfer is mediated via acetaldehyde and not water in protonated acetaldehyde-water clusters.

  14. Modeling dietary influences on offspring metabolic programming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Brookheart, Rita T; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    The influence of nutrition on offspring metabolism has become a hot topic in recent years owing to the growing prevalence of maternal and childhood obesity. Studies in mammals have identified several factors correlating with parental and early offspring dietary influences on progeny health; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these factors remain undiscovered. Mammalian metabolic tissues and pathways are heavily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster, making the fly an invaluable genetic model organism for studying metabolism. In this review, we discuss the metabolic similarities between mammals and Drosophila and present evidence supporting its use as an emerging model of metabolic programming. PMID:27450801

  15. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.93 Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content...

  16. 27 CFR 21.93 - Acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetaldehyde. 21.93 Section 21.93 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.93 Acetaldehyde. (a) Aldehyde content...

  17. Metabolic influences on neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Víctor M.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Reproduction is a tightly regulated function in which many mechanisms contribute to ensure the survival of the species. Among those, due to the elevated energy requirements of reproduction, metabolic factors exert a pivotal role in the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Although this control may occur at multiple levels of the axis, the majority of interactions between metabolic and reproductive systems take place in the hypothalamus. In this article, we present an overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the metabolic regulation of reproduction at the central level. We aim to identify the neuroanatomical location where both functions interconnect by discussing the likelihood of each component of the neuronal hierarchical network controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone release to be first-order responders to metabolic cues, especially the peripheral metabolic signals leptin, insulin, and ghrelin. Recent findings Latest evidence suggests that the primary action of leptin, insulin, and ghrelin to regulate reproduction is located upstream of the main central elicitors of gonadotropin release, Kiss1 and gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, and neuroanatomically separated from their metabolic action. Summary The study of the neuronal interactions between the mechanisms governing metabolism and reproduction offers the platform to overcome or treat a number of prevailing metabolic and/or reproductive conditions. PMID:23807606

  18. [Determination methods for human blood acetaldehyde].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Yamamoto, H; Tanegashima, A

    1998-06-01

    Although a number of reports on human blood acetaldehyde have been published, most of them during alcohol intoxication are still various in each researcher. The difficult problems are summarized as follows; 1) low boiling point of acetaldehyde, 2) low level in blood, 3) rapid disappearance in blood, and 4) artefactual formation during the procedures. The most crucial problem is the artefactual formation from ethanol or other sources during the procedures. Hemolysation, heating and/or other analytical procedures cause the artefacts. In this report, several methods for the determination and the evaluation of the acetaldehyde levels are reviewed. PMID:9701996

  19. Do Dietary Factors Influence Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Nordin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    There is very little direct research to conclusively prove the relevance of diet in primary tendinopathies, however it seems prudent to ask whether our current knowledge about the impact of nutrition on collagen metabolism could be useful in assessing, preventing, or treating tendinopathy. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the potential impact (negative or positive) that nutrition may have on the metabolism of tendons by summarizing the related research. The chapter briefly discusses the roles that specific vitamins, amino acids, lipids, and antioxidants have in various processes of the body that may be directly or indirectly related to tenocyte metabolism. PMID:27535270

  20. Effects of acetaldehyde on hepatocyte glycerol uptake and cell size: implication of Aquaporin 9

    PubMed Central

    Potter, James J.; Koteish, Ayman; Hamilton, James; Liu, Xiaopu; Liu, Kun; Agre, Peter; Mezey, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on uptake of glycerol and on cell size of hepatocytes and a role Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a glycerol transport channel, were evaluated. Methods The studies were done in primary rat and mouse hepatocytes. The uptake of [14C] glycerol was determined with hepatocytes in suspension. For determination of cell size, rat hepatocytes on coated dishes were incubated with a lipophilic fluorochrome that is incorporated into the cell membrane and examined by confocal microscopy. A three dimensional z scan of the cell was performed, and the middle slice of the z scan was used for area measurements. Results Acute exposure to acetaldehyde, but not to ethanol, causes a rapid increase in the uptake of glycerol and an increase in hepatocyte size, which was inhibited by HgCl2, an inhibitor of aquaporins. This was not observed in hepatocytes from AQP9 knockout mice, nor observed by direct application of acetaldehyde to AQP9 expressed in Xenopus Laevis oocytes. Prolonged 24 hours exposure to either acetaldehyde or ethanol did not result in an increase in glycerol uptake by rat hepatocytes. Acetaldehyde decreased AQP9 mRNA and AQP9 protein, while ethanol decreased AQP9 mRNA but not AQP9 protein. Ethanol, but not acetaldehyde, increased the activities of glycerol kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Conclusions The acute effects of acetaldehyde, while mediated by AQP9, are probably influenced by binding of acetaldehyde to hepatocyte membranes and changes in cell permeability. The effects of ethanol in enhancing glucose kinase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase leading to increased formation of glycerol-3-phosphate most likely contribute to alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:21294757

  1. Glycolytic metabolism influences global chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Song; Little, John B.; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring, specifically elevated glycolytic metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Global chromatin structure regulates gene expression, DNA repair, and also affects cancer progression. But the interrelationship between tumor metabolism and chromatin architecture remain unclear. Here we show that increased glycolysis in cancer cells promotes an open chromatin configuration. Using complementary methods including Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion assay, electron microscope and immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrate that glycolysis inhibition by pharmacological and genetic approaches was associated with induction of compacted chromatin structure. This condensed chromatin status appeared to result chiefly from histone hypoacetylation as restoration of histone acetylation with an HDAC inhibitor reversed the compacted chromatin state. Interestingly, glycolysis inhibition-induced chromatin condensation impeded DNA repair efficiency leading to increased sensitivity of cancer cells to DNA damage drugs, which may represent a novel molecular mechanism that can be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:25784656

  2. Pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease: Role of oxidative metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a preeminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell

  3. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  4. Decomposition of acetaldehyde : experiment and detailed theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Gupte, K. S.; Kiefer, J. H.; Tranter, R. S.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Chemistry; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2007-01-01

    The classic pyrolytic decomposition of acetaldehyde has been examined to the higher temperatures used in combustion and also lower pressures with 85 laser-schlieren, shock-tube measurements of density gradient covering 40-500 torr and 1550-2400 K. This work is supplemented and modeled with a CASPT2 based variable reaction coordinate RRKM prediction of the dissociation kinetics. These RRKM predictions are then incorporated in good two-dimensional master equation fits of the strong falloff seen in the laser-schlieren experiments, and also that shown in some previous shock-tube results using UV absorption of the acetaldehyde as diagnostic. The laser-schlieren data provide not only unambiguous dissociation rates but also solid indications of the secondary chemistry. Modeling of the full density gradient profiles offers good estimates of rates for H-atom abstraction from both the acetaldehyde and the HCO radical, again at high temperatures.

  5. Ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiogrosso, A.; Vasyunin, A.; Herbst, E.; Viti, S.; Ward, M. D.; Price, S. D.; Brown, W. A.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O), and its isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), are important complex organic molecules because of their potential role in the formation of amino acids. The discovery of ethylene oxide in hot cores suggests the presence of ring-shaped molecules with more than 3 carbon atoms such as furan (c-C4H4O), to which ribose, the sugar found in DNA, is closely related. Aims: Despite the fact that acetaldehyde is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, ethylene oxide has not yet been detected in cold sources. We aim to understand the chemistry of the formation and loss of ethylene oxide in hot and cold interstellar objects (i) by including in a revised gas-grain network some recent experimental results on grain surfaces and (ii) by comparison with the chemical behaviour of its isomer, acetaldehyde. Methods: We introduce a complete chemical network for ethylene oxide using a revised gas-grain chemical model. We test the code for the case of a hot core. The model allows us to predict the gaseous and solid ethylene oxide abundances during a cooling-down phase prior to star formation and during the subsequent warm-up phase. We can therefore predict at what temperatures ethylene oxide forms on grain surfaces and at what temperature it starts to desorb into the gas phase. Results: The model reproduces the observed gaseous abundances of ethylene oxide and acetaldehyde towards high-mass star-forming regions. In addition, our results show that ethylene oxide may be present in outer and cooler regions of hot cores where its isomer has already been detected. Our new results are compared with previous results, which focused on the formation of ethylene oxide only. Conclusions: Despite their different chemical structures, the chemistry of ethylene oxide is coupled to that of acetaldehyde, suggesting that acetaldehyde may be used as a tracer for ethylene oxide towards cold cores.

  6. Periodontal disease: the influence of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that include obesity, impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Recently, more attention has been reserved to the correlation between periodontitis and systemic health. MetS is characterized by oxidative stress, a condition in which the equilibrium between the production and the inactivation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) becomes disrupted. ROS have an essential role in a variety of physiological systems, but under a condition of oxidative stress, they contribute to cellular dysfunction and damage. Oxidative stress may act as a common link to explain the relationship between each component of MetS and periodontitis. All those conditions show increased serum levels of products derived from oxidative damage, promoting a proinflammatory state. Moreover, adipocytokines, produced by the fat cells of fat tissue, might modulate the balance between oxidant and antioxidant activities. An increased caloric intake involves a higher metabolic activity, which results in an increased production of ROS, inducing insulin resistance. At the same time, obese patients require more insulin to maintain blood glucose homeostasis – a state known as hyperinsulinemia, a condition that can evolve into type 2 diabetes. Oxidation products can increase neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis, thus favoring oxidative damage. Hyperglycemia and an oxidizing state promote the genesis of advanced glycation end-products, which could also be implicated in the degeneration and damage of periodontal tissue. Thus, MetS, the whole of interconnected factors, presents systemic and local manifestations, such as cardiovascular disease and periodontitis, related by a common factor known as oxidative stress. PMID:23009606

  7. Acetone and Acetaldehyde Exchange Above a Managed Temperate Mountain Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörtnagl, L. J.; Bamberger, I.; Graus, M.; Ruuskanen, T.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2011-12-01

    measurement campaigns and during undisturbed conditions. The shortcomings in predicting VOC fluxes might be a consequence of missing parameters that were not captured by our meteorological data. The identification and quantification of biochemical cycles associated with soil and plant root processes and the possible influence of insect life cycles on VOC exchange might provide important information during the development and parameterization of VOC models. The total amount of carbon associated with the VOC flux of the two compounds was low: the grassland was a net source of acetaldehyde in both years with emissions of 21.8 mg C m-2 and 10.2 mg C m-2 in 2008 and 2009, respectively, while the meadow was a source of acetone in 2008 with 14.6 mg C m-2 and a sink in 2009 with a cumulative uptake of 5.0 mg C m-2.

  8. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16568779

  9. Metabolic differences in cattle with excitable temperaments can influence productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperament can negatively affect various production traits, including live weight, ADG, DMI, conception rates, and carcass weight. Three research studies are summarized which indicate the potential influence of temperament on metabolism. In Brahman heifers, (n=12) the 6 most temperamental and 6 mos...

  10. Transport and intracellular accumulation of acetaldehyde in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Pamment, N.B. )

    1993-06-05

    The rate of acetaldehyde efflux from yeast cells and its intracellular concentration were studied in the light of recent suggestions that acetaldehyde inhibition may be an important factor in yeast ethanol fermentations. When the medium surrounding cells containing ethanol and acetaldehyde was suddenly diluted, the rate of efflux of acetaldehyde was slow relative to the rate of ethanol efflux, suggesting that acetaldehyde, unlike ethanol, may accumulate intracellularly. Intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations were measured during high cell density fermentations, using direct injection gas chromatography to avoid the need to concentrate or disrupt the cells. Intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations substantially exceeded the extracellular concentrations throughout fermentation and were generally much higher than the acetaldehyde concentrations normally recorded in the culture broth in ethanol fermentations. The technique used was sensitive to the time taken to cool and freeze the samples. Measured intracellular acetaldehyde concentrations fell rapidly as the time taken to freeze the suspensions was extended beyond 2 s. The results add weight to recent claims that acetaldehyde toxicity is responsible for some of the effects previously ascribed to ethanol in alcohol fermentations, especially Zymomonas fermentations. Further work is required to confirm the importance of acetaldehyde toxicity under other culture conditions.

  11. The molecular and metabolic influence of long term agmatine consumption.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Chen, Pan; Li, Changhong; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Nissim, Ilana; Yudkoff, Marc

    2014-04-01

    Agmatine (AGM), a product of arginine decarboxylation, influences multiple physiologic and metabolic functions. However, the mechanism(s) of action, the impact on whole body gene expression and metabolic pathways, and the potential benefits and risks of long term AGM consumption are still a mystery. Here, we scrutinized the impact of AGM on whole body metabolic profiling and gene expression and assessed a plausible mechanism(s) of AGM action. Studies were performed in rats fed a high fat diet or standard chow. AGM was added to drinking water for 4 or 8 weeks. We used (13)C or (15)N tracers to assess metabolic reactions and fluxes and real time quantitative PCR to determine gene expression. The results demonstrate that AGM elevated the synthesis and tissue level of cAMP. Subsequently, AGM had a widespread impact on gene expression and metabolic profiling including (a) activation of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-α and its coactivator, PGC1α, and (b) increased expression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ and genes regulating thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and carnitine biosynthesis and transport. The changes in gene expression were coupled with improved tissue and systemic levels of carnitine and short chain acylcarnitine, increased β-oxidation but diminished incomplete fatty acid oxidation, decreased fat but increased protein mass, and increased hepatic ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis but decreased glycolysis. These metabolic changes were coupled with reduced weight gain and a curtailment of the hormonal and metabolic derangements associated with high fat diet-induced obesity. The findings suggest that AGM elevated the synthesis and levels of cAMP, thereby mimicking the effects of caloric restriction with respect to metabolic reprogramming. PMID:24523404

  12. Using Non-Enzymatic Chemistry to Influence Microbial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephen; Schultz, Erica E.; Balskus, Emily P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural manipulation of small molecule metabolites occurs in all organisms and plays a fundamental role in essentially all biological processes. Despite an increasing interest in developing new, non-enzymatic chemical reactions capable of functioning in the presence of living organisms, the ability of such transformations to interface with cellular metabolism and influence biological function is a comparatively underexplored area of research. This review will discuss efforts to combine non-enzymatic chemistry with microbial metabolism. We will highlight recent and historical uses of non-biological reactions to study microbial growth and function, the use of non-enzymatic transformations to rescue auxotrophic microorganisms, and the combination of engineered microbial metabolism and biocompatible chemical reactions for organic synthesis. PMID:25579453

  13. Quantitative analysis of the lactic acid and acetaldehyde produced by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Gezginc, Y; Topcal, F; Comertpay, S; Akyol, I

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-producing abilities of lactic acid bacterial species isolated from traditionally manufactured Turkish yogurts using HPLC. The lactic acid bacterial species purified from the yogurts were the 2 most widely used species in industrial yogurt production: Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. These bacteria have the ability to ferment hexose sugars homofermentatively to generate lactic acid and some carbonyl compounds, such as acetaldehyde through pyruvate metabolism. The levels of the compounds produced during fermentation influence the texture and the flavor of the yogurt and are themselves influenced by the chemical composition of the milk, processing conditions, and the metabolic activity of the starter culture. In the study, morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics were employed to identify the bacteria obtained from homemade yogurts produced in different regions of Turkey. A collection of 91 Strep. thermophilus and 35 L. bulgaricus strains were investigated for their lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-formation capabilities in various media such as cow milk, LM17 agar, and aerobic-anaerobic SM17 agar or de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar. The amounts of the metabolites generated by each strain in all conditions were quantified by HPLC. The levels were found to vary depending on the species, the strain, and the growth conditions used. Whereas lactic acid production ranged between 0 and 77.9 mg/kg for Strep. thermophilus strains, it ranged from 0 to 103.5 mg/kg for L. bulgaricus. Correspondingly, the ability to generate acetaldehyde ranged from 0 to 105.9 mg/kg in Strep. thermophilus and from 0 to 126.9 mg/kg in L. bulgaricus. Our study constitutes the first attempt to determine characteristics of the wild strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts, and the approach presented here, which reveals the differences in metabolite production abilities of the

  14. Development of industrial brewing yeast with low acetaldehyde production and improved flavor stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinjing; Shen, Nan; Yin, Hua; Liu, Chunfeng; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Higher acetaldehyde concentration in beer is one of the main concerns of current beer industry in China. Acetaldehyde is always synthesized during beer brewing by the metabolism of yeast. Here, using ethanol as the sole carbon source and 4-methylpyrazole as the selection marker, we constructed a new mutant strain with lower acetaldehyde production and improved ethanol tolerance via traditional mutagenesis strategy. European Brewery Convention tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broths of mutant strain and industrial brewing strain showed that the acetaldehyde concentration of mutant strain was 81.67 % lower, whereas its resistant staling value was 1.0-fold higher. Owing to the mutation, the alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant strain decreased to about 30 % of the wild-type strain. In the meantime, the fermentation performance of the newly screened strain has little difference compared with the wild-type strain, and there are no safety problems regarding the industrial usage of the mutant strain. Therefore, we suggest that the newly screened strain could be directly applied to brewing industry. PMID:23296804

  15. Involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol: the role of acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Font, Laura; Luján, Miguel Á.; Pastor, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Significant evidence implicates the endogenous opioid system (EOS) (opioid peptides and receptors) in the mechanisms underlying the psychopharmacological effects of ethanol. Ethanol modulates opioidergic signaling and function at different levels, including biosynthesis, release, and degradation of opioid peptides, as well as binding of endogenous ligands to opioid receptors. The role of β-endorphin and µ-opioid receptors (OR) have been suggested to be of particular importance in mediating some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including psychomotor stimulation and sensitization, consumption and conditioned place preference (CPP). Ethanol increases the release of β-endorphin from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (NArc), which can modulate activity of other neurotransmitter systems such as mesolimbic dopamine (DA). The precise mechanism by which ethanol induces a release of β-endorphin, thereby inducing behavioral responses, remains to be elucidated. The present review summarizes accumulative data suggesting that the first metabolite of ethanol, the psychoactive compound acetaldehyde, could participate in such mechanism. Two lines of research involving acetaldehyde are reviewed: (1) implications of the formation of acetaldehyde in brain areas such as the NArc, with high expression of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and presence of cell bodies of endorphinic neurons and (2) the formation of condensation products between DA and acetaldehyde such as salsolinol, which exerts its actions via OR. PMID:23914161

  16. Ethanol metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract and its possible consequences.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K; Gärtner, U; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A

    1994-01-01

    Ethanol is oxidised not only in the liver, but also in the gastrointestinal tract. Although this ethanol metabolism is less than that of the liver, it has some important relevance with respect to the first pass metabolism of alcohol and to ethanol induced tissue toxicity. In the gastrointestinal tract, ethanol can be metabolised not only in the mucosal cell via alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and microsomal ethanol oxidising system (MEOS), but also in a great variety of bacteria. Depending on the gastrointestinal location, one or the other metabolic pathway of alcohol may be predominant. The metabolism of ethanol by gastric ADH, the so called first pass metabolism, influences ethanol blood concentrations not only in the portal vein and thus in the liver, but also in the systemic circulation. As gastric ADH activity is decreased in younger women, in the elderly, in the alcoholic, during fasting and after treatment with certain H-2-receptor antagonists, increased blood ethanol concentrations may occur in these situations after oral intake of ethanol. However, this first pass metabolism of alcohol is influenced not only by ADH activity but also by the speed of gastric emptying (e.g. slow gastric emptying leads to increased first pass metabolism). Finally, gastric morphology also determines first pass metabolism. Chronic atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated gastric injury lead to a decrease of gastric ADH activity, and thus possibly to a decreased first pass metabolism of alcohol. In addition, the local production of acetaldehyde from ethanol in the oesophagus, where significantly more sigma-ADH is present, may contribute to tissue injury and this may lead to the well known ethanol associated oesophageal cancer development. Various isoenzymes of ADH exist in the colorectum and they are also capable of producing acetaldehyde in amounts sufficient to injure the mucosa. Besides ADH, the MEOS, a mixed function oxidase, also metabolises ethanol. This system is

  17. Acetaldehyde stimulation of net gluconeogenic carbon movement from applied malic Acid in tomato fruit pericarp tissue.

    PubMed

    Halinska, A; Frenkel, C

    1991-03-01

    Applied acetaldehyde is known to lead to sugar accumulation in fruit including tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) (O Paz, HW Janes, BA Prevost, C Frenkel [1982] J Food Sci 47: 270-274) presumably due to stimulation of gluconeogenesis. This conjecture was examined using tomato fruit pericarp discs as a test system and applied i-[U-(14)C]malic acid as the source for gluconeogenic carbon mobilization. The label from malate was recovered in respiratory CO(2), in other organic acids, in ethanol insoluble material, and an appreciable amount in the ethanol soluble sugar fraction. In Rutgers tomatoes, the label recovery in the sugar fraction and an attendant label reduction in the organic acids fraction intensified with fruit ripening. In both Rutgers and in the nonripening tomato rin, these processes were markedly stimulated by 4000 ppm acetaldehyde. The onset of label apportioning from malic acids to sugars coincided with decreased levels of fructose-2,6-biphosphate, the gluconeogenesis inhibitor. In acetaldehyde-treated tissues, with enhanced label mobilization, this decline reached one-half to one third of the initial fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. Application of 30 micromolar fructose-2,6-biphosphate or 2,5-anhydro-d-mannitol in turn led to a precipitous reduction in the label flow to sugars presumably due to inhibition of fructose-1,6-biphosphatase by the compounds. We conclude that malic and perhaps other organic acids are carbon sources for gluconeogenesis occurring normally in ripening tomatoes. The process is stimulated by acetaldehyde apparently by attenuating the fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. The mode of the acetaldehyde regulation of fructose-2,6-biphosphate metabolism awaits clarification. PMID:16668078

  18. Acetaldehyde inhibition of protein synthesis in isolated rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.P.; Haiman, M.J.; Zylbert, B.A.; Billy, H.T.; Vesenka, G.D.; Geokas, M.C.

    1986-03-30

    Exposure of isolated dispersed pancreatic acini to increasing concentrations of ethanol (5 to 500 mM) or acetaldehyde (0.5 to 100 mM) produced a progressive inhibition of (3H)leucine incorporation into both cellular (those remaining in the cell) and secretory (those released into the medium) proteins. Whereas 500 mM ethanol caused 90-95% inhibition in the synthesis of cellular and secretory proteins, the concentration of acetaldehyde needed to produce a similar inhibition was found to be 50 mM. All subsequent experiments were performed with 12.5 mM acetaldehyde, a concentration that consistently inhibited acinar protein synthesis by about 50%. The acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of acinar protein synthesis was partially normalized when this metabolite was removed after 30 min during a 90-min incubation period. In the presence of acetaldehyde, the secretion of 3H-pulse-labeled proteins, but not amylase, trypsinogen, or chymotrypsinogen, was greatly depressed. Acetaldehyde also caused a marked reduction in (3H)uridine incorporation into acinar RNA. The entry of (3H)uridine, (3H)leucine, and (3H)aminoisobutyric acid into isolated acini was found to be slightly (15-25%) decreased by acetaldehyde. It is concluded that acetaldehyde exerts a direct toxic effect on isolated dispersed pancreatic acini as evidenced by diminution of both protein and RNA synthesis and decreased secretion of the newly synthesized proteins. This inhibitory effect of acetaldehyde could be partially reversed.

  19. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Chun; Oro, J.; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde, and ammonia. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, and 6.8 percent respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  20. Influence of diet and nutritional status on drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Walter-Sack, I; Klotz, U

    1996-07-01

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a wide inter- and intraindividual variability in drug metabolism. Among the environmental factors that may influence drug metabolism, the diet and nutritional status of the individuals are important determinants. As altered drug-metabolising enzyme activities can influence the intensity and duration of drug action, such factors should be considered in pharmacotherapy. For this reason the effects of dietary energy, protein deficiency, nutritional ingredients, special diet forms and nutrition regimens and malnutritional states must be differentiated. In various pharmacokinetic studies different model drugs metabolised either by oxidative phase I pathways [e.g. phenazone (antipyrine), aminopyrine, phenacetin, theophylline, propranolol, nifedipine] or phase II conjugation reactions [e.g. paracetamol (acetaminophen), oxazepam] were used and from the calculated pharmacokinetic data some information on the involved and affected drug-metabolising enzymes [e.g. cytochrome P450 (CYP) subspecies, glucuronosyltransferases] can be generated. It is well known that smoking, charcoal broiled food or cruciferous vegetables induce the metabolism of many xenobiotics, whereas grapefruit juice increases the oral bioavailability of the high clearance drugs nifedipine, nitrendipine or felodipine by inhibiting their presystemic (intestinal) elimination. Energy deficiency, and especially a low intake of protein, will cause a decrease of about 20 to 40% in phenazone and theophylline clearance and elimination of those drugs can be accelerated by a protein-rich diet. In the same way, protein deficiency induced by either vegetarian food or undernourishment will have the opposite pharmacokinetic consequences. On the basis of some more examples from the literature it is emphasised that the variable influence of the above factors should be taken into account in study participant selection and study design when the pharmacokinetics of a drug must be

  1. [Chloroquine influence on lipid metabolism and selected laboratory parameters].

    PubMed

    Woźniacka, Anna; Lesiak, Aleksandra; Smigielski, Janusz; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease with complex pathogenesis, various clinical presentation and chronic course with relapses. Mode of treatment depends on the disease activity and kind of internal organ involvement. In most cases clinical remission could be obtained after antimalarials, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and photoprotection use. Despite the approved antimalarials therapeutic value, the mechanisms by which they provide benefit in lupus, patients are not fully understood. Literature data indicate that they can influence lipid metabolism. The aim of the performed study was the objective evaluation of the influence of 3-month chloroquine treatment (Arechin, 250 mg/day) on lipid metabolism and selected laboratory parameters. In 34 patients with SLE clinical and laboratory evaluation was performed twice, before and after 3-month treatment. After 3 months significantly lower total cholesterol level was observed (mean value 184.91 mg%, 165.26 mg%, p < 0.001). Also LDL level was evidently lowered (111.27 mg%, 99.25 mg%). Similar tendency was noticed in triglycerides, which level after 3 months decreased from the average 152.38 mg% to 104.97 mg%, p < 0.001. Moreover the lowering of sedimentation rate, increasing hemoglobin level and lengthening coagulation time was perceived. The results of the study indicate the influence of chloroquine on decreasing of the disease activity, its anti-inflammatory properties and mainly the drug impact on lipid metabolism. Not only does antimalarials treatment reduce the risk of atherosclerosis development but it also minimizes corticosteroids side effects, which are considered to be the basic medication in lupus patients. PMID:16541717

  2. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHES77). Interestingly, the ADHES77 was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration. PMID:26216639

  3. Acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde from cultured white cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Won; Umber, Brandon J; Meinardi, Simone; Leu, Szu-Yun; Zaldivar, Frank; Blake, Donald R; Cooper, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Noninvasive detection of innate immune function such as the accumulation of neutrophils remains a challenge in many areas of clinical medicine. We hypothesized that granulocytes could generate volatile organic compounds. Methods To begin to test this, we developed a bioreactor and analytical GC-MS system to accurately identify and quantify gases in trace concentrations (parts per billion) emitted solely from cell/media culture. A human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, frequently used to assess neutrophil function, was grown in serum-free medium. Results HL60 cells released acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde in a time-dependent manner. The mean ± SD concentration of acetaldehyde in the headspace above the cultured cells following 4-, 24- and 48-h incubation was 157 ± 13 ppbv, 490 ± 99 ppbv, 698 ± 87 ppbv. For hexanaldehyde these values were 1 ± 0.3 ppbv, 8 ± 2 ppbv, and 11 ± 2 ppbv. In addition, our experimental system permitted us to identify confounding trace gas contaminants such as styrene. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human immune cells known to mimic the function of innate immune cells, like neutrophils, produce volatile gases that can be measured in vitro in trace amounts. PMID:19402909

  4. Biochemical basis of mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1991-01-01

    As reported previously, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in all four known genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1 through ADH4) produce considerable amounts of ethanol during aerobic growth on glucose. It has been suggested that ethanol production in such adh0 cells is a corollary of acetaldehyde dismutation in mitochondria. This could be substantiated further by showing that mitochondrial ethanol formation requires functional electron transport, while the proton gradient or oxidative phosphorylation does not interfere with reduction of acetaldehyde in isolated mitochondria. This acetaldehyde-reducing activity is different from classical alcohol dehydrogenases in that it is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane and also is unable to carry out ethanol oxidation. The putative cofactor is NADH + H+ generated by a soluble, matrix-located aldehyde dehydrogenase upon acetaldehyde oxidation to acetate. This enzyme has been purified from mitochondria of glucose-grown cells. It is clearly different from the known mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, which is absent in glucose-grown cells. Both acetaldehyde-reducing and acetaldehyde-oxidizing activities are also present in the mitochondrial fraction of fermentation-proficient (ADH+) cells. Mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation may have some significance in the removal of surplus acetaldehyde and in the formation of acetate in mitochondria during aerobic glucose fermentation. Images FIG. 4 PMID:1938903

  5. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as...

