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1

Acetic acid bacteria in oenology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid bacteria have always been considered the bad mi- croorganisms of oenology; responsible for wine spoiling (vine- gary taint). The taxonomy and our knowledge of the metabo- lism of acetic acid bacteria are rapidly evolving, especially as new molecular biology techniques are applied to this fastidious group of microorganisms, which are still rather difficult to work with. The dramatic

A. Mas; M. J. Torija; A. González; M. Poblet; J. M. Guillamón

2

DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID HYBRIDS OF ACETIC ACID BACTERIA  

PubMed Central

De Ley, J. (State University, Ghent, Belgium), and S. Friedman. Deoxyribonucleic acid hybrids of acetic acid bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 88:937–945. 1964.—Deuterated N15-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Acetobacter aceti (mesoxydans 4) forms hybrids with ordinary DNA from other species of this genus (A. xylinum, A. pasteurianus, A. estunensis, and possibly A. xylinoides) when the guanine plus cytosine base composition does not vary by more than 1 to 2%. Beyond this limit (A. aceti Ch31 and A. muciparus 5) no hybrids are formed. The hybrids are apparently derived from an asymmetrical part of the compositional distribution. The results lend strength to the concept of a genetic species rather than to a division of a genus into sharply separated species, based on small phenotypic differences. Taxonomic implications are discussed. PMID:14219057

De Ley, J.; Friedman, S.

1964-01-01

3

Correlation between acetic acid resistance and characteristics of PQQ-dependent ADH in acetic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we compared the growth properties and molecular characteristics of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) among highly acetic acid-resistant strains of acetic acid bacteria. Ga. europaeus exhibited the highest resistance to acetic acid (10%), whereas Ga. intermedius and Acetobacter pasteurianus resisted up to 6% of acetic acid. In media with different concentrations of acetic acid, the maximal

Janja Trcek; Hirohide Toyama; Jerzy Czuba; Anna Misiewicz; Kazunobu Matsushita

2006-01-01

4

Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in “traditional balsamic vinegar”  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the glucose tolerance of acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from Traditional Balsamic Vinegar. The results showed that the greatest hurdle to acetic acid bacteria growth is the high sugar concentration, since the majority of the isolated strains are inhibited by 25% of glucose. Sugar tolerance is an important technological trait because Traditional Balsamic Vinegar is made with

Maria Gullo; Cinzia Caggia; Luciana De Vero; Paolo Giudici

2006-01-01

5

Correlation between acetic acid resistance and characteristics of PQQ-dependent ADH in acetic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

In this study, we compared the growth properties and molecular characteristics of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) among highly acetic acid-resistant strains of acetic acid bacteria. Gluconacetobacter europaeus exhibited the highest resistance to acetic acid (10%), whereas Gluconacetobacter intermedius and Acetobacter pasteurianus resisted up to 6% of acetic acid. In media with different concentrations of acetic acid, the maximal acetic acid production rate of Ga. europaeus slowly increased, but specific growth rates decreased concomitant with increased concentration of acetic acid in medium. The lag phase of A. pasteurianus was twice and four times longer in comparison to the lag phases of Ga. europaeus and Ga. intermedius, respectively. PQQ-dependent ADH activity was twice as high in Ga. europaeus and Ga. intermedius as in A. pasteurinus. The purified enzymes showed almost the same specific activity to each other, but in the presence of acetic acid, the enzyme activity decreased faster in A. pasteurianus and Ga. intermedius than in Ga. europaeus. These results suggest that high ADH activity in the Ga. europaeus cells and high acetic acid stability of the purified enzyme represent two of the unique features that enable this species to grow and stay metabolically active at extremely high concentrations of acetic acid. PMID:16133326

Trcek, Janja; Toyama, Hirohide; Czuba, Jerzy; Misiewicz, Anna; Matsushita, Kazunobu

2006-04-01

6

Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in "traditional balsamic vinegar".  

PubMed

This study evaluated the glucose tolerance of acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from Traditional Balsamic Vinegar. The results showed that the greatest hurdle to acetic acid bacteria growth is the high sugar concentration, since the majority of the isolated strains are inhibited by 25% of glucose. Sugar tolerance is an important technological trait because Traditional Balsamic Vinegar is made with concentrated cooked must. On the contrary, ethanol concentration of the cooked and fermented must is less significant for acetic acid bacteria growth. A tentative identification of the isolated strains was done by 16S-23S-5S rDNA PCR/RFLP technique and the isolated strains were clustered: 32 strains belong to Gluconacetobacter xylinus group, two strains to Acetobacter pasteurianus group and one to Acetobacter aceti. PMID:16214251

Gullo, Maria; Caggia, Cinzia; De Vero, Luciana; Giudici, Paolo

2006-02-01

7

Acetic Acid Bacteria Taxonomy from Early Descriptions to Molecular Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exploitation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) has a long history in fermentation processes and now represents an emerging\\u000a field in biotechnological applications, especially with regard to the biosynthesis of useful chemicals with a potentially\\u000a high economic value and, in food science, through the standardization of microbiological processes for the manufacture of\\u000a both vinegar and other fermented beverages.

Maria Gullo; Paolo Giudici

8

The enumeration and identification of acetic acid bacteria from South African red wine fermentations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid bacteria are microorganisms that can profoundly influence the quality of wine. Surprisingly, little research has been done on these microorganisms in the winemaking field. The object of this study was to investigate the occurrence of acetic acid bacteria in South African red wine fermentations and to identify the dominant species occurring. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated and enumerated

W. J. Du Toit; M. G. Lambrechts

2002-01-01

9

Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism. PMID:24426139

Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

2013-12-01

10

Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance. PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Herbaspirillum, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Gluconacetobacter, among others. They are capable of promoting plant growth through different mechanisms including (in some cases), the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the enzymatic reduction of the atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia, catalyzed by nitrogenase. Aerobic bacteria able to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid in neutral or acid media are candidates of belonging to the family Acetobacteraceae. At present, this family has been divided into ten genera: Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Saccharibacter, Swaminathania, Neoasaia, and Granulibacter. Among them, only three genera include N(2)-fixing species: Gluconacetobacter, Swaminathania and Acetobacter. The first N(2)-fixing acetic acid bacterium (AAB) was described in Brazil. It was found inside tissues of the sugarcane plant, and first named as Acetobacter diazotrophicus, but then renamed as Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. Later, two new species within the genus Gluconacetobacter, associated to coffee plants, were described in Mexico: G. johannae and G. azotocaptans. A salt-tolerant bacterium named Swaminathania salitolerans was found associated to wild rice plants. Recently, N(2)-fixing Acetobacter peroxydans and Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, associated with rice plants and Kombucha tea, respectively, were described in India. In this paper, recent advances involving nitrogen-fixing AAB are presented. Their natural habitats, physiological and genetic aspects, as well as their association with different plants and contribution through BNF are described as an overview. PMID:18177965

Pedraza, Raúl O

2008-06-30

11

Acetic Acid Bacteria, Newly Emerging Symbionts of Insects?  

PubMed Central

Recent research in microbe-insect symbiosis has shown that acetic acid bacteria (AAB) establish symbiotic relationships with several insects of the orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Homoptera, all relying on sugar-based diets, such as nectars, fruit sugars, or phloem sap. To date, the fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster and Bactrocera oleae, mosquitoes of the genera Anopheles and Aedes, the honey bee Apis mellifera, the leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus, and the mealybug Saccharicoccus sacchari have been found to be associated with the bacterial genera Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Asaia, and Saccharibacter and the novel genus Commensalibacter. AAB establish symbiotic associations with the insect midgut, a niche characterized by the availability of diet-derived carbohydrates and oxygen and by an acidic pH, selective factors that support AAB growth. AAB have been shown to actively colonize different insect tissues and organs, such as the epithelia of male and female reproductive organs, the Malpighian tubules, and the salivary glands. This complex topology of the symbiosis indicates that AAB possess the keys for passing through body barriers, allowing them to migrate to different organs of the host. Recently, AAB involvement in the regulation of innate immune system homeostasis of Drosophila has been shown, indicating a functional role in host survival. All of these lines of evidence indicate that AAB can play different roles in insect biology, not being restricted to the feeding habit of the host. The close association of AAB and their insect hosts has been confirmed by the demonstration of multiple modes of transmission between individuals and to their progeny that include vertical and horizontal transmission routes, comprising a venereal one. Taken together, the data indicate that AAB represent novel secondary symbionts of insects. PMID:20851977

Crotti, Elena; Rizzi, Aurora; Chouaia, Bessem; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Alma, Alberto; Sacchi, Luciano; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mandrioli, Mauro; Cherif, Ameur; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

2010-01-01

12

Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity. Materials and Methods Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC) medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distinguishing Acetobacter from Gluconobacter. The isolates were cultured in basal medium to find the highest acetic acid producer. Biochemical tests followed by 16S rRNA and restriction analyses were employed for identification of the isolate and phylogenic tree was constructed. Bacterial growth and acid production conditions were optimized based on optimal inoculum size, pH, temperature, agitation, aeration and medium composition. Results Thirty-seven acetic acid bacteria from acetobacter and gluconobacter members were isolated. Acetic acid productivity yielded 4 isolates that produced higher amounts of acid. The highest producer of acid (10.03%) was selected for identification. The sequencing and restriction analyses of 16S rRNA revealed a divergent strain of Acetobacter pasteurianus (Gene bank accession number#GU059865). The optimum condition for acid production was a medium composed of 2% glucose, 2% yeast extract, 3% ethanol and 3% acid acetic at inoculum size of 4% at 3L/Min aeration level in the production medium. The isolate was best preserved in GYC medium at 12°C for more than a month. Longer preservation was possible at ?70°C. Conclusion The results are suggestive of isolation of an indigenous acetic acid bacteria. Pilot plan is suggested to study applicability of the isolated strain in acetic acid production. PMID:22347549

Sharafi, SM; Rasooli, I; Beheshti-Maal, K

2010-01-01

13

Population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria during traditional wine vinegar production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria in traditional vinegar production was determined in two independent vinegar plants at both the species and strain level. The effect of barrels made of four different woods upon the population dynamics was also determined. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated on solid media and the species were identified by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA genes

Carlos Vegas; Estibaliz Mateo; Ángel González; Carla Jara; José Manuel Guillamón; Montse Poblet; Ma Jesús Torija; Albert Mas

2010-01-01

14

The enumeration and identification of acetic acid bacteria from South African red wine fermentations.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria are microorganisms that can profoundly influence the quality of wine. Surprisingly, little research has been done on these microorganisms in the winemaking field. The object of this study was to investigate the occurrence of acetic acid bacteria in South African red wine fermentations and to identify the dominant species occurring. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated and enumerated from small-scale and commercial red must fermentations in 1998 and 1999, respectively. The initial occurrence of acetic acid bacteria in the must was shown to vary with cell numbers ranging from 10(6)-10(7) to 10(4)-10(5) cfu/ml for the 1998 and 1999 musts, respectively. The acetic acid bacteria decreased to 10(2)-10(3) cfu/ml in musts having a low pH (< or = 3.6), whereas in some musts having a high pH (> or = 3.7), the cell numbers increased during fermentation. During the process of cold soaking, the cell numbers of acetic acid bacteria also increased until inoculation with commercial wine yeast. Gluconobacter oxydans dominated in the fresh must and Acetobacter pasteurianus and A. liquefaciens during fermentation. This study showed that A. liquefaciens and A. hansenii were present in significant numbers, which has not been reported before. PMID:11930953

Du Toit, W J; Lambrechts, M G

2002-03-25

15

Diversity of acetic acid bacteria present in healthy grapes from the Canary Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) from sound grapes from the Canary Islands is reported in the present study. No direct recovery of bacteria was possible in the most commonly used medium, so microvinifications were performed on grapes from Tenerife, La Palma and Lanzarote islands. Up to 396 AAB were isolated from those microvinifications and identified by 16S rRNA

Maria José Valera; Federico Laich; Sara S. González; Maria Jesús Torija; Estibaliz Mateo; Albert Mas

2011-01-01

16

Application of molecular methods for routine identification of acetic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently many new species of Acetic acid Bacteria have been described. The description and identification as new species was based on molecular techniques (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, DNA base ratio (% GC) determinations and DNA–DNA hybridisation) and phenotypic characterization. In the present paper, we propose a fast and reliable method for the identification most of the species currently

Ángel González; José Manuel Guillamón; Albert Mas; Montse Poblet

2006-01-01

17

Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance.PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter,

Raúl O. Pedraza

2008-01-01

18

Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations in Brazil are characterized by a restricted species diversity of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations were carried out on two different farms in Brazil. Physical parameters, microbial growth, bacterial species diversity [mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB)], and metabolite kinetics were monitored, and chocolates were produced from the fermented dry cocoa beans. The main end-products of the catabolism of the pulp substrates (glucose, fructose, and

Zoi Papalexandratou; Gino Vrancken; Katrien De Bruyne; Peter Vandamme; Luc De Vuyst

2011-01-01

19

Biodiversity of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in the fermentation of “Shanxi aged vinegar”, a traditional Chinese vinegar  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shanxi aged vinegar is a famous traditional Chinese vinegar made from several kinds of cereal by spontaneous solid-state fermentation techniques. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of culturable microorganism’s diversity present in its fermentation, the indigenous microorganisms including 47 yeast isolates, 28 lactic acid bacteria isolates and 58 acetic acid bacteria isolates were recovered in different fermenting time and

Jia Jia Wu; Ying Kun Ma; Fen Fen Zhang; Fu Sheng Chen

20

Evolution of Acetic Acid Bacteria During Fermentation and Storage of Wine  

PubMed Central

Acetic acid bacteria were present at all stages of wine making, from the mature grape through vinification to conservation. A succession of Gluconobacter oxydans, Acetobacter pasteurianus, and Acetobacter aceti during the course of these stages was noted. Low levels of A. aceti remained in the wine; they exhibited rapid proliferation on short exposure of the wine to air and caused significant increases in the concentration of acetic acid. Higher temperature of wine storage and higher wine pH favored the development and metabolism of these species. PMID:16346581

Joyeux, A.; Lafon-Lafourcade, S.; Ribereau-Gayon, P.

1984-01-01

21

Population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria during traditional wine vinegar production.  

PubMed

The population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria in traditional vinegar production was determined in two independent vinegar plants at both the species and strain level. The effect of barrels made of four different woods upon the population dynamics was also determined. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated on solid media and the species were identified by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA genes and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, while strains were typed by ERIC-PCR and (GTG)(5)-rep-PCR. The most widely isolated species was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which accounted for 100% of all the isolates during most of the acetification. Gluconacetobacter europaeus only appeared at any notable level at the end of the process in oak barrels from one vinegar plant. The various A. pasteurianus strains showed a clear succession as the concentration of acetic acid increased. In both vinegar plants the relative dominance of different strains was modified as the concentrations of acetic acid increased, and strain diversity tended to reduce at the end of the process. PMID:20117853

Vegas, Carlos; Mateo, Estibaliz; González, Angel; Jara, Carla; Guillamón, José Manuel; Poblet, Montse; Torija, Ma Jesús; Mas, Albert

2010-03-31

22

Effect of different fertilization treatments on indole-3-acetic acid producing bacteria in soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Soil microorganisms directly affect the growth of plants. Especially, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play an\\u000a important role in plant growth. There are many studies about the effects of different fertilization treatments on soil microbial\\u000a community structure; however, the effects on PGPR, including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-producing bacteria have not been previously\\u000a reported. The objective of this study is to determine the

Chao-Lei Yuan; Cheng-Xiang Mou; Wen-Liang Wu; Yan-Bin Guo

2011-01-01

23

The formation of acetic acid from carbon dioxide and hydrogen by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Further experiments on an anaerobic bacillus synthesising acetic acid from CO2 and H2 are described. The organism in question was classified asClostridium aceticum n.sp. Acetic acid is also formed from sugar.

K. T. Wieringa

1939-01-01

24

Biodiversity of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in the fermentation of "Shanxi aged vinegar", a traditional Chinese vinegar.  

PubMed

Shanxi aged vinegar is a famous traditional Chinese vinegar made from several kinds of cereal by spontaneous solid-state fermentation techniques. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of culturable microorganism's diversity present in its fermentation, the indigenous microorganisms including 47 yeast isolates, 28 lactic acid bacteria isolates and 58 acetic acid bacteria isolates were recovered in different fermenting time and characterized based on a combination of phenotypic and genotypic approaches including inter-delta/PCR, PCR-RFLP, ERIC/PCR analysis, as well as 16S rRNA and 26S rRNA partial gene sequencing. In the alcoholic fermentation, the dominant yeast species Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae (96%) exhibited low phenotypic and genotypic diversity among the isolates, while Lactobacillus (Lb.) fermentum together with Lb. plantarum, Lb. buchneri, Lb. casei, Pediococcus (P.) acidilactici, P. pentosaceus and Weissella confusa were predominated in the bacterial population at the same stage. Acetobacter (A.) pasteurianus showing great variety both in genotypic and phenotypic tests was the dominant species (76%) in the acetic acid fermentation stage, while the other acetic acid bacteria species including A. senegalensis, A. indonesiensis, A. malorum and A. orientalis, as well as Gluconobacter (G.) oxydans were detected at initial point of alcoholic and acetic acid fermentation stage respectively. PMID:22265314

Wu, Jia Jia; Ma, Ying Kun; Zhang, Fen Fen; Chen, Fu Sheng

2012-05-01

25

Acetic Acid Bacteria Genomes Reveal Functional Traits for Adaptation to Life in Insect Guts  

PubMed Central

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB, we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral in AAB and shows a phylogeny that is congruent with that of the genomes. The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts. PMID:24682158

Chouaia, Bessem; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Crotti, Elena; Comandatore, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Ricci, Irene; Alma, Alberto; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

2014-01-01

26

Rapid molecular methods for enumeration and taxonomical identification of acetic acid bacteria responsible for submerged vinegar production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to search for a rapid and reliable method to enumerate viable acetic acid bacteria (AAB)\\u000a and to identify to genera and species level AAB isolates from vinegars in full acetic fermentation elaborated by the submerged\\u000a method from cider, wine and spirit ethanol in industrial bioreactors. Results showed that the rapid epifluorescence staining\\u000a method

Rocío Fernández-Pérez; Carmen Torres; Susana Sanz; Fernanda Ruiz-Larrea

2010-01-01

27

Diversity of acetic acid bacteria present in healthy grapes from the Canary Islands.  

PubMed

The identification of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) from sound grapes from the Canary Islands is reported in the present study. No direct recovery of bacteria was possible in the most commonly used medium, so microvinifications were performed on grapes from Tenerife, La Palma and Lanzarote islands. Up to 396 AAB were isolated from those microvinifications and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. With this method, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter tropicalis, Gluconobacter japonicus and Gluconacetobacter saccharivorans were identified. However, no discrimination between the closely related species Acetobacter malorum and Acetobacter cerevisiae was possible. As previously described, 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region phylogenetic analysis was required to classify isolates as one of those species. These two species were the most frequently occurring, accounting for more than 60% of the isolates. For typing the AAB isolates, both the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR and (GTG)5-PCR techniques gave similar resolution. A total of 60 profiles were identified. Thirteen of these profiles were found in more than one vineyard, and only one profile was found on two different islands (Tenerife and La Palma). PMID:21903289

Valera, Maria José; Laich, Federico; González, Sara S; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mateo, Estibaliz; Mas, Albert

2011-11-15

28

Application of culture culture-independent molecular biology based methods to evaluate acetic acid bacteria diversity during vinegar processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are considered fastidious microorganisms because they are difficult to isolate and cultivate. Different molecular approaches were taken to detect AAB diversity, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media. Those methods were tested in samples that originated during traditional vinegar production. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, obtained by PCR amplifications

Carolina Ilabaca; Paola Navarrete; Pamela Mardones; Jaime Romero; Albert Mas

2008-01-01

29

Dynamics and biodiversity of populations of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria involved in spontaneous heap fermentation of cocoa beans in Ghana.  

PubMed

The Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentation process was studied through a multiphasic approach, encompassing both microbiological and metabolite target analyses. A culture-dependent (plating and incubation, followed by repetitive-sequence-based PCR analyses of picked-up colonies) and culture-independent (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE] of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, PCR-DGGE) approach revealed a limited biodiversity and targeted population dynamics of both lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) during fermentation. Four main clusters were identified among the LAB isolated: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, and Enterococcus casseliflavus. Other taxa encompassed, for instance, Weissella. Only four clusters were found among the AAB identified: Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter syzygii-like bacteria, and two small clusters of Acetobacter tropicalis-like bacteria. Particular strains of L. plantarum, L. fermentum, and A. pasteurianus, originating from the environment, were well adapted to the environmental conditions prevailing during Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentation and apparently played a significant role in the cocoa bean fermentation process. Yeasts produced ethanol from sugars, and LAB produced lactic acid, acetic acid, ethanol, and mannitol from sugars and/or citrate. Whereas L. plantarum strains were abundant in the beginning of the fermentation, L. fermentum strains converted fructose into mannitol upon prolonged fermentation. A. pasteurianus grew on ethanol, mannitol, and lactate and converted ethanol into acetic acid. A newly proposed Weissella sp., referred to as "Weissella ghanaensis," was detected through PCR-DGGE analysis in some of the fermentations and was only occasionally picked up through culture-based isolation. Two new species of Acetobacter were found as well, namely, the species tentatively named "Acetobacter senegalensis" (A. tropicalis-like) and "Acetobacter ghanaensis" (A. syzygii-like). PMID:17277227

Camu, Nicholas; De Winter, Tom; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Vandamme, Peter; Takrama, Jemmy S; Vancanneyt, Marc; De Vuyst, Luc

2007-03-01

30

Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations in Brazil are characterized by a restricted species diversity of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations were carried out on two different farms in Brazil. Physical parameters, microbial growth, bacterial species diversity [mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB)], and metabolite kinetics were monitored, and chocolates were produced from the fermented dry cocoa beans. The main end-products of the catabolism of the pulp substrates (glucose, fructose, and citric acid) by yeasts, LAB, and AAB were ethanol, lactic acid, mannitol, and/or acetic acid. Lactobacillus fermentum and Acetobacter pasteurianus were the predominating bacterial species of the fermentations as revealed through (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting of isolates and PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons of DNA directly extracted from fermentation samples. Fructobacillus pseudoficulneus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Acetobacter senegalensis were among the prevailing species during the initial phase of the fermentations. Also, three novel LAB species were found. This study emphasized the possible participation of Enterobacteriaceae in the cocoa bean fermentation process. Tatumella ptyseos and Tatumella citrea were the prevailing enterobacterial species in the beginning of the fermentations as revealed by 16S rRNA gene-PCR-DGGE. Finally, it turned out that control over a restricted bacterial species diversity during fermentation through an ideal post-harvest handling of the cocoa beans will allow the production of high-quality cocoa and chocolates produced thereof, independent of the fermentation method or farm. PMID:21839382

Papalexandratou, Zoi; Vrancken, Gino; De Bruyne, Katrien; Vandamme, Peter; De Vuyst, Luc

2011-10-01

31

Kinetic analysis of strains of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in cocoa pulp simulation media toward development of a starter culture for cocoa bean fermentation.  

PubMed

The composition of cocoa pulp simulation media (PSM) was optimized with species-specific strains of lactic acid bacteria (PSM-LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (PSM-AAB). Also, laboratory fermentations were carried out in PSM to investigate growth and metabolite production of strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and of Acetobacter pasteurianus isolated from Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations, in view of the development of a defined starter culture. In a first step, a selection of strains was made out of a pool of strains of these LAB and AAB species, obtained from previous studies, based on their fermentation kinetics in PSM. Also, various concentrations of citric acid in the presence of glucose and/or fructose (PSM-LAB) and of lactic acid in the presence of ethanol (PSM-AAB) were tested. These data could explain the competitiveness of particular cocoa-specific strains, namely, L. plantarum 80 (homolactic and acid tolerant), L. fermentum 222 (heterolactic, citric acid fermenting, mannitol producing, and less acid tolerant), and A. pasteurianus 386B (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid overoxidizing, acid tolerant, and moderately heat tolerant), during the natural cocoa bean fermentation process. For instance, it turned out that the capacity to use citric acid, which was exhibited by L. fermentum 222, is of the utmost importance. Also, the formation of mannitol was dependent not only on the LAB strain but also on environmental conditions. A mixture of L. plantarum 80, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B can now be considered a mixed-strain starter culture for better controlled and more reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes. PMID:20889778

Lefeber, Timothy; Janssens, Maarten; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

2010-12-01

32

Application of molecular methods for routine identification of acetic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

Recently many new species of Acetic acid Bacteria have been described. The description and identification as new species was based on molecular techniques (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, DNA base ratio (% GC) determinations and DNA-DNA hybridisation) and phenotypic characterization. In the present paper, we propose a fast and reliable method for the identification most of the species currently described based on the RFLP-PCR of the 16S rRNA. According to the proposed protocol, 1 species can be identified with the use of a single enzyme, 13 with a combination of 2 enzymes, 2 species with a combination of 3 enzymes, 2 with a combination of 4 enzymes. To differentiate 5 more species RFLP-PCR of the ITS was also needed, after using 3 enzymes. Finally, a pair of species (Acetobacter pasteurianus and Acetobacter pomorum) could not be distinguished with the proposed method. However, doubts can be raised about their differentiation as separate species. Keeping these limitations in mind, the method is fast and reliable, allowing the processing of large number of samples in relatively short periods of time (less than 24 h after the isolation). PMID:16386324

González, Angel; Guillamón, José Manuel; Mas, Albert; Poblet, Montse

2006-04-15

33

Structural analysis of fructans produced by acetic acid bacteria reveals a relation to hydrocolloid function.  