  9. Catalytic oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L.; Akgerman, A.

    1995-05-01

    Supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction has been receiving increasing attention for the remediation of environmental matrices contaminated with organic compounds. Catalytic oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde over a 4.45% Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide was studied in a 1/2 in. fixed bed reactor. Experiments for ethanol oxidation were performed at temperatures from 423 to 573 K and at a pressure of 8.96 MPa with a 5:1 molar ratio of oxygen to ethanol in the feed. Acetaldehyde oxidation was performed at temperatures from 423 to 548 K and at 8.96 MPa with an approximate 4.7:1 molar ratio of oxygen to acetaldehyde in the feed. In addition to CO{sub 2}, the complete oxidation product, acetaldehyde and trace amounts of CO were generated during ethanol oxidation, while a trace amount of CO was the only partial oxidation product during acetaldehyde oxidation. A parallel and consecutive reaction mechanism was postulated for ethanol oxidation, whereas dissociative adsorption of acetaldehyde on the catalyst surface and surface reaction rate control were postulated for acetaldehyde oxidation. The kinetic parameters in the rate expressions based on the mechanisms were obtained by fitting the experimental data with the results of the model calculation. The models were used to predict the conversion and yield for ethanol oxidation and acetaldehyde oxidation.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10036 - Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10036 Acetaldehyde based polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... based polymer (PMN P-02-406) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS TO DETERMINE IF EARLY NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES ON EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS CAUSE METABOLIC IMPRINTING IN HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic imprinting occurs when nutritional influences during critical periods of development cause specific metabolic adaptations that persist to adulthood. Epigenetic mechanisms, which regulate the broad diversity of tissue-specific gene expression, are established during development and largely ...

  12. Acetaldehyde photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, Robert T.; Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photon induced decomposition of acetaldehyde absorbed on the oxidized retile TIO2(110) surface was studied with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and theral programmed desorption (TPD). Acetaldehyde desorbs molecularly from TiO2(110) with minor decomposition channels yielding butene on the reduced TiO2 surface and acetate on the oxidized TiO2 surface. Acetaldehyde absorbed on oxidized TiO2(110) undergoes a facile thermal reaction to form a photoactive acetaldehyde-oxygen complex. UV irradiation of the acetaldehyde-oxygen complex resulting in the ejection of methyl radical into gas phase and conversion of the surface bound fragment to formate.

  13. Acetaldehyde Photochemistry on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, Robert T.; Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photon induced decomposition of acetaldehyde adsorbed on the oxidized rutile TiO2(110) surface was studied with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal programmed desorption (TPD). Acetaldehyde desorbs molecularly from TiO2(110) with minor decomposition channels yielding butene on the reduced TiO2 surface and acetate on the oxidized TiO2 surface. Acetaldehyde adsorbed on oxidized TiO2(110) undergoes a facile thermal reaction to form a photoactive acetaldehyde-oxygen complex. UV irradiation of the acetaldehyde-oxygen complex initiated photofragmentation of the complex resulting in the ejection of methyl radical into gas phase and conversion of the surface bound fragment to formate.

  14. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the enzymes. Lyophilization of

  15. Development of an LC-MS/MS method for studying migration characteristics of acetaldehyde in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-packed mineral water.

    PubMed

    Baumjohann, Nina; Harms, Diedrich

    2015-01-01

    During storage, acetaldehyde migration from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles can affect the quality of mineral water even in the low µg l(-1) range negatively, as it features a fruity or plastic-like off-flavour. For a sensitive and fast analysis of acetaldehyde in mineral water, a new analysis method of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatisation followed by HPLC-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was developed. Acetaldehyde was directly derivatised in the mineral water sample avoiding extraction and/or pre-concentration steps and then analysed by reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Along with method development, the optimum molar excess of DNPH in contrast to acetaldehyde was studied for the mineral water matrix, because no specific and robust data were yet available for this critical parameter. Best results were obtained by using a calibration via the derivatisation reaction. Without any analyte enrichment or extraction, an LOD of 0.5 µg l(-1) and an LOQ of 1.9 µg l(-1) were achieved. Using the developed method, mineral water samples packed in PET bottles from Germany were analysed and the correlation between the acetaldehyde concentration and other characteristics of the samples was evaluated illustrating the applicability of the method. Besides a relationship between bottle size and CO2 content of the mineral water and acetaldehyde migration, a correlation with acetaldehyde migration and the material composition of the bottle, e.g. recycled PET, was noted. Investigating the light influence on the acetaldehyde migration with a newly developed, reproducible light exposure setup, a significant increase of the acetaldehyde concentration in carbonated mineral water samples was observed. PMID:26258902

  16. The effects of acetaldehyde, glyoxal and acetic acid on the heterogeneous reaction of nitrogen dioxide on gamma-alumina.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenyu; Kong, Lingdong; Ding, Xiaoxiao; Du, Chengtian; Zhao, Xi; Chen, Jianmin; Fu, Hongbo; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Tiantao

    2016-04-14

    Heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen oxides on the surface of aluminium oxide result in the formation of adsorbed nitrite and nitrate. However, little is known about the effects of other species on these heterogeneous reactions and their products. In this study, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to analyze the process of the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of aluminium oxide particles in the presence of pre-adsorbed organic species (acetaldehyde, glyoxal and acetic acid) at 298 K and reveal the influence of these organic species on the formation of adsorbed nitrite and nitrate. It was found that the pre-adsorption of organic species (acetaldehyde, glyoxal and acetic acid) on γ-Al2O3 could suppress the formation of nitrate to different extents. Under the same experimental conditions, the suppression of the formation of nitrate by the pre-adsorption of acetic acid is much stronger than that by pre-adsorption of acetaldehyde and glyoxal, indicating that the influence of acetic acid on the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 is different from that of acetaldehyde and glyoxal. Surface nitrite is formed and identified to be an intermediate product. For the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of γ-Al2O3 with and without the pre-adsorption of acetaldehyde and glyoxal, it is firstly formed and then gradually disappears as the reaction proceeds, but for the reaction with the pre-adsorption of acetic acid, it is the final main product besides nitrate. This indicates that the pre-adsorption of acetic acid would promote the formation of nitrite, while the others would not change the trend of the formation of nitrite. The possible influence mechanisms of the pre-adsorption of acetaldehyde, glyoxal and acetic acid on the heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on γ-Al2O3 are proposed and atmospheric implications based on these results are discussed. PMID:26745767

  17. Influence of metabolism on endocrine activities of bisphenol S.

    PubMed

    Skledar, Darja Gramec; Schmidt, Jan; Fic, Anja; Klopčič, Ivana; Trontelj, Jurij; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Finel, Moshe; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol S (BPS; bis[4-hydroxyphenyl]sulfone) is commonly used as a replacement for bisphenol A in numerous consumer products. The main goal of this study was to examine the influence of different metabolic reactions that BPS undergoes on the endocrine activity. We demonstrate that hydroxylation of the aromatic ring of BPS, catalyzed mainly by the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C9, is its major in-vitro phase I biotransformation. Nevertheless, coupled oxidative-conjugative reactions analyses revealed that glucuronidation and formation of BPS glucuronide is the predominant BPS metabolic pathway. BPS reactive metabolites that can be tracked as glutathione conjugates were not detected in the present study. Two in-vitro systems were used to evaluate the endocrine activity of BPS and its two main metabolites, BPS glucuronide and hydroxylated BPS 4-(4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonyl)-benzene-1,2-diol (BPSM1). In addition, we have tested two structural analogs of BPS, bis[4-(2-hydroxyetoxy)phenyl]sulfone (BHEPS) and 4,4-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS). The test systems were yeast cells, for evaluating estrogenic and androgenic activities, and the GH3.TRE-Luc reporter cell line for measuring thyroid hormone activity. BPS and BPSM1 were weak agonists of the estrogen receptor, EC50 values of 8.4 × 10(-5) M and 6.7 × 10(-4) M, respectively. Additionally, BPSM1 exhibited weak antagonistic activity toward the thyroid hormone receptor, with an IC50 of 4.3 × 10(-5) M. In contrast to BPSM1, BPS glucuronide was inactive in these assays, inhibiting neither the estrogen nor the thyroid hormone receptors. Hence, glucuronidation appears to be the most important pathway for both BPS metabolism and detoxification. PMID:27213244

  18. Acetaldehyde removal using an atmospheric non-thermal plasma combined with a packed bed: role of the adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Klett, C; Duten, X; Tieng, S; Touchard, S; Jestin, P; Hassouni, K; Vega-González, A

    2014-08-30

    This work is an attempt in order to help towards understanding the influence of the adsorption process on the removal of a VOC (acetaldehyde, CH3CHO) using cyclic non thermal plasma (NTP) combined with a packed-bed of a catalyst support, α-Al2O3. In the first part, the results obtained by placing the saturated alumina pellets inside the plasma discharge zone are discussed, in terms of acetaldehyde removal, CO and CO2 production. In the second part, adsorption of CH3CHO, CO, CO2 and O3 was carried out, from single and multicomponent mixtures of the different compounds. The results showed that (i) the adsorption capacities followed the order CH3CHO≫  CO2>CO; (ii) O3 was decomposed on the alumina surface; (iii) CO oxidation occurred on the surface when O3 was present. In the third part, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to follow the alumina surface during acetaldehyde adsorption. DRIFTS measurements demonstrated that besides the bands of molecularly adsorbed acetaldehyde, several absorptions appeared on the spectra showing the intermediate surface transformation of acetaldehyde already at 300K. Finally, the relationship between the adsorption results and the NTP combined with a packed-bed process is discussed. PMID:25072139

  19. Eating beyond metabolic need: how environmental cues influence feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2013-02-01

    Animals use current, past, and projected future states of the organism and the world in a finely tuned system to control ingestion. They must not only deal effectively with current nutrient deficiencies, but also manage energy resources to meet future needs, all within the constraints of the mechanisms of metabolism. Many recent approaches to understanding the control of ingestive behavior distinguish between homeostatic mechanisms concerned with energy balance, and hedonic and incentive processes based on palatability and reward characteristics of food. In this review, I consider how learning about environmental cues influences homeostatic and hedonic brain signals, which may lead to increases in the affective taste properties of food and desire to over consume. Understanding these mechanisms may be critical for elucidating the etiology of the obesity epidemic. PMID:23333343

  20. Circadian Influence on Metabolism and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Cameron S; Swirski, Filip K

    2016-06-24

    Many aspects of human health and disease display daily rhythmicity. The brain's suprachiasmic nucleus, which interprets recurring external stimuli, and autonomous molecular networks in peripheral cells together, set our biological circadian clock. Disrupted or misaligned circadian rhythms promote multiple pathologies including chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis. Here, we discuss studies suggesting that circadian fluctuations in the vessel wall and in the circulation contribute to atherogenesis. Data from humans and mice indicate that an impaired molecular clock, disturbed sleep, and shifting light-dark patterns influence leukocyte and lipid supply in the circulation and alter cellular behavior in atherosclerotic lesions. We propose that a better understanding of both local and systemic circadian rhythms in atherosclerosis will enhance clinical management, treatment, and public health policy. PMID:27340272

  1. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: metabolic response to glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Burdick Sanchez, N C; Carroll, J A; Broadway, P R; Hughes, H D; Roberts, S L; Richeson, J T; Schmidt, T B; Vann, R C

    2016-07-01

    Cattle temperament, defined as the reactivity of cattle to humans or novel environments, can greatly influence several physiological systems in the body, including immunity, stress, and most recently discovered, metabolism. Greater circulating concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) found in temperamental cattle suggest that temperamental cattle are metabolically different than calm cattle. Further, elevated NEFA concentrations have been reported to influence insulin sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether cattle temperament would influence the metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin sensitivity test (IST). Angus-cross steers (16 calm and 15 temperamental; 216 ± 6 kg BW) were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning. On day 1, steers were moved into indoor stanchions to allow measurement of individual ad libitum feed intake. On day 6, steers were fitted with indwelling rectal temperature probes and jugular catheters. At 9 AM on day 7, steers received the GTT (0.5-mL/kg BW of a 50% dextrose solution), and at 2 PM on day 7, steers received the IST (2.5 IU bovine insulin/kg BW). Blood samples were collected and serum isolated at -60, -45, -30, -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min relative to each challenge. Serum was stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol, glucose, NEFA, and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. All variables changed over time (P < 0.01). For the duration of the study, temperamental steers maintained greater (P < 0.01) serum NEFA and less (P ≤ 0.01) serum blood urea nitrogen and insulin sensitivity (calculated using Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) compared with calm steers. During the GTT, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum glucose, yet decreased (P = 0.03) serum insulin and (P < 0.01) serum insulin: serum glucose compared to calm cattle. During the IST, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum

  2. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, P.; Molina, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption. PMID:23801947

  3. Acetaldehyde involvement in ethanol's postabsortive effects during early ontogeny.

    PubMed

    March, Samanta M; Abate, P; Molina, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and biomedical studies sustains the notion that early ontogeny is a vulnerable window to the impact of alcohol. Experiences with the drug during these stages increase latter disposition to prefer, use or abuse ethanol. This period of enhanced sensitivity to ethanol is accompanied by a high rate of activity in the central catalase system, which metabolizes ethanol in the brain. Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first oxidation product of ethanol, has been found to share many neurobehavioral effects with the drug. Cumulative evidence supports this notion in models employing adults. Nevertheless very few studies have been conducted to analyze the role of ACD in ethanol postabsorptive effects, in newborns or infant rats. In this work we review recent experimental literature that syndicates ACD as a mediator agent of reinforcing aspects of ethanol, during early ontogenetic stages. We also show a meta-analytical correlational approach that proposes how differences in the activity of brain catalase across ontogeny, could be modulating patterns of ethanol consumption. PMID:23801947

  4. Lack of evidence for sustained blood acetaldehyde concentrations during alcohol detoxification.

    PubMed

    Nijm, W P; Borge, G F; Origitano, T; Teas, G; Goldfarb, C; Collins, M A

    1978-04-01

    Contrary to a published report, blood acetaldehyde concentrations become undetectable in patients 1--2 days following admission for alcohol detoxification. The persistently elevated blood acetaldehydes reported by others probably were due to artifactual formation during analysis. Nevertheless, our admission blood acetaldehyde concentrations are significant enough to support the contention that acetaldehyde has a cytotoxic role in alcoholic disease. PMID:663401

  5. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and acetaldehyde. 80.56 Section 80.56 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. (a) Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde will be measured by... acetaldehyde are used to determine the response, repeatability, and limit of quantitation of the HPLC...

  6. [Medichronal lowers blood ethanol and acetaldehyde and restores the concentration of catecholamines in rat tissues].

    PubMed

    Bozhko HKZh; Boĭko, T P; Kostiukovs'ka, L S

    1995-01-01

    Variation of ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in blood, catecholamines in hypothalamus, brain stem and hemispheres, heart and adrenal glands, serotonin in the same structures of the brain, thin intestine and blood in rats was studied. Isolated action of medichronal during 10 days against the background of prolonged administration of moderate doses of ethanol significantly lowered ethanol and acetaldehyde concentration in the animal blood. Medichronal increased the level of noradrenaline, lowered under the conditions of ethanol intoxication in the hypothalamus, and increased adrenalina level in the heart; noradrenaline level in adrenal glands is restored. The amount of serotonin in the blood and tissues increased under the conditions of ethanol intoxication did not vary under the action of medichronal. The obtained results indicate to pronounced detoxication influence of medichronal. One of the mechanisms of its action is normalizing the catecholamine changes caused by the ethanol intoxication in tissues. PMID:8592777

  7. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci. PMID:23637459

  8. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, Diego P; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  9. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  10. Influence of host seed on metabolic activity by Enterobacter cloacae in the spermosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding the influences of nutrients released from plants on the metabolic activity of colonizing microbes. To gain a better understanding of these influences, we used bioluminescence- and oxygen consumption-based methods to compare bacterial metabolic activity expressed during col...

  11. Atmospheric Vinyl Alcohol to Acetaldehyde Tautomerization Revisited.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Jozef; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Müller, Jean-François

    2015-10-15

    The atmospheric oxidation of vinyl alcohol (VA) produced by photoisomerization of acetaldehyde (AA) is thought to be a source of formic acid (FA). Nevertheless, a recent theoretical study predicted a high rate coefficient k1(298 K) of ≈10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the FA-catalyzed tautomerization reaction 1 of VA back into AA, which suggests that FA buffers its own production from VA. However, the unusually high frequency factor implied by that study prompted us to reinvestigate reaction 1 . On the basis of a high-level ab initio potential energy profile, we first established that transition state theory is applicable, and derived a k1(298 K) of only ≈2 × 10(-20) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), concluding that the reaction is negligible. Instead, we propose and rationalize another important VA sink: its uptake by aqueous aerosol and cloud droplets followed by fast liquid-phase tautomerization to AA; global modeling puts the average lifetime by this sink at a few hours, similar to oxidation by OH. PMID:26722769

  12. Influence of metabolism in skin on dosimetry after topical exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Bronaugh, R L; Collier, S W; Macpherson, S E; Kraeling, M E

    1994-01-01

    Metabolism of chemicals occurs in skin and therefore should be taken into account when one determines topical exposure dose. Skin metabolism is difficult to measure in vivo because biological specimens may also contain metabolites from other tissues. Metabolism in skin during percutaneous absorption can be studied with viable skin in flow-through diffusion cells. Several compounds metabolized by microsomal enzymes in skin (benzo[a]pyrene and 7-ethoxycoumarin) penetrated human and hairless guinea pig skin predominantly unmetabolized. However, compounds containing a primary amino group (p-aminobenzoic acid, benzocaine, and azo color reduction products) were substrates for acetyltransferase activity in skin and were substantially metabolized during absorption. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model has been developed with an input equation, allowing modeling after topical exposure. Plasma concentrations in the hairless guinea pig were accurately predicted for the model compound, benzoic acid, from in vitro absorption, metabolism, and other pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:7737045

  13. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.L.; Ollis, D.F.

    1996-02-01

    Photocatalysis is considered as a potential air treatment and purification technology. Photocatalyzed oxidation of ethanol and acetaldehyde in humidified air was carried out to establish a first complete kinetic model for a photocatalyzed multispecies network. Two photocatalysts were examined in a batch, recirculation reactor, near-UV illuminated TiO{sub 2} (anatase) coated (i) on the surface of a nonporous quartz glass plate and (ii) on a porous ceramic honeycomb monolith. The former contained only illuminated (active) surfaces, the latter consisted of substantial {open_quotes}dark{close_quotes} surfaces coated with a thin layer of illuminated (active) catalyst. Ethanol was photooxidized to acetaldehyde and formaldehyde intermediates, and eventually to carbon dioxide and water products. The catalyst and monolith surfaces adsorbed appreciable fractions of the trace ethanol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide and water present. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms were measured on both catalysts; the formaldehyde adsorption isotherms were assumed identical to those of acetaldehyde. On the fully illuminated glass plate reactor, all four species were accounted for, and closure of a transient carbon mass balance was demonstrated. Completion of a transient carbon mass balance on the monolith reactor required inclusion of additional reaction intermediates (acetic and formic acids), which appear to reversibly accumulate on only the dark surfaces. The ethanol and acetaldehyde photocatalyzed oxidation kinetic networks were modeled using Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate forms combined with adsorption isotherms for reactant, intermediates, and product CO{sub 2}. For both the quartz plate and monolith catalysts, satisfactory kinetic models were developed to predict the entire time course of ethanol and acetaldehyde multicomponent batch conversions. 43 refs., 16 figs.

  14. The Involvement of Acetaldehyde in Ethanol-Induced Cell Cycle Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Marc A.; Schneider, Katrina J.; Finnigan, Rochelle L.; Maloney, Eamon P.; Wells, Mark A.; Clemens, Dahn L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocytes metabolize the vast majority of ingested ethanol. This metabolic activity results in hepatic toxicity and impairs the ability of hepatocytes to replicate. Previous work by our group has shown that ethanol metabolism results in a G2/M cell cycle arrest. The intent of these studies was to discern the roles of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen, two of the major by-products of ethanol metabolism, in the G2/M cell cycle arrest. Methods: To investigate the role of ethanol metabolites in the cell cycle arrest, VA-13 and VL-17A cells were used. These are recombinant Hep G2 cells that express alcohol dehydrogenase or alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome P450 2E1, respectively. Cells were cultured with or without ethanol, lacking or containing the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or trolox, for three days. Cellular accumulation was monitored by the DNA content of the cultures. The accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2 in the inactive phosphorylated form (p-Cdc2) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 were determined by immunoblot analysis. Results: Cultures maintained in the presence of ethanol demonstrated a G2/M cell cycle arrest that was associated with a reduction in DNA content and increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21, compared with cells cultured in its absence. Inclusion of antioxidants in the ethanol containing media was unable to rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest or these ethanol metabolism-mediated effects. Additionally, culturing the cells in the presence of acetaldehyde alone resulted in increased levels of p-Cdc2 and p21. Conclusions: Acetaldehyde produced during ethanol oxidation has a major role in the ethanol metabolism-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest, and the concurrent accumulation of p21 and p-Cdc2. Although reactive oxygen species are thought to have a significant role in ethanol-induced hepatocellular damage, they may have a less important role in the inability of hepatocytes to replace dead or damaged

  15. Biotransformation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, O.M.; Sibirnyi, A.A.; Ksheminskaya, G.P. |

    1995-05-01

    The conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by intact cells of wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied. It was established that mutations that lower the activity of aldehyde reductase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. The highest accumulation of acetaldehyde was found in a mutant that possessed increased alcohol oxidase activity in growth on a medium with glucose. A decrease in formaldehyde dehydrogenase did not stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. Bioconversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde was most effective at lowered temperatures due to marked suppression of catabolic alcohol oxidase inactivation, but not to the activity of this enzyme under indicated conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Decarboxylation of Pyruvate to Acetaldehyde for Ethanol Production by Hyperthermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Eram, Mohammad S.; Ma, Kesen

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC encoded by pdc) is a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-containing enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in many mesophilic organisms. However, no pdc/PDC homolog has yet been found in fully sequenced genomes and proteomes of hyper/thermophiles. The only PDC activity reported in hyperthermophiles was a bifunctional, TPP- and CoA-dependent pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR)/PDC enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Another enzyme known to be involved in catalysis of acetaldehyde production from pyruvate is CoA-acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (AcDH encoded by mhpF and adhE). Pyruvate is oxidized into acetyl-CoA by either POR or pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and AcDH catalyzes the reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde in mesophilic organisms. AcDH is present in some mesophilic (such as clostridia) and thermophilic bacteria (e.g., Geobacillus and Thermoanaerobacter). However, no AcDH gene or protein homologs could be found in the released genomes and proteomes of hyperthermophiles. Moreover, no such activity was detectable from the cell-free extracts of different hyperthermophiles under different assay conditions. In conclusion, no commonly-known PDCs was found in hyperthermophiles. Instead of the commonly-known PDC, it appears that at least one multifunctional enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde in hyperthermophiles. PMID:24970182

  17. Effect of oxygen on the conversion of acetaldehyde in homogeneous plasmas of N2/O2/CH3CHO mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faider, W.; Pasquiers, S.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Magne, L.

    2013-12-01

    A photo-triggered discharge producing a homogeneous plasma was used to investigate, experimentally and with the help of a self-consistent 0D model, the decomposition processes of acetaldehyde (concentration up to 0.5%) in N2/O2/CH3CHO mixtures containing up to 20% oxygen, at a total pressure of 460 mbar. This work follows a previous one about N2/CH3CHO, having provided the necessary data about the quenching of the N2 metastable states by the acetaldehyde molecule. For the condition of the experiment, it was shown that oxygen has a weak influence on the acetaldehyde removal. Nevertheless, the kinetic reactions involved drastically change when the oxygen percentage is increased. Quenching reactions gradually give way to oxidation reactions by O(3P) and OH. Oxidation by OH dominates for a high acetaldehyde concentration or a high oxygen percentage. Moreover, CH3 is an important primary compound for the formation of CH4 and C2H6. Ethane is less populated than methane in the whole range of oxygen percentage values studied, and there are still hydrocarbon molecules in the gas mixture at 20% oxygen. This is well explained by the adopted kinetic scheme.