PubMed

Some strains of acetic acid bacteria (Gluconobacter frateurii TMW 2.767, Gluconobacter cerinus DSM 9533T, Neoasaia chiangmaiensis NBRC 101099, Kozakia baliensis DSM 14400) produce high amounts of fructans, which can be exploited in food applications as previously demonstrated empirically for dough systems. In order to get insight into the structure and functionality of these polymers, we investigated the fructans isolated from these strains with respect to their linkage types and molecular weights/shapes using NMR spectroscopy and AF4-MALS-RI. Each fructan was identified as levan. The isolated levan fractions were highly similar according to their basic linearity and linkage types, but differed significantly in terms of their individual molecular weight distributions. In aqueous solutions the size of levan molecules present in all isolated levans continuously increased with their molecular weight and they tended to adopt a more compact molecular shape. Our data suggest that the increasing molecular weight of a levan particle enforces intramolecular interactions to reach the structural compactness of a microgel with hydrocolloid properties. PMID:23399151

Jakob, Frank; Pfaff, Andre; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Rübsam, Heinrich; Becker, Thomas; Vogel, Rudi F

2013-02-15

34

Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in traditional acetic acid fermentation of rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) produced in Japan.  

PubMed

Bacterial strains were isolated from samples of Japanese rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) fermented by the traditional static method. Fermentations have never been inoculated with a pure culture since they were started in 1907. A total of 178 isolates were divided into groups A and B on the basis of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analyses. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of strains belonging to each group showed similarities of more than 99% with Acetobacter pasteurianus. Group A strains overwhelmingly dominated all stages of fermentation of both types of vinegar. Our results indicate that appropriate strains of acetic acid bacteria have spontaneously established almost pure cultures during nearly a century of komesu and kurosu fermentation. PMID:11157275

Nanda, K; Taniguchi, M; Ujike, S; Ishihara, N; Mori, H; Ono, H; Murooka, Y

2001-02-01

35

Characterization of Acetic Acid Bacteria in Traditional Acetic Acid Fermentation of Rice Vinegar (Komesu) and Unpolished Rice Vinegar (Kurosu) Produced in Japan  

PubMed Central

Bacterial strains were isolated from samples of Japanese rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) fermented by the traditional static method. Fermentations have never been inoculated with a pure culture since they were started in 1907. A total of 178 isolates were divided into groups A and B on the basis of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analyses. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of strains belonging to each group showed similarities of more than 99% with Acetobacter pasteurianus. Group A strains overwhelmingly dominated all stages of fermentation of both types of vinegar. Our results indicate that appropriate strains of acetic acid bacteria have spontaneously established almost pure cultures during nearly a century of komesu and kurosu fermentation. PMID:11157275

Nanda, Kumiko; Taniguchi, Mariko; Ujike, Satoshi; Ishihara, Nobuhiro; Mori, Hirotaka; Ono, Hisayo; Murooka, Yoshikatsu

2001-01-01

36

Antibacterial Activity of Hen Egg White Lysozyme Modified by Heat and Enzymatic Treatments against Oenological Lactic Acid Bacteria and Acetic Acid Bacteria.  

PubMed

The antimicrobial activity of heat-denatured and hydrolyzed hen egg white lysozyme against oenological lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria was investigated. The lysozyme was denatured by heating, and native and heat-denatured lysozymes were hydrolyzed by pepsin. The lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus of heat-denatured lysozyme decreased with the temperature of the heat treatment, whereas the hydrolyzed lysozyme had no enzymatic activity. Heat-denatured and hydrolyzed lysozyme preparations showed antimicrobial activity against acetic acid bacteria. Lysozyme heated at 90°C exerted potent activity against Acetobacter aceti CIAL-106 and Gluconobacter oxydans CIAL-107 with concentrations required to obtain 50% inhibition of growth (IC50) of 0.089 and 0.013 mg/ml, respectively. This preparation also demonstrated activity against Lactobacillus casei CIAL-52 and Oenococcus oeni CIAL-91 (IC50, 1.37 and 0.45 mg/ml, respectively). The two hydrolysates from native and heat-denatured lysozyme were active against O. oeni CIAL-96 (IC50, 2.77 and 0.3 mg/ml, respectively). The results obtained suggest that thermal and enzymatic treatments increase the antibacterial spectrum of hen egg white lysozyme in relation to oenological microorganisms. PMID:25285490

Carrillo, W; García-Ruiz, A; Recio, I; Moreno-Arribas, M V

2014-10-01

37

Identification and quantification of acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar by TaqMan–MGB probes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed using TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes for the specific detection and quantification of five acetic acid bacteria (AAB) species (Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Gluconobacter oxydans) in wine and vinegar. The primers and probes, designed from the 16S rRNA gene, showed good specificity with the target AAB species.

M. J. Torija; E. Mateo; J. M. Guillamón; A. Mas

2010-01-01

38

Field-scale isotopic labeling of phospholipid fatty acids from acetate-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria.  

PubMed

Isotopic labeling of biomarker molecules is a technique applied to link microbial community structure with activity. Previously, we successfully labeled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) of suspended nitrate-reducing bacteria in an aquifer. However, the application of the method to low energy-yielding processes such as sulfate reduction, and extension of the analysis to attached communities remained to be studied. To test the feasibility of the latter application, an anoxic test solution of 500 l of groundwater with addition of 0.5 mM Br- as a conservative tracer, 1.1 mM SO4(2-), and 2.0 mM [2-13C]acetate was injected in the transition zone of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer where sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions prevailed. Thousand liters of test solution/groundwater mixture were extracted in a stepwise fashion after 2-46 h incubation. Computed apparent first-order rate coefficients were 0.31+/-0.04 day(-1) for acetate and 0.34+/-0.05 day(-1) for SO4(2-) consumption. The delta13C increased from -71.03 per thousand to +3352.50 per thousand in CH4 and from -16.15 per thousand to +32.13 per thousand in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). A mass balance suggested that 43% of the acetate-derived (13)C appeared in DIC and 57% appeared in CH4. Thus, acetate oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction and acetoclastic methanogenesis occurred simultaneously. The delta13C of PLFA increased on average by 27 per thousand in groundwater samples and 4 per thousand in sediment samples. Hence, both suspended and attached communities actively degraded acetate. The PLFA labeling patterns and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of sediment and groundwater samples suggested that the main sulfate-reducing bacteria degrading the acetate were Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans and Desulfobacter sp. in groundwater, and D. acetoxidans in sediment. PMID:16329868

Pombo, Silvina A; Kleikemper, Jutta; Schroth, Martin H; Zeyer, Josef

2005-01-01

39

Dynamics and species diversity of communities of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria during spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation in vessels.  

PubMed

To speed up research on the usefulness and selection of bacterial starter cultures for cocoa bean fermentation, a benchmark cocoa bean fermentation process under natural fermentation conditions was developed successfully. Therefore, spontaneous fermentations of cocoa pulp-bean mass in vessels on a 20 kg scale were tried out in triplicate. The community dynamics and kinetics of these fermentations were studied through a multiphasic approach. Microbiological analysis revealed a limited bacterial species diversity and targeted community dynamics of both lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) during fermentation, as was the case during cocoa bean fermentations processes carried out in the field. LAB isolates belonged to two main (GTG)(5)-PCR clusters, namely Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum, with Fructobacillus pseudofilculneus occurring occasionally; one main (GTG)(5)-PCR cluster, composed of Acetobacter pasteurianus, was found among the AAB isolates, besides minor clusters of Acetobacter ghanensis and Acetobacter senegalensis. 16S rRNA-PCR-DGGE revealed that L. plantarum and L. fermentum dominated the fermentations from day two until the end and Acetobacter was the only AAB species present at the end of the fermentations. Also, species of Tatumella and Pantoea were detected culture-independently at the beginning of the fermentations. Further, it was shown through metabolite target analyses that similar substrate consumption and metabolite production kinetics occurred in the vessels compared to spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation processes. Current drawbacks of the vessel fermentations encompassed an insufficient mixing of the cocoa pulp-bean mass and retarded yeast growth. PMID:21356451

Lefeber, Timothy; Gobert, William; Vrancken, Gino; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

2011-05-01

40

Application of culture culture-independent molecular biology based methods to evaluate acetic acid bacteria diversity during vinegar processing.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are considered fastidious microorganisms because they are difficult to isolate and cultivate. Different molecular approaches were taken to detect AAB diversity, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media. Those methods were tested in samples that originated during traditional vinegar production. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, obtained by PCR amplifications of DNA extracted directly from the acetification container. Bacterial composition was analyzed by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA gene, Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) separation of amplicons containing region V3-V5 of 16S rRNA gene and cloning of those amplicons. TTGE bands and clones were grouped based on their electrophoretic pattern similarity and sequenced to be compared with reference strains. The main microorganism identified in vinegar was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which at the end of the acetification process was considered to be the only microorganism present. The diversity was the highest at 2% acetic acid, where indefinite species of Gluconacetobacter xylinus/europaeus/intermedius were also present. PMID:18571262

Ilabaca, Carolina; Navarrete, Paola; Mardones, Pamela; Romero, Jaime; Mas, Albert

2008-08-15

41

Occurrence of Enzymes Involved in Biosynthesis of Indole3Acetic Acid from Indole3Acetonitrile in Plant-Associated Bacteria, Agrobacterium and Rhizobium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of a hitherto unknown pathway involving the action of two enzymes, a nitrile hydratase and an amidase for the biosynthesis of indole-3-acetic acid was discovered in phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and in leguminous bacteria Rhizobium. The nitrile hydratase acting on indole-3-acetonitrile was purified to homogeneity through only two steps from the cell-free extract of A. tumefaciens. The molecular

Michihiko Kobayashi; Takahisa Suzuki; Takayuki Fujita; Masatoshi Masuda; Sakayu Shimizu

1995-01-01

42

Analysis of several methods for the extraction of high quality DNA from acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar for characterization by PCR-based methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are fastidious microorganisms with poor recovery in culture. Culture-independent methods are currently under examination. Good DNA extraction is a strict requirement of these methods. We compared five methods for extracting the DNA of AAB directly from wine and vinegar samples. Four matrices (white wine, red wine, superficial vinegar and submerged vinegar) contaminated with two AAB strains

C. Jara; E. Mateo; J. M. Guillamón; M. J. Torija; A. Mas

2008-01-01

43

Influence of turning and environmental contamination on the dynamics of populations of lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria involved in spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentation in Ghana.  

PubMed

The influence of turning and environmental contamination on six spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentations performed in Ghana was studied through a multiphasic approach, encompassing both microbiological (culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques) and metabolite target analyses. A sensory analysis of chocolate made from the fermented, dried beans was performed as well. Only four clusters were found among the isolates of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) identified: Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter ghanensis, Acetobacter senegalensis, and a potential new Acetobacter lovaniensis-like species. Two main clusters were identified among the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated, namely, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum. No differences in biodiversity of LAB and AAB were seen for fermentations carried out at the farm and factory sites, indicating the cocoa pod surfaces and not the general environment as the main inoculum for spontaneous cocoa bean heap fermentation. Turning of the heaps enhanced aeration and increased the relative population size of AAB and the production of acetic acid. This in turn gave a more sour taste to chocolate made from these beans. Bitterness was reduced through losses of polyphenols and alkaloids upon fermentation and cocoa bean processing. PMID:17993565

Camu, Nicholas; González, Angel; De Winter, Tom; Van Schoor, Ann; De Bruyne, Katrien; Vandamme, Peter; Takrama, Jemmy S; Addo, Solomon K; De Vuyst, Luc

2008-01-01

44

Increased number of Arginine-based salt bridges contributes to the thermotolerance of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria, Acetobacter tropicalis SKU1100  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria (AAB), Acetobacter tropicalis SKU1100, can grow above 40°C. To investigate the basis of its thermotolerance, we compared the genome of A. tropicalis SKU1100 with that of mesophilic AAB strain Acetobacter pasteurianus IFO3283-01. The comparative genomic study showed that amino acid substitutions from large to small residue and Lys to Arg occur in many orthologous genes. Furthermore,

Minenosuke Matsutani; Hideki Hirakawa; Mitsuteru Nishikura; Wichai Soemphol; Ibnaof Ali Ibnaof Ali; Toshiharu Yakushi; Kazunobu Matsushita

2011-01-01

45

Identification of yeast and acetic acid bacteria isolated from the fermentation and acetification of persimmon (Diospyros kaki).  

PubMed

Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) is a seasonal fruit with important health benefits. In this study, persimmon use in wine and condiment production was investigated using molecular methods to identify the yeast and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) isolated from the alcoholic fermentation and acetification of the fruit. Alcoholic fermentation was allowed to occur either spontaneously, or by inoculation with a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, while acetification was always spontaneous; all these processes were performed in triplicates. Non-Saccharomyces yeast species were particularly abundant during the initial and mid-alcoholic fermentation stages, but S. cerevisiae became dominant toward the end of these processes. During spontaneous fermentation, S. cerevisiae Sc1 was the predominant strain isolated throughout, while the commercial strain of S. cerevisiae was the most common strain isolated from the inoculated fermentations. The main non-Saccharomyces strains isolated included Pichia guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Zygosaccharomyces florentinus and Cryptococcus sp. A distinct succession of AAB was observed during the acetification process. Acetobacter malorun was abundant during the initial and mid-stages, while Gluconacetobacter saccharivorans was the main species during the final stages of these acetifications. Four additional AAB species, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter syzygii, Gluconacetobacter intermedius and Gluconacetobacter europaeus, were also detected. We observed 28 different AAB genotypes, though only 6 of these were present in high numbers (between 25%-60%), resulting in a high biodiversity index. PMID:22265289

Hidalgo, C; Mateo, E; Mas, A; Torija, M J

2012-05-01

46

Identification and quantification of acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar by TaqMan-MGB probes.  

PubMed

A Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed using TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes for the specific detection and quantification of five acetic acid bacteria (AAB) species (Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Gluconobacter oxydans) in wine and vinegar. The primers and probes, designed from the 16S rRNA gene, showed good specificity with the target AAB species. The technique was tested on AAB grown in glucose medium (GY) and inoculated samples of red wine and wine vinegar. Standard curves were constructed with the five target species in all these matrices. Quantification was linear over at least 5 log units using both serial dilution of purified DNA and cells. When this technique was tested in GY medium and inoculated matrices, at least 10(2)-10(3) cells/ml were detected. To quantify low populations of AAB in microbiologically complex samples, a PCR enrichment including part of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region was needed to increase the amount of target DNA compared to non-target DNA. The RT-PCR assay used in this study is a reliable, specific and fast method for quantifying these five AAB species in wine and vinegar. PMID:20141944

Torija, M J; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

2010-04-01

47

Identification and characterization of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka.  

PubMed

From the pellicle formed on top of brewing coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka, three Acetobacter strains (SL13E-2, SL13E-3, and SL13E-4) that grow at 42 °C and four Gluconobacter strains (SL13-5, SL13-6, SL13-7, and SL13-8) grow at 37 °C were identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii, respectively. Acetic acid production by the isolated Acetobacter strains was examined. All three strains gave 4% acetic acid from 6% initial ethanol at 37 °C, and 2.5% acetic acid from 4% initial ethanol at 40 °C. Compared with the two other strains, SL13E-4 showed both slower growth and slower acetic acid production. As well as the thermotolerant SKU1108 strain, the activities of the alcohol dehydrogenase and the aldehyde dehydrogenase of SL13E-2 and SL13E-4 were more stable than those of the mesophilic strain. The isolated strains were used to produce coconut water vinegar at higher temperatures than typically used for vinegar production. PMID:25036846

Perumpuli, P A B N; Watanabe, Taisuke; Toyama, Hirohide

2014-01-01

48

Identification of acetic acid bacteria by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a PCR-amplified fragment of the gene coding for 16S rRNA.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) irreversibly spoil wines and represent a serious problem. Limited studies on the ecology of AAB during winemaking have been done due to the lack of rapid and precise techniques for their identification. RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified fragment of 16S rDNA was performed on AAB reference strains. The amplified rDNAs were approximately 870-bp long for all AAB species while no amplicons were detected for lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Out of the four restriction enzymes tested, TaqI was the most efficient one and divided the studied AAB into six groups. However, complete differentiation among collection strains of Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconoacetobacter hansenii was not possible. PMID:10886617

Poblet, M; Rozès, N; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

2000-07-01

49

Increased number of Arginine-based salt bridges contributes to the thermotolerance of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria, Acetobacter tropicalis SKU1100.  

PubMed

Thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria (AAB), Acetobacter tropicalis SKU1100, can grow above 40°C. To investigate the basis of its thermotolerance, we compared the genome of A. tropicalis SKU1100 with that of mesophilic AAB strain Acetobacter pasteurianus IFO3283-01. The comparative genomic study showed that amino acid substitutions from large to small residue and Lys to Arg occur in many orthologous genes. Furthermore, comparative modeling study was carried out with the orthologous proteins between SKU1100 and IFO3283-01 strains, indicating that the number of Arg-based salt bridges increased in protein models. Since it has been reported that Arg-based salt bridges are important factor for thermo-stability of protein structure, our results strongly suggest that the increased number of Arg-based salt bridges may contributes to the thermotolerance of A. tropicalis SKU1100 (the thermo-stability of proteins in A. tropicalis SKU1100). PMID:21554859

Matsutani, Minenosuke; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nishikura, Mitsuteru; Soemphol, Wichai; Ali, Ibnaof Ali Ibnaof; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

2011-05-27

50

Metabolic Activity of Fatty Acid-Oxidizing Bacteria and the Contribution of Acetate, Propionate, Butyrate, and CO2 to Methanogenesis in Cattle Waste at 40 and 60°C  

PubMed Central

The quantitative contribution of fatty acids and CO2 to methanogenesis was studied by using stirred, 3-liter bench-top digestors fed on a semicontinuous basis with cattle waste. The fermentations were carried out at 40 and 60°C under identical loading conditions (6 g of volatile solids per liter of reactor volume per day, 10-day retention time). In the thermophilic digestor, acetate turnover increased from a prefeeding level of 16 ?M/min to a peak (49 ?M/min) 1 h after feeding and then gradually decreased. Acetate turnover in the mesophilic digestor increased from 15 to 40 ?M/min. Propionate turnover ranged from 2 to 5.2 and 1.5 to 4.5 ?M/min in the thermophilic and mesophilic digestors, respectively. Butyrate turnover (0.7 to 1.2 ?M/min) was similar in both digestors. The proportion of CH4 produced via the methyl group of acetate varied with time after feeding and ranged from 72 to 75% in the mesophilic digestor and 75 to 86% in the thermophilic digestor. The contribution from CO2 reduction was 24 to 29% and 19 to 27%, respectively. Propionate and butyrate turnover accounted for 20% of the total CH4 produced. Acetate synthesis from CO2 was greatest shortly after feeding and was higher in the thermophilic digestor (0.5 to 2.4 ?M/min) than the mesophilic digestor (0.3 to 0.5 ?M/min). Counts of fatty acid-degrading bacteria were related to their turnover activity. PMID:16345789

Mackie, Roderick I.; Bryant, Marvin P.

1981-01-01

51

Acetic Acid Catalyzed Carbon Aerogels  

Microsoft Academic Search

We prepared carbon aerogels with a wide range of structural properties and densities using the weak acetic acid as a catalyst. Two series of acetic acid catalyzed carbon aerogels with different dilution of the catalyst and the monomers were investigated accurately. Structural investigation was performed via (U)SAXS, gas sorption and SEM. The pore and particle size can be tailored according

R. Brandt; R. Petricevic; H. Pröbstle; J. Fricke

2003-01-01

52

Neokomagataea gen. nov., with descriptions of Neokomagataea thailandica sp. nov. and Neokomagataea tanensis sp. nov., osmotolerant acetic acid bacteria of the ?-Proteobacteria.  

PubMed

Isolates AH11(T) and AH13(T) were isolated from flowers of lantana and candle bush respectively collected in Thailand. In phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the two isolates formed an independent cluster, which was then connected to the type strain of Saccharibacter floricola. The calculated pair-wise 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of isolate AH11(T) were 95.7-92.3% to the type strains of the type species of the 12 genera of acetic acid bacteria. The DNA base composition was from 51.2 to 56.8 mol % G+C, with a range of 5.6 mol %. When isolate AH11(T) was labeled, DNA-DNA similarities were 100, 12, 4, 5, and 4% respectively to isolates AH11(T) and AH13(T) and the type strains of Saccharibacter floricola, Gluconobacter oxydans, and Acetobacter aceti. The two isolates were non-motile and did not oxidize either acetate or lactate. No growth was found in the presence of 0.35% acetic acid w/v. The two isolates were not osmophilic but osmotolerant, produced 2,5-diketo-D-gluconate from D-glucose, and did not oxidize lactate, thus differing from strains of Saccharibacter floricola, which showed weak lactate oxidation. The two isolates contained unsaturated C(18:1)?7c fatty acid as the major fatty acid, and were unique in the presence of a considerable amount of straight-chain C(18:1)2OH fatty acid. Q-10 was present as the major isoprenoid quinone. Neokomagataea gen. nov. was proposed with the two species, Neokomagataea thailandica sp. nov. for isolate AH11(T) (=BCC 25710(T)=NBRC 106555(T)), which has 56.8 mol % G+C, and Neokomagataea tanensis sp. nov. for isolate AH13(T) (=BCC 25711(T)=NBRC 106556(T)), which has 51.2 mol % G+C. PMID:21389630

Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Malimas, Taweesak; Muramatsu, Yuki; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Yamada, Yuzo

2011-01-01

53

Genome Sequences of the High-Acetic Acid-Resistant Bacteria Gluconacetobacter europaeus LMG 18890T and G. europaeus LMG 18494 (Reference Strains), G. europaeus 5P3, and Gluconacetobacter oboediens 174Bp2 (Isolated from Vinegar) ?  

PubMed Central

Bacteria of the genus Gluconacetobacter are usually involved in the industrial production of vinegars with high acetic acid concentrations. We describe here the genome sequence of three Gluconacetobacter europaeus strains, a very common bacterial species from industrial fermentors, as well as of a Gluconacetobacter oboediens strain. PMID:21441523

Andres-Barrao, Cristina; Falquet, Laurent; Calderon-Copete, Sandra P.; Descombes, Patrick; Ortega Perez, Ruben; Barja, Francois

2011-01-01

54

Acidbase interaction in the acetic acid-acetic anhydride system  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The electroconductivity and dielectric permeability of the acetic acid-acetic anhydride system have been measured. The electroconductivity of the system has a maximum close to 50% of the anhydride. The curve of the dielectric permeability is concave toward the composition axis.2.The dependence of the electroconductivity on the composition is explained by the formation of a complex between acetic acid and acetic

V. E. Bel'skii; M. I. Vinnik

1963-01-01

55

Analysis of several methods for the extraction of high quality DNA from acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar for characterization by PCR-based methods.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are fastidious microorganisms with poor recovery in culture. Culture-independent methods are currently under examination. Good DNA extraction is a strict requirement of these methods. We compared five methods for extracting the DNA of AAB directly from wine and vinegar samples. Four matrices (white wine, red wine, superficial vinegar and submerged vinegar) contaminated with two AAB strains belonging to Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconacetobacter hansenii were assayed. To improve the yield and quality of the extracted DNA, a sample treatment (washing with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or NaCl) was also tested. DNA quality was measured by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene with conventional PCR. DNA recovery rate was assessed by real-time PCR. DNA amplification was always successful with the Wizard method though DNA recovery was poor. A CTAB-based method and NucleoSpin protocol extracted the highest DNA recoveries from wine and vinegar samples. Both of these methods require treatment to recover suitable DNA for amplification with maximum recovery. Both may therefore be good solutions for DNA extraction in wine and vinegar samples. DNA extraction of Ga hansenii was more effective than that of A. pasteurianus. The fastest and cheapest method we evaluated (the Thermal shock protocol) produced the worst results both for DNA amplification and DNA recovery. PMID:18950887

Jara, C; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Torija, M J; Mas, A

2008-12-10

56

Effects of Growth Medium on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectra: a Case Study of Acetic Acid Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The effect of the growth medium used on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra generated and its consequences for species and strain level differentiation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were determined by using a set of 25 strains. The strains were grown on five different culture media that yielded a total of more than 600 mass spectra, including technical and biological replicates. The results demonstrate that the culture medium can have a profound effect on the mass spectra of AAB as observed in the presence and varying signal intensities of peak classes, in particular when culture media do not sustain optimal growth. The observed growth medium effects do not disturb species level differentiation but strongly affect the potential for strain level differentiation. The data prove that a well-constructed and robust MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification database should comprise mass spectra of multiple reference strains per species grown on different culture media to facilitate species and strain level differentiation. PMID:24362425

Wieme, Anneleen D.; Spitaels, Freek; Aerts, Maarten; De Bruyne, Katrien; Van Landschoot, Anita

2014-01-01

57

A Specialized Citric Acid Cycle Requiring Succinyl-Coenzyme A (CoA):Acetate CoA-Transferase (AarC) Confers Acetic Acid Resistance on the Acidophile Acetobacter aceti  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by

Elwood A. Mullins; Julie A. Francois; T. Joseph Kappock

2008-01-01

58

Carbohydrate metabolism in lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term “lactic acid bacteria” is discussed. An overview of the following topics is given: main pathways of homo- and heterofermentation of hexoses, i.e. glycolysis, bifidus pathway, 6-phosphogluconate pathway; uptake and dissimilation of lactose (tagatose pathway); fermentation of pentoses and pentitols; alternative fates of pyruvate, i.e. splitting to formate and acetate, CO2 and acetate or formation of acetoin and diacetyl;

Otto Kandler

1983-01-01

59

Conductance of Dilute Sodium Acetate Solutions to 469 K and of Acetic Acid and Sodium Acetate\\/Acetic Acid Mixtures to 548 K and 20 MPa  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to obtain accurate association constants for sodium acetate, a very precise flow method was used to measure the electrical conductivity of dilute aqueous solutions of sodium acetate at ambient conditions and 469 K and 20 MPa. Measurements at ambient conditions, 469 and 548 K and 20 MPa, were also made on sodium acetate\\/acetic acid mixtures and acetic acid.