  18. Non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces strains co-fermentation increases acetaldehyde accumulation: effect on anthocyanin-derived pigments in Tannat red wines.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Fariña, Laura; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    During fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae releases into the medium secondary metabolic products, such as acetaldehyde, able to react with anthocyanins, producing more stable derived pigments. However, very limited reports are found about non-Saccharomyces effects on grape fermentation. In this study, six non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, belonging to the genera Metschnikowia and Hanseniaspora, were screened for their effect on red wine colour and wine-making capacity under pure culture conditions and mixed with Saccharomyces. An artificial red grape must was prepared, containing a phenolic extract of Tannat grapes that allows monitoring changes of key phenol parameters during fermentation, but without skin solids in the medium. When fermented in pure cultures, S. cerevisiae produced higher concentrations of acetaldehyde and vitisin B (acetaldehyde reaction-dependent) compared to M. pulcherrima M00/09G, Hanseniaspora guillermondii T06/09G, H. opuntiae T06/01G, H. vineae T02/05F and H. clermontiae (A10/82Fand C10/54F). However, co-fermentation of H. vineae and H. clermontiae with S. cerevisiae resulted in a significantly higher concentration of acetaldehyde compared with the pure S. cerevisiae control. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis confirmed an increased formation of vitisin B in co-fermentation treatments when compared to pure Saccharomyces fermentation, suggesting the key role of acetaldehyde. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26888345

  19. Metabolic alterations in morbid obesity. Influence on the haemorheological profile.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Suescun, Marta; Solá, Eva; Cámara, Rosa; Romagnoli, Marco; Bautista, Daniel; Laiz, Begoña

    2011-01-01

    There are few studies on haemorheological disturbances in morbidly obese patients. The role played by the metabolic syndrome on the rheological profile of morbidly obese subjects has not yet been established, and it is not clear whether morbidly obese, but "metabolically healthy", show rheological alterations. We aimed to determine the whole rheological profile in 136 morbidly obese patients and 136 normo-weight volunteers, along with plasma lipids, inflammatory and insulin resistance parameters. Patients had statistically higher glucose, triglycerides, HbA1c, leptin, insulin, HOMA, CRP, leucocytes, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity (p < 0.001, respectively), erythrocyte aggregation at 3 s-1 (p = 0.011) and lower erythrocyte elongation index 60 Pa (p = 0.015). In the multivariate regression analysis, the anthropometric, lipidic, insulin resistance and inflammatory parameters predicted haemorheological variables (p < 0.001). No differences were observed for the rheological parameters when morbidly obese subjects with (n = 75) and without (n = 61) the metabolic syndrome were compared (p > 0.05), indicating that the altered rheological profile not only related to the metabolic syndrome, but to obesity itself. When further patients were classified as "metabolically healthy" obese (n = 23) and "metabolically unhealthy" obese (n = 113), the latter presented higher insulin resistance (insulin p < 0.01, HOMA p < 0.05, glucose p < 0.001, triglycerides p < 0.05 and HbA1c p < 0.01) than the former, but no differences in the rheological parameters (p > 0.05) were observed. When "metabolically healthy" obese (n = 23) were compared with "metabolically healthy" controls (n = 81), the former still showed higher HOMA (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.05), CRP (p < 0.001) and HbA1c (p < 0.05), higher fibrinogen (p < 0.001), plasma viscosity (p < 0.001), erythrocyte aggregation at 3 s-1 (p < 0.05), but a lower erythrocyte elongation index 60 Pa (p < 0.05). Morbidly obese subjects present

  20. Inorganic acid-catalyzed tautomerization of vinyl alcohol to acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The vinyl alcohol-acetaldehyde tautomerization reaction has recently received considerable attention as a potential route for the formation of organic acids in the troposphere (Andrews et al., 2012 [7]). We examine the catalytic effect of inorganic acids in the troposphere (e.g. HNO3, H2SO4 and HClO4) on the vinyl alcohol-acetaldehyde tautomerization reaction, by means high-level thermochemical procedures. We show that H2SO4 and HClO4 catalysts lead to near-zero reaction barrier heights for the vinyl alcohol → acetaldehyde reaction, and to low reaction barrier heights in the reverse direction (ΔH298‡=40.6 and 39.5 kJ mol, respectively).

  1. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: 1. Metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test in beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperamental cattle are behaviorally, physiologically, and immunologically different in comparison to calm cattle. Recently, the metabolic differences between temperamental and calm cattle have begun to be explored; temperamental cattle maintain greater circulating concentrations of non-esterified ...

  2. Gas phase acetaldehyde production in a continuous bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Soon Ook . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Trantolo, D.J. . Center for Biotechnology Engineering); Wise, D.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA . Center for Biotechnology Engineering)

    1993-08-20

    The gas phase continuous production of acetaldehyde was studied with particular emphasis on the development of biocatalyst (alcohol oxidase on solid phase support materials) for a fixed bed reactor. Based on the experimental results in a batch bioreactor, the biocatalysts were prepared by immobilization of alcohol oxidase on Amberlite IRA-400, packed into a column, and the continuous acetaldehyde production in the gas phase by alcohol oxidase was performed. The effects of the reaction temperature, flow rates of gaseous stream, and ethanol vapor concentration on the performance of the continuous bioreactor were investigated.

  3. Influence of drugs on vitamin D and calcium metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Kisters, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In the past, interactions between drugs and vitamin D have received only little or no attention in the health care practices. However, since more and more drugs are used for the treatment of patients, this topic is increasingly relevant. Several drugs can interfere with the vitamin D and bone metabolism. Drugs that activate the pregnane X receptor can disrupt vitamin D metabolism and vitamin D function. Beside this, the medication oriented supplementation of vitamin D can ameliorate the pharmacologic action of some drugs, such as bisphosphonates, cytostatics and statins. PMID:22928072

  4. Quality Characteristics and Quantification of Acetaldehyde and Methanol in Apple Wine Fermentation by Various Pre-Treatments of Mash.

    PubMed

    Won, Seon Yi; Seo, Jae Soon; Kwak, Han Sub; Lee, Youngseung; Kim, Misook; Shim, Hyoung-Seok; Jeong, Yoonhwa

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of adding lactic acid and pectinase, and chaptalization for the quality of apple wine and the production of hazardous compounds (methanol and acetaldehyde). The pH of all of the samples was below 4; therefore, mash seemed to be fermented without any issue. Total acidity was the highest in sample A due to lactic acid addition. Pre-treated groups (samples B, C, and D) showed higher total acidities than that of the control (P<0.05). Pre-treatments might influence the production of organic acids in apple wines. The control and pectinase added sample (sample B) had the lowest alcohol contents. Adding lactic acid produced more alcohol, and chaptalized samples produced more alcohol due to the addition of sugar. Adding pectinase with and without chaptalization was not effective for producing more alcohol. The control sample had significantly higher acetaldehyde content (2.39 mg/L) than the other samples (1.00~2.07 mg/L); therefore, pre-treatments for apple wine fermentation produced a lower amount of acetaldehyde. Among the pre-treated samples, samples C and D showed the lowest acetaldehyde content of 1.00 mg/L and 1.16 mg/L, respectively. On the other hand, a significantly higher amount of methanol was generated for sample A (1.03 mg/L) and sample D (1.22 mg/L) than that of the control (0.82 mg/L) (P<0.05). Adding lactic acid or chaptalization was effective in reducing methanol and acetaldehyde in apple wines. PMID:26770917

  5. Quality Characteristics and Quantification of Acetaldehyde and Methanol in Apple Wine Fermentation by Various Pre-Treatments of Mash

    PubMed Central

    Won, Seon Yi; Seo, Jae Soon; Kwak, Han Sub; Lee, Youngseung; Kim, Misook; Shim, Hyoung-Seok; Jeong, Yoonhwa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of adding lactic acid and pectinase, and chaptalization for the quality of apple wine and the production of hazardous compounds (methanol and acetaldehyde). The pH of all of the samples was below 4; therefore, mash seemed to be fermented without any issue. Total acidity was the highest in sample A due to lactic acid addition. Pre-treated groups (samples B, C, and D) showed higher total acidities than that of the control (P<0.05). Pre-treatments might influence the production of organic acids in apple wines. The control and pectinase added sample (sample B) had the lowest alcohol contents. Adding lactic acid produced more alcohol, and chaptalized samples produced more alcohol due to the addition of sugar. Adding pectinase with and without chaptalization was not effective for producing more alcohol. The control sample had significantly higher acetaldehyde content (2.39 mg/L) than the other samples (1.00~2.07 mg/L); therefore, pre-treatments for apple wine fermentation produced a lower amount of acetaldehyde. Among the pre-treated samples, samples C and D showed the lowest acetaldehyde content of 1.00 mg/L and 1.16 mg/L, respectively. On the other hand, a significantly higher amount of methanol was generated for sample A (1.03 mg/L) and sample D (1.22 mg/L) than that of the control (0.82 mg/L) (P<0.05). Adding lactic acid or chaptalization was effective in reducing methanol and acetaldehyde in apple wines. PMID:26770917

  6. INFLUENCE OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM IN ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential extrapulmonary effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on hepatic xenobiotic metabolism were examined. Initial studies were conducted using pentobarbital (PEN) induced sleeping time (S.T.) in mice as an indicator of integrated mechanisms of xenobiotic clearance. A 3 hr. expos...

  7. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  8. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  9. Glucokinase regulatory proten genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3...

  10. The effect of flooding on the exchange of the volatile C2-compounds ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid between leaves of Amazonian floodplain tree species and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenberger, S.; Kleiss, B.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Junk, W.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of root inundation on the leaf emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid in relation to assimilation and transpiration was investigated with 2 3 years old tree seedlings of four Amazonian floodplain species by applying dynamic cuvette systems under greenhouse conditions. Emissions were monitored over a period of several days of inundation using a combination of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional techniques (HPLC, ion chromatography). Under non-flooded conditions, none of the species exhibited measurable emissions of any of the compounds, but rather low deposition of acetaldehyde and acetic acid was observed instead. Tree species specific variations in deposition velocities were largely due to variations in stomatal conductance. Flooding of the roots resulted in leaf emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde by all species, while emissions of acetic acid were only observed from the species exhibiting the highest ethanol and acetaldehyde emission rates. All three compounds showed a similar diurnal emission profile, each displaying an emission burst in the morning, followed by a decline in the evening. This concurrent behavior supports the conclusion, that all three compounds emitted by the leaves are derived from ethanol produced in the roots by alcoholic fermentation, transported to the leaves with the transpiration stream and finally partly converted to acetaldehyde and acetic acid by enzymatic processes. Co-emissions and peaking in the early morning suggest that root ethanol, after transportation with the transpiration stream to the leaves and enzymatic oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, is the metabolic precursor for all compounds emitted, though we can not totally exclude other production pathways. Emission rates substantially varied among tree species, with maxima differing by up to two orders of magnitude (25 1700 nmol m-2 min-1 for ethanol and 5 500 nmol m-2 min-1 for acetaldehyde). Acetic acid emissions

  11. The effect of flooding on the exchange of the volatile C2-compounds ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid between leaves of Amazonian floodplain tree species and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenberger, S.; Kleiss, B.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Junk, W.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of root inundation on the leaf emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid was investigated with 2-3 years old tree seedlings of four Amazonian floodplain species by applying dynamic cuvette systems under greenhouse conditions. Emissions were monitored over a period of several days of inundation using a combination of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional techniques (HPLC, ion chromatography). Under non-flooded conditions, none of the species exhibited significant emissions of any of the compounds. A slight deposition of acetaldehyde and acetic acid was mainly observed, instead. Tree species specific variations in deposition velocities were largely due to variations in stomatal conductance. Flooding of the roots resulted in leaf emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde by all species, while emissions of acetic acid occurred only by the species exhibiting the highest ethanol and acetaldehyde emission rates. All three compounds showed a similar diurnal emission profile, each displaying an emission burst in the morning, followed by a decline in the evening. This concurrent behavior supports the conclusion, that all three compounds emitted by the leaves are derived from ethanol produced in the roots by alcoholic fermentation, transported to the leaves with the transpiration stream and finally partly converted to acetaldehyde and acetic acid by enzymatic processes. Co-emissions and peaking in the early morning confirmed that root ethanol, after transportation with the transpiration stream to the leaves and enzymatic oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, is the metabolic precursor for all compounds emitted. Emission rates substantially varied among tree species, with maxima differing by up to two orders of magnitude (3-200 nmol m-2 min-1 for ethanol and 5-500 nmol m-2 min-1 for acetaldehyde). Acetic acid emissions reached 12 nmol m-2 min-1. The observed differences in emission rates between the tree species are discussed

  12. BIOGENIC SOURCES FOR FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  13. [A gas chromatographic method for determining acetaldehyde in cadaver blood].

    PubMed

    Savich, V I; Valladares, Kh A; Gusakov, Iu A; Skachko, Z M

    1990-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic method of acetaldehyde detection in blood of subjects who died of alcoholic intoxication is suggested. Method is simple, does not require additional expenses, can be readily used in medicolegal practice and in difficult cases it may help the expert to make an objective conclusion on the cause of death. PMID:2087747

  14. Influence of temperature, oxygen and salinity on the metabolism of the European sea bass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claireaux, G.; Lagardère, J.-P.

    1999-09-01

    Standard (SMR) and routine (RMR) metabolic rates of groups (4 to 5 individuals) of European sea bass ( Dicentrarchus labrax) were measured at combinations of the following factors: temperature (10, 15, 20 and 25°C), oxygenation level (air saturation to 1.5 mg dm -3) and salinity (30, 20, 10 and 5‰). The influence of these environmental conditions on fish metabolic demand was then analysed through ANOVA. At 10, 15, 20 and 25°C, standard metabolic rates were 36, 65, 89, and 91 mg O 2 kg -1 h -1, respectively, while routine oxygen consumptions covered most of the metabolic range accessible. Osmoregulatory costs are linked to metabolic activity through ventilation. This relationship was highlighted by the observed interaction between environmental salinity and temperature. We were, however, unable to detect interactions between salinity and routine metabolic rate, or between salinity and oxygenation level. In order to delineate more precisely the restrictions imposed by water oxygenation on fish metabolic performance we determined the limiting oxygen concentration curves at each experimental temperature. We followed up by modelling the bass active metabolic rate (AMR) and metabolic scope (MS) as functions of both ambient temperature and oxygenation. These mathematical models allowed the characterisation of the controlling and limiting effects of water temperature and oxygen content on the metabolic capacity of the species. Thus, AMR at 10, 15 and 20°C were estimated at 65, 160 and 360 mg O 2 kg -1 h -1, respectively. However, at higher temperature (25°C) AMR dropped slightly (to 340 mg O 2 kg -1 h -1). Bass MS increased by a factor of 9 between 10 and 20°C, but diminished at higher temperatures. The present study contributes to our current understanding of the influences of environmental factors on the metabolism of sea bass and provides a bioenergetic basis for a study of how environmental constraints govern the spatial and temporal distribution pattern of this

  15. Aromatic Amines Exert Contrasting Effects on the Anticoagulant Effect of Acetaldehyde upon APTT

    PubMed Central

    Hall, La'Teese; Murrey, Sarah J.; Brecher, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological effects of amphetamine, procaine, procainamide, DOPA, isoproterenol, and atenolol upon activated partial thromboplastin time in the absence and presence of acetaldehyde have been investigated. In the absence of acetaldehyde, amphetamine and isoproterenol exhibit a procoagulant effect upon activated partial thromboplastin time, whereas atenolol and procaine display anticoagulant effects upon activated partial thromboplastin time. DOPA and procainamide do not alter activated partial thromboplastin time. Premixtures of procaine with acetaldehyde produce an additive anticoagulant effect on activated partial thromboplastin time, suggesting independent action of these compounds upon clotting factors. Premixtures of amphetamine with acetaldehyde, as well as atenolol with acetaldehyde, generate a detoxication of the anticoagulant effect of acetaldehyde upon activated partial thromboplastin time. A similar statistically significant decrease in activated partial thromboplastin time is seen when procainamide is premixed with acetaldehyde for 20 minutes at room temperature. Premixtures of DOPA and isoproterenol with acetaldehyde do not affect an alteration in activated partial thromboplastin time relative to acetaldehyde alone. Hence, a selective interaction of atenolol, procaine, and amphetamine with acetaldehyde to produce detoxication of the acetaldehyde is suggested, undoubtedly due to the presence of amino, hydroxyl, or amide groups in these drugs. PMID:25548568

  16. Influence of metabolic syndrome on upper gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    A recent increase in the rate of obesity as a result of insufficient physical exercise and excess food consumption has been seen in both developed and developing countries throughout the world. Additionally, the recent increased number of obese individuals with lifestyle-related diseases associated with abnormalities in glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, defined as metabolic syndrome (MS), has been problematic. Although MS has been highlighted as a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and arteriosclerotic diseases, it was also recently shown to be associated with digestive system disorders, including upper gastrointestinal diseases. Unlike high body weight and high body mass index, abdominal obesity with visceral fat accumulation is implicated in the onset of various digestive system diseases because excessive visceral fat accumulation may cause an increase in intra-abdominal pressure, inducing the release of various bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, resistin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review article focuses on upper gastrointestinal disorders and their association with MS, including obesity, visceral fat accumulation, and the major upper gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27372302

  17. Hybridization in sunfish influences the muscle metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Davies, R; Mathers, K E; Hume, A D; Bremer, K; Wang, Y; Moyes, C D

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to exert pleiotropic effects on metabolism. Effects on mitochondrial enzymes may arise through incompatibilities in nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation. We explored the metabolic phenotype of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), and their unidirectional F(1) hybrids (male bluegill × female pumpkinseed). In hybrids, glycolytic enzyme activities were indistinguishable from (aldolase, pyruvate kinase) or intermediate to (lactate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucoisomerase) parentals, but complex IV activities aligned with pumpkinseed, both 30% lower than bluegill. In isolated mitochondria, the specific activities of complexes I, II, and V were indistinguishable between groups. However, both complex III and IV showed indications of depressed activities in hybrid mitochondria, though no effects on mitochondrial state 3 or state 4 respiration were apparent. The patterns in complex IV activities were due to differences in enzyme content rather than enzyme V(max); immunoblots comparing complex IV content with catalytic activity were indistinguishable between groups. The sequence differences in complex IV catalytic subunits (CO1, CO2, CO3) were minor in nature; however, the mtDNA-encoded subunit of complex III (cytochrome b) showed eight differences between bluegill and pumpkinseed, several of which could have structural consequences to the multimeric enzyme, contributing to the depressed complex III catalytic activity in hybrids. PMID:22705483

  18. Metabolic Depression in Cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) Is Influenced by Ontogeny, and Enhances Thermal Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Gordon W.; Gamperl, A. Kurt

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of ontogeny on metabolic depression in the cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), and to understand how ontogeny and the ability to metabolically depress influence this species' upper thermal tolerance: 1) the metabolic rate of 9°C-acclimated cunner of three size classes [0.2–0.5 g, young of the year (YOY); 3–6 g, small; and 80–120 g, large (adult)] was measured during a 2°C per day decrease in temperature; and 2) the metabolic response of the same three size classes of cunner to an acute thermal challenge [2°C h−1 from 10°C until Critical Thermal Maximum, CTMax] was examined, and compared to that of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). The onset-temperature for metabolic depression in cunner increased with body size, i.e. from 5°C in YOY cunner to 7°C in adults. In contrast, the extent of metabolic depression was ∼80% (Q10 = ∼15) for YOY fish, ∼65% (Q10 = ∼8) for small fish and ∼55% (Q10 = ∼5) for adults, and this resulted in the metabolic scaling exponent (b) gradually increasing from 0.84 to 0.92 between 9°C to 1°C. All size classes of cunner had significantly (approximately 60%) lower routine metabolic rates at 10°C than Atlantic cod. However, there was no species' difference in the temperature-induced maximum metabolic rate, and this resulted in factorial metabolic scope values that were more than two-fold greater for cunner, and CTMax values that were 6–9°C higher (∼21 vs. 28°C). These results: 1) show that ontogeny influences the temperature of initiation and the extent of metabolic depression in cunner, but not O2 consumption when in a hypometabolic state; and 2) suggest that the evolution of cold-induced metabolic depression in this northern wrasse species has not resulted in a trade-off with upper thermal tolerance, but instead, an enhancement of this species' metabolic plasticity. PMID:25514755

  19. [Abilities of acetaldehyde removal in different water-treating techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Chao; Fan, Kang-Ping

    2011-03-01

    The effect of acetaldehyde removal by several kinds of water-treating technologies is experienced in laboratory and the results reveal that traditional water-treating processes have hardly any useful results and the absorption of GAC does no better either for its efficiency depending on the GAC service time greatly and with a very short leakage time. However, the micro-biological degradation process in the BAC filter can consume more than 95% acetaldehyde in 13 minutes when the biomass has been fully acclimatized. The acclimation process usually lasts 4-30 h under field conditions depending on the stabilization and maturity of the original biomass on the carbon, but can be shortened remarkably by means of inhibiting the activity of existing biomass or artificially inoculating acclimatized microbe. PMID:21634164

  20. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  1. Influence of dietary substances on intestinal drug metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Won, Christina S; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2010-11-01

    Successful delivery of promising new chemical entities via the oral route is rife with challenges, some of which cannot be explained or foreseen during drug development. Further complicating an already multifaceted problem is the obvious, yet often overlooked, effect of dietary substances on drug disposition and response. Some dietary substances, particularly fruit juices, have been shown to inhibit biochemical processes in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK), and potentially pharmacodynamic (PD), outcomes. Inhibition of intestinal CYP3Amediated metabolism is the major mechanism by which fruit juices, including grapefruit juice, enhances systemic exposure to new and already marketed drugs. Inhibition of intestinal non-CYP3A enzymes and apically-located transport proteins represent recently identified mechanisms that can alter PK and PD. Several fruit juices have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, but some interactions have not translated to the clinic. The lack of in vitroin vivo concordance is due largely to a lack of rigorous methods to elucidate causative ingredients prior to clinical testing. Identification of specific components and underlying mechanisms is challenging, as dietary substances frequently contain multiple, often unknown, bioactive ingredients that vary in composition and bioactivity. A translational research approach, combining expertise from clinical pharmacologists and natural products chemists, is needed to develop robust models describing PK/PD relationships between a given dietary substance and drug of interest. Validation of these models through well-designed clinical trials would facilitate development of common practice guidelines for managing drug-dietary substance interactions appropriately. PMID:21189136

  2. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  3. The influence of BMI on the association between serum lycopene and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Soliman, Ghada A; Meza, Jane L; Islam, K M Monirul; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2016-04-14

    Overweight and obese individuals have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome because of subsequent chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, which the antioxidant nutrient lycopene can reduce. However, studies indicate that different BMI statuses can alter the positive effects of lycopene. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how BMI influences the association between serum lycopene and the metabolic syndrome. The tertile rank method was used to divide 13 196 participants, aged 20 years and older, into three groups according to serum concentrations of lycopene. The associations between serum lycopene and the metabolic syndrome were analysed separately for normal-weight, overweight and obese participants. Overall, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the first tertile group (OR 38·6%; 95% CI 36·9, 40·3) compared with the second tertile group (OR 29·3%; 95% CI 27·5, 31·1) and the third tertile group (OR 26·6%; 95% CI 24·9, 28·3). However, the associations between lycopene and the metabolic syndrome were only significant for normal-weight and overweight participants (P0·05), even after adjusting for possible confounding variables. In conclusion, BMI appears to strongly influence the association between serum lycopene and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26857614

  4. Metabolomic Applications to Decipher Gut Microbial Metabolic Influence in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, François-Pierre J.; Collino, Sebastiano; Rezzi, Serge; Kochhar, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Dietary preferences and nutrients composition have been shown to influence human and gut microbial metabolism, which ultimately has specific effects on health and diseases’ risk. Increasingly, results from molecular biology and microbiology demonstrate the key role of the gut microbiota metabolic interface to the overall mammalian host’s health status. There is therefore raising interest in nutrition research to characterize the molecular foundations of the gut microbial–mammalian cross talk at both physiological and biochemical pathway levels. Tackling these challenges can be achieved through systems biology approaches, such as metabolomics, to underpin the highly complex metabolic exchanges between diverse biological compartments, including organs, systemic biofluids, and microbial symbionts. By the development of specific biomarkers for prediction of health and disease, metabolomics is increasingly used in clinical applications as regard to disease etiology, diagnostic stratification, and potentially mechanism of action of therapeutical and nutraceutical solutions. Surprisingly, an increasing number of metabolomics investigations in pre-clinical and clinical studies based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided compelling evidence that system wide and organ-specific biochemical processes are under the influence of gut microbial metabolism. This review aims at describing recent applications of metabolomics in clinical fields where main objective is to discern the biochemical mechanisms under the influence of the gut microbiota, with insight into gastrointestinal health and diseases diagnostics and improvement of homeostasis metabolic regulation. PMID:22557976

  5. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential wood combustion in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, Mário; Gomes, Luís; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to characterize formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from residential combustion of common wood species growing in Portugal. Five types of wood were investigated: maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), cork oak (Quercus suber), holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) and pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica). Laboratory experiments were performed with a typical wood stove used for domestic heating in Portugal and operating under realistic home conditions. Aldehydes were sampled from diluted combustion flue gas using silica cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The average formaldehyde to acetaldehyde concentration ratio (molar basis) in the stove flue gas was in the range of 2.1-2.9. Among the tested wood types, pyrenean oak produced the highest emissions for both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde: 1772 ± 649 and 1110 ± 454 mg kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. By contrast, maritime pine produced the lowest emissions: 653 ± 151 and 371 ± 162 mg kg-1 biomass (dry basis) burned, respectively. Aldehydes were sampled separately during distinct periods of the holm oak wood combustion cycles. Significant variations in the flue gas concentrations were found, with higher values measured during the devolatilization stage than in the flaming and smoldering stages.

  6. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY SUBSTANCES ON INTESTINAL DRUG METABOLISM AND TRANSPORT

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    Successful delivery of promising new chemical entities via the oral route is rife with challenges, some of which cannot be explained or foreseen during drug development. Further complicating an already multifaceted problem is the obvious, yet often overlooked, effect of dietary substances on drug disposition and response. Some dietary substances, particularly fruit juices, have been shown to inhibit biochemical processes in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK), and potentially pharmacodynamic (PD), outcomes. Inhibition of intestinal CYP3A-mediated metabolism is the major mechanism by which fruit juices, including grapefruit juice, enhances systemic exposure to new and already marketed drugs. Inhibition of intestinal non-CYP3A enzymes and apically-located transport proteins represent recently identified mechanisms that can alter PK and PD. Several fruit juices have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, but some interactions have not translated to the clinic. The lack of in vitro-in vivo concordance is due largely to a lack of rigorous methods to elucidate causative ingredients prior to clinical testing. Identification of specific components and underlying mechanisms is challenging, as dietary substances frequently contain multiple, often unknown, bioactive ingredients that vary in composition and bioactivity. A translational research approach, combining expertise from clinical pharmacologists and natural products chemists, is needed to develop robust models describing PK/PD relationships between a given dietary substance and drug of interest. Validation of these models through well-designed clinical trials would facilitate development of common practice guidelines for managing drug-dietary substance interactions appropriately. PMID:21189136

  7. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis. PMID:26986217

  8. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis. PMID:26986217

  9. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and contractile function; influence of workload and oleate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple extra-cardiac stimuli, such as workload and circulating nutrients (e.g., fatty acids), known to influence myocardial metabolism and contractile function exhibit marked circadian rhythms. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the rat heart exhibits circadian rhythms in its ...

  10. Absorption of Anthocyanins from Berries: Metabolic Products and Influence of Glycoside

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are unique among the flavonoids in that they are absorbed as the intact glycoside. Berries are rich sources of anthocyanins; differences among the berries in aglycone as well as in sugar moieties provide opportunities to study factors that influence absorption/metabolism. The rel...