G. H. Zimmerman; R. H. Wood

2002-01-01

60

21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01...2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED... § 582.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product....

2012-04-01

61

21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01...2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED... § 582.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product....

2013-04-01

62

21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01...2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED... § 582.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product....

2011-04-01

63

21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01...2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED... § 582.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product....

2010-04-01

64

21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.  

21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01...2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED... § 582.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product....

2014-04-01

65

Proteome analysis of Acetobacter pasteurianus during acetic acid fermentation.  

PubMed

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are Gram-negative, strictly aerobic microorganisms that show a unique resistance to ethanol (EtOH) and acetic acid (AcH). Members of the Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter genera are capable of transforming EtOH into AcH via the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes and are used for the industrial production of vinegar. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how AAB resist high concentrations of AcH, such as the assimilation of acetate through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the export of acetate by various transporters and modifications of the outer membrane. However, except for a few acetate-specific proteins, little is known about the global proteome responses to AcH. In this study, we used 2D-DIGE to compare the proteome of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1262(T) when growing in glucose or ethanol and in the presence of acetic acid. Interesting protein spots were selected using the ANOVA p-value of 0.05 as threshold and 1.5-fold as the minimal level of differential expression, and a total of 53 proteins were successfully identified. Additionally, the size of AAB was reduced by approximately 30% in length as a consequence of the acidity. A modification in the membrane polysaccharides was also revealed by PATAg specific staining. PMID:22155126

Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Saad, Maged M; Chappuis, Marie-Louise; Boffa, Mauro; Perret, Xavier; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Barja, François

2012-03-16

66

Effects of Acetic Acid Pretreatment and Hot Air Drying on Resistance of Salmonella on Cabbage Slices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heat resistance of Salmonella anatum inoculated onto the surface of cabbage slices as affected by acetic acid pretreatment (0.5–1.5% v\\/v) and hot air drying at 50–60°C was investigated. Approximately 1.5 log10 of Salmonella numbers was reduced after soaking the vegetables in acetic acid solution. The inhibitory effect of acetic acid on the bacteria was more pronounced during drying. The heat

Naphaporn Chiewchan; Pornpen Morakotjinda

2009-01-01

67

Acetic acid fermentation of acetobacter pasteurianus: relationship between acetic acid resistance and pellicle polysaccharide formation.  

PubMed

Acetobacter pasteurianus strains IFO3283, SKU1108, and MSU10 were grown under acetic acid fermentation conditions, and their growth behavior was examined together with their capacity for acetic acid resistance and pellicle formation. In the fermentation process, the cells became aggregated and covered by amorphous materials in the late-log and stationary phases, but dispersed again in the second growth phase (due to overoxidation). The morphological change in the cells was accompanied by changes in sugar contents, which might be related to pellicle polysaccharide formation. To determine the relationship between pellicle formation and acetic acid resistance, a pellicle-forming R strain and a non-forming S strain were isolated, and their fermentation ability and acetic acid diffusion activity were compared. The results suggest that pellicle formation is directly related to acetic acid resistance ability, and thus is important to acetic acid fermentation in these A. pasteurianus strains. PMID:20699583

Kanchanarach, Watchara; Theeragool, Gunjana; Inoue, Taketo; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

2010-01-01

68

Bacterial utilization of formic and acetic acid in rainwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rain samples were collected aseptically, during 1983 and 1984, in Charlottesville, Virginia to determine the ability of bacteria in precipitation to utilize formate and acetate. The total number of bacteria, as counted by Acridine Orange Direct Counts, was one to two orders of magnitude greater from April to September (10 5 cells ml -1) than during the rest of the year (10 3-10 4 cells ml -1). Formate and acetate concentrations ranged between 6-23 and 3-9 ?M, respectively and were higher from June to September. Heterotrophic uptake on the day of collection was not different from the controls, but after incubation at room temperature for a minimum of three days, the turnover rate constants were 0.14 and 0.17 h -1 for formate and acetate, respectively. Total bacterial counts increased an order of magnitude during that interval. These turnover rate constants were used to calculate losses of 44 and 24 ?moll-1day-1 of formic and acetic acid, respectively. Turnover times were 1.5 and 34 days for formate and acetate, respectively. This study demonstrated that there are viable microorganisms in the atmosphere capable of utilizing formate and acetate for growth.

Herlihy, Linda Jolley; Galloway, James N.; Mills, Aaron L.

69

Acetic acid mediated interactions between alumina surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-molecular-weight organic acids have been known to modify colloidal stability of alumina-based suspensions. We investigated interaction forces between alumina surfaces mediated by acetic acid which is one of the simplest organic acids. Forces between alumina surfaces were measured using the colloid-probe method of atomic force microscope (AFM). Repulsive forces attributed to steric repulsion due to adsorbed molecules and electrostatic repulsion dominated the interaction. Results of rheological characterization of the alumina slurry containing acetic acid supported the finding.

Sato, Kimiyasu; Y?lmaz, Hüseyin; Ijuin, Atsuko; Hotta, Yuji; Watari, Koji

2012-02-01

70

Acetobacter aceti Possesses a Proton Motive Force-Dependent Efflux System for Acetic Acid  

PubMed Central

Acetic acid bacteria are obligate aerobes able to oxidize ethanol, sugar alcohols, and sugars into their corresponding acids. Among them, Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter species have very high ethanol oxidation capacity, leading to accumulation of vast amounts of acetic acid outside the cell. Since these bacteria are able to grow in media with high concentrations of acetic acid, they must possess a specific mechanism such as an efflux pump by which they can resist the toxic effects of acetic acid. In this study, the efflux pump of Acetobacter aceti IFO 3283 was examined using intact cells and membrane vesicles. The accumulation of acetic acid/acetate in intact cells was increased by the addition of a proton uncoupler and/or cyanide, suggesting the presence of an energy-dependent efflux system. To confirm this, right-side-out and inside-out membrane vesicles were prepared from A. aceti IFO 3283, and the accumulation of acetic acid/acetate in the vesicles was examined. Upon the addition of a respiratory substrate, the accumulation of acetic acid/acetate in the right-side-out vesicles was largely decreased, while its accumulation was very much increased in the inside-out vesicles. These respiration-dependent phenomena observed in both types of membrane vesicles were all sensitive to a proton uncoupler. Acetic acid/acetate uptake in the inside-out membrane vesicles was dependent not on ATP but on the proton motive force. Furthermore, uptake was shown to be rather specific for acetic acid and to be pH dependent, because higher uptake was observed at lower pH. Thus, A. aceti IFO 3283 possesses a proton motive force-dependent efflux pump for acetic acid. PMID:15968043

Matsushita, Kazunobu; Inoue, Taketo; Adachi, Osao; Toyama, Hirohide

2005-01-01

71

Oxygen17 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on acetic acid exchange processes of the chloride, nitrate, and acetate of nickel(II) in acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exchange rates of acetic acid coordinating to nickel(II) chloride, nickel(II) nitrate, and nickel(II) acetate in neat acetic acid and acetic acid\\/dichloromethane-d2 mixtures were measured by the oxygen-17 and proton NMR line-broadening methods. The activation parameters for the acetic acid exchange on these nickel(II) salts were independent of the concentration of acetic acid (HOAc) in the mixed solvents. The first-order

A. Hioki; S. Funahashi; M. Tanaka

1985-01-01

72

Polypyrrole based strong acid catalyst for acetalization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Novel polypyrrole based acid catalyst has been synthesized through the neutralization reaction of polypyrrole and sulfuric acid. The polypyrrole based acid owned the acidity as high as 6.0 mmol/g, which was much higher than that of the traditional solid acids such as Nafion and Amberlyst-15 (0.8 mmol/g). The catalytic activities of the novel solid acid were investigated through the acetalization. The results showed that the novel solid acid held high activities for the reactions. Furthermore, the recycled activities of the catalyst indicated that the solid acid owned high stability during the catalytic process and little acid sites dropped from polypyrrole. The high acidity and stability made the novel polypyrrole based acid hold great potential for the green chemical processes.

Liang, Xuezheng; Cheng, Yuxiao; Qi, Chenze

2011-09-01

73

Electrically generated lead(IV) acetate and manganese(III) acetate as reagents for coulometric redox titrations in acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The conditions were investigated for electrochemical generation of lead(IV) acetate in acetic acid by oxidation of lead(II) acetate on a lead dioxide electrode and on a platinum electrode. Bivalent manganese ions are quantitatively oxidized on a platinum electrode to the tervalent state in the same solvent. Coulometric titration methods for the determination of small amounts of hydroquinone in acetic

Tibor J. Pastor; Vilim J. Vajgand; Zorica Kicovic

1976-01-01

74

Strengths of the Chloro-acetic Acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

IT is well known that the introduction of chlorine atoms into acetic acid causes a rapid rise of dissociation constant (see ). If changes in the value of K are taken as a measure of the effect of the chlorine atoms, it would appear that the second chlorine atom has a greater effect than the first, and the third a

John Shorter; F. J. Stubbs

1949-01-01

75

Solid–liquid equilibrium in the acetic acid–acetophenone and acetic acid–formamide systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid–liquid equilibrium in the binary systems acetic acid–acetophenone and acetic acid–formamide was determined from time–temperature cooling and warming curves. The first system shows a sagged curve with a eutectic point at x1?0.6 and T=267.18 K. In the second system a solid compound (2:1) was found and an equilibrium constant of the compound dissociation was calculated.

I. Malijevská; Z. Sedláková

2006-01-01

76

Validation of the (GTG)(5)-rep-PCR fingerprinting technique for rapid classification and identification of acetic acid bacteria, with a focus on isolates from Ghanaian fermented cocoa beans.  

PubMed

Amplification of repetitive bacterial DNA elements through the polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR fingerprinting) using the (GTG)(5) primer, referred to as (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting, was found a promising genotypic tool for rapid and reliable speciation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB). The method was evaluated with 64 AAB reference strains, including 31 type strains, and 132 isolates from Ghanaian, fermented cocoa beans, and was validated with DNA:DNA hybridization data. Most reference strains, except for example all Acetobacter indonesiensis strains and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens LMG 1509, grouped according to their species designation, indicating the usefulness of this technique for identification to the species level. Moreover, exclusive patterns were obtained for most strains, suggesting that the technique can also be used for characterization below species level or typing of AAB strains. The (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting allowed us to differentiate four major clusters among the fermented cocoa bean isolates, namely A. pasteurianus (cluster I, 100 isolates), A. syzygii- or A. lovaniensis-like (cluster II, 23 isolates), and A. tropicalis-like (clusters III and IV containing 4 and 5 isolates, respectively). A. syzygii-like and A. tropicalis-like strains from cocoa bean fermentations were reported for the first time. Validation of the method and indications for reclassifications of AAB species and existence of new Acetobacter species were obtained through 16S rRNA sequencing analyses and DNA:DNA hybridizations. Reclassifications refer to A. aceti LMG 1531, Ga. xylinus LMG 1518, and Ga. xylinus subsp. sucrofermentans LMG 18788(T). PMID:17920717

De Vuyst, Luc; Camu, Nicholas; De Winter, Tom; Vandemeulebroecke, Katrien; Van de Perre, Vincent; Vancanneyt, Marc; De Vos, Paul; Cleenwerck, Ilse

2008-06-30

77

Anodically generated cobalt(III) acetate as reagent for coulometric titrations in acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Conditions for the anodic generation of cobalt(III) acetate with high current efficiency in non-aqueous solutions of potassium acetate in acetic acid have been investigated. The presence of water or acetic anhydride in the anolyte diminishes the amount of the generated oxidant. The stability of the generated cobalt(III) acetate solution is decreased in the presence of water and at elevated

T. J. Pastor; I. ?iri?

1985-01-01

78

Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method  

SciTech Connect

Furfural production by hydrolysis of fibrous plant materials is accompanied by formation of acetic acid in amounts depending on the material used. The amount of acetic formed in the hydrolysis of the fruit shell of oil-tea camellia (Camellia oleosa) (an oilseed-bearing tree) is equal to the amount of furfural. The acetic acid can be separated from the furfural and concentrated to 10% by electrodialysis. A smaller amount of furfural is separated with acetic acid.