  11. Influence of manganese on growth, somatomedin and glycosaminoglycan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bolze, M S; Reeves, R D; Lindbeck, F E; Kemp, S F; Elders, M J

    1985-03-01

    Day-old chicks were fed control or manganese (Mn deficient diets ad libitum for 25 d. The chicks subsequently were refed control diet for up to 5 d. Mn deficiency significantly decreased growth rate and feed intake compared to controls. After 25 d of depletion, bone Mn concentration was 2% that of controls and 88% of the deficient chicks exhibited signs of perosis. Sulfate (35SO4) uptake into uronic acid was significantly depressed in cartilage from the Mn-depleted chicks and increased rapidly with refeeding, which may indicate increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis or increased sulfation of the GAG molecule. In vitro activity of glycosyltransferases suggest that GAG synthesis may be interrupted by Mn deficiency. Somatomedin activity, serum insulin and glucose levels were not influenced significantly by Mn deficiency. Thus, while Mn deficiency decreased growth and GAG synthesis these effects were not mediated by somatomedin. PMID:3882911

  12. On the Reaction Mechanism of Acetaldehyde Decomposition on Mo(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-16

    The strong Mo-O bond strength provides promising reactivity of Mo-based catalysts for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates. Combining the novel dimer saddle point searching method with periodic spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we investigated the reaction pathways of a acetaldehyde decomposition on the clean Mo(110) surface. Two reaction pathways were identified, a selective deoxygenation and a nonselective fragmentation pathways. We found that acetaldehyde preferentially adsorbs at the pseudo 3-fold hollow site in the η2(C,O) configuration on Mo(110). Among four possible bond (β-C-H, γ-C-H, C-O and C-C) cleavages, the initial decomposition of the adsorbed acetaldehyde produces either ethylidene via the C-O bond scission or acetyl via the β-C-H bond scission while the C-C and the γ-C-H bond cleavages of acetaldehyde leading to the formation of methyl (and formyl) and formylmethyl are unlikely. Further dehydrogenations of ethylidene into either ethylidyne or vinyl are competing and very facile with low activation barriers of 0.24 and 0.31 eV, respectively. Concurrently, the formed acetyl would deoxygenate into ethylidyne via the C-O cleavage rather than breaking the C-C or the C-H bonds. The selective deoxygenation of acetaldehyde forming ethylene is inhibited by relatively weaker hydrogenation capability of the Mo(110) surface. Instead, the nonselective pathway via vinyl and vinylidene dehydrogenations to ethynyl as the final hydrocarbon fragment is kinetically favorable. On the other hand, the strong interaction between ethylene and the Mo(110) surface also leads to ethylene decomposition instead of desorption into the gas phase. This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). This work was financially supported

  13. Effect of acetaldehyde on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis subjected to environmental shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Hobley, T.J.; Pamment, N.B.

    1997-01-05

    The lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a step increase in temperature or ethanol concentration was reduced by as much as 60% when acetaldehyde was added to the medium at concentrations less than 0.1 g/L. Maximum specific growth rates were also substantially increased. Even greater proportional reductions in lag time due to acetaldehyde addition were observed for ethanol-shocked cultures of Zymomonas mobilis. Acetaldehyde had no effect on S. cerevisiae cultures started from stationary phase inocula in the absence of environmental shock and its lag-reducing effects were greater in complex medium than in a defined synthetic medium. Acetaldehyde reacted strongly with the ingredients of complex culture media. It is proposed that the effect of added acetaldehyde may be to compensate for the inability of cells to maintain transmembrane acetaldehyde gradients following an environmental shock.

  14. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde over CeO(X)(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetaldehyde with well-ordered CeO{sub X}(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetaldehyde with the sole desorption product (TPD) being the parent molecule at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the {eta}{sub 1}-acetaldehyde species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy configuration. Acetaldehyde chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-X}(111) with nonrecombinative and recombinative acetaldehyde desorbing at 405 and 550-600 K, respectively. Deoxygenation and dehydration also occur, producing ethylene and acetylene at 580 and 620 K, respectively. Acetaldehyde initially adsorbs in the {eta}{sub 1} configuration and then converts to a carbanion species with both C=C and C=O bond character above 300 K.

  15. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    T Chen; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    This study reports the interaction of acetaldehyde with well-ordered CeO{sub X}(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetaldehyde with the sole desorption product (TPD) being the parent molecule at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the {eta}{sub 1}-acetaldehyde species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy configuration. Acetaldehyde chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-X}(111) with nonrecombinative and recombinative acetaldehyde desorbing at 405 and 550-600 K, respectively. Deoxygenation and dehydration also occur, producing ethylene and acetylene at 580 and 620 K, respectively. Acetaldehyde initially adsorbs in the {eta}{sub 1} configuration and then converts to a carbanion species with both C {double_bond} C and C {double_bond} O bond character above 300 K.

  16. Neonatal environment exerts a sustained influence on the development of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Claire A; Lewis, Marie C; Berger, Bernard; Cloarec, Olivier; Heinzmann, Silke S; Charton, Florence; Krause, Lutz; Levin, Nadine S; Duncker, Swantje; Mercenier, Annick; Holmes, Elaine; Bailey, Mick; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2016-01-01

    The postnatal environment, including factors such as weaning and acquisition of the gut microbiota, has been causally linked to the development of later immunological diseases such as allergy and autoimmunity, and has also been associated with a predisposition to metabolic disorders. We show that the very early-life environment influences the development of both the gut microbiota and host metabolic phenotype in a porcine model of human infants. Farm piglets were nursed by their mothers for 1 day, before removal to highly controlled, individual isolators where they received formula milk until weaning at 21 days. The experiment was repeated, to create two batches, which differed only in minor environmental fluctuations during the first day. At day 1 after birth, metabolic profiling of serum by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated significant, systemic, inter-batch variation which persisted until weaning. However, the urinary metabolic profiles demonstrated that significant inter-batch effects on 3-hydroxyisovalerate, trimethylamine-N-oxide and mannitol persisted beyond weaning to at least 35 days. Batch effects were linked to significant differences in the composition of colonic microbiota at 35 days, determined by 16 S pyrosequencing. Different weaning diets modulated both the microbiota and metabolic phenotype independently of the persistent batch effects. We demonstrate that the environment during the first day of life influences development of the microbiota and metabolic phenotype and thus should be taken into account when interrogating experimental outcomes. In addition, we suggest that intervention at this early time could provide 'metabolic rescue' for at-risk infants who have undergone aberrant patterns of initial intestinal colonisation. PMID:26066712

  17. Preferred Barefoot Step Frequency is Influenced by Factors Beyond Minimizing Metabolic Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandell, Matthew B.; Zelik, Karl E.

    2016-03-01

    Humans tend to increase their step frequency in barefoot walking, as compared to shod walking at the same speed. Based on prior studies and the energy minimization hypothesis we predicted that people make this adjustment to minimize metabolic cost. We performed an experiment quantifying barefoot walking metabolic rate at different step frequencies, specifically comparing preferred barefoot to preferred shod step frequency. We found that subjects increased their preferred frequency when walking barefoot at 1.4 m/s (~123 vs. ~117 steps/min shod, P = 2e-5). However, average barefoot walking metabolic rates at the preferred barefoot and shod step frequencies were not significantly different (P = 0.40). Instead, we observed subject-specific trends: five subjects consistently reduced (‑8% average), and three subjects consistently increased (+10% average) their metabolic rate at preferred barefoot vs. preferred shod frequency. Thus, it does not appear that people ubiquitously select a barefoot step frequency that minimizes metabolic rate. We concluded that preferred barefoot step frequency is influenced by factors beyond minimizing metabolic rate, such as shoe properties and/or perceived comfort. Our results highlight the subject-specific nature of locomotor adaptations and how averaging data across subjects may obscure meaningful trends. Alternative experimental designs may be needed to better understand individual adaptations.

  18. Preferred Barefoot Step Frequency is Influenced by Factors Beyond Minimizing Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yandell, Matthew B.; Zelik, Karl E.

    2016-01-01

    Humans tend to increase their step frequency in barefoot walking, as compared to shod walking at the same speed. Based on prior studies and the energy minimization hypothesis we predicted that people make this adjustment to minimize metabolic cost. We performed an experiment quantifying barefoot walking metabolic rate at different step frequencies, specifically comparing preferred barefoot to preferred shod step frequency. We found that subjects increased their preferred frequency when walking barefoot at 1.4 m/s (~123 vs. ~117 steps/min shod, P = 2e-5). However, average barefoot walking metabolic rates at the preferred barefoot and shod step frequencies were not significantly different (P = 0.40). Instead, we observed subject-specific trends: five subjects consistently reduced (−8% average), and three subjects consistently increased (+10% average) their metabolic rate at preferred barefoot vs. preferred shod frequency. Thus, it does not appear that people ubiquitously select a barefoot step frequency that minimizes metabolic rate. We concluded that preferred barefoot step frequency is influenced by factors beyond minimizing metabolic rate, such as shoe properties and/or perceived comfort. Our results highlight the subject-specific nature of locomotor adaptations and how averaging data across subjects may obscure meaningful trends. Alternative experimental designs may be needed to better understand individual adaptations. PMID:26988124

  19. Influence of tacrolimus metabolism rate on BKV infection after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schmidt, Christina; Koch, Raphael; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Pabst, Dirk; Wolters, Heiner; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression is the major risk factor for BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) after renal transplantation (RTx). As the individual tacrolimus (Tac) metabolism rate correlates with Tac side effects, we hypothesized that Tac metabolism might also influence the BKV infection risk. In this case-control study RTx patients with BK viremia within 4 years after RTx (BKV group) were compared with a BKV negative control group. The Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the daily dose (C/D ratio) was applied to assess the Tac metabolism rate. BK viremia was detected in 86 patients after a median time of 6 (0–36) months after RTx. BKV positive patients showed lower Tac C/D ratios at 1, 3 and 6 months after RTx and were classified as fast Tac metabolizers. 8 of 86 patients with BK viremia had histologically proven BKN and a higher median maximum viral load than BKV patients without BKN (441,000 vs. 18,572 copies/mL). We conclude from our data that fast Tac metabolism (C/D ratio <1.05) is associated with BK viremia after RTx. Calculation of the Tac C/D ratio early after RTx, may assist transplant clinicians to identify patients at risk and to choose the optimal immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:27573493

  20. Influence of tacrolimus metabolism rate on BKV infection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Schmidt, Christina; Koch, Raphael; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Pabst, Dirk; Wolters, Heiner; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression is the major risk factor for BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) after renal transplantation (RTx). As the individual tacrolimus (Tac) metabolism rate correlates with Tac side effects, we hypothesized that Tac metabolism might also influence the BKV infection risk. In this case-control study RTx patients with BK viremia within 4 years after RTx (BKV group) were compared with a BKV negative control group. The Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the daily dose (C/D ratio) was applied to assess the Tac metabolism rate. BK viremia was detected in 86 patients after a median time of 6 (0-36) months after RTx. BKV positive patients showed lower Tac C/D ratios at 1, 3 and 6 months after RTx and were classified as fast Tac metabolizers. 8 of 86 patients with BK viremia had histologically proven BKN and a higher median maximum viral load than BKV patients without BKN (441,000 vs. 18,572 copies/mL). We conclude from our data that fast Tac metabolism (C/D ratio <1.05) is associated with BK viremia after RTx. Calculation of the Tac C/D ratio early after RTx, may assist transplant clinicians to identify patients at risk and to choose the optimal immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:27573493

  1. Influence of diet, vitamin, tea, trace elements and exogenous antioxidants on arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Liu, Su; Li, Mei; Wu, Bing

    2016-04-01

    Health risk of arsenic (As) has received increasing attention. Acute and chronic exposure to As could cause several detrimental effects on human health. As toxicity is closely related to its bioaccessibility and metabolism. In real environment, many factors, such as diet and nutrition, can influence As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity. This paper mainly reviews the influences of diets and elements on As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity and their underlying mechanisms to provide suggestions for future investigations. Vitamins, jaggery, fruit, tea, glutathione, N-acetylcysteine and zinc could reduce the As-induced toxicity by increasing antioxidative enzymes to antagonize oxidative stress caused by As and/or increasing As methylation. However, bean and betel nut could increase risk of skin lesions caused by As. Interestingly, high-fat diet, selenium and iron have incompatible effects on As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity in different experimental conditions. Based on current literatures, the As methylation and As-induced oxidative damage might be two main ways that the diets and elements influence As toxicity. Combined application of in vitro human cell lines and gastrointestinal models might be useful tools to simultaneously characterize the changes in As bioaccessibility and toxicity in the future research. PMID:26169729

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  3. Influence of NO-containing gas flow on various parameters of energy metabolism in erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'yova, A G; Peretyagin, S P; Karelin, V I; Selemir, V D

    2014-11-01

    We studied the influence of NO-containing gas phase on some parameters of energy metabolism in human erythrocytes. Whole blood samples were aerated with gas flows from the Plazon instrument (NO concentrations 800 and 80 ppm) and from the experimental generator (75 ppm). Activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reactions, lactate level, and a number of derived coefficients were estimated. Treatment of blood with 800 ppm NO inhibited erythrocyte energy metabolism, and its 10-fold dilution attenuated the effect. The use of ROS-free gas flow containing 75 ppm of NO promoted optimization of the process under investigation. PMID:25403392

  4. Divergent pathways of acetaldehyde and ethanol decarbonylation on the Rh(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Houtman, C.J.; Barteau, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The decomposition reactions of acetaldehyde and ethanol on the Rh(111) surface were compared in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. The decarbonylation of acetaldehyde produced methane at 267 K in TPD. For acetaldehyde coverages less than 0.05 monolayer, no methane was desorbed, but for a coverage that saturated the first layer, methane was produced with 50% selectivity. Coadsorbing deuterium with a low coverage of acetaldehyde resulted in the enhancement of methane production. This result indicates that the selectivity to methane was partially controlled by the availability of hydrogen atoms on the surface required to hydrogenate the hydrocarbon species produced by acetaldehyde decarbonylation. Monodeuterated methane was the primary methane product observed after these coadsorption experiments. Thus it was concluded that acetaldehyde decarbonylates via a methyl migration mechanism on the Rh(111) surface. Decarbonylation of ethanol did not produce methane. The absence of methane production indicated that the decomposition of ethanol on the Rh(111) surface did not proceed via dehydrogenation to adsorbed acetaldehyde, but instead, ethanol appeared to dehydrogenate by methyl hydrogen abstraction resulting in the formation of an oxametallacycle. Since this proposed intermediate rapidly dehydrogenated to carbon monoxide and surface carbon, it was difficult to characterize spectroscopically. The existence of an ethanol decomposition pathway that does not include acetaldehyde intermediates indicates that ethanol formation on supported Rh catalysts may not be the result of acetaldehyde hydrogenation.

  5. Dietary fats influence consumption and metabolic measures in male and female laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Brain, P F; Maimanee, T A; Andrade, M

    2000-04-01

    Juvenile and adult male and female Swiss mice in metabolism cages were fed one of four specially-formulated, pelleted diets containing respectively 8% saturated vegetable fat, 8% soya oil, 8% olive oil and 2% soya oil. The identities of the diets were hidden from the experimenter. Subjects were individually housed in metabolism cages and their consumption of food, growth and eliminative activities were measured. Clearly, these non-isocaloric diets differed in palatability, producing complex effects on growth as well as metabolic measures. Many indices were influenced by age, sex, and the duration of dietary exposure. Interactions between factors were common. Dietary fats appear to have subtle effects on the physiology and behaviour of rodents and may account for some differences between studies. PMID:10817454

  6. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Deuterated Acetaldehyde: CH_2DCHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2014-06-01

    This study follows our recent investigations about deuterated methyl-top species of complex organic molecules: methanol, methyl formate, In particular these works led the first ISM detection of HCOOCH_2D and CH_2DOCH_3. Acetaldehyde is not very abundant in the ISM, but this is a very interesting case from the spectroscopic point of view as it is an intermediate case between methyl formate and methanol. In the normal species of acetaldehyde, the barrier to internal rotation which is close to the value in methyl formate: 373 cm-1. However, the value of the Coriolis coupling constant ρ is 0.33 in acetaldehyde which is a much larger value than in methyl formate, 0.08, meaning that the coupling between the torsion and the overall rotation is more important. The sample was not a commercial one and half of its amount is the normal species which leads to a more difficult line assignment. The spectra were recorded in Lille between 75 and 950 GHz with a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer. The starting point of the analysis was the centimeter-wave measurements carried out for the sym and asym- conformers. A comparison between the approach developed for deuterated methyl formate (HCOOCH_2D), based on the water dimer formalism, and that designed recently for deuterated methanola (CH_2DOH) will be presented. This work is supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. Coudert, L. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys., 140, (2014) 64307 Coudert, L. H.; et al. ApJ, 779, (2013) 119 Richard, C.; et al. A&A, 552, (2013) A117 Smirnov, I. A.; et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 295 (2014) 44 Ilyushin, V.; et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 255 (2009) 32 Turner, P. H.; and Cox, A. P. Chem. Phys. Lett., 42, (1976) 84 Turner, P. H.; Cox, A. P.; and Hardy, J. A. J.C.S. Farady Trans., 2, (1981) 1217

  7. Acetaldehyde stimulates monocyte adhesion in a P-selectin- and TNFα-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Eileen M.; Morrow, David; Kundimi, Sreenath; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; Cullen, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acetaldehyde on various steps of the monocyte recruitment cascade. Methods Human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC), primary blood monocytes (PBM) and THP-1 monocytes, were treated with acetaldehyde (0.1–0 μM) for 6 h. Monocyte adherence experiments were performed using 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethylester labeled PBM or 3H-thymidine labeled THP-1 cells. HUVEC TNFα mRNA and protein levels were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoassay, respectively, and HUVEC P-selectin and monocyte CCR2 expression were determined by FACS analysis. Results Acetaldehyde dose-dependently increased the number of CCR2 positive THP-1 monocytes, with a maximal increase of ~50% observed in the presence of 10 μM acetaldehyde. There was a significant increase in both the number of P-selectin positive cells and P-selectin receptor density when HUVEC were incubated with acetaldehyde. HUVEC TNFα mRNA expression and secretion were enhanced by acetaldehyde. Moreover, acetaldehyde increased THP-1 and PBM adhesion to HUVEC. Inhibition of P-selectin or TNFα, using antibodies or siRNA-directed gene knockdown, attenuated acetaldehyde-induced monocyte adhesion. In conclusion, acetaldehyde increased the number of CCR2 positive monocytes and stimulated endothelial cell P-selectin and TNFα expression. Moreover, acetaldehyde increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, an effect that was both P-selectin- and TNFα-dependent. Conclusion These effects of acetaldehyde may contribute, in part, to the increase in coronary heart disease that is associated with binge patterns of alcohol consumption. PMID:19036374

  8. The detection of acetaldehyde in cold dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Friber, P.; Irvine, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the 1(01)-0(00) rotational transitions of A and E state acetaldehyde are reported. The transitions were detected, for the first time in interstellar space, in the cold dust clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and in Sgr B2. This is also the first time acetaldehyde has been found in a dust cloud and is the most complex oxygen-bearing molecule yet known in this environment. A column density of 6 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm in TMC-1, comparable to many other species detected there, and an approximately equal column density in L134N are formed. In the direction of Sgr B2, the CH3CHO profile appears to consist of broad emission features from the hot molecular cloud core, together with absorption features resulting from intervening colder material. The possible detection of HC9N toward IRC + 10 deg 216 through its J = 33-32 transition is also reported. Implications for cold dust cloud chemistry and excitation are discussed.

  9. Roaming radical kinetics in the decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for predicting the branching between roaming and bond fission channels in molecular dissociations is described and applied to the decomposition of acetaldehyde. This reduced dimensional trajectory (RDT) approach, which is motivated by the long-range nature of the roaming, bond fission, and abstraction dynamical bottlenecks, involves the propagation of rigid-body trajectories on an analytic potential energy surface. The analytic potential is obtained from fits to large-scale multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. The final potential includes one-dimensional corrections from higher-level electronic structure calculations and for the effect of conserved mode variations along both the addition and abstraction paths. The corrections along the abstraction path play a significant role in the predicted branching. Master equation simulations are used to transform the microcanonical branching ratios obtained from the RDT simulations to the temperature- and pressure-dependent branching ratios observed in thermal decomposition experiments. For completeness, a transition-state theory treatment of the contributions of the tight transition states for the molecular channels is included in the theoretical analyses. The theoretically predicted branching between molecules and radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde is in reasonable agreement with the corresponding shock tube measurement described in the companion paper. The prediction for the ratio of the tight to roaming contributions to the molecular channel also agrees well with results extracted from recent experimental and experimental/theoretical photodissociation studies.

  10. Acetaldehyde alters MAP kinase signalling and epigenetic histone modifications in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Lee, Youn Ju; Park, Pil-hoon; Aroor, Annayya R

    2007-01-01

    Although both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol are involved in generating ethanol matabolic stress (Emess), the oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde plays a critical role in the cellular actions of ethanol. We have investigated the effects of acetaldehyde on p42/44 MAP kinase, p46/p54 c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/JNK2) and p38 MAP kinase in hepatocytes. Acetaldehyde caused temporal activation of p42/44 MAPK followed by JNK, but the activation of the p42/44 MAPK was not a prerequisite for the JNK activation. Activation ofJNK1 by acetaldehyde was greater than JNK2. Ethanol and acetaldehyde activatedJNK have opposing roles; ethanol-induced JNK activation increased apoptosis whereas that by acetaldehyde decreased apoptosis. Acetaldehyde also caused histone H3 acetylation at Lys9 and phosphorylation of histone H3 at Serl0 and 28, the latter being dependent on p38 MAP kinase. Phosphorylation at Ser28 was higher than at Serl0. Thus acetaldehyde distinctively alters MAP kinase signalling and histone modifications, processes involved in transcriptional activation. PMID:17590997

  11. The hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' reduces acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Acetaldehyde is a detrimental substance produced in alcoholic liquor aging. We assessed an ability of hydrogen-storing microporous silica 'Microcluster' (MC+) to reduce acetaldehyde, as compared with autoclave-dehydrogenated MC+ (MC-). Acetaldehyde was quantified spectrophotometrically by an enzymatic method. Authentic acetaldehyde was treated by MC+ for 20min, and decreased from 43.4ppm to 10.9ppm, but maintained at 49.3ppm by MC-. On the other hand, acetaldehyde contained in a distilled spirit was decreased from 29.5ppm to 3.1ppm at 20min by MC+, but not decreased by MC-. Addition of MC+ or MC- to distilled water without acetaldehyde showed no seeming effect on the quantification used. Accordingly acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit is reduced to ethanol by hydrogen contained in MC+, but not by the silica moiety of MC+. Hydrogen gas of 1.2mL was released for 20min from MC+ of 0.59g in water, resulting in dissolved hydrogen of 1.09ppm and an oxidation- reduction potential of -687.0mV indicative of a marked reducing ability. Thus, MC+ has an ability to reduce acetaldehyde in a distilled spirit due to dissolved hydrogen released from MC+. PMID:27612695

  12. Oxygen vacancy-assisted coupling and enolization of acetaldehyde on CeO2(111).

    PubMed

    Calaza, Florencia C; Xu, Ye; Mullins, David R; Overbury, Steven H

    2012-10-31

    The temperature-dependent adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH(3)CHO) on a fully oxidized and a highly reduced thin-film CeO(2)(111) surface have been investigated using a combination of reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and periodic density functional theory (DFT+U) calculations. On the fully oxidized surface, acetaldehyde adsorbs weakly through its carbonyl O interacting with a lattice Ce(4+) cation in the η(1)-O configuration. This state desorbs at 210 K without reaction. On the highly reduced surface, new vibrational signatures appear below 220 K. They are identified by RAIRS and DFT as a dimer state formed from the coupling of the carbonyl O and the acyl C of two acetaldehyde molecules. This dimer state remains up to 400 K before decomposing to produce another distinct set of vibrational signatures, which are identified as the enolate form of acetaldehyde (CH(2)CHO¯). Furthermore, the calculated activation barriers for the coupling of acetaldehyde, the decomposition of the dimer state, and the recombinative desorption of enolate and H as acetaldehyde are in good agreement with previously reported TPD results for acetaldehyde adsorbed on reduced CeO(2)(111) [Chen et al. J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 3385]. The present findings demonstrate that surface oxygen vacancies alter the reactivity of the CeO(2)(111) surface and play a crucial role in stabilizing and activating acetaldehyde for coupling reactions. PMID:23020248

  13. Removal of acetaldehyde and skatole in gas by a corona-discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Noriaki; Nagamoto, Toshiki; Hamon, Hajime; Suzuki, Tetsuo; Okazaki, Morio

    1997-09-01

    Recently, ultrahigh gas purification has been important in many cases, such as, for example, (1) removal of dioxin from incineration plants, (2) complete removal of radioactive iodine compounds from nuclear fuel recycling, (3) simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in exhaust gases from cogeneration plants, (4) removal or decomposition of chlorofluorocarbons, and (5) supply of purified gas for semiconductor industries. A corona-discharge reactor, called a deposition-type reactor, was applied to remove acetaldehyde and skatole from nitrogen and an oxygen-nitrogen mixture. In the removal from nitrogen, acetaldehyde and skatole are negatively ionized and removed by depositing at the anode surface. In simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole, it is found that skatole has a higher reactivity of electron attachment than acetaldehyde. In the removal of acetaldehyde from an oxygen-nitrogen mixture, 40 molecules of acetaldehyde were removed by one electron. The reason for the extremely high removal efficiency is considered to be based on the ozone reaction and the formation of negative-ion clusters. Stabilization energies of the negative-ion clusters were estimated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. Skatole was removed from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture perfectly with extremely low discharge current by the ozone reaction. Simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture suggest that coexisting skatole inhibits the removal of acetaldehyde.

  14. Influence of Amino Acid Metabolism on Embryonic Stem Cell Function and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kilberg, Michael S; Terada, Naohiro; Shan, Jixiu

    2016-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have promise in regenerative medicine because of their ability to differentiate into all 3 primary germ layers. This review describes recent advances in the understanding of the link between the metabolism of ESCs/iPSCs and their maintenance/differentiation in the cell culture setting, with particular emphasis on amino acid (AA) metabolism. ESCs are endowed with unique metabolic features with regard to energy consumption, metabolite flux through particular pathways, and macromolecular synthesis. Therefore, nutrient availability has a strong influence on stem cell growth, self-renewal, and lineage specification, both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence from several laboratories has documented that self-renewal and differentiation of mouse ESCs are critically dependent on proline metabolism, with downstream metabolites possibly serving as signal molecules. Likewise, catabolism of either threonine (mouse) or methionine (human) is required for growth and differentiation of ESCs because these AAs serve as precursors for donor molecules used in histone methylation and acetylation. Epigenetic mechanisms are recognized as critical steps in differentiation, and AA metabolism in ESCs appears to modulate these epigenetic processes. Recent reports also document that, in vitro, the nutrient composition of the culture medium in which ESCs are differentiated into embryoid bodies can influence lineage specification, leading to enrichment of a specific cell type. Although research designed to direct tissue specification of differentiating embryoid bodies in culture is still in its infancy, early results indicate that manipulation of the nutrient milieu can promote or suppress the formation of specific cell lineages. PMID:27422515

  15. Diffusion behaviour of the acetaldehyde scavenger 2-aminobenzamide in polyethylene terephthalate for beverage bottles.

    PubMed

    Franz, Roland; Gmeiner, Margit; Gruner, Anita; Kemmer, Diana; Welle, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles are widely used as packaging material for natural mineral water. However, trace levels of acetaldehyde can migrate into natural mineral water during the shelf life and might influence the taste of the PET bottled water. 2-Aminobenzamide is widely used during PET bottle production as a scavenging agent for acetaldehyde. The aim of this study was the determination of the migration kinetics of 2-aminobenzamide into natural mineral water as well as into 20% ethanol. From the migration kinetics, the diffusion coefficients of 2-aminobenzamide in PET at 23 and 40°C were determined to be 4.2 × 10(-)(16) and 4.2 × 10(-)(15) cm(2) s(-1), respectively. The diffusion coefficient for 20% ethanol at 40°C was determined to be 7.7 × 10(-)(15) cm(2) s(-1), which indicates that 20% ethanol is causing swelling of the PET polymer. From a comparison of migration values between 23 and 40°C, acceleration factors of 9.7 when using water as contact medium and 18.1 for 20% ethanol as simulant can be derived for definition of appropriate accelerated test conditions at 40°C. The European Union regulatory acceleration test based on 80 kJ mol(-1) as conservative activation energy overestimates the experimentally determined acceleration rates by a factor of 1.6 and 3.1, respectively. PMID:26666986

  16. Diffusion behaviour of the acetaldehyde scavenger 2-aminobenzamide in polyethylene terephthalate for beverage bottles

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Roland; Gmeiner, Margit; Gruner, Anita; Kemmer, Diana; Welle, Frank

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles are widely used as packaging material for natural mineral water. However, trace levels of acetaldehyde can migrate into natural mineral water during the shelf life and might influence the taste of the PET bottled water. 2-Aminobenzamide is widely used during PET bottle production as a scavenging agent for acetaldehyde. The aim of this study was the determination of the migration kinetics of 2-aminobenzamide into natural mineral water as well as into 20% ethanol. From the migration kinetics, the diffusion coefficients of 2-aminobenzamide in PET at 23 and 40°C were determined to be 4.2 × 10− 16 and 4.2 × 10− 15 cm2 s–1, respectively. The diffusion coefficient for 20% ethanol at 40°C was determined to be 7.7 × 10− 15 cm2 s–1, which indicates that 20% ethanol is causing swelling of the PET polymer. From a comparison of migration values between 23 and 40°C, acceleration factors of 9.7 when using water as contact medium and 18.1 for 20% ethanol as simulant can be derived for definition of appropriate accelerated test conditions at 40°C. The European Union regulatory acceleration test based on 80 kJ mol–1 as conservative activation energy overestimates the experimentally determined acceleration rates by a factor of 1.6 and 3.1, respectively. PMID:26666986

  17. Impairment of histone H1 DNA binding by adduct formation with acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Niemela, O.; Mannermaa, R.; Oikarinen, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of histone H1 with pharmacologically relevant concentrations of acetaldehyde resulted in the formation of spontaneously stable acetaldehyde-protein linkages. The reaction of acetaldehyde and H1 purified from rat liver either by a DNA recognition site affinity chromatography or by perchloric acid extraction occurred primarily at the lysine residues in the carboxyterminal tail of H1, which is crucial for its function as a eukaryotic repressor. It was further shown using an H1-lacZ fusion protein produced in E. coli and the protein isolated from rat liver that the formation of acetaldehyde adducts with H1 impair its DNA binding properties. They propose that such a reaction may occur in vivo and lead to an inability to repress genes in the liver upon excessive alcohol consumption. This mechanism may play a role in acetaldehyde-induced collagen synthesis in alcoholics.

  18. Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Xuan, Chuan-Jin; Feng, Wen-Ling; Tian, Shan Xi

    2015-02-01

    Dissociation dynamics of the temporary negative ions of ethanol and acetaldehyde formed by the low-energy electron attachments is investigated by using the anion velocity map imaging technique and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The momentum images of the dominant fragments O-/OH- and CH3- are recorded, indicating the low kinetic energies of O-/OH- for ethanol while the low and high kinetic energy distributions of O- ions for acetaldehyde. The CH3- image for acetaldehyde also shows the low kinetic energy. With help of the dynamics simulations, the fragmentation processes are qualitatively clarified. A new cascade dissociation pathway to produce the slow O- ion via the dehydrogenated intermediate, CH3CHO- (acetaldehyde anion), is proposed for the dissociative electron attachment to ethanol. After the electron attachment to acetaldehyde molecule, the slow CH3- is produced quickly in the two-body dissociation with the internal energy redistributions in different aspects before bond cleavages.

  19. Influence of Cd, Co, and Zn on inorganic carbon acquisition and carbon metabolism in Emiliania huxleyi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Boye, M.; De La Broise, D.; Probert, I.

    2014-12-01

    Trace elements are essential micronutrients for primary producers; hence they influence the global carbon cycle and contribute to the regulation of Earth's climate. Over the past 25 years, the influence of Fe concentration on phytoplankton production has been well studied and this research has been instrumental in our understanding of the influence that biology has on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. However, other trace elements that are directly involved in carbon metabolism by primary producers, such as Zn, Cd, and Co, have received less attention. We examined the physiological response of two strains of Emiliania huxleyi to a range of realistic trace element concentrations (Zn, Cd, Co) in the marine environment under batch, semi-continuous, and continuous culture conditions. In addition, the continuous culture system was maintained at a pH of 8.15 ±0.02 by a sensor and regulator-controlled CO2­ injection system. The results from this study will highlight the influence that trace element composition of seawater has on the growth rate, elemental quota, inorganic carbon uptake, and carbon metabolism of Emiliania huxleyi. Potential limitations for the interpretation of paleo-productivity records will be discussed.

  20. Is hepatic lipid metabolism of beef cattle influenced by breed and dietary silage level?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In ruminants, unsaturated dietary fatty acids are biohydrogenated in the rumen and are further metabolised in various tissues, including liver, which has an important role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Therefore, manipulation of muscle fatty acid composition should take into account liver metabolism. In the present study, the influence of breed and diet on liver lipid composition and gene expression was investigated in order to clarify the role of this organ in the lipid metabolism of ruminants. Forty purebred young bulls from two phylogenetically distant autochthonous cattle breeds, Alentejana and Barrosã, were assigned to two different diets (low vs. high silage) and slaughtered at 18 months of age. Liver fatty acid composition, mRNA levels of enzymes and transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism, as well as the plasma lipid profile, were assessed. Results In spite of similar plasma non-esterified fatty acids levels, liver triacylglycerols content was higher in Barrosã than in Alentejana bulls. Moreover, the fatty acid composition of liver was clearly distinct from the remaining tissues involved in fatty acid metabolism of ruminants, as shown by Principal Components Analysis. The hepatic tissue is particularly rich in α-linolenic acid and their products of desaturation and elongation. Results indicate that DGAT1, ELOVL2, FADS1 and FADS2 genes influence the fatty acid composition of the liver the most. Moreover, genes such as DGAT1 and ELOVL2 appear to be more sensitive to genetic background than to dietary manipulation, whereas genes encoding for desaturases, such as FADS1, appear to be modulated by dietary silage level. Conclusions Our results indicate that liver plays an important role in the biosynthesis of n-3 LC-PUFA. It is also suggested that dietary silage level influences the hepatic fatty acid metabolism in a breed-dependent manner, through changes in the expression of genes encoding for enzymes associated with the

  1. Upstream transcription factor 1 influences plasma lipid and metabolic traits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sulin; Mar-Heyming, Rebecca; Dugum, Eric Z.; Kolaitis, Nicholas A.; Qi, Hongxiu; Pajukanta, Päivi; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Drake, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) has been associated with familial combined hyperlipidemia, the metabolic syndrome, and related conditions, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. In this study, we report validation of Usf1 as a causal gene of cholesterol homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and body composition in mouse models using several complementary approaches and identify associated pathways and gene expression network modules. Over-expression of human USF1 in both transgenic mice and mice with transient liver-specific over-expression influenced metabolic trait phenotypes, including obesity, total cholesterol level, LDL/VLDL cholesterol and glucose/insulin ratio. Additional analyses of trait and hepatic gene expression data from an F2 population derived from C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ strains in which there is a naturally occurring variation in Usf1 expression supported a causal role for Usf1 for relevant metabolic traits. Gene network and pathway analyses of the liver gene expression signatures in the F2 population and the hepatic over-expression model suggested the involvement of Usf1 in immune responses and metabolism, including an Igfbp2-centered module. In all three mouse model settings, notable sex specificity was observed, consistent with human studies showing differences in association with USF1 gene polymorphisms between sexes. PMID:19995791

  2. Elucidating the influence of praziquantel nanosuspensions on the in vivo metabolism of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana Damacena; Arrúa, Eva Carolina; Pereira, Dayanne Amaral; Fraga, Carolina Miguel; Costa, Tatiane Luiza da; Hemphill, Andrew; Salomon, Claudio Javier; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop nanosuspensions of praziquantel (PZQ) and to evaluate their influence on the energetic metabolism of cysticerci inoculated in BALB/c mice. We analyzed metabolic alterations of glycolytic pathways and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the parasite. The nanosuspensions were prepared by precipitation and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poloxamer 188 (P188) and poloxamer 407 (P407) were used as stabilizers. Nanosuspension prepared with PVA had a particle size of 100nm, while P188- and P407-based nanosuspensions had particle sizes of 74nm and 285nm, respectively. The zeta potential was -8.1, -8.6, and -13.2 for the formulations stabilized with PVA, P188 and P407, respectively. Treatments of T. crassiceps cysticerci-infected mice resulted in an increase in glycolysis organic acids, and enhanced the partial reversion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the urea cycle and the production of ketonic bodies in the parasites when compared to the groups treated with conventional PZQ. These data suggest that PZQ nanosuspensions greatly modified the energetic metabolism of cysticerci in vivo. Moreover, the remarkable metabolic alterations produced by the stabilizers indicate that further studies on nanoformulations are required to find potentially suitable nanomedicines. PMID:27269203

  3. Influence of feeding regimens on rat gut fluids and colonic metabolism of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Amélia C F; Murdan, Sudaxshina; Serra, Arménio C; Veiga, Francisco J; Gonsalves, António M d'A Rocha; Basit, Abdul W

    2014-11-01

    Feeding states may affect the performance of colonic prodrugs. The aim is to investigate the influence of feeding regimen in Wistar rats on: (i) distribution and pH contents along the gut and (ii) metabolism of two colonic prodrugs, diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin and a commercially available control, sulfasalazine, within the caecal and colonic contents. Male Wistar rats were subject to four different feeding regimens, the gut contents characterized (mass and pH) and the metabolism of prodrugs investigated. The feeding regimen affects gut contents (mass and pH), more specifically in the stomach and lower intestine, and affects the rate of metabolism of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin, but not that of sulfasalazine. The latter's degradation is much faster than that of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin while the metabolism of both prodrugs is faster in colonic (versus caecal) contents. Fasting results in most rapid degradation of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin, possibly due to lack of competition (absence of food) for microbial enzymatic activity. PMID:25129806

  4. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature microtubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation reanalysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest-energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a reisomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory-based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (∼10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water, and acetylene in the recent microtubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms and have no bearing on

  5. Influence of Obesity and Metabolic Disease on Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CordioPrev Study)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Gomez-Luna, Purificacion; Gomez-Garduño, Angela; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F.; Yubero-Serrano, Elena; Marin, Carmen; Perez-Caballero, Ana I.; Fuentes-Jimenez, Francisco J.; Camargo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Perez- Jimenez, Francisco; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent data suggest that the presence of associated metabolic abnormalities may be important modifiers of the association of obesity with a poorer prognosis in coronary heart disease. We determined the influence of isolated overweight and obesity on carotid intima media thickness (IMT-CC), and also assessed whether this influence was determined by the presence of metabolic abnormalities. Methods 1002 participants from the CordioPrev study were studied at entry. We determined their metabolic phenotypes and performed carotid ultrasound assessment. We evaluated the influence of obesity, overweight and metabolic phenotypes on the IMT-CC. Results Metabolically sick participants (defined by the presence of two or more metabolic abnormalities) showed a greater IMT-CC than metabolically healthy individuals (p = 4 * 10−6). Overweight and normal weight patients who were metabolically healthy showed a lower IMT-CC than the metabolically abnormal groups (all p<0.05). When we evaluated only body weight (without considering metabolic phenotypes), overweight or obese patients did not differ significantly from normal-weight patients in their IMT-CC (p = 0.077). However, obesity was a determinant of IMT-CC when compared to the composite group of normal weight and overweight patients (all not obese). Conclusions In coronary patients, a metabolically abnormal phenotype is associated with a greater IMT-CC, and may be linked to a higher risk of suffering new cardiovascular events. The protection conferred in the IMT-CC by the absence of metabolic abnormality may be blunted by the presence of obesity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00924937 PMID:27064675

  6. Metabolic profiling of biofilm bacteria known to cause microbial influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Morrison, P D; Key, C; Palombo, E A

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon previous research that demonstrated the simplicity of obtaining metabolite profiles of bacteria in urban water networks, by using the metabolic profile of bacteria extracted from a reticulation pipe biofilm, which is known to cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). The extracellular metabolites of the isolated bacteria, and those bacteria in consortium, were analysed in isolation, and after exposure to low levels of copper. Applying chemometric analytical methodologies to the metabolomic data, we were able to better understand the profile of the isolated biofilm bacteria, which were differentiated according to their activity and copper exposure. It was found that the metabolic activity of the isolated bacteria and the bacteria in consortium varied according to the bacterium's ability to metabolise copper. This demonstrates the power of metabolomic techniques for the discrimination of water reticulation biofilms comprising similar bacteria in consortium, but undergoing different physico-chemical activities, such as corrosion and corrosion inhibition. PMID:24434961

  7. Assessment of the environmental and genetic factors influencing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Gosadi, Ibrahim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a combination of factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular atherosclerotic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure. Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the adult Saudi population where the increase in cardiovascular-related mortality is augmented by the rise in the prevalence of MS. Metabolic syndrome is a multi-factorial disorder influenced by interactions between genetic and environmental components. This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of studied environmental and genetic factors explaining the prevalence of MS in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Additionally, this review aims to illustrate factors related to the population genetics of Saudi Arabia, which might explain a proportion of the prevalence of MS. PMID:26739969

  8. Genetic and environmental influences on factors associated with cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Sonya J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Pittas, Anastassios G.; Roberts, Susan B.; Fuss, Paul J.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; McCrory, Megan A.; Bouchard, Thomas J.; Saltzman, Edward; Neale, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The relative influence of genetics and the environment on factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains unclear. We performed model-fitting analyses to quantify genetic, common environmental, and unique environmental variance components of factors associated with CVD and MetS [waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and fasting plasma lipids] in adult male and female monozygotic twins reared apart or together. We also investigated whether MetS components share common influences. Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were highly heritable (56–77%, statistically significant). Waist circumference, plasma glucose and insulin, HOMA-IR, and blood pressure were moderately heritable (43–57%, statistically significant). Unique environmental factors contributed to the variance of all variables (20–38%, perforce statistically significant). Common environmental factors contributed 23, 30, and 42% (statistically significant) of the variance of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, and plasma glucose, respectively. Two shared factors influenced MetS components; one influenced all components except HDL cholesterol, another influenced only lipid (triglyceride and HDL cholesterol) concentrations. These results suggest that genetic variance has a dominant influence on total variance of factors associated with CVD and MetS and support the proposal of one or more underlying pathologies of MetS. PMID:19372593

  9. The role of nest surface temperatures and the brain in influencing ant metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nigel R; Ghaedi, Behnaz; Groenewald, Berlizé

    2016-08-01

    Thermal limits of insects can be influenced by recent thermal history: here we used thermolimit respirometry to determine metabolic rate responses and thermal limits of the dominant meat ant, Iridomyrmex purpureus. Firstly, we tested the hypothesis that nest surface temperatures have a pervasive influence on thermal limits. Metabolic rates and activity of freshly field collected individuals were measured continuously while ramping temperatures from 44°C to 62°C at 0.25°C/minute. At all the stages of thermolimit respirometry, metabolic rates were independent of nest surface temperatures, and CTmax did not differ between ants collected from nest with different surface temperatures. Secondly, we tested the effect of brain control on upper thermal limits of meat ants via ant decapitation experiments ('headedness'). Decapitated ants exhibited similar upper critical temperature (CTmax) results to living ants (Decapitated 50.3±1.2°C: Living 50.1±1.8°C). Throughout the temperature ramping process, 'headedness' had a significant effect on metabolic rate in total (Decapitated V̇CO2 140±30µlCO2mg(-1)min(-1): Living V̇CO2 250±50 CO2mg(-1)min(-1)), as well as at temperatures below and above CTmax. At high temperatures (>44°C) pre- CTmax the relationships between I. purpureus CTmax values and mass specific metabolic rates for living ants exhibited a negative slope whilst decapitated ants exhibited a positive slope. The decapitated ants also had a significantly higher Q10:25-35°C when compared to living ants (1.91±0.43 vs. 1.29±0.35). Our findings suggest that physiological responses of ants may be able to cope with increasing surface temperatures, as shown by metabolic rates across the thermolimit continuum, making them physiologically resilient to a rapidly changing climate. We also demonstrate that the brain plays a role in respiration, but critical thermal limits are independent of respiration levels. PMID:27503725

  10. Computer modeling of cool flames and ignition of acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.; Cox, R.A. ); Olson, G. )

    1990-10-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of acetaldehyde at temperatures between 500-1000 K has been assembled using 77 elementary reactions involving 32 reactant, product, and intermediate species. Rate coefficients were taken from recent critical evaluations of experimental data. Where experimental measurements were not available, the rate parameters were estimated from the body of currently available kinetics information. The mechanism was shown to predict correctly the rates and products observed in CH{sub 3}CHO oxidation studies in a low-pressure in a stirred flow reactor and at high pressure in a rapid compression machine. The oscillatory phenomena in the flow system and the two-stage ignition observed at high pressure were satisfactorily described by the mechanism. It is shown that cool flames are caused by degenerate branching mainly by peracetic acid and that hydrogen peroxide promotes hot ignition.

  11. Pyrolysis of Acetaldehyde: a Fleeting Glimpse of Vinylidene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilou, A. J.; Piech, K. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Golan, A.; Kostko, O.; Ahmed, M.; Osborn, D. L.; Daily, J. W.; Nimlos, M. R.; Stanton, J. F.

    2011-06-01

    The thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been studied in a heated silicon carbide ``microtubular reactor", with products monitored by both photoionization mass spectrometry and matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A well-known, and observed, route of decomposition occurs when the weakest C-C bond is broken; this process leads to methyl and formyl radicals. In addition to this, we find evidence for two additional channels: CH_3CHO + Δ → H_2CCO (ketene) and CH_3CHO + Δ → C_2H_2 (acetylene), reactions that also generate molecular hydrogen and water, respectively. This talk focuses on the last pathway, which proceeds via vinyl alcohol. Evidence is presented that the high temperature unimolecular dehydration of vinyl alcohol proceeds by two mechanisms; one of these is a (1,2) elimination that directly yields acetylene, and the other is a (1,1) elimination that necessarily accesses the vinylidene isomer of C_2H_2 as an intermediate.

  12. Velocity-map imaging study of the photodissociation of acetaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, H.A.; Softley, T.P.

    2005-03-22

    Velocity-map imaging studies are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde over a range of photolysis wavelengths (317.5-282.5 nm). Images are obtained for both the HCO and CH{sub 3} fragments. The mean rotational energy of both fragments increases with photodissociation energy, with a lesser degree of excitation in the CH{sub 3} fragment. The CH{sub 3} images demonstrate that the CH{sub 3} fragments are rotationally aligned with respect to the recoil direction and this is interpreted, and well modeled, on the basis of a propensity for forming CH{sub 3} fragments with M{approx}K, where M is the projection of the rotational angular momentum along the recoil direction. The origin of the CH{sub 3} rotation is conserved motion from the torsional and methyl-rocking modes of the parent molecule. Nonstatistical vibrational distributions for the CH{sub 3} fragment are obtained at higher energies.

  13. Vanadate influence on metabolism of sugar phosphates in fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus.

    PubMed

    Žižić, Milan; Živić, Miroslav; Maksimović, Vuk; Stanić, Marina; Križak, Strahinja; Antić, Tijana Cvetić; Zakrzewska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The biological and chemical basis of vanadium action in fungi is relatively poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the influence of vanadate (V5+) on phosphate metabolism of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. Addition of V5+ caused increase of sugar phosphates signal intensities in 31P NMR spectra in vivo. HPLC analysis of mycelial phosphate extracts demonstrated increased concentrations of glucose 6 phosphate, fructose 6 phosphate, fructose 1, 6 phosphate and glucose 1 phosphate after V5+ treatment. Influence of V5+ on the levels of fructose 2, 6 phosphate, glucosamine 6 phosphate and glucose 1, 6 phosphate (HPLC), and polyphosphates, UDPG and ATP (31P NMR) was also established. Increase of sugar phosphates content was not observed after addition of vanadyl (V4+), indicating that only vanadate influences its metabolism. Obtained results from in vivo experiments indicate catalytic/inhibitory vanadate action on enzymes involved in reactions of glycolysis and glycogenesis i.e., phosphoglucomutase, phosphofructokinase and glycogen phosphorylase in filamentous fungi. PMID:25036378

  14. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  15. Role of apoptotic hepatocytes in HCV dissemination: regulation by acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Murali; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Zhang, Jinjin; Mott, Justin L; Poluektova, Larisa I; McVicker, Benita L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Tuma, Dean J; Osna, Natalia A

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis and promotes disease progression, although the mechanisms are not quite clear. We have previously observed that acetaldehyde (Ach) continuously produced by the acetaldehyde-generating system (AGS), temporarily enhanced HCV RNA levels, followed by a decrease to normal or lower levels, which corresponded to apoptosis induction. Here, we studied whether Ach-induced apoptosis caused depletion of HCV-infected cells and what role apoptotic bodies (AB) play in HCV-alcohol crosstalk. In liver cells exposed to AGS, we observed the induction of miR-122 and miR-34a. As miR-34a has been associated with apoptotic signaling and miR-122 with HCV replication, these findings may suggest that cells with intensive viral replication undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, when AGS-induced apoptosis was blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor, the expression of HCV RNA was not changed. AB from HCV-infected cells contained HCV core protein and the assembled HCV particle that infect intact hepatocytes, thereby promoting the spread of infection. In addition, AB are captured by macrophages to switch their cytokine profile to the proinflammatory one. Macrophages exposed to HCV(+) AB expressed more IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with those exposed to HCV(-) AB. The generation of AB from AGS-treated HCV-infected cells even enhanced the induction of aforementioned cytokines. We conclude that HCV and alcohol metabolites trigger the formation of AB containing HCV particles. The consequent spread of HCV to neighboring hepatocytes via infected AB, as well as the induction of liver inflammation by AB-mediated macrophage activation potentially exacerbate the HCV infection course by alcohol and worsen disease progression. PMID:27056722

  16. Metabolic syndrome influences cardiac gene expression pattern at the transcript level in male ZDF rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    18. Gene ontology analysis revealed several significantly enriched functional inter-relationships between genes influenced by metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Metabolic syndrome significantly alters cardiac gene expression profile which may be involved in development of cardiac pathologies in the presence of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23320804

  17. Ethanol-derived acetaldehyde: pleasure and pain of alcohol mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Muggironi, Giulia; Fois, Giulia R.; Diana, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first metabolite of ethanol (EtOH), has been implicated in several actions of alcohol, including its reinforcing effects. Previously considered an aversive compound, ACD was useful in alcoholic’s pharmacological treatment aimed at discouraging alcohol drinking. However, it has recently been shown that EtOH-derived ACD is necessary for EtOH-induced place preference and self-administration, thereby suggesting a possible involvement of ACD in EtOH motivational properties. In addition, EtOH-stimulating properties on DA neurons are prevented by pharmacological blockade of local catalase H2O2 system, the main metabolic step for biotransformation of EtOH into ACD within the central nervous system. It was further shown that pretreatment with thiol compounds, like L-Cysteine or D-Penicillamine, reduced EtOH and ACD-induced motivational effects, in fact preventing self-administration of both EtOH and ACD, thus suggesting a possible role for ACD as a biomarker useful in evaluating potential innovative treatments of alcohol abuse. These findings suggest a key role of ACD in the EtOH reinforcing effects. In the present paper we review the role of EtOH-derived ACD in the reinforcing effects of EtOH and the possibility that ACD may serve as a therapeutically targetable biomarker in the search for novel treatments in alcohol abuse and alcoholism. PMID:23882197

  18. Crucial role of acetaldehyde in alcohol activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Diana, Marco; Peana, Alessandra Tiziana; Sirca, Donatella; Lintas, Alessandra; Melis, Miriam; Enrico, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    Ethyl alcohol (EtOH), the main psychoactive ingredient of alcoholic drinks, is widely considered responsible for alcohol abuse and alcoholism through its positive motivational properties, which depend, at least partially, on the activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. On the other hand, acetaldehyde (ACD), EtOH's first metabolite, has been classically considered aversive and useful in the pharmacologic therapy of alcoholics. Here we show that EtOH-derived ACD is necessary for EtOH-induced place preference, a preclinical test with high predictive validity for reward liability. We also found that ACD is essential for EtOH-increased microdialysate dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and that this effect is mimicked by ACD administration to the intraventral tegmental area (VTA). Furthermore, in vitro, ACD enhances VTA DA neuronal firing. Coherently, EtOH-stimulating properties on DA neurons are prevented by pharmacologic blockade of local catalase: the main metabolic step for biotransformation of EtOH into ACD in the central nervous system. These results provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a key role of ACD in EtOH motivational properties and its activation of the mesolimbic DA system. Additionally, these observations suggest that ACD, by increasing VTA DA neuronal activity, would oppose its well-known peripherally originating aversive properties. These findings could help in devising new effective pharmacologic therapies in alcoholism. PMID:18991876

  19. A single sip of a strong alcoholic beverage causes exposure to carcinogenic concentrations of acetaldehyde in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Linderborg, Klas; Salaspuro, Mikko; Väkeväinen, Satu

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore oral exposure to carcinogenic (group 1) acetaldehyde after single sips of strong alcoholic beverages containing no or high concentrations of acetaldehyde. Eight volunteers tasted 5 ml of ethanol diluted to 40 vol.% with no acetaldehyde and 40 vol.% calvados containing 2400 μM acetaldehyde. Salivary acetaldehyde and ethanol concentrations were measured by gas chromatography. The protocol was repeated after ingestion of ethanol (0.5 g/kg body weight). Salivary acetaldehyde concentration was significantly higher after sipping calvados than after sipping ethanol at 30s both with (215 vs. 128 μmol/l, p<0.05) and without (258 vs. 89 μmol/l, p<0.05) alcohol ingestion. From 2 min onwards there were no significant differences in the decreasing salivary acetaldehyde concentration, which remained above the level of carcinogenicity still at 10 min. The systemic alcohol distribution from blood to saliva had no additional effect on salivary acetaldehyde after sipping of the alcoholic beverages. Carcinogenic concentrations of acetaldehyde are produced from ethanol in the oral cavity instantly after a small sip of strong alcoholic beverage, and the exposure continues for at least 10 min. Acetaldehyde present in the beverage has a short-term effect on total acetaldehyde exposure. PMID:21641957

  20. Investigation of carbohydrate and protein metabolism in the digestive organs of the rabbit under the combined influence of vibration, acceleration and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuy, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    During spaceflight, the organism is subjected to the influence of various extremal factors such as acceleration, vibration, irradiation, etc. The study of the influence of these factors on metabolism, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism, in young rabbits is of great significance in simulation experiments. Dynamic factors and irradiation, depending on dose and duration, lead to reduced RNA and protein metabolism.