Guan, S.F.; Li, C.S. Ye, S.T.; Shen, S.Y.; Wang, Y.T.; Yu, S.H.

1981-01-01

79

The behaviour of tungsten electrodes in a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Tungsten electrodes have advantageously been used for potentiometric end-point detection in perchloric acid titration of bases in a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride. They have also given good results in biamperometric detection of the equivalence point in continuous coulometric titration of small quantities of bases and acids in the same solvent. Tungsten electrodes in the presence of

Tibor J. Pastor; Vilim J. Vajgand

1976-01-01

80

Putative ABC Transporter Responsible for Acetic Acid Resistance in Acetobacter aceti  

PubMed Central

Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid. PMID:16391084

Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

2006-01-01

81

Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate,

Michael E. Stiles

1996-01-01

82

Acetobacter ghanensis sp. nov., a novel acetic acid bacterium isolated from traditional heap fermentations of Ghanaian cocoa beans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-three acetic acid bacteria, isolated from traditional heap fermentations of Ghanaian cocoa beans, were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The isolates were catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, Gram-negative rods. They oxidized ethanol to acetic acid and were unable to produce 2-ketogluconic acid, 5-ketogluconic acid and 2,5-diketogluconic acid from glucose; therefore, they were tentatively identified as Acetobacter species. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and

Ilse Cleenwerck; Nicholas Camu; Katrien Engelbeen; Tom De Winter; Katrien Vandemeulebroecke; Paul De Vos; Luc De Vuyst

2007-01-01

83

Selective extraction of succinic acid from binary mixture of succinic acid and acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

In production of succinic acid by fermentation, succinic acid and acetic acid are co-produced. To purify the succinic acid from binary-acid mixture of succinic acid and acetic acid, the tertiary amine-based extraction was used. In 1-octanol, the selectivity for succinic acid was proportional to the chain length of tertiary amine. But, the distribution of acids into organic phase was low

Yeon Ki Hong; Won Hi Hong; Ho Nam Chang

2000-01-01

84

Solid–liquid equilibrium in the acetic acid–cyclohexane and acetic acid–trichloroacetic acid systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid–liquid equilibrium in the binary systems acetic acid–cyclohexane and acetic acid–trichloroacetic acid was determined from time–temperature cooling and heating curves. The first system shows an eutectic point at x1?0.08 and T=271.9K. In the second system, a solid compound (1:1) was found and an equilibrium constant of the compound dissociation was calculated.

I Malijevská

2003-01-01

85

Development of an Amperometric Acetic Acid Sensor in Organic System  

Microsoft Academic Search

An amperometric method was developed by using a lead working electrode in acetonitrile organic solution for detecting acetic acid. The mechanisms of electrochemical reaction were corresponding to the reduction of acetic ions in acetonitrile organic solution. The steady state amperometric current resulted from the reduction of acetic ions to produce the aldehyde in a two-electron process. In the organic sensing

Shin Lin; Tse-Chuan Chou

86

Histamine production by bacilli bacteria, acetic bacteria and yeast isolated from fruit wines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven red wines imported from foreign country and 40 domestic fruit wines, including 15 red wines, 4 white wines, 7 plum wines, and 14 other fruit wines, sold in the supermarkets in Taiwan were purchased and tested to determine the occurrence of biogenic amines and histamine-forming bacteria. The levels of pH, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA), reducing sugar

Shu-Chen Chang; Ching-Wen Lin; Chii-Ming Jiang; Hwi-Chang Chen; Ming-Kuei Shih; Yu-Ywan Chen; Yung-Hsiang Tsai

2009-01-01

87

Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

1988-01-01

88

The impact of acetate metabolism on yeast fermentative performance and wine quality: reduction of volatile acidity of grape musts and wines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid is the main component of the volatile acidity of grape musts and wines. It can be formed as a by-product of alcoholic\\u000a fermentation or as a product of the metabolism of acetic and lactic acid bacteria, which can metabolize residual sugars to\\u000a increase volatile acidity. Acetic acid has a negative impact on yeast fermentative performance and affects the

Alice Vilela-Moura; Dorit Schuller; Arlete Mendes-Faia; Rui D. Silva; Susana R. Chaves; Maria João Sousa; Manuela Côrte-Real

2011-01-01

89

Addition of acetic acid to styrene catalyzed by ion exchanger  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possibility of preparation of 1-phenylethyl acetate by direct addition of acetic acid to styrene catalyzed by Ostion KS in the acid cycle has been investigated. The reaction is accompanied by the formation of higher molecular compounds. The effect of temperature, mole ratio of the starting compounds, stabilization of styrene, amount of the catalyst and of its repeated use on

L. ?ervený; A. Marhoul; J. Kozel

1988-01-01

90

Cellulose production by acetic acid-resistant Acetobacter xylinum  

Microsoft Academic Search

A bacterium that could produce a gelatinous cellulosic pellicle in the presence of more than 2% acetic acid was isolated as a contaminant in a continuous surface culture for acetic acid production using Acetobacter aceti. The bacterium was identified as a strain belonging to Acetobacter xylinum and designated as strain DA. The production of cellulose in a static culture of

Kiyoshi Toda; Tomoko Asakura; Masahiro Fukaya; Etsuzo Entani; Yoshiya Kawamura

1997-01-01

91

Cathodic Hydrogen Evolution from Aqueous Solutions of Acetic Acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

In continuation of the work on establishing hydrogen donors in the hydrogen evolution reaction from different acid molecules, cathodic evolution of hydrogen on silver is investigated from solutions of monobasic acetic acid with the aim to establish the origin of reduced hydrogen. Solutions of 0.2 M acetic acid with 0.2 M perchloric acid, neutralized to different pH values by NaOH,

V. Marinovi?; A. R. Despi?

2004-01-01

92

Acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria of acidic mine waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram

P. L. Wichlacz; R. F. Unz

1981-01-01

93

The antibacterial activity and stability of acetic acid.  

PubMed

Acetic acid has been shown to have good antibacterial activity against micro-organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study examined the activity against a range of bacterial pathogens and also assessed any reduction in antibacterial activity due to evaporation or inactivation by organic material in dressings. Acetic acid was active at dilutions as low as 0.166% and the activity was not reduced by evaporation nor by inactivation by cotton swabs. Burn injuries are a major problem in countries with limited resources. Acetic acid is an ideal candidate for use in patients who are treated in those parts of the world. PMID:23747099

Fraise, A P; Wilkinson, M A C; Bradley, C R; Oppenheim, B; Moiemen, N

2013-08-01

94

Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.  

PubMed

A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta-glucuronidase and beta-glucosidase, and deconjugation of bile acids, or merely by enhancing the immune system of the host. The latter has attracted considerable interest, and LAB have been tested in several clinical trials in allergic diseases. Characteristics ascribed to a probiotic strain are in general strain specific, and individual strains have to be tested for each property. Survival of strains during production, packing and storage of a viable cell mass has to be tested and declared. PMID:16875422

Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

2006-09-01

95

SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF WASTEWATERS FROM ACETIC-ACID MANUFACTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

Solvent extraction was evaluated as a potential treatment method for wastewaters generated during the manufacture of acetic acid. Possible goals for an extraction process were considered. For the wastewater samples studied, extraction appeared to be too expensive to be practical ...

96

Effect of Acetic Acid on the Oxidation of Ascorbic Acid in Fruits and Vegetables  

Microsoft Academic Search

IT has been established by earlier investigators that acetic acid has a destructive effect on the ascorbic acid in raw cabbage. This effect is somewhat surprising, since the lower the pH in the medium, the more stable is the ascorbic acid and, therefore, one would expect the acetic acid to have a preservative effect on the ascorbic acid in cabbage.

F. Alm

1952-01-01

97

Thermal decomposition of pyridine-substituted cobaltic acetate in acetic acid.  

PubMed

The thermal decomposition of [py(3)Co(3)O(OAc)(5)OH][PF(6)] in acetic acid solution in the absence of oxygen produced carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, picoline, and formic acid as the major products. The ratio of the products was affected by the water concentration and acidity of the mixture. Increased water concentration caused a decrease in methane and an increase in carbon monoxide. Decreased acidity resulted in an increase in methane and a decrease in carbon monoxide. Isotopic labeling experiments showed that some of the carbon monoxide originated as the carboxyl group of the acetic acid. Labeling experiments also showed that formaldehyde and formic acid could be converted to carbon monoxide under the reaction conditions. Two pathways leading to the formation of carbon monoxide were proposed; one involving the decomposition of glyoxylic acid and another involving the oxidation of the methyl radical by cobalt(III). PMID:20397646

Sumner, Charles E; Little, James; Howard, Adam S; Liang, Weimin C

2010-05-17

98

Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Itaconic Acid and Enol Acetate Derivatives with  

E-print Network

. A variety of chiral 2-substituted succinic acids and chiral acetates have been obtained in excellent ee efficient synthesis of chiral R-amino acids via transition metal-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation has become one of most efficient methods for the synthesis of chiral R-amino acids, chiral -amino

Zhang, Xumu

99

Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes the biochemistry of the enzymes and the bioenergetics of the processes, but

Bert Poolman

1993-01-01

100

Proteolytic systems in lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The proteolytic systems of lactic acid bacteria are important as a means of making protein and peptide N available for growth and as part of the curing or maturation processes which give foods their characteristic rheological and organoleptic properties. The proteolytic systems of lactic acid bacteria are described in relation to their growth and their functions in protein-rich foods. Their

Barry A. Law; Jens Kolstad; Pekka Varmanen; Bert Poolman I; Wil N. Konings

1983-01-01

101

Tetrazole acetic acid: tautomers, conformers, and isomerization.  

PubMed

Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0-8 kJ mol(-1) energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (?330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol(-1)) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol(-1)). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm(-1), where the first OH stretching overtone vibrations of 1ccc and 2pcc occur. The reverse transformations could be induced by irradiations at 7010 and 7030 cm(-1), transforming 1cct and 2pct back to 1ccc and 2pcc, also selectively. Besides the NIR-induced transformations, the photogenerated 1cct and 2pct forms also decay in N2 matrices back to 1ccc and 2pcc spontaneously, with characteristic decay times of hours (1H) and tens of minutes (2H). The decay mechanism is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling. In crystals, TAA exists exclusively as 1H-tautomer. By contrast, the tautomeric composition of the matrix-isolated monomers was found to consist of both 1H- and 2H-tautomers, in comparable amounts. A mechanistic discussion of the tautomerization process occurring during sublimation, accounting also for the observed minor decomposition of TAA leading to CO2 and 5-methyl-tetrazole, is proposed. PMID:24527914

Araujo-Andrade, C; Reva, I; Fausto, R

2014-02-14

102

Tetrazole acetic acid: Tautomers, conformers, and isomerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0-8 kJ mol-1 energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (˜330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol-1) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol-1). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm-1, where the first OH stretching overtone vibrations of 1ccc and 2pcc occur. The reverse transformations could be induced by irradiations at 7010 and 7030 cm-1, transforming 1cct and 2pct back to 1ccc and 2pcc, also selectively. Besides the NIR-induced transformations, the photogenerated 1cct and 2pct forms also decay in N2 matrices back to 1ccc and 2pcc spontaneously, with characteristic decay times of hours (1H) and tens of minutes (2H). The decay mechanism is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling. In crystals, TAA exists exclusively as 1H-tautomer. By contrast, the tautomeric composition of the matrix-isolated monomers was found to consist of both 1H- and 2H-tautomers, in comparable amounts. A mechanistic discussion of the tautomerization process occurring during sublimation, accounting also for the observed minor decomposition of TAA leading to CO2 and 5-methyl-tetrazole, is proposed.

Araujo-Andrade, C.; Reva, I.; Fausto, R.