  1. Uptake, translocation, and metabolism of oxabetrinil and CGA-133205 in grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and their influence on metolachlor metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yenne, S.P.; Hatzios, K.K.; Meredith, S.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The uptake, translocation, and metabolism of the oxime ether safeners oxabetrinil and CGA-133205 in grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, var. Funk G-522-DR) were investigated. Following application of ({sup 14}C)oxabetrinil and ({sup 14}C)CGA-133205 to imbibed seeds, it appears that the safeners are conferring protection to grain sorghum by increasing the rate of metolachlor metabolism.

  2. Metabolic Influence of Psychrophilic Diatoms on Travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3− etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  3. Influence of Wastewater Discharge on the Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in River Sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sharp, Jonathan O; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the variation of microbial community functions during water filtration process in river sediments, which has been utilized widely in natural water treatment systems, this study investigates the influence of municipal wastewater discharge to streams on the phylotype and metabolic potential of the microbiome in upstream and particularly various depths of downstream river sediments. Cluster analyses based on both microbial phylogenetic and functional data collectively revealed that shallow upstream sediments grouped with those from deeper subsurface downstream regions. These sediment samples were distinct from those found in shallow downstream sediments. Functional genes associated with carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and certain amino acid metabolisms were overrepresented in upstream and deep downstream samples. In contrast, the more immediate contact with wastewater discharge in shallow downstream samples resulted in an increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen, sulfur, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, as well as restriction-modification systems. More diverse bacterial phyla were associated with upstream and deep downstream sediments, mainly including Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Firmicutes. In contrast, in shallow downstream sediments, genera affiliated with Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were enriched with putative functions that included ammonia and sulfur oxidation, polyphosphate accumulation, and methylotrophic bacteria. Collectively, these results highlight the enhanced capabilities of microbial communities residing in deeper stream sediments for the transformation of water contaminants and thus provide a foundation for better design of natural water treatment systems to further improve the removal of contaminants. PMID:26403720

  4. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong natural scenic district of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season.Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite.Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3− etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25590097

  5. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3- etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  6. Influence of mitochondrial genome rearrangement on cucumber leaf carbon and nitrogen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębska, Agata; Kulka, Marek; Leśniak, Karolina; Podgórska, Anna; Pärnik, Tiit; Ivanova, Hiie; Keerberg, Olav; Gardeström, Per; Rychter, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    The MSC16 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) mitochondrial mutant was used to study the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction and disturbed subcellular redox state on leaf day/night carbon and nitrogen metabolism. We have shown that the mitochondrial dysfunction in MSC16 plants had no effect on photosynthetic CO2 assimilation, but the concentration of soluble carbohydrates and starch was higher in leaves of MSC16 plants. Impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain activity was associated with the perturbation of mitochondrial TCA cycle manifested, e.g., by lowered decarboxylation rate. Mitochondrial dysfunction in MSC16 plants had different influence on leaf cell metabolism under dark or light conditions. In the dark, when the main mitochondrial function is the energy production, the altered activity of TCA cycle in mutated plants was connected with the accumulation of pyruvate and TCA cycle intermediates (citrate and 2-OG). In the light, when TCA activity is needed for synthesis of carbon skeletons required as the acceptors for NH4+ assimilation, the concentration of pyruvate and TCA intermediates was tightly coupled with nitrate metabolism. Enhanced incorporation of ammonium group into amino acids structures in mutated plants has resulted in decreased concentration of organic acids and accumulation of Glu. PMID:20830597

  7. Nutritional Influences on Skatole Formation and Skatole Metabolism in the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Wesoly, Raffael; Weiler, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Summary Skatole is a tryptophan metabolite with fecal odor. Skatole and the testicular steroid androstenone are regarded as the main compounds leading to ‘boar taint,’ a sex-specific odor from pork taken from entire males, as elevated concentrations of both substances may be found in adipose boars tissue. High skatole concentrations in adipose tissue are the result of a complex process, which includes microbial formation in the colon, absorption, metabolism and accretion in fat. Several of these steps leading to high skatole concentrations are influenced by feed components and additives. The present paper discusses the mechanisms by which effective feeding strategies and feed additives exert their influence in the prevention of high skatole concentrations in adipose pig tissue. PMID:26486918

  8. The influence of triiodothyronine (T3) on the postnatal development of drug metabolism in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Müller, D; Greiling, K; Greiling, H; Klinger, W

    1983-01-01

    The influence of T3 on some cytochrome P-450-dependent biotransformation reactions (ethylmorphine N-demethylation, ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation) was investigated in rats of different ages. After T3 administrations on 3 consecutive days to rats of different ages, on the 4th day ethylmorphine N-demethylation rate was diminished in all age groups. On the contrary, ethoxyresorufin and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation rates were considerably enhanced, preferentially in 33-day-old animals. The P-450 concentration was increased to a smaller degree. After T3 treatment on the first 8 days of life long-term effects on ethylmorphine N-demethylation were observed. Low T3 doses accelerated this reaction in 33- and 60-day-old rats. Ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation was not influenced. T3 administrations cannot diminish age-differences in drug metabolism. PMID:6651813

  9. The role of acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nordback, I H; MacGowan, S; Potter, J J; Cameron, J L

    1991-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (AA), the first product of ethanol metabolism, has been suggested as an important mediator in alcoholic pancreatitis, but experimental evidence has not been convincing. Prior work using the isolated perfused canine pancreas preparation has suggested that toxic oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase (XO) may mediate the early injury in pancreatitis. Xanthine oxidase is capable of oxidizing AA, and during this oxidation free radicals are released. The hypothesis that acute alcoholic pancreatitis may be initiated by AA in the presence of active XO (converted from xanthine dehydrogenase [XD]) was tested in the authors' experimental preparation by converting XD to XO by a period of ischemia, and infusing AA. Control preparations remained normal throughout the 4-hour perfusion (weight gain, 7 +/- 4 g; amylase activity, 1162 +/- 202 U/dL). One hour of ischemia or infusion of AA at 25 mg/hr or at 50 mg/hr without ischemia did not induce changes in the preparation. Acetaldehyde at 250 mg/hr induced minimal edema and weight gain (16 +/- 4 g; p less than 0.05), but not significant hyperamylasemia. Changes also were not observed when 1-hour ischemia was followed by a bolus of ethanol (1.5 g) or sodium acetate (3.0 g), or by infusion of 25 mg/hr of AA. One hour of ischemia followed by infusion of AA at 50 mg/hr or at 250 mg/hr induced edema, hemorrhage, weight gain (22 +/- 7 g [p less than 0.05] and 26 +/- 17 g [p less than 0.05]) and hyperamylasemia (2249 +/- 1034 U/dL [p less than 0.05] and 2602 +/- 1412 U/dL [p less than 0.05]). Moreover infusion of AA at 250 mg/hr after 2 hours of ischemia potentiated the weight gain (62 +/- 20 g versus 30 +/- 14 g [p less than 0.05]), but not the hyperamylasemia (3404 +/- 589 U/dL versus 2862 +/- 1525 U/dL) as compared with 2 hours of ischemia alone. Pancreatitis induced by 1 hour of ischemia followed by AA at 50 mg/hr could be inhibited by pretreatment with the free radical scavengers superoxide dismutase and

  10. Consequences of complex environments: Temperature and energy intake interact to influence growth and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Jodrey, Alicia D; Luoma, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    The field of comparative physiology has a rich history of elegantly examining the effects of individual environmental factors on performance traits linked to fitness (e.g., thermal performance curves for locomotion). However, animals live in complex environments wherein multiple environmental factors co-vary. Thus, we investigated the independent and interactive effects of temperature and energy intake on the growth and metabolic rate of juvenile corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) in the context of shifts in complex environments. Unlike previous studies that imposed constant or fluctuating temperature regimes, we manipulated the availability of preferred thermal microclimates (control vs. relatively warm regimes) for eight weeks and allowed snakes to behaviorally thermoregulate among microclimates. By also controlling for energy intake, we demonstrate an interactive effect of temperature and energy on growth-relevant temperature shifts had no effect on snakes' growth when energy intake was low and a positive effect on growth when energy intake was high. Thus, acclimation to relatively warm thermal options can result in increased rates of growth when food is abundant in a taxon in which body size confers fitness advantages. Temperature and energy also interactively influenced metabolic rate-snakes in the warmer temperature regime exhibited reduced metabolic rate (O2 consumption rate at 25 °C and 30 °C) if they had relatively high energy intake. Although we advocate for continued investigation into the effects of complex environments on other traits, our results indicate that warming may actually benefit important life history traits in some taxa and that metabolic shifts may underlie thermal acclimation. PMID:25899738

  11. Influence of vitamin B auxotrophy on nitrogen metabolism in eukaryotic phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    While nitrogen availability is known to limit primary production in large parts of the ocean, vitamin starvation amongst eukaryotic phytoplankton is becoming increasingly recognized as an oceanographically relevant phenomenon. Cobalamin (B12) and thiamine (B1) auxotrophy are widespread throughout eukaryotic phytoplankton, with over 50% of cultured isolates requiring B12 and 20% requiring B1. The frequency of vitamin auxotrophy in harmful algal bloom species is even higher. Instances of colimitation between nitrogen and B vitamins have been observed in marine environments, and interactions between these nutrients have been shown to impact phytoplankton species composition. This review surveys available data, including relevant gene expression patterns, to evaluate the potential for interactive effects of nitrogen and vitamin B12 and B1 starvation in eukaryotic phytoplankton. B12 plays essential roles in amino acid and one-carbon metabolism, while B1 is important for primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and likely useful as an anti-oxidant. Here we will focus on three potential metabolic interconnections between vitamin, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism that may have ramifications for the role of vitamin and nitrogen scarcities in driving ocean productivity and species composition. These include: (1) B12, B1, and N starvation impacts on osmolyte and antioxidant production, (2) B12 and B1 starvation impacts on polyamine biosynthesis, and (3) influence of B12 and B1 starvation on the diatom urea cycle and amino acid recycling through impacts on the citric acid cycle. We evaluate evidence for these interconnections and identify oceanographic contexts in which each may impact rates of primary production and phytoplankton community composition. Major implications include that B12 and B1 deprivation may impair the ability of phytoplankton to recover from nitrogen starvation and that changes in vitamin and nitrogen availability may synergistically impact harmful

  12. The influence of hydrologic connectivity on ecosystem metabolism and nitrate uptake in an active beaver meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, P.; Covino, T. P.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Lacy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands have been widely demonstrated to provide important watershed services, such as the sequestration of carbon (C) and removal of nitrate (NO3-) from through-flowing water. Hydrologic connectivity (degree of water and associated material exchange) between floodplain water bodies (e.g., side channels, ponds) and the main channel influence rates of C accumulation and NO3- uptake, and the degree to which wetlands contribute to enhanced water quality at the catchment scale. However, environmental engineers have largely ignored the role of hydrologic connectivity in providing essential ecosystem services, and constructed wetlands are commonly built using compacted clay and berms that result in less groundwater and surface water exchange than observed in natural wetlands. In a study of an active beaver meadow (multithreaded, riparian wetland) in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, we show how shifts in hydrology (connectivity, residence times, flow paths) from late spring snowmelt (high connectivity) to autumn/winter baseflow (low connectivity) influence ecosystem metabolism metrics (e.g., gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem productivity) and NO3- uptake rates. We use a combination of mixing analyses, tracer tests, and hydrometric methods to evaluate shifts in surface and subsurface hydrologic connections between floodplain water bodies from snowmelt to baseflow. In the main channel and three floodplain water bodies, we quantify metabolism metrics and NO3- uptake kinetics across shifting flow regimes. Results from our research indicate that NO3- uptake and metabolism dynamics respond to changing levels of hydrologic connectivity to the main channel, emphasizing the importance of incorporating connectivity in wetland mitigation practices that seek to enhance water quality at the catchment scale.

  13. Influence of progesterone on serotonin metabolism: a possible causal factor for mood changes.

    PubMed

    Ladisich, W

    1977-01-01

    The influence of progesterone on gestagen upon stress reactions and the metabolism of the biogenic amines, noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT), were evaluated. For the 1st experiments, the 54 subjects ranged in age from 18 to 30 years. Of these, 19 (35%) had reported premenstrual tension, depression, or somatic complaints. After a preliminary interview the Moss Menstrual Distress Questionnarie and the Eysenck Personality Inventory were completed. Each subject was subsequently seen at Day 8 before predicted menstruation and 1 day before menstruation. At each session, blood samples were taken for progesterone assay. The patients sat in a darkened room and were asked to memorize words heard from a tape recording while being given a mild electric shock. The morning after the session, subjects completed the Scale of Well-Being. Psychic difficulty shortly before menstruation was higher in 49 subjects; in 16.3% of these it was severe. Only 10.2% had a negative effect. There was a correlation between the different tests. Only in the medroxyprogesterone-treated group was there a significantly higher reaction to stress on Day 1 before menstruation than a week earlier. There were large individual variations. For studies of the effects of progesterone on NA metabolism, Sprague-Dawley rats which had been ovariectomized 3 weeks earlier, were given progesterone 20 mg/kg sc on 2 consecutive days. These animals were injected with tritiated NA intracisternally and underwent a stress procedure. 3 hours after the intracisternal injection, rats were killed and tritiated-NA and its metabolites estimated. Progesterone injections did not influence NA turnover or percentage distribution of tritiated-NA and its metabolites in unstressed rats but did increase 5-HT turnover. In stress-altered 5-HT metabolism an effect of progesterone was shown. Footshock also raised endogenous progesterone levels. PMID:561984

  14. The Influence of Dam Discharge Regime and Canyon Orientation on Ecosystem Metabolism in the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, T. A.; Tietjen, T.; Wright, S.

    2005-05-01

    Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam and the beginning of flow regulation of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon in 1963, considerable efforts have been directed toward understanding the aquatic ecology of this altered ecosystem. Understanding what controls resource availability has been a central focus of these efforts because the Colorado River supports populations of sport fish and endangered humpback chub, both of which appear to be strongly resource limited. There is evidence that dam discharge regime and canyon orientation influence algal standing crop due to their effects on water velocity (scour) and solar insolation, respectively. We explored whether these physical factors influenced rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, two different metrics of resource availability, in the clear tailwater section of the Colorado River by conducting whole system metabolism measurements across a range of discharge regimes and in reaches with different orientation (i.e. N-S vs. E-W). We found that while both discharge regime and canyon orientation influence rates of primary production, seasonal changes in light availability appear to have a far stronger influence on rates of primary production in the Colorado River. Water temperature appeared to be the main driver of ecosystem respiration.

  15. Rosiglitazone protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Tae Woo; Lee, Ji Young; Shim, Wan Sub; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Soo Kyung; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo . E-mail: bscha@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-02-03

    Acetaldehyde, an inhibitor of mitochondrial function, has been widely used as a neurotoxin because it elicits a severe Parkinson's disease-like syndrome with elevation of the intracellular reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis. Rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonist, has been known to show various non-hypoglycemic effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, and anti-apoptotic. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of rosiglitazone on acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and attempted to examine its mechanism. Acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis was moderately reversed by rosiglitazone treatment. Our results suggest that the protective effects of rosiglitazone on acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis may be ascribed to ability to induce the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and to regulate Bcl-2 and Bax expression. These data indicate that rosiglitazone may provide a useful therapeutic strategy for the prevention of progressive neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease.

  16. Acetaldehyde Adsorption and Reaction onCeO2(100) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    This study reports and compares the adsorption and dissociation of acetaldehyde on oxidized and reduced CeOX(100) thin films. Acetaldehyde reacts and decomposes on fully oxidized CeO2(100) whereas it desorbs molecularly at low temperature on CeO2(111). The primary products are CO, CO2 and water along with trace amounts of crotonaldehyde and acetylene. The acetaldehyde adsorbs as the 2-acetaldehyde species, dioxyethylene. Decomposition proceeds by dehydrogenation through acetate and enolate intermediates. The reaction pathway is similar on the reduced CeO2-X(100) surface however the inability to react with surface O on the reduced surface results in H2 rather than H2O desorption and C is left on the surface rather than producing CO and CO2. C-O bond cleavage in the enolate intermediate followed by reaction with surface H results in ethylene desorption.

  17. Coproduction of Acetaldehyde and Hydrogen during Glucose Fermentation by Escherichia coli ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huilin; Gonzalez, Ramon; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was engineered to coproduce acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by the use of exogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) reductase (for the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde) and the native formate hydrogen lyase. A putative acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA reductase from Salmonella enterica (SeEutE) was cloned, produced at high levels, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. In vitro assays showed that this enzyme had both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (68.07 ± 1.63 μmol min−1 mg−1) and the desired acetyl-CoA reductase activity (49.23 ± 2.88 μmol min−1 mg−1). The eutE gene was engineered into an E. coli mutant lacking native glucose fermentation pathways (ΔadhE, ΔackA-pta, ΔldhA, and ΔfrdC). The engineered strain (ZH88) produced 4.91 ± 0.29 mM acetaldehyde while consuming 11.05 mM glucose but also produced 6.44 ± 0.26 mM ethanol. Studies showed that ethanol was produced by an unknown alcohol dehydrogenase(s) that converted the acetaldehyde produced by SeEutE to ethanol. Allyl alcohol was used to select for mutants with reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Three allyl alcohol-resistant mutants were isolated; all produced more acetaldehyde and less ethanol than ZH88. It was also found that modifying the growth medium by adding 1 g of yeast extract/liter and lowering the pH to 6.0 further increased the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Under optimal conditions, strain ZH136 converted glucose to acetaldehyde and hydrogen in a 1:1 ratio with a specific acetaldehyde production rate of 0.68 ± 0.20 g h−1 g−1 dry cell weight and at 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. This specific production rate is the highest reported thus far and is promising for industrial application. The possibility of a more efficient “no-distill” ethanol fermentation procedure based on the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen is discussed. PMID:21803884

  18. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water (a 10% surface tension reduction from that of pure water) and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions (a 20.6% reduction from that of a 3.1 M AS solution). Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9% reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  19. Reactive processing of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in aqueous aerosol mimics: surface tension depression and secondary organic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive uptake of carbonyl-containing volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) by aqueous atmospheric aerosols is a likely source of particulate organic material. The aqueous-phase secondary organic products of some cVOCs are surface-active. Therefore, cVOC uptake can lead to organic film formation at the gas-aerosol interface and changes in aerosol surface tension. We examined the chemical reactions of two abundant cVOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in water and aqueous ammonium sulfate (AS) solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Secondary organic products were identified using Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-CIMS), and changes in surface tension were monitored using pendant drop tensiometry. Hemiacetal oligomers and aldol condensation products were identified using Aerosol-CIMS. A hemiacetal sulfate ester was tentatively identified in the formaldehyde-AS system. Acetaldehyde depresses surface tension to 65(±2) dyn cm-1 in pure water and 62(±1) dyn cm-1 in AS solutions. Surface tension depression by formaldehyde in pure water is negligible; in AS solutions, a 9 % reduction in surface tension is observed. Mixtures of these species were also studied in combination with methylglyoxal in order to evaluate the influence of cross-reactions on surface tension depression and product formation in these systems. We find that surface tension depression in the solutions containing mixed cVOCs exceeds that predicted by an additive model based on the single-species isotherms.

  20. Biological production of acetaldehyde from ethanol using non-growing Pichia pastoris whole cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Heien-Kun; Foutch, G.L.; Fish, W.W.

    1991-12-31

    Acetaldehyde has been produced biologically using whole-cell Pichia Pass in a semibatch fermentor. Ethanol and air were fed continuously, and the product, acetaldehyde, was removed by the air stream. Operation of the reactor exceeded 100 h, maintaining high alcohol oxidase activity. Low cell-mass concentration (9.9 g/L) minimized product inhibition. Ethanol concentration in the broth, oxygen concentration in the air, and pH were evaluated for their effects on the fermentation process.

  1. Dietary Fat Influences the Expression of Contractile and Metabolic Genes in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Shirouchi, Bungo; Sato, Masao; Komiya, Yusuke; Razin, Farzaneh Rahimi; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Sato, Yusuke; Nakamura, Mako; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fat plays a major role in obesity, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether the intake of different types of dietary fats affect the muscle fiber types that govern the metabolic and contractile properties of the skeletal muscle, we fed male Wistar rats with a 15% fat diet derived from different fat sources. Diets composed of soybean oil (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)-rich), fish oil (n-3 PUFA-rich), or lard (low in PUFAs) were administered to the rats for 4 weeks. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were used as biomarkers to delineate the skeletal muscle fiber types. Compared with soybean oil intake, fish oil intake showed significantly lower levels of the fast-type MyHC2B and higher levels of the intermediate-type MyHC2X composition in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, which is a fast-type dominant muscle. Concomitantly, MyHC2X mRNA levels in fish oil-fed rats were significantly higher than those observed in the soybean oil-fed rats. The MyHC isoform composition in the lard-fed rats was an intermediate between that of the fish oil and soybean oil-fed rats. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4, and porin mRNA showed significantly upregulated levels in the EDL of fish oil-fed rats compared to those observed in soybean oil-fed and lard-fed rats, implying an activation of oxidative metabolism. In contrast, no changes in the composition of MyHC isoforms was observed in the soleus muscle, which is a slow-type dominant muscle. Fatty acid composition in the serum and the muscle was significantly influenced by the type of dietary fat consumed. In conclusion, dietary fat affects the expression of genes related to the contractile and metabolic properties in the fast-type dominant skeletal muscle, where the activation of oxidative metabolism is more pronounced after fish oil intake than that after soybean oil intake. PMID:24244634

  2. The total margin of exposure of ethanol and acetaldehyde for heavy drinkers consuming cider or vodka.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Gill, Jan S; Chick, Jonathan; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Heavy drinkers in Scotland may consume 1600 g ethanol per week. Due to its low price, cider may be preferred over other beverages. Anecdotal evidence has linked cider to specific health hazards beyond other alcoholic beverages. To examine this hypothesis, nine apple and pear cider samples were chemically analysed for constituents and contaminants. None of the products exceeded regulatory or toxicological thresholds, but the regular occurrence of acetaldehyde in cider was detected. To provide a quantitative risk assessment, two collectives of exclusive drinkers of cider and vodka were compared and the intake of acetaldehyde was estimated using probabilistic Monte-Carlo type analysis. The cider consumers were found to ingest more than 200-times the amount of acetaldehyde consumed by vodka consumers. The margins of exposure (MOE) of acetaldehyde were 224 for the cider and over 220,000 for vodka consumers. However, if the effects of ethanol were considered in a cumulative assessment of the combined MOE, the effect of acetaldehyde was minor and the combined MOE for both groups was 0.3. We suggest that alcohol policy priority should be given on reducing ethanol intake by measures such as minimum pricing, rather than to focus on acetaldehyde. PMID:26116882

  3. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants 2. Saturated aliphatics: Acetaldehyde, dioxane, ethylene glycol ethers, propylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Detailed mechanisms are outlined for the chemical reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the saturated aliphatic contaminants acetaldehyde, dioxane, ethylene glycol ethers (methyl, ethyl, n-butyl) and propylene oxide. In-situ formation is of major importance for acetaldehyde. In-situ removal involves reaction with OH (all compounds) and, for acetaldehyde, photolysis and reaction with NO{sub 3}. Acetaldehyde, dioxane, and the ethers are rapidly removed (half-lives of less than one day), leading to PAN (acetaldehyde) and to 2-oxodioxane and formaldehyde (dioxane). Reaction products of the glycol ethers include a large number of hydroxyesters, hydroxyacids, and hydroxycarbonyls. Propylene oxide reacts only slowly with OH, with an atmospheric half-life of 3 - 10 days, to yeild formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and PAN. Uncertainties in the reaction mechanisms for dioxane, the glycol ethers, and propylene oxide are discussed and include C-C vs C-O bond scission in alkoxy radicals as well as alkoxy radical unimolecular decomposition vs reaction with oxygen.

  4. Effect of rinsing with ethanol-containing mouthrinses on the production of salivary acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Rebecca; Thompson, Hayley; Palmer, Richard M; Wilson, Ron F; Proctor, Gordon B; Wade, William G

    2011-12-01

    It has been suggested that the use of alcohol-containing mouthrinses could lead to the presence of acetaldehyde in saliva. In this cross-over study, salivary acetaldehyde levels and microbial profiles were determined before and after rinsing with ethanol-containing mouthrinses with essential oils (EO) and cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) as the active ingredients, and with 21.6% ethanol and water controls. After rinsing with all ethanol-containing rinses, acetaldehyde was detected in saliva after 30 s but declined to low levels after 5 min. The highest peak levels were seen with the ethanol control (median = 82.9 μM at 2 min) and were significantly higher than those seen at the same time after rinsing with the EO rinse (43.1 μM). There was no correlation between microbial counts or plaque scores and acetaldehyde levels, although dividing the subjects on the basis of a peak acetaldehyde salivary concentration of > 90.8 μM after the ethanol rinse revealed that the high responders were highly significantly more likely to harbour salivary yeasts than were the low responders. Rinsing with ethanol-containing mouthrinses causes a rapid, but transient, increase in salivary acetaldehyde levels. PMID:22112029

  5. Influence of coral and algal exudates on microbially mediated reef metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Craig E.; Rohwer, Forest; Wegley-Kelly, Linda; Quistad, Steven D.; Carlson, Craig A.; Leichter, James J.; Hatay, Mark; Smith, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Benthic primary producers in tropical reef ecosystems can alter biogeochemical cycling and microbial processes in the surrounding seawater. In order to quantify these influences, we measured rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exudate release by the dominant benthic primary producers (calcifying and non-calcifying macroalgae, turf-algae and corals) on reefs of Mo‘orea French Polynesia. Subsequently, we examined planktonic and benthic microbial community response to these dissolved exudates by measuring bacterial growth rates and oxygen and DOC fluxes in dark and daylight incubation experiments. All benthic primary producers exuded significant quantities of DOC (roughly 10% of their daily fixed carbon) into the surrounding water over a diurnal cycle. The microbial community responses were dependent upon the source of the exudates and whether the inoculum of microbes included planktonic or planktonic plus benthic communities. The planktonic and benthic microbial communities in the unamended control treatments exhibited opposing influences on DO concentration where respiration dominated in treatments comprised solely of plankton and autotrophy dominated in treatments with benthic plus plankon microbial communities. Coral exudates (and associated inorganic nutrients) caused a shift towards a net autotrophic microbial metabolism by increasing the net production of oxygen by the benthic and decreasing the net consumption of oxygen by the planktonic microbial community. In contrast, the addition of algal exudates decreased the net primary production by the benthic communities and increased the net consumption of oxygen by the planktonic microbial community thereby resulting in a shift towards net heterotrophic community metabolism. When scaled up to the reef habitat, exudate-induced effects on microbial respiration did not outweigh the high oxygen production rates of benthic algae, such that reef areas dominated with benthic primary

  6. Influence of coral and algal exudates on microbially mediated reef metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Nelson, Craig E; Rohwer, Forest; Wegley-Kelly, Linda; Quistad, Steven D; Carlson, Craig A; Leichter, James J; Hatay, Mark; Smith, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    Benthic primary producers in tropical reef ecosystems can alter biogeochemical cycling and microbial processes in the surrounding seawater. In order to quantify these influences, we measured rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exudate release by the dominant benthic primary producers (calcifying and non-calcifying macroalgae, turf-algae and corals) on reefs of Mo'orea French Polynesia. Subsequently, we examined planktonic and benthic microbial community response to these dissolved exudates by measuring bacterial growth rates and oxygen and DOC fluxes in dark and daylight incubation experiments. All benthic primary producers exuded significant quantities of DOC (roughly 10% of their daily fixed carbon) into the surrounding water over a diurnal cycle. The microbial community responses were dependent upon the source of the exudates and whether the inoculum of microbes included planktonic or planktonic plus benthic communities. The planktonic and benthic microbial communities in the unamended control treatments exhibited opposing influences on DO concentration where respiration dominated in treatments comprised solely of plankton and autotrophy dominated in treatments with benthic plus plankon microbial communities. Coral exudates (and associated inorganic nutrients) caused a shift towards a net autotrophic microbial metabolism by increasing the net production of oxygen by the benthic and decreasing the net consumption of oxygen by the planktonic microbial community. In contrast, the addition of algal exudates decreased the net primary production by the benthic communities and increased the net consumption of oxygen by the planktonic microbial community thereby resulting in a shift towards net heterotrophic community metabolism. When scaled up to the reef habitat, exudate-induced effects on microbial respiration did not outweigh the high oxygen production rates of benthic algae, such that reef areas dominated with benthic primary

  7. Theoretical survey of the reaction between osmium and acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guo-Liang; Wang, Chuan-Feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism of the reaction of osmium atom with acetaldehyde has been investigated with a DFT approach. All the stationary points are determined at the UB3LYP/ sdd/6-311++G** level of the theory. Both ground and excited state potential energy surfaces are investigated in detail. The present results show that the title reaction start with the formation of a CH3CHO-metal complex followed by C-C, aldehyde C-H, C-O, and methyl C-H activation. These reactions can lead to four different products (HOsCH3 + CO, OsCO + CH4, OsCOCH3 + H, and OsO + C2H4). The minimum energy reaction path is found to involve the spin inversion in the initial reaction step. This potential energy curve-crossing dramatically affects reaction exothermic. The present results may be helpful in understanding the mechanism of the title reaction and further experimental investigation of the reaction.

  8. Pasture-feeding of Charolais steers influences skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Malek, I; Jurie, C; Bernard, C; Barnola, I; Micol, D; Hocquette, J-F

    2009-10-01

    Extensive beef production systems on pasture are promoted to improve animal welfare and beef quality. This study aimed to compare the influence on muscle characteristics of two management approaches representative of intensive and extensive production systems. One group of 6 Charolais steers was fed maize-silage indoors and another group of 6 Charolais steers grazed on pasture. Activities of enzymes representative of glycolytic and oxidative (Isocitrate dehydrogenase [ICDH], citrate synthase [CS], hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase [HAD]) muscle metabolism were assessed in Rectus abdominis (RA) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles. Activities of oxidative enzymes ICDH, CS and HAD were higher in muscles from grazing animals demonstrating a plasticity of muscle metabolism according to the production and feeding system. Gene expression profiling in RA and ST muscles was performed on both production groups using a multi-tissue bovine cDNA repertoire. Variance analysis showed an effect of the muscle type and of the production system on gene expression (P<0.001). A list of the 212 most variable genes according to the production system was established, of which 149 genes corresponded to identified genes. They were classified according to their gene function annotation mainly in the "protein metabolism and modification", "signal transduction", "cell cycle", "developmental processes" and "muscle contraction" biological processes. Selenoprotein W was found to be underexpressed in pasture-fed animals and could be proposed as a putative gene marker of the grass-based system. In conclusion, enzyme-specific adaptations and gene expression modifications were observed in response to the production system and some of them could be candidates for grazing or grass-feeding traceability. PMID:19996487

  9. Vulnerability of individual fish to capture by trawling is influenced by capacity for anaerobic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S.; Nati, Julie J. H.; Suski, Cory D.

    2015-01-01

    The harvest of animals by humans may constitute one of the strongest evolutionary forces affecting wild populations. Vulnerability to harvest varies among individuals within species according to behavioural phenotypes, but we lack fundamental information regarding the physiological mechanisms underlying harvest-induced selection. It is unknown, for example, what physiological traits make some individual fish more susceptible to capture by commercial fisheries. Active fishing methods such as trawling pursue fish during harvest attempts, causing fish to use both aerobic steady-state swimming and anaerobic burst-type swimming to evade capture. Using simulated trawling procedures with schools of wild minnows Phoxinus phoxinus, we investigate two key questions to the study of fisheries-induced evolution that have been impossible to address using large-scale trawls: (i) are some individuals within a fish shoal consistently more susceptible to capture by trawling than others?; and (ii) if so, is this related to individual differences in swimming performance and metabolism? Results provide the first evidence of repeatable variation in susceptibility to trawling that is strongly related to anaerobic capacity and swimming ability. Maximum aerobic swim speed was also negatively correlated with vulnerability to trawling. Standard metabolic rate was highest among fish that were least vulnerable to trawling, but this relationship probably arose through correlations with anaerobic capacity. These results indicate that vulnerability to trawling is linked to anaerobic swimming performance and metabolic demand, drawing parallels with factors influencing susceptibility to natural predators. Selection on these traits by fisheries could induce shifts in the fundamental physiological makeup and function of descendent populations. PMID:26246542

  10. Influence of Different Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria on Microbiota and Metabolism of Rats with Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    ERMOLENKO, Elena; GROMOVA, Ludmila; BORSCHEV, Yuri; VOEIKOVA, Anna; KARASEVA, Alena; ERMOLENKO, Konstantin; GRUZDKOV, Andrei; SUVOROV, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are often used for prevention and treatment of dysbiosis. However, the action of various strains of LAB on metabolism and digestion under these conditions are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of probiotic LAB on metabolism, digestion and microbiota in animals with dysbiosis. After administration of ampicillin and metronidazole male Wistar rats, were fed products containing Enterococcus faecium L3 (E.f.), Lactobacillus fermentum Z (L.f.) or milk (control 1). Animals in control group 2 were fed milk, after water instead of antibiotics. Dyspeptic symptoms disappeared after administration of probiotic compared with control 1. At the end of the experiment, an increase in the content of enterococci and lactobacilli in the proximal part of the small intestine was found in the animals treated with E.f. and L.f., respectively. After the introduction of probiotic enterococci, the quantity of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the intestines of rats increased, and the content of Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli decreased in comparison with the control group 1 and the group fed lactobacilli. The activity of alkaline phosphatase and aspartate transaminase was greater in blood serum of rats with dysbiosis receiving milk and lactobacilli. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity increased in the epithelium and chyme in the jejunum of the animals treated with L. f. and in the chyme only in the animals treated with E. f. Thus, the specific effects of different strains of probiotic LAB on the microbiota, and on metabolism and digestion of various nutrients were demonstrated. PMID:24936361

  11. Vulnerability of individual fish to capture by trawling is influenced by capacity for anaerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Killen, Shaun S; Nati, Julie J H; Suski, Cory D

    2015-08-22

    The harvest of animals by humans may constitute one of the strongest evolutionary forces affecting wild populations. Vulnerability to harvest varies among individuals within species according to behavioural phenotypes, but we lack fundamental information regarding the physiological mechanisms underlying harvest-induced selection. It is unknown, for example, what physiological traits make some individual fish more susceptible to capture by commercial fisheries. Active fishing methods such as trawling pursue fish during harvest attempts, causing fish to use both aerobic steady-state swimming and anaerobic burst-type swimming to evade capture. Using simulated trawling procedures with schools of wild minnows Phoxinus phoxinus, we investigate two key questions to the study of fisheries-induced evolution that have been impossible to address using large-scale trawls: (i) are some individuals within a fish shoal consistently more susceptible to capture by trawling than others?; and (ii) if so, is this related to individual differences in swimming performance and metabolism? Results provide the first evidence of repeatable variation in susceptibility to trawling that is strongly related to anaerobic capacity and swimming ability. Maximum aerobic swim speed was also negatively correlated with vulnerability to trawling. Standard metabolic rate was highest among fish that were least vulnerable to trawling, but this relationship probably arose through correlations with anaerobic capacity. These results indicate that vulnerability to trawling is linked to anaerobic swimming performance and metabolic demand, drawing parallels with factors influencing susceptibility to natural predators. Selection on these traits by fisheries could induce shifts in the fundamental physiological makeup and function of descendent populations. PMID:26246542

  12. Mechanistic insights into the formation of acetaldehyde and diethyl ether from ethanol over supported VO{subx}, MoO{subx}, and WO{subx} catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, H.; Gatt, J. E.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D.

    2011-04-01

    Catalytic pathways are described for reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde by oxidative dehydrogenation and of ethanol to diethyl ether by condensation over VO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and WO{sub x}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopic labeling shows that acetaldehyde formation occurs via rate-determining C-H bond cleavage of the CH{sub 2} group in an adsorbed alkoxide followed by removal of surface oxygen in a Mars and van Krevelen redox mechanism (as confirmed by in situ X-ray absorption, diffuse reflectance infra-red Fourier transform spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy); diethyl ether formation occurs in parallel via coupling and condensation of two adjacent ethoxy species. Using a combination of in situ spectroscopic and kinetic analysis, catalyst properties influencing the formation of acetaldehyde and ether from the common adsorbed ethoxy intermediate are elucidated. X-ray absorption analysis during anaerobic ethanol titration is used to preclude the involvement of terminal M{double_bond}O bonds during the reaction. A study of the activity of catalysts with the same MoO{sub x} domain size on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and CeO{sub 2} supports and binary oxides of MoO{sub x} and WO{sub x} on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used to prove that the active redox oxygen for acetaldehyde formation is the oxygen atom linking the active metal oxide domain to the support oxide. Ether formation ability of the metal oxide is related to the electronegativity of the active metal atom.

  13. The evaluation of insulin as a metabolic signal influencing behavior via the brain.

    PubMed

    Woods, S C; Chavez, M; Park, C R; Riedy, C; Kaiyala, K; Richardson, R D; Figlewicz, D P; Schwartz, M W; Porte, D; Seeley, R J

    1996-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to evaluate decreases of food intake and body weight that occur when a peptide is administered to an animal. Using the pancreatic hormone insulin as an example, the case is made that endogenous insulin is normally secreted in response to circulating nutrients as well as in proportion to the degree of adiposity. Hence, its levels in the blood are a reliable indicator of adiposity. A further case is then made demonstrating that insulin is transported through the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where it gains access to neurons containing specific insulin receptors that are important in the control of feeding and metabolism. Finally, experimentally-induced changes of insulin in the brain cause predictable changes of food intake and body weight. Given these observations, the question is then asked: since endogenous insulin, acting within the brain, appears to decrease food intake, can a decrease of food intake caused by exogenous insulin administered into the same area of the brain be ascribed to the same, naturally-occurring response system, or should it be attributed to malaise or a non-specific depression of behavior? Arguments are presented supporting the former position that exogenous insulin, when administered in small quantities directly into the brain, taps into the natural caloric/metabolic system and hence influences food intake and body weight. PMID:8622820

  14. Clinical and Environmental Influences on Metabolic Biomarkers Collected for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Cook, Daniel E; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identifying common clinical and environmental factors that influence newborn metabolic biomarkers will improve the utilization of metabolite panels for clinical diagnostic medicine. Design and Methods Environmental effects including gender, season of birth, gestational age, birth weight, feeding method and age at time of collection were evaluated for over 50 metabolites collected by the Iowa Neonatal Metabolic Screening Program on 221,788 newborns over a six year period. Results We replicated well known observations that low birth weight and preterm infants have higher essential amino acids and lower medium and long chain acylcarnitine levels than their term counterparts. Smaller, but still significant, differences were observed for gender and timing of sample collection, specifically the season in which the infant was born. Most intriguing were our findings of higher thyroid stimulating hormone in the winter months (P<1×10−40) which correlated with an increased false positive rate of congenital hypothyroidism in the winter (0.9%) compared to summer (0.6%). Previous studies, conducted globally, have identified an increased prevalence of suspected and confirmed cases of congenital hypothyroidism in the winter months. We found that the percentage of unresolved suspected cases were slightly higher in the winter (0.3% vs 0.2%). Conclusions We identified differences in metabolites by gestational age, birth weight, gender and season. Some are widely reported such as gestational age and birth weight, while others such as the effect of seasonality are not as well studied. PMID:23010448

  15. Differential lipid metabolism in monocytes and macrophages: influence of cholesterol loading.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Irene; Puchalska, Patrycja; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the hypercholesterolemia associated with atherosclerosis on monocytes is poorly understood. Monocytes are exposed to high concentrations of lipids, particularly cholesterol and lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC). Indeed, in line with recent reports, we found that monocytes accumulate cholesteryl esters (CEs) in hypercholesterolemic mice, demonstrating the need for studies that analyze the effects of lipid accumulation on monocytes. Here we analyze the effects of cholesterol and lyso-PC loading in human monocytes and macrophages. We found that cholesterol acyltransferase and CE hydrolase activities are lower in monocytes. Monocytes also showed a different expression profile of cholesterol influx and efflux genes in response to lipid loading and a different pattern of lyso-PC metabolism. In monocytes, increased levels of CE slowed the conversion of lyso-PC into PC. Interestingly, although macrophages accumulated glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine was the main water-soluble choline metabolite being generated in monocytes, suggesting a role for mono- and diacylglycerol in the chemoattractability of these cells. In summary, monocytes and macrophages show significant differences in lipid metabolism and gene expression profiles in response to lipid loading. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and suggest potentials for targeting monocyte chemotactic properties not only in atherosclerosis but also in other diseases. PMID:26839333

  16. Temperature influence on post-prandial metabolic rate of sub-Antarctic teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Vanella, Fabián Alberto; Boy, Claudia C; Lattuca, María Eugenia; Calvo, Jorge

    2010-06-01

    The influence of temperature on the aerobic metabolism and the energetic cost of food intake (Specific Dynamic Action; SDA) have been investigated in four species of Sub-Antarctic teleosts. The species were the notothenioids Paranotothenia magellanica, Patagonotothen sima and Harpagifer bispinis and the zoarcid Austrolycus depressiceps. Individuals were captured in the vicinity of Ushuaia Bay. Experimental temperatures were 10, 4 and 2 degrees C, which correspond to summer, winter and extreme winter respectively. Individual respirometry chambers and calorimetric techniques were used. Different food items were provided: crustaceans (isopods and amphipods) and Argentinean hake muscle. Interspecific analysis was done on species fed with isopods. A rapid increase in oxygen consumption was registered after meals, indicating a typical SDA response. The Duration of the SDA was longer at low temperatures. The extra energy spent during the process itself, and when expressed as a percentage of consumed food energy, decreased with decreasing temperature. The SDA Coefficient was higher for H. bispinis that were fed with isopods. We suggest that decreases in temperature diminish the metabolic cost and extend SDA. Energy-saving mechanisms could be an evolutionary advantage to minimize the energetic cost of living at low sub-Antarctic temperatures. A general model of exponential decay is suggested for the duration of SDA and Temperature, based on the present study and compiled from literature data. PMID:20167285

  17. Hydrogen isotopic profile in the characterization of sugars. Influence of the metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Billault, Isabelle; Li, Xiaobao; Mabon, Françoise; Remaud, Gérald; Martin, Maryvonne L

    2002-03-13

    The site-specific natural hydrogen isotope ratios of plant metabolites determined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR method) can provide powerful criteria for inferring mechanistic and environmental effects on biosynthetic pathways. This work examines the potential of isotopic profiles for the main constituents of carbohydrates, glucose and fructose, to distinguish different photosynthetic pathways. An appropriate analytical strategy, involving three suitable isotopic probes, has been elaborated with a view to measuring simultaneously, in conditions devoid of isotopic perturbations, all (or nearly all) of the carbon-bound hydrogen isotope ratios. It is shown that the type of photosynthetic metabolism, either C3 (sugar beet, orange, and grape), C4 (maize and sugar cane), or CAM (pineapple), and the physiological status of the precursor plant exert strong influences on the deuterium distribution in the sugar molecules. Consequently, this isotopic fingerprint may be a rich source of information for the comparison of mechanisms in metabolic pathways. In addition, it can provide complementary criteria to ethanol as a probe for the origin of sugars. PMID:11879039

  18. The relative influence of nutrients and habitat on stream metabolism in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankforter, J.D.; Weyers, H.S.; Bales, J.D.; Moran, P.W.; Calhoun, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Stream metabolism was measured in 33 streams across a gradient of nutrient concentrations in four agricultural areas of the USA to determine the relative influence of nutrient concentrations and habitat on primary production (GPP) and respiration (CR-24). In conjunction with the stream metabolism estimates, water quality and algal biomass samples were collected, as was an assessment of habitat in the sampling reach. When data for all study areas were combined, there were no statistically significant relations between gross primary production or community respiration and any of the independent variables. However, significant regression models were developed for three study areas for GPP (r 2 = 0.79-0.91) and CR-24 (r 2 = 0.76-0.77). Various forms of nutrients (total phosphorus and area-weighted total nitrogen loading) were significant for predicting GPP in two study areas, with habitat variables important in seven significant models. Important physical variables included light availability, precipitation, basin area, and in-stream habitat cover. Both benthic and seston chlorophyll were not found to be important explanatory variables in any of the models; however, benthic ash-free dry weight was important in two models for GPP. ?? 2009 The Author(s).

  19. Kleptoparasitism and aggressiveness are influenced by standard metabolic rate in eels.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, Benjamin; Bolliet, Valérie; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2016-04-01

    Kleptoparasitism refers to either interspecific or intraspecific stealing of food already procured by other species or individuals. Within a given species, individuals might differ in their propensity to use such a tactic, in a similar manner to which they differ in their general level of aggressiveness. Standard metabolic rate is often viewed as a proxy for energy requirements. For this reason, it should directly impact on both kleptoparasitism and aggressiveness when individuals have to share the same food source. In the present study we first assessed the standard metabolic rate (SMR) of 128 juvenile European eels (Anguilla anguilla) by the determination of oxygen consumption. We then tested how the SMR could influence agonistic behavior of individuals competing for food in three distinct trials evenly distributed over three months. We demonstrate that SMR positively correlates with attacks (sum of bite and push events) in all trials. Similarly SMR correlated positively with kleptoparasitism (food theft), but this was significant only for the third trial (month 3). To our knowledge, the present study is the first reporting a link between kleptoparasitism and SMR in a fish species. This has ecological implications owing to the fact that this species is characterized by an environmental sex determination linked to early growth rate. We discuss theses findings in the light of the producer-scrounger foraging game. PMID:26861178

  20. Rain influences the physiological and metabolic responses to exercise in hot conditions.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryo; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Eiko; Matsumoto, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor exercise often proceeds in rainy conditions. However, the cooling effects of rain on human physiological responses have not been systematically studied in hot conditions. The present study determined physiological and metabolic responses using a climatic chamber that can precisely simulate hot, rainy conditions. Eleven healthy men ran on a treadmill at an intensity of 70% VO2max for 30 min in the climatic chamber at an ambient temperature of 33°C in the presence (RAIN) or absence (CON) of 30 mm · h(-1) of precipitation and a headwind equal to the running velocity of 3.15 ± 0.19 m · s(-1). Oesophageal temperature, mean skin temperature, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, blood parameters, volume of expired air and sweat loss were measured. Oesophageal and mean skin temperatures were significantly lower from 5 to 30 min, and heart rate was significantly lower from 20 to 30 min in RAIN than in CON (P < 0.05 for all). Plasma lactate and epinephrine concentrations (30 min) and sweat loss were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in RAIN compared with CON. Rain appears to influence physiological and metabolic responses to exercise in heat such that heat-induced strain might be reduced. PMID:25555077

  1. The influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenland, D. M.; Brown, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a system to study the influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves by means of clinorotation. The use of excised leaves in our clinostat studies offered a number of advantages over the use of whole plants, most important of which were minimization of exogenous mechanical stress and a greater amount of carbohydrate accumulation during the time of treatment. We found that horizontal clinorotation of excised wheat leaves resulted in significant reductions in the accumulation of fructose, sucrose, starch and fructan relative to control, vertically clinorotated leaves. Photosynthesis, dark respiration and the extractable activities of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27), sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.4.14), sucrose sucrose fructosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.99), and fructan hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.80) were unchanged due to altered gravity treatment.

  2. Thz Spectroscopy of Acetaldehyde and Search of 13C Species in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    Acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) is one of the high priority complex organic molecules for the astrophysical community. There is a lack of data concerning the 13C species since the measurements are limited to 40 GHz up to date. This molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with RAM36 code which used the Rho Axis Method. Last year we presented the analysis of the millimeterwave spectra of the 13CH_3CHO species. We extended the analysis to the THz range of the vibrational ground state for both species. We are also analyzing the first torsional state (≈140 cm-1) for two reasons: first, this permits to remove correlation between parameters. Second, this state contribute to the partition function even at ISM temperature (100--150 K) since there is an influence on the column density determined in case of detection. The searches of these isotopomers are in progress in ORION. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. This work was also done under the ANR-08-BLAN-0054. Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B. J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Ilyushin, V.V. et al J. Mol. Spectrosc. 259, (2010) 26 Margules, L. et al. FA07, 66th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2011)

  3. Acetaldehyde sequestering prevents ethanol-induced stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Mereu, Maddalena; Peana, Alessandra Tiziana; Lintas, Alessandra; Golosio, Angela; Diana, Marco

    2009-03-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD) has been postulated to mediate some of the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol (EtOH). In this study we sought to evaluate whether the stimulatory effects of EtOH on mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission are affected by the administration of ACD-sequestering agent D-penicillamine (Dp). To this end we studied the effect of EtOH and ACD in the rat mesoaccumbens pathway by in vivo microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccs), and by single cell extracellular recordings from antidromically identified mesoaccumbens DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Both EtOH (1g/kg) and ACD (20mg/kg) administration increased DA levels in the NAccs and increased the activity of mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Pretreatment with Dp (50mg/kg i.p. 1h before drug challenge) prevented both EtOH- and ACD-induced stimulation of the DA mesolimbic system without affecting morphine stimulatory actions. These observations add further support to the notion that EtOH-derived ACD stimulates the mesolimbic DA system and is essential in EtOH-induced stimulation of the DA mesoaccumbens system. We conclude that modulation of ACD bioavailability may influence the addictive profile of EtOH by decreasing its psychotropic effects and possibly leading the way to new pharmacological treatments of alcoholism. PMID:19070441

  4. Aerobic glycolysis during brain activation: adrenergic regulation and influence of norepinephrine on astrocytic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic glycolysis occurs during brain activation and is characterized by preferential up-regulation of glucose utilization compared with oxygen consumption even though oxygen level and delivery are adequate. Aerobic glycolysis is a widespread phenomenon that underlies energetics of diverse brain activities, such as alerting, sensory processing, cognition, memory, and pathophysiological conditions, but specific cellular functions fulfilled by aerobic glycolysis are poorly understood. Evaluation of evidence derived from different disciplines reveals that aerobic glycolysis is a complex, regulated phenomenon that is prevented by propranolol, a non-specific β-adrenoceptor antagonist. The metabolic pathways that contribute to excess utilization of glucose compared with oxygen include glycolysis, the pentose phosphate shunt pathway, the malate-aspartate shuttle, and astrocytic glycogen turnover. Increased lactate production by unidentified cells, and lactate dispersal from activated cells and lactate release from the brain, both facilitated by astrocytes, are major factors underlying aerobic glycolysis in subjects with low blood lactate levels. Astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling with local oxidation is minor. Blockade of aerobic glycolysis by propranolol implicates adrenergic regulatory processes including adrenal release of epinephrine, signaling to brain via the vagus nerve, and increased norepinephrine release from the locus coeruleus. Norepinephrine has a powerful influence on astrocytic metabolism and glycogen turnover that can stimulate carbohydrate utilization more than oxygen consumption, whereas β-receptor blockade 're-balances' the stoichiometry of oxygen-glucose or -carbohydrate metabolism by suppressing glucose and glycogen utilization more than oxygen consumption. This conceptual framework may be helpful for design of future studies to elucidate functional roles of preferential non-oxidative glucose utilization and glycogen turnover during brain

  5. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids) were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64%) elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently identified S. meliloti s

  6. Effect of (L)-cysteine on acetaldehyde self-administration.

    PubMed

    Peana, Alessandra T; Muggironi, Giulia; Fois, Giulia R; Zinellu, Manuel; Sirca, Donatella; Diana, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first metabolite of ethanol, has been implicated in several behavioural actions of alcohol, including its reinforcing effects. Recently, we reported that l-cysteine, a sequestrating agent of ACD, reduced oral ethanol self-administration and that ACD was orally self-administered. This study examined the effects of l-cysteine pre-treatment during the acquisition and maintenance phases of ACD (0.2%) self-administration as well as on the deprivation effect after ACD extinction and on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In a separate PR schedule of reinforcement, the effect of l-cysteine was assessed on the break-point produced by ethanol (10%). Furthermore, we tested the effect of l-cysteine on saccharin (0.2%) reinforcement. Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ACD by nose poking on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule in 30-min daily sessions. Responses on an active nose-poke caused delivery of ACD solution, whereas responses on an inactive nose-poke had no consequences. l-cysteine reduced the acquisition (40 mg/kg), the maintenance and the deprivation effect (100 mg/kg) of ACD self-administration. Furthermore, at the same dose, l-cysteine (120 mg/kg) decreased both ACD and ethanol break point. In addition, l-cysteine was unable to suppress the different responses for saccharin, suggesting that its effect did not relate to an unspecific decrease in a general motivational state. Compared to saline, l-cysteine did not modify responses on inactive nose-pokes, suggesting an absence of a non-specific behavioural activation. Taken together, these results could support the hypotheses that ACD possesses reinforcing properties and l-cysteine reduces motivation to self-administer ACD. PMID:22440691

  7. Influence of corticosteroids on chemotactic response and collagen metabolism of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hein, R; Mauch, C; Hatamochi, A; Krieg, T

    1988-07-15

    Following chronic administration of corticosteroids in vivo, a number of complications occur, which mainly involve the metabolism of connective tissue cells. Therefore, several attempts have been made to develop corticosteroids, which show less pronounced side effects. Fibroblasts were kept in monolayer cultures and were exposed to corticosteroids demonstrating similar anti-inflammatory activity (prednicarbate, desoximetasone). Chemotaxis of fibroblasts was studied over 4 hr, protein and collagen synthesis were estimated using proteinchemical methods and also by dot blot hybridization. Corticosteroids used in a high dosage (10 microM) affected all biosynthetic capacities of the investigated fibroblasts. Protein synthesis and production of collagen types I and III were reduced and a similar decrease of mRNA levels for collagen type I could be found indicating an influence on the pretranslational control. In the same concentrations desoximetasone was much more active than prednicarbate. Fibroblast migration was dosage dependently inhibited from 10(-9) M to 10(-5) M for desoximetasone, while incubation with prednicarbate did not cause a reduction of the chemotactic response at concentrations lower than 10(-7) M. These data suggest that modifications of corticosteroids might result in a dissociation of some of their biological activities and can specifically influence their effects on biosynthetic capacities of fibroblasts. PMID:3395353

  8. A Novel Antifungal Is Active against Candida albicans Biofilms and Inhibits Mutagenic Acetaldehyde Production In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Mikko T.; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Vilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (p<0.05) with the largest reductions seen at acidic pH. Caspofungin was mainly active against biofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 µM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (p<0.05). Expression of genes responsible for ACH catabolism was up-regulated by HICA but down-regulated by caspofungin. SEM showed aberrant hyphae and collapsed hyphal structures during incubation with HICA at acidic pH. We conclude that HICA has potential as an antifungal agent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm

  9. Influence of circadian rhythms on rat muscle glycogen metabolism during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Garetto, L P; Armstrong, R B

    1983-01-01

    Marked circadian fluctuations in skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations have previously been reported. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the influence of these rhythms on muscle glycogen metabolism during and after high-intensity treadmill exercise. Male Sprague-Dawley rats ran five 1-min sprints at 75 m min-1 interspersed by 1-3 min rest intervals either at 08.00 h (morning) or at 20.00 h (night). All muscles sampled lost significant amounts of glycogen during exercise at both time periods. There were no differences in rates of loss between morning and night, even though glycogen levels in several muscles (high-oxidative muscles) were significantly higher before exercise in the morning. Following exercise, glycogen restoration in muscle samples primarily composed of fast-twitch fibres was more rapid in the morning than at night. There was no difference in glycogen restoration rates between the two time periods in the muscle primarily composed of slow-twitch fibres. Although liver glycogen was lower after exercise at night than in the morning, there were no differences in post-exercise blood glucose levels between the two time periods. In conclusion, circadian rhythms do not appear to influence rates of glycogen loss during high-speed running. However, since glycogen loss is the same at all times of day, one would predict that circadian changes in pre-exercise muscle glycogen concentrations would affect muscular endurance. Muscle glycogen restoration after exercise does appear to be affected by circadian rhythms, although interpretation of these data is complicated by possible changes in patterns of muscle fibre contraction at different times of the day. These circadian influences should be considered in the design of exercise studies using laboratory rodents. PMID:6833943

  10. Influence of neonatal hypothyroidism on hepatic gene expression and lipid metabolism in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Santana-Farré, Ruymán; Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Bocos, Carlos; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Kahlon, Nusrat; Herrera, Emilio; Norstedt, Gunnar; Parini, Paolo; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH) has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregnant rats were given the antithyroid drug methimazole (MMI) from GD12 until PND30 to induce CH in male offspring. Growth defects due to CH were evident as reductions in body weight and tail length from the second week of life. Once the MMI treatment was discontinued, the feed efficiency increased in CH, and this was accompanied by significant catch-up growth. On PND80, significant reductions in body mass, tail length, and circulating IGF-I levels remained in CH rats. Conversely, the mRNA levels of known GH target genes were significantly upregulated. The serum levels of thyroid hormones, cholesterol, and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARα and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3 replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development plays on normal liver physiology in adulthood. PMID:22666351

  11. Influence of Neonatal Hypothyroidism on Hepatic Gene Expression and Lipid Metabolism in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bocos, Carlos; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Kahlon, Nusrat; Herrera, Emilio; Norstedt, Gunnar; Parini, Paolo; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH) has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregnant rats were given the antithyroid drug methimazole (MMI) from GD12 until PND30 to induce CH in male offspring. Growth defects due to CH were evident as reductions in body weight and tail length from the second week of life. Once the MMI treatment was discontinued, the feed efficiency increased in CH, and this was accompanied by significant catch-up growth. On PND80, significant reductions in body mass, tail length, and circulating IGF-I levels remained in CH rats. Conversely, the mRNA levels of known GH target genes were significantly upregulated. The serum levels of thyroid hormones, cholesterol, and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARα and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3 replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development plays on normal liver physiology in adulthood. PMID:22666351

  12. Fructophilic characteristics of Fructobacillus spp. may be due to the absence of an alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (adhE).