2014-02-01

103

Long-term competition between sulfate reducing and methanogenic bacteria in UASB reactors treating volatile fatty acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The competition between acetate utilizing methane-producing bacteria (MB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was studied in mesophilic (30 C) upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors treating volatile fatty acids and sulfate. The UASB reactors treated a VFA mixture (with an acetate:propionate:butyrate ratio of 5:3:2 on COD basis) or acetate as the sole substrate at different COD:sulfate ratios. The outcome of the

F. Omil; P. Lens; A. Visser; L. W. Hulshoff Pol; G. Lettinga

1998-01-01

104

Utilization of the Plant Hormone Indole3Acetic Acid for Growth by Pseudomonas putida Strain 1290  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have isolated from plant surfaces several bacteria with the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). One of them, isolate 1290, was able to utilize IAA as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The strain was identified by its 16S rRNA sequence as Pseudomonas putida. Activity of the enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase was induced during growth on IAA, suggesting

Johan H. J. Leveau; Steven E. Lindow

2005-01-01

105

Origin and fate of acetate in an acidic fen.  

PubMed

Acetate is a central intermediate in the anaerobic degradation of organic matter, and the resolution of its metabolism necessitates integrated strategies. This study aims to (1) estimate the contribution of acetogenesis to acetate formation in an acidic fen (pH ~ 4.9), (2) assess the genetic potential for acetogenesis targeting the fhs gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) and (3) unravel the in situ turnover of acetate using stable carbon isotope pore-water analysis. H(2)/CO(2)-supplemented peat microcosms yielded (13)C-depleted acetate (-37.2‰ vs. VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite standard) compared with -14.2‰ vs. VPDB in an unamended control), indicating the potential for H(2)-dependent acetogenesis. Molecular analysis revealed a high diversity and depth-dependent distribution of fhs phylotypes with the highest number of operational taxonomic units in 0-20 cm depth, but only few and distant relationships to known acetogens. In pore waters, acetate concentrations (0-170 ?M) and ?(13)C-values varied widely (-17.4‰ to -3.4‰ vs. VPDB) and did not indicate acetogenesis, but pointed to a predominance of sinks, which preferentially consumed (12)C-acetate, like acetoclastic methanogenesis. However, depth profiles of methane and ?(13)C(CH4) revealed a temporarily and spatially restricted role of this acetate sink and suggest other processes like sulfate and iron reduction played an important role in acetate turnover. PMID:22404042

Hädrich, Anke; Heuer, Verena B; Herrmann, Martina; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

2012-08-01

106

Atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a,b  

E-print Network

Atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid on Ge(100) Do Hwan Kim a,b , Eunkyung Hwang to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of acetic acid adsorbed on Ge(100) surface. Due to its acidity, acetic acid dissociates and the resulting electron-rich acetate group reacts with the electron

Kim, Sehun

107

21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived...

2012-04-01

108

21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived...

2013-04-01

109

21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived...

2011-04-01

110

21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.  

...64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived...

2014-04-01

111

21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of carbohydrates or by organic synthesis. The principal synthetic methods currently employed are oxidation of acetaldehyde derived...

2010-04-01

112

Metabolism of Indole-3-Acetic Acid  

PubMed Central

An indoleacetic acid oxidase preparation from an acetone powder of Parthenocissus tricuspidata crown-gall tissue has been examined. An intermediate in the reaction is 3-hydroxymethyloxindole and nonenzymic conversion of it to 3-methyleneoxindole was observed. Neither reaction mixtures nor 3-methyleneoxindole have any auxin-like activity in Avena or wheat coleoptile bioassays. In vivo studies show that although 53% decarboxylation of indoleacetic acid was observed in 48 hours, only a small amount of 3-methyloxindole could be recovered from the medium. The other decarboxylated products remain to be identified but are not 3-hydroxymethyloxindole or 3-methyleneoxindole. PMID:16659625

Hamilton, Robert H.; Meyer, Harold E.; Burke, Robert E.; Feung, Chao S.; Mumma, Ralph O.

1976-01-01

113

Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria  

PubMed Central

Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats. PMID:17030793

Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rohksar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J.-H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V.; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O'Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

2006-01-01

114

Acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria of acidic mine waters  

SciTech Connect

Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram negative, nonencapsulated, motile, capable of growth at pH 2.6 but not at pH 6.0, catalase and oxidase positive, strictly aerobic, and capable of growth on citric acid. The bacteria were cultivatable on solid nutrient media only if agarose was employed as the hardening agent. Bacterial densities in natural mine waters ranged from approximately 20 to 250 cells per ml, depending upon source and culture medium.

Wichlacz, P.L.; Unz, R.F.

1981-05-01

115

Hydrogen bonding of hydrates of double acetic acid molecules.  

PubMed

In the chemical industry, the separation of the acetic acid from the HAc/H(2)O system is always influenced by the hydrogen bonding. In the present work, an investigation on the hydrogen bonding of various hydrates of double acetic acid (HAc) molecules is carried out with two first-principle methods including ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation and quantum chemical calculations (QCC). From the AIMD simulation, the distribution of the head-on rings of acetic acid is revealed and shows that the favorable structures tend to be the acetic acid hydrates rather than the HAc cyclic dimer. The 6- and 10-membered head-on rings involving single and double HAc molecules, respectively, appear to be the dominant structures. According to the QCC, the most stable structure is found to be the conformer with the biggest head-on ring in each group. The energetics of the rings indicates that the stability of the ring increases with increased ring size (with the exception of the 9-membered ring), and the 10-membered ring is the most stable. The relative stability of the ring structures implied by the static QCC result is in good agreement with the statistical ring distribution of the AIMD simulation. PMID:19462952

Pu, Liang; Sun, Yueming; Zhang, Zhibing

2009-06-18

116

Original article Effect of 1-naphthalene acetic acid concentrations and  

E-print Network

) Abstract - Field experiments were performed in two successive seasons at the Experimental Station, Faculty.). Cotton plants were sprayed with the growth regulator 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) once (90 days after planting (DAP)), or twice (90 and 105 DAP) or three times (90, 105 and 120 DAP), during the square

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

Phase and reaction equilibria of acetic acid–1-pentanol–water– n-amyl acetate system at 760 mm Hg  

Microsoft Academic Search

The esterification reaction of acetic acid and alcohol is one of the processes applying reactive distillation technology. It is known that the thermodynamic properties are essential to chemical process design. In this study, the thermodynamic behaviors of vapor–liquid equilibrium (VLE) and reaction equilibrium of acetic acid, 1-pentanol, n-amyl acetate, and water mixture were determined experimentally. Since the present esterification reaction

Liang-sun Lee; Shen-jang Liang

1998-01-01

118

Antagonism of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Phytopathogenic Bacteria  

PubMed Central

A variety of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from plant surfaces and plant-associated products, were found to be antagonistic to test strains of the phytopathogens Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. Effective “in vitro” inhibition was found both on agar plates and in broth cultures. In pot trials, treatment of bean plants with a Lactobacillus plantarum strain before inoculation with P. syringae caused a significant reduction of the disease incidence. Images PMID:16347150

Visser, Ronel; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.; Bezuidenhout, Johannes J.; Kotze, Johannes M.

1986-01-01

119

Neutralization of acids and bases in subcritical and supercritical water: acetic acid and HCl  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acid-base titrations for the KOH-acetic acid or NH3-acetic acid systems were monitored with the optical indicator 2-naphthoic acid at 350 °C and 34 MPa, and those for the HCl?Cl? system with acridine at 380 °C and up to 34 MPa (5000 psi). KOH remains a much stronger base than NH4OH at high temperature. From 298 K to the critical temperature

Keith P. Johnston; Jerzy B. Chlistunoff

1998-01-01

120

Effects of acetic acid on light scattering from cells  

PubMed Central

Abstract. Acetic acid has been used for decades as an aid for the detection of precancerous cervical lesions, and the use of acetic acid is being investigated in several other tissues. Nonetheless, the mechanism of acetowhitening is unclear. This work tests some of the hypotheses in the literature and measures changes in light scattering specific to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Wide angle side scattering from both the nucleus and the cytoplasm increases with acetic application to tumorigenic cells, with the increase in nuclear scattering being greater. In one cell line, the changes in nuclear scattering are likely due to an increase in number or scattering efficiency of scattering centers smaller than the wavelength of excitation light. There are likely several cellular changes that cause acetowhitening and the cellular changes may differ with cell type. These results should lead to a better understanding of acetowhitening and potentially the development of adjunct techniques to improve the utility of acetic acid application. For the well-studied case of cervical tissue, acetowhitening has been shown to be sensitive, but not specific for oncogenic changes needing treatment. PMID:23224185

Marina, Oana C.; Sanders, Claire K.; Mourant, Judith R.

2012-01-01

121

Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid, alternative end products--ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid--are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food fermentation processes, but also for novel applications of lactic acid bacteria, such as cell factories for the production of green fuels and chemicals. With respect to the control and regulation of the fermentation mode, some progress has been made, but the question of which component(s) control the main glycolytic flux remains unanswered. PMID:23266099

Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

2013-04-01

122

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH[sub 4]. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

Zinder, S.H.

1993-01-01

123

(Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

Zinder, S.

1991-01-01

124

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

Zinder, S.

1991-12-31

125

Theoretical studies of molecular structure and vibrational spectra of melaminium acetate acetic acid solvate monohydrate.  

PubMed

The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of melaminium acetate acetic acid solvate monohydrate in the ground state have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The molecule contains the weak hydrogen bonds of N-H...O and O-H...O types, and those bonds are calculated with HF and DFT method. The computed vibrational frequencies were used to determine the types of molecular motions associated with each of the experimental bands observed. In addition, calculated results are related to the linear correlation plot of computed data versus experimental geometric parameters and IR data. PMID:20692201

Pekparlak, A; Avci, D; Cömert, H; Atalay, Y

2010-10-15

126

Microwave Spectra of Molecules of Astrophysical Interest. XXVI. Acetic Acid ,,CH3COOH...  

E-print Network

Microwave Spectra of Molecules of Astrophysical Interest. XXVI. Acetic Acid ,,CH3COOH... V The microwave spectrum of acetic acid is critically reviewed and supplemented with spectral frequency; microwave spectrum; radio astronomy; rota- tional transitions. CONTENTS 1. Introduction

Magee, Joseph W.

127

Acetic Acid Synthesis by Catalytic Carbonylation of Methanol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid synthesis via the carbonylation of methanol is one of the most important industrial applications\\u000a of catalysis using organometallic compounds. All the group 9 metals are active, with processes based on\\u000a cobalt, rhodium and iridium having been developed since the 1960s. This paper surveys some of the more\\u000a recent approaches employed for improving the performance of the rhodium- and

Anthony Haynes

128

One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron

J. G. Zeikus; M. Jain

1993-01-01

129

Probiotic Spectra of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their probio-active cellular substances exert many beneficial effects in the gastrointestinal tract. LAB prevent adherence, establishment, and replication of several enteric mucosal pathogens through several antimicrobial mechanisms. LAB also release various enzymes into the intestinal lumen and exert potential synergistic effects on digestion and alleviate symptoms of intestinal malabsoption. Consumption of LAB fermented dairy products

A. S. Naidu; W. R. Bidlack; R. A. Clemens

1999-01-01

130

The proteotytic systems of lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proteolysis in dairy lactic acid bacteria has been studied in great detail by genetic, biochemical and ultrastructural methods. From these studies the picture emerges that the proteolytic systems of lactococci and lactobacilli are remarkably similar in their components and mode of action. The proteolytic system consists of an extracellularly located serine-proteinase, transport systems specific for di-tripeptides and oligopeptides (> 3

Edmund R. S. Kunji; Igor Mierau; Anja Hagting; Bert Poolman; Wil N. Konings

1996-01-01

131

Inhibition of C4 photosynthesis by (benzamidooxy)acetic acid.  

PubMed

(Benzamidooxy)acetic acid (common name benzadox) which has herbicidal properties was evaluated as a potential inhibitor of photosynthesis in C4 plants. Among enzymes of the C4 pathway, it was a relatively strong inhibitor of alanine aminotransferase in in vitro experiments at concentrations of 5mM. In benzadox treated leaves of Panicum miliaceum, a NAD-malic enzyme type C4 species, there was strong inhibition of both alanine and aspartate aminotransferase and of photosynthetic O2 evolution within one hour. Consistent with the inhibition of these enzymes of the C4 cycle, the pool sizes of metabolites of the cycle was altered: the aspartate level was increased two fold, while the levels of other metabolites such as pyruvate, alanine, oxalacetate and malate were decreased. Kinetic studies with partially purified alanine aminotransferase showed that benzadox is a competitive inhibitor with respect to alanine and a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to 2-oxoglutarate. Comparisons between the structures and inhibitory actions of benzadox and (aminooxy)acetic acid, the latter a potent inhibitor of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, suggest that in vivo, benzadox may exert its effect through metabolism to (aminooxy)acetic acid. PMID:24458342

Nakamoto, H; Ku, M S; Edwards, G E

1982-12-01

132

21 CFR 175.350 - Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer.  

...2014-04-01 false Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer. 175.350 Section 175.350... § 175.350 Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer. A copolymer of vinyl acetate and crotonic acid may be safely used as a coating or...

2014-04-01

133

The critical temperatures and densities of acetic acid?water mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The critical temperatures and densities of acetic acid?water mixtures have been measured using a sealed ampule method. The measurements for pure acetic acid were compared with data reported in the literature and were found to be in good agreement. It is shown that the critical temperatures of acetic acid?water mixtures increase with the addition of water, and that the critical

V. Vandana; Amyn S. Teja

1995-01-01

134

Peptidases and amino acid catabolism in lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conversion of peptides to free amino acids and their subsequent utilization is a central metabolic activity in prokaryotes. At least 16 peptidases from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been characterized biochemically and\\/or genetically. Among LAB, the peptidase systems of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactococcus lactis have been examined in greatest detail. While there are homologous enzymes common to both systems,

Jeffrey E. Christensen; Edward G. Dudley; Jeffrey A. Pederson; James L. Steele

1999-01-01

135

Simultaneous determination of uric acid and ascorbic acid using glassy carbon electrodes in acetate buffer solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work reports the simultaneous determination of uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in 0.2M, pH 4.0, acetate buffer solution using glassy carbon (GC) electrode by square wave voltammetry. Selective detection of UA in the presence of 200-fold excess of AA is achieved at the GC electrode in acetate buffer solution. The GC electrode separates the voltammetric signal

S. Abraham John

2005-01-01

136

Effect of Acetic, Lactic and other Organic Acids on the Formation of Artificial Carious Lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artificial carious lesions were produced in human enamel using a diphosphonate\\/organíc acid system over periods up to 30 days, and progress assessed by depth measurement. Acids studied were lactic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, succinic, tartaric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric. The rate of lesion progress was found to be a function of calculated unionized acid concentration, and acid dissociation constant. Acetic acid made

J. D. B. Featherstone; B. E. Rodgers

1981-01-01

137

Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect

The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

Yadav, Vishnu P.; Maity, Sunil K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailiram-502205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mukherjee, Rudra Palash [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Bantraj, Kandi [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela-769008, Orissa (India)

2010-10-26

138

13C6-[Benzene Ring]-Indole-3-Acetic Acid  

PubMed Central

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) labeled with 13C in the six carbons of the benzene ring is described for use as an internal standard for quantitative mass spectral analysis of IAA by gas chromatography/selected ion monitoring. [13C6]IAA was compared to the available deuterium labeled compounds and shown to offer the advantages of nonexchangeability of the isotope label, high isotopic enrichment, and chromatographic properties identical to that of the unlabeled compound. The utility of [13C6]IAA for measurement of endogenous IAA levels was demonstrated by analysis of IAA in Lemna gibba G-3. PMID:16664570

Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Slovin, Janet Pernise

1986-01-01

139

A Study of the Acid Properties of Structurally and Compositionally Different Heteropoly Acids in Acetic Acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The acid properties of heteropoly acids of the following three structure types were studied by conductometry in acetic acid: Keggin (H3PW12O40, H3PMo12O40, H4SiW12O40, H3PW11ThO39; and H5PW11XO40, where X(IV) = Ti or Zr), Dawson (a-H6P2W18O62and a-H6P2Mo18O62), and H6P2W21O71(H2O)3. These compounds are electrolytes that dissociate in only the first step of this solvent. The thermodynamic dissociation constants of the heteropoly acids were

M. N. Timofeeva; M. M. Matrosova; G. M. Maksimov; V. A. Likholobov

2001-01-01

140

Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic Acid bacteria.  

PubMed

The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. PMID:25261518

Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

2014-12-15

141

Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Are Protected against Acetic Acid, but Not Hydrochloric Acid, by Hypertonicity?  

PubMed Central

Chapman et al. (B. Chapman, N. Jensen, T Ross, and M. B. Cole, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5165-5172, 2006) demonstrated that an increased NaCl concentration prolongs survival of Escherichia coli O157 SERL 2 in a broth model simulating the aqueous phase of a food dressing or sauce containing acetic acid. We examined the responses of five other E. coli strains and four Salmonella enterica strains to increasing concentrations of NaCl under conditions of lethal acidity and observed that the average “lag” time prior to inactivation decreases in the presence of hydrochloric acid but not in the presence of acetic acid. For E. coli in the presence of acetic acid, the lag time increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 2 to 4% at pH 4.0, up to 4 to 6% at pH 3.8, and up to 4 to 7% (wt/wt of water) NaCl at pH 3.6. Salmonella was inactivated more rapidly by combined acetic acid and NaCl stresses than E. coli, but increasing NaCl concentrations still decreased the lag time prior to inactivation in the presence of acetic acid; at pH 4.0 up to 1 to 4% NaCl was protective, and at pH 3.8 up to 1 to 2% NaCl delayed the onset of inactivation. Sublethal injury kinetics suggest that this complex response is a balance between the lethal effects of acetic acid, against which NaCl is apparently protective, and the lethal effects of the NaCl itself. Compared against 3% NaCl, 10% (wt/wt of water) sucrose with 0.5% NaCl (which has similar osmotic potential) was found to be equally protective against adverse acetic acid conditions. We propose that hypertonicity may directly affect the rate of diffusion of acetic acid into cells and hence cell survival. PMID:19346344

Chapman, B.; Ross, T.

2009-01-01

142

Clostridium stain which produces acetic acid from waste gases  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (2207 Tall Oaks Dr., Fayetteville, AR 72703)

1997-01-01

143

Lactic acid bacteria of meat and meat products  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the growth of aerobic spoilage bacteria is inhibited, lactic acid bacteria may become the dominant component of the microbial flora of meats. This occurs with cured meats and with meats packaged in films of low gas permeability. The presence of a flora of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria on vacuum-packaged fresh chilled meats usually ensures that shelf-life is maximal. When

Aubrey F. Egan

1983-01-01

144

Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.  

PubMed

Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105 % compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 ?g/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

2014-12-01

145

Toxicokinetics and Oral Bioavailability of Halogenated Acetic Acids Mixtures in Naive and GSTzeta-Depleted Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pharmacokinetics of halogenated acetic acid (HAA) mixtures in native and GSTzeta depleted rats was investigated. Rats were administered orally or i.v. to Mixture-1 (monobromo- dichloro-, chlorodibromo-, tribromo- acetic acids) or Mixture-2 (bromochloro-, dibromo-, trichloro- bromodichloro- acetic acids) at a dose of 25 ?mol\\/kg HAA and blood samples collected up to 36 h. GSTzeta depleted rats were also orally dosed with

Shakil A. Saghir; Irvin R. Schultz

2005-01-01

146

Leaching of spent lead acid battery paste components by sodium citrate and acetic acid.  

PubMed

A sustainable method, with minimal pollution and low energy cost in comparison with the conventional smelting methods, is proposed for treating components of spent lead-acid battery pastes in aqueous organic acid(s). In this study, PbO, PbO2, and PbSO4, the three major components in a spent lead paste, were individually reacted with a mixture of aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid solution. Pure lead citrate precursor of Pb3(C6H5O7)2 · 3H2O is the only product crystallized in each leaching experiment. Conditions were optimized for individual lead compounds which were then used as the basis for leaching real industrial spent paste. In this work, efficient leaching process is achieved and raw material cost is reduced by using aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid, instead of aqueous sodium citrate and citric acid as reported in a pioneering hydrometallurgical method earlier. Acetic acid is not only cheaper than citric acid but is also more effective in aiding dissolution of the lead compounds thus speeding up the leaching process in comparison with citric acid. Lead citrate is readily crystallized from the aqueous solution due to its low solubility and can be combusted to directly produce leady oxide as a precursor for making new battery pastes. PMID:23500418

Zhu, Xinfeng; He, Xiong; Yang, Jiakuan; Gao, Linxia; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qin; Kumar, R Vasant

2013-04-15

147

Inflammatory cells' role in acetic acid-induced colitis  

PubMed Central

Background: Free radicals are the known mechanisms responsible for inducing colitis with two origins: Inflammatory cells and tissues. Only the inflammatory cells can be controlled by corticosteroids. Our aim was to assess the importance of neutrophils as one of the inflammatory cells in inducing colitis and to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Colitis was induced in three groups by exposing them to acetic acid through enema (group 1), ex vivo (group 3), and enema after immune suppression (group 5). Each group had one control group that was exposed to water injection instead of acetic acid. Tissue samples were evaluated and compared based on macroscopic damages and biochemical and pathological results. Results: Considering neutrophilic infiltration, there were significant differences between groups 1, 3, 5, and the control of group 1. Groups 3, 5, and their controls, and group 1 and the control of group 3 had significant differences in terms of goblet depletion. Based on tissue originated H2O2, we found significant differences between group 1 and its control and group 3, and also between groups 5 and the control of group 3. All the three groups were significantly different from their controls based on Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) and such differences were also seen between group 1 with two other groups. Conclusion: Neutrophils may not be the only cause of oxidation process in colitis, and also makes the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the treatment of this disease doubtful. PMID:25337523

Sanei, Mohammad H.; Hadizadeh, Fatemeh; Adibi, Peyman; Alavi, Sayyed Ali

2014-01-01

148

Hydrogen bond mediated rotor-ring coupling in acetic acid-benzoic acid mixed dimer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we demonstrate that a doubly hydrogen-bonded interface of two carboxylic acid groups behaves as efficient conduit to transmit the rotor effects for IVR acceleration in a phenyl ring. The phenomenon has been demonstrated by measuring the resolved emission spectra following SVL excitations in S1 of a 1:1 mixed dimer between acetic acid and benzoic acid. The role of the methyl rotor has been ascertained by comparing the results with those obtained for an analogous dimeric system between formic acid and benzoic acid.

Nandi, Chayan K.; Hazra, Montu K.; Chakraborty, Tapas

2004-10-01

149

Reducing pathogens by using zinc oxide nanoparticles and acetic acid in sheep meat.  

PubMed

Practical applications of different concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mM) of zinc oxide (ZnO) suspensions containing 1 % acetic acid were investigated against the pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. ZnO suspensions (0, 1, 3, 6, and 8 mM) containing acetic acid had a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes, E. coli, and S. aureus during 12 h of incubation, and the 8 mM suspensions of ZnO were the most effective against all the strains. These data suggested that the antibacterial activity of ZnO was concentration dependent. Thus, 6 and 8 mM ZnO were selected for further studies in meat. ZnO nanoparticles reduced initial growth of all inoculated strains in meat. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles in meat and indicates the potential of these nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent in the food industry. PMID:25198854

Mirhosseini, Mahboubeh; Arjmand, Vahid

2014-09-01

150

Original article Antagonism of lactic acid bacteria towards  

E-print Network

Original article Antagonism of lactic acid bacteria towards Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia 10 October 1994; accepted 22 May 1995) Summary ― The antagonistic effect of lactic acid aureus/Escherichia colii INTRODUCTION Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are the normal flora of digestive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

Endohyphal bacterium enhances production of indole-3-acetic acid by a foliar fungal endophyte.  

PubMed

Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

Hoffman, Michele T; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A Elizabeth

2013-01-01

152

Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte  

PubMed Central

Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

2013-01-01

153

Utilization of the Plant Hormone Indole-3-Acetic Acid for Growth by Pseudomonas putida Strain 1290†  

PubMed Central

We have isolated from plant surfaces several bacteria with the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). One of them, isolate 1290, was able to utilize IAA as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The strain was identified by its 16S rRNA sequence as Pseudomonas putida. Activity of the enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase was induced during growth on IAA, suggesting that catechol is an intermediate of the IAA catabolic pathway. This was in agreement with the observation that the oxygen uptake by IAA-grown P. putida 1290 cells was elevated in response to the addition of catechol. The inability of a catR mutant of P. putida 1290 to grow at the expense of IAA also suggests a central role for catechol as an intermediate in IAA metabolism. Besides being able to destroy IAA, strain 1290 was also capable of producing IAA in media supplemented with tryptophan. In root elongation assays, P. putida strain 1290 completely abolished the inhibitory effect of exogenous IAA on the elongation of radish roots. In fact, coinoculation of roots with P. putida 1290 and 1 mM concentration of IAA had a positive effect on root development. In coinoculation experiments on radish roots, strain 1290 was only partially able to alleviate the inhibitory effect of bacteria that in culture overproduce IAA. Our findings imply a biological role for strain 1290 as a sink or recycler of IAA in its association with plants and plant-associated bacteria. PMID:15870323

Leveau, Johan H. J.; Lindow, Steven E.

2005-01-01

154

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway  

E-print Network

retention time OLR Organic loading rate PCR Polymerase chain reaction qPCR Quantitative polymerase chain reaction RNA Ribonucleic acid SAO Syntrophic acetate