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Tanaka, Naoto; Oikawa, Yo; Okada, Sanae; Dicks, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Fructophilic strains of Leuconostoc spp. have recently been reclassified to a new genus, i.e., Fructobacillus. Members of the genus are differentiated from Leuconostoc spp. by their preference for fructose on growth, requirement of an electron acceptor for glucose metabolism, and the inability to produce ethanol from the fermentation of glucose. In the present study, enzyme activities and genes involved in ethanol production were studied, since this is the key pathway for NAD(+)/NADH cycling in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Fructobacillus spp. has a weak alcohol dehydrogenase activity and has no acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, whereas both enzymes are active in Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene, adhE, was described in Leuconostoc spp., but not in Fructobacillus spp. These results suggested that, due to the deficiency of the adhE gene, the normal pathway for ethanol production is absent in Fructobacillus spp. This leads to a shortage of NAD(+), and the requirement for an electron acceptor in glucose metabolism. Fructophilic characteristics, as observed for Fructobacillus spp., are thus due to the absence of the adhE gene, and a phenotype that most likely evolved as a result of regressive evolution. PMID:24352296

  13. Cereal Processing Influences Postprandial Glucose Metabolism as Well as the GI Effect

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Normand, Sylvie; Meynier, Alexandra; Sothier, Monique; Louche-Pelissier, Corinne; Peyrat, Jocelyne; Maitrepierre, Christine; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Brand-Miller, Jeannie; Laville, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Technological processes may influence the release of glucose in starch. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic response and the kinetics of appearance of exogenous glucose from 2 cereal products consumed at breakfast. Methods: Twenty-five healthy men were submitted to a randomized, open, crossover study that was divided into 2 parts: 12 of the 25 subjects were included in the “isotope part,” and the 13 other subjects were included in the “glycemic part.” On test days, subjects received biscuits (low glycemic index [GI], high slowly available glucose [SAG]) or extruded cereals (medium GI, low SAG) as part of a breakfast similar in terms of caloric and macronutrient content. The postprandial phase lasted 270 minutes. Results: The rate of appearance (RaE) of exogenous glucose was significantly lower after consumption of biscuits in the first part of the morning (90–150 minutes) than after consumption of extruded cereals (p ≤ 0.05). Conversely, at 210 minutes, it was significantly higher with biscuits (p ≤ 0.01). For the first 2 hours, plasma glucose and insulin were significantly lower after biscuits during the glycemic part. C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower at 90, 120, and 150 minutes after ingestion of the biscuits (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The consumption of biscuits with a high content of slowly digestible starch reduces the appearance rate of glucose in the first part of the morning and prolongs this release in the late phase of the morning (210 minutes). Our results also emphasize that modulation of glucose availability at breakfast is an important factor for metabolic control throughout the morning in healthy subjects due to the lowering of blood glucose and insulin excursions. PMID:24015715

  14. Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Xuan, Chuan-Jin; Feng, Wen-Ling; Tian, Shan Xi

    2015-02-14

    Dissociation dynamics of the temporary negative ions of ethanol and acetaldehyde formed by the low-energy electron attachments is investigated by using the anion velocity map imaging technique and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The momentum images of the dominant fragments O{sup −}/OH{sup −} and CH{sub 3}{sup −} are recorded, indicating the low kinetic energies of O{sup −}/OH{sup −} for ethanol while the low and high kinetic energy distributions of O{sup −} ions for acetaldehyde. The CH{sub 3}{sup −} image for acetaldehyde also shows the low kinetic energy. With help of the dynamics simulations, the fragmentation processes are qualitatively clarified. A new cascade dissociation pathway to produce the slow O{sup −} ion via the dehydrogenated intermediate, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup −} (acetaldehyde anion), is proposed for the dissociative electron attachment to ethanol. After the electron attachment to acetaldehyde molecule, the slow CH{sub 3}{sup −} is produced quickly in the two-body dissociation with the internal energy redistributions in different aspects before bond cleavages.

  15. Correlations between serum proteins modified by acetaldehyde and biochemical variables in heavy drinkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasinghe, S N; Marjot, D H; Rosalki, S B; Fink, R S

    1989-01-01

    A strong and highly significant correlation was observed between serum aspartate transaminase (AST) activity and an index of the cytotoxic activity associated with serum proteins modified by acetaldehyde in a group of 24 heavy drinkers. A weaker but significant correlation (R = 0.564, p = 0.008) was found between total serum creatine kinase activity and this index of serum cytotoxicity. As it is likely that the concentration of circulating modified protein was largely determined by the quantity of free acetaldehyde generated in the liver and that the AST activity was mainly derived from damaged hepatocytes, the data indicate a correlation between hepatic acetaldehyde generation and hepatocyte damage. This correlation may indicate either that increased quantities of acetaldehyde are released by damaged hepatocytes or that acetaldehyde is hepatotoxic in vivo. As only the creatine kinase isoenzyme present in skeletal muscle (CK-MM) was demonstrable in the serum in all but one of our patients, the data also suggest that circulating modified serum proteins may be toxic towards skeletal muscle cells. PMID:2703546

  16. Mechanistic understanding of hydrogenation of acetaldehyde on Au(111): A DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingsen; Shen, Yongli; Xu, Jing; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the reaction pathways for hydrogenation of acetaldehyde on atomic hydrogen pre-adsorbed Au(111) employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All the surface species involved in the reaction scheme have low diffusion barriers, suggesting that the rearrangement and movement of these species on the surface are facile under reaction condition. The hydroxyethyl is proposed to be the intermediate for the hydrogenation of acetaldehyde, and the activation energy for its formation is 0.37 eV. Additionally, the coupling reaction of hydroxyethyl and acetaldehyde - resulting in the formation of the ethylidene ethylene glycol (CH3C*HOCH(CH3)OH) species - also readily occurs at the reaction condition. Two-dimensional (2-D) polyacetaldehyde ((CH3CHO)2) can be easily hydrogenated to ethylidene ethylene glycol or ethoxy hemiacetal (CH3CH2OCH(CH3)O*); the latter can be converted to ethanol and acetaldehyde via further hydrogenation. As the hydrogenation products of ethylidene ethylene glycol and ethoxy hemiacetal, ethoxyethanol (CH3CH2OCH(CH3)OH) can be deeply hydrogenated to hydroxyethyl and ethanol. Our calculations also suggest that the formation of an ethoxyl intermediate is not likely, which agrees with the experimental observation that no deuterated acetaldehydes have been detected in isotopic measurements.

  17. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Stoichiometric and Defective SrTiO₃(100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Ferris, Kim F.; Azad, Samina; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2004-02-05

    The adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), on stoichiometric (TiO{sub 2}-terminated) and reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surfaces, have been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Acetaldehyde adsorbs molecularly on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface that contains predominantly Ti{sup 4+} cations. The Ti{sup 4+} sites on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface are not sufficiently active for surface reactions such as aldol condensation, as opposed to the Ti{sup 4+} ions on the TiO{sub 2}(001) surface. However, decomposition and redox reactions of acetaldehyde occur in the presence of surface defects created by Ar{sup +} sputtering. The decomposition products following reactions of acetaldehyde on the defective surface include H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 4}H{sub 8}. Reductive coupling, to produce C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 4}H{sub 8} is the main reaction pathway for decomposition of acetaldehyde on the sputter reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface.

  18. The influence of trilostane on steroid hormone metabolism in canine adrenal glands and corpora lutea-an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ouschan, C; Lepschy, M; Zeugswetter, F; Möstl, E

    2012-03-01

    Trilostane is widely used to treat hyperadrenocorticism in dogs. Trilostane competitively inhibits the enzyme 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which converts pregnenolone (P5) to progesterone (P4) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstendione (A4). Although trilostane is frequently used in dogs, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on canine steroid hormone biosynthesis is still an enigma. Multiple enzymes of 3β-HSD have been found in humans, rats and mice and their presence might explain the contradictory results of studies on the effectiveness of trilostane. We therefore investigated the influence of trilostane on steroid hormone metabolism in dogs by means of an in vitro model. Canine adrenal glands from freshly euthanized dogs and corpora lutea (CL) were incubated with increasing doses of trilostane. Tritiated P5 or DHEA were used as substrates. The resulting radioactive metabolites were extracted, separated by thin layer chromatography and visualized by autoradiography. A wide variety of radioactive metabolites were formed in the adrenal glands and in the CL, indicating high metabolic activity in both tissues. In the adrenal cortex, trilostane influences the P5 metabolism in a dose- and time-dependent manner, while DHEA metabolism and metabolism of both hormones in the CL were unaffected. The results indicate for the first time that there might be more than one enzyme of 3β-HSD present in dogs and that trilostane selectively inhibits P5 conversion to P4 only in the adrenal gland. PMID:22113849

  19. Comparative study of the damage produced by acute ethanol and acetaldehyde treatment in a human fetal hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Olivares, I P; Bucio, L; Souza, V; Cárabez, A; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C

    1997-06-27

    The effects of acute ethanol and acetaldehyde treatment on cell proliferation, cell adhesion capacity, neutral red incorporation into lysosomes, glutathione content, protein sulfhydryl compounds, lipid peroxidation, inner mitochondrial membrane integrity (MTT test), lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and ultrastructural alterations were investigated in a human fetal hepatic cell line (WRL-68 cells). WRL-68 cells were used, due to the fact that, although this cell line expresses some hepatic characteristics, it does not express alcohol dehydrogenase or cytochrome P450 activity, so it could be a good model to study the effect of the toxic agents per se. Cells were exposed during 120 min with 200 mM ethanol or 10 mM acetaldehyde. Under these conditions, cells presented 100% viability and no morphological alteration was observed by light microscopy. Acetaldehyde-treated cells reduced their proliferative capacity drastically while the ethanol-treated ones presented no difference with control cells. Cell adhesion to substrate, measured as time required to adhere to the substrate and time required to detach from the substrate, was diminished in acetaldehyde WRL-68-treated cells. Cytotoxicity measures as neutral red and MTT test showed that acetaldehyde-treated cells presented more damage than ethanol-treated ones. Cellular respiratory capacity was compromised by acetaldehyde treatment due to 40% less oxygen consumption than control cells. Lipid peroxidation values, measured as malondialdehyde production, were higher in ethanol-treated WRL-68 cells (127%) than in acetaldehyde-treated ones (60%) to control cell values. Lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) in extracellular media of ethanol-treated cells presented the highest values. GSH content was reduced 95% and thiol protein content was diminished severely in acetaldehyde-treated cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed more ultrastructural alterations in cells treated with acetaldehyde. The results indicate that

  20. Acetaldehyde and parkinsonism: role of CYP450 2E1

    PubMed Central

    Vaglini, Francesca; Viaggi, Cristina; Piro, Valentina; Pardini, Carla; Gerace, Claudio; Scarselli, Marco; Corsini, Giovanni Umberto

    2013-01-01

    The present review update the relationship between acetaldehyde (ACE) and parkinsonism with a specific focus on the role of P450 system and CYP 2E1 isozyme particularly. We have indicated that ACE is able to enhance the parkinsonism induced in mice by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, a neurotoxin able to damage the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Similarly diethyldithiocarbamate, the main metabolite of disulfiram, a drug widely used to control alcoholism, diallylsulfide (DAS) and phenylisothiocyanate also markedly enhance the toxin-related parkinsonism. All these compounds are substrate/inhibitors of CYP450 2E1 isozyme. The presence of CYP 2E1 has been detected in the dopamine (DA) neurons of rodent Substantia Nigra (SN), but a precise function of the enzyme has not been elucidated yet. By treating CYP 2E1 knockout (KO) mice with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, the SN induced lesion was significantly reduced when compared with the lesion observed in wild-type animals. Several in vivo and in vitro studies led to the conclusion that CYP 2E1 may enhance the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice by increasing free radical production inside the dopaminergic neurons. ACE is a good substrate for CYP 2E1 enzyme as the other substrate-inhibitors and by this way may facilitate the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to toxic events. The literature suggests that ethanol and/or disulfiram may be responsible for toxic parkinsonism in human and it indicates that basal ganglia are the major targets of disulfiram toxicity. A very recent study reports that there are a decreased methylation of the CYP 2E1 gene and increased expression of CYP 2E1 mRNA in Parkinson's disease (PD) patient brains. This study suggests that epigenetic variants of this cytochrome contribute to the susceptibility, thus confirming multiples lines of evidence which indicate a link between environmental toxins and PD. PMID:23801948

  1. Impact of bioethanol fuel implementation in transport based on modelled acetaldehyde concentration in the urban environment.

    PubMed

    Sundvor, Ingrid; López-Aparicio, Susana

    2014-10-15

    This study shows the results obtained from emission and air dispersion modelling of acetaldehyde in the city of Oslo and associated with the circulation of bioethanol vehicles. Two scenarios of bioethanol implementation, both realistic and hypothetical, have been considered under winter conditions; 1) realistic baseline scenario, which corresponds to the current situation in Oslo where one bus line is running with bioethanol (E95; 95% ethanol-5% petrol) among petrol and diesel vehicles; and 2) a hypothetical scenario characterized by a full implementation of high-blend bioethanol (i.e. E85) as fuel for transportation, and thus an entire bioethanol fleet. The results indicate that a full implementation of bioethanol will have a certain impact on urban air quality due to direct emissions of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde emissions are estimated to increase by 233% and concentration levels increase up to 650% with regard to the baseline. PMID:25064718

  2. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  3. Feasibility studies of a fuel cell for cogeneration of homogeneously catalyzed acetaldehyde and electricity from ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, S.; Datta, R.

    1996-10-01

    The development and feasibility of a novel fuel cell for simultaneously generating electricity and homogeneously catalyzed acetaldehyde from ethanol are reported. The fuel cell is based on the supported molten-salt electrocatalysis technique that allows use of homogeneous (liquid-phase) catalysts in fuel cells for the first time. The electrocatalytic reaction combines the chemistry of the Wacker process conventionally used for acetaldehyde production from the partial oxidation of ethylene and that of the Veba-Chemie method. Nafion membranes impregnated with different electrolytic materials were used in the fuel cell as electrolytes to allow operation at reaction temperatures up to 165 C. Results obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature on partial oxidation of ethylene to acetaldehyde in a fuel cell based on conventional heterogeneous electrocatalysts.

  4. [Influences of indomethacin on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems of fetuses].

    PubMed

    Chimura, T; Fujimori, K

    1982-09-01

    The influences of indomethacin--a drug with prostaglandins inhibiting effect--on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems of fetuses were studied. 1) 1mg/day of indomethacin was administered subcutaneously to pregnant Wister rats for 5-6 days. The rats were administered laparotomyon on the 21st day of conception, and the histopathological changes of the lungs of the fetuses were studied. The findings demonstrated no histopathological changes due to indomethacin nor any hypertrophy of the smooth muscles in the small arteries of the lungs. 2) 10-35mg of indomethacin was administered intravenously to rabbits in the final stages of pregnancy, thus, indomethacin was absorbed into the maternal livers, placentas, fetal livers, maternal plasmas, and amniotic fluids as the serum concentrations of indomethacin increased with each added dosage. The percentile changes in relation to the maternal plasma concentration values revealed high percentages in fetal livers, followed by placentas, maternal livers, and fetal plasmas. Amniotic fluid concentrations were as low as 20 percent. 3) As for the clinical results of the use of indomethacin (N = 302), tocolysis showed that abortions numbered 7 out of 101 (5.3%), premature births 63 out of 155 (40.6%), SFD 14 out of 302 (4.6%), perinatal deaths 8 out of 302 (2.6%), and deaths due to distress 3 out of 302 (1%). No neonatal pulmonary hypertension was observed in the 8 premature infants that were delivered dead. PMID:7130772

  5. Metabolic Influences on Reproduction: Adiponectin Attenuates GnRH Neuronal Activity in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klenke, Ulrike; Taylor-Burds, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunctions are often linked to reproductive abnormalities. Adiponectin (ADP), a peripheral hormone secreted by white adipose tissue, is important in energy homeostasis and appetite regulation. GnRH neurons are integral components of the reproductive axis, controlling synthesis, and release of gonadotropins. This report examined whether ADP can directly act on GnRH neurons. Double-label immunofluorescence on brain sections from adult female revealed that a subpopulation of GnRH neurons express ADP receptor (AdipoR)2. GnRH/AdipoR2+ cells were distributed throughout the forebrain. To determine the influence of ADP on GnRH neuronal activity and the signal transduction pathway of AdipoR2, GnRH neurons maintained in explants were assayed using whole-cell patch clamping and calcium imaging. This mouse model system circumvents the dispersed distribution of GnRH neurons within the forebrain, making analysis of large numbers of GnRH cells possible. Single-cell PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of AdipoR2 in GnRH neurons in explants. Functional analysis revealed 20% of the total GnRH population responded to ADP, exhibiting hyperpolarization or decreased calcium oscillations. Perturbation studies revealed that ADP activates AMP kinase via the protein kinase Cζ/liver kinase B1 pathway. The modulation of GnRH neuronal activity by ADP demonstrated in this report directly links energy balance to neurons controlling reproduction. PMID:24564393

  6. Influence of dietary methionine on the metabolism of selenomethionine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Beilstein, M.A.; Whanger, P.D. )

    1989-07-01

    To determine the influence of methionine on selenomethionine (SeMet) metabolism, weanling male rats were fed for 8 wk a basal diet marginally deficient in sulfur amino acids, containing 2.0 micrograms selenium (Se)/g as DL-SeMet and supplemented with 0, 0.3, 0.6 or 1.2% DL-methionine. Increased dietary methionine caused decreased selenium deposition in all tissues examined but increased glutathione peroxidase activity in testes, liver and lungs. A positive correlation was found between dietary methionine and the calculated percentage of selenium associated with GSHPx. In a second experiment, {sup 75}SeMet was injected into weanling male rats which had been fed the basal diet containing 2.0 micrograms selenium as DL-SeMet with or without the addition of 1.0% methionine. The selenoamino acid content of tissues and the distribution of {sup 75}Se in erythrocyte proteins were determined. In comparison to the rats fed the basal diet without added methionine, significantly more {sup 75}Se-selenocysteine was found in liver and muscle, more {sup 75}Se was found in erythrocyte GSHPx and less {sup 75}Se was found in erythrocyte hemoglobin of rats fed 1.0% methionine. These data suggest that methionine diverts SeMet from incorporation into general proteins and enhances its conversion to selenocysteine for specific selenium-requiring proteins, such as GSHPx.

  7. EPAC activation inhibits acetaldehyde-induced activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cell via Rap1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation represents an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). Previous studies have demonstrated that the rat HSCs could be significantly activated after exposure to 200 μmol/L acetaldehyde for 48 h, and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathways were also dramatically upregulated in activated HSCs isolated from alcoholic fibrotic rat liver. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for the small Ras-like GTPases Rap, and is being considered as a vital mediator of cAMP signaling in parallel with the principal cAMP target protein kinase A (PKA). Our data showed that both cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC signaling pathways were involved in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Acetaldehyde could reduce the expression of EPAC1 while enhancing the expression of EPAC2. The cAMP analog Me-cAMP, which stimulates the EPAC/Rap1 pathway, could significantly decrease the proliferation and collagen synthesis of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Furthermore, depletion of EPAC2, but not EPAC1, prevented the activation of HSC measured as the production of α-SMA and collagen type I and III, indicating that EPAC1 appears to have protective effects on acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Curiously, activation of PKA or EPAC perhaps has opposite effects on the synthesis of collagen and α-SMA: EPAC activation by Me-cAMP increased the levels of GTP-bound (activated) Rap1 while PKA activation by Phe-cAMP had no significant effects on such binding. These results suggested that EPAC activation could inhibit the activation and proliferation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs via Rap1. PMID:26854595

  8. Artisanal alcohol production in Mayan Guatemala: chemical safety evaluation with special regard to acetaldehyde contamination.

    PubMed

    Kanteres, Fotis; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2009-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition, production, distribution, and consumption of artisanal alcohol, particularly in the developing world. In Nahualá, an indigenous Mayan municipality located in highland Guatemala, heavy alcohol consumption appears to have had a significant negative impact on health, a major role in cases of violence and domestic abuse, and a link to street habitation. Cuxa, an artisanally, as well as commercially produced sugarcane alcohol, is widely consumed by heavy drinkers in this community. Cuxa samples from all distribution points in the community were obtained and chemically analyzed for health-relevant constituents and contaminants including methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols, and metals. From those, only acetaldehyde was confirmed to be present in unusually high levels (up to 126 g/hl of pure alcohol), particularly in samples that were produced clandestinely. Acetaldehyde has been evaluated as "possibly carcinogenic" and has also been identified as having significant human exposure in a recent risk assessment. This study explores the reasons for the elevated levels of acetaldehyde, through both sampling and analyses of raw and intermediary products of cuxa production, as well as interviews from producers of the clandestine alcohol. For further insight, we experimentally produced this alcohol in our laboratory, based on the directions provided by the producers, as well as materials from the town itself. Based on these data, the origin of the acetaldehyde contamination appears to be due to chemical changes induced during processing, with the major causative factors consisting of poor hygiene, aerobic working conditions, and inadequate yeast strains, compounded by flawed distillation methodology that neglects separation of the first fractions of the distillate. These results indicate a preventable public health concern for consumers, which can be overcome through education about good manufacturing practices, as well

  9. Effect of indole-3-carbinol on ethanol-induced liver injury and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells activation using precision-cut rat liver slices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Zhang-Xiu; Wu, Yong; Xia, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Hui

    2010-12-01

    1. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a major indole compound found in high levels in cruciferous vegetables, shows a broad spectrum of biological activities. However, few studies have reported the effect of I3C on alcoholic liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of I3C on acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) activation using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS). 2. Rat PCLS were incubated with 50 mmol/L ethanol or 350 μmol/L acetaldehyde, and different concentrations (100-400 μmol/L) of I3C were added into the culture system of these two liver injury models, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring enzyme leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in tissue. Activities of alcoholic enzymes were also determined. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor (TGF-β(1) ) and hydroxyproline (HYP) were used as indices to evaluate the activation of HSC. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were observed to estimate collagen degradation. 3. I3C significantly reduced the enzyme leakage in ethanol-treated slices. In I3C groups, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activities were inhibited by 40.9-51.8%, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity was enhanced 1.6-fold compared with the ethanol-treated group. I3C also showed an inhibitory effect against HSC activation and collagen production stimulated by acetaldehyde. After being incubated with I3C (400 μmol/L), the expression of MMP-1 was markedly enhanced, whereas TIMP-1 was decreased. 4. These results showed that I3C protected PCLS against alcoholic liver injury, which might be associated with the regulation of ethanol metabolic enzymes, attenuation of oxidative injury and acceleration of collagen degradation. PMID:20880187

  10. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic influences on life history expression: metabolism and parentally induced temperature influences on embryo development rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Nikilson, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic processes are assumed to underlie life history expression and trade-offs, but extrinsic inputs are theorised to shift trait expression and mask trade-offs within species. Here, we explore application of this theory across species. We do this based on parentally induced embryo temperature as an extrinsic input, and mass-specific embryo metabolism as an intrinsic process, underlying embryonic development rate. We found that embryonic metabolism followed intrinsic allometry rules among 49 songbird species from temperate and tropical sites. Extrinsic inputs via parentally induced temperatures explained the majority of variation in development rates and masked a relationship with metabolism; metabolism explained a minor proportion of the variation in development rates among species, and only after accounting for temperature effects. We discuss evidence that temperature further obscures the expected interspecific trade-off between development rate and offspring quality. These results demonstrate the importance of considering extrinsic inputs to trait expression and trade-offs across species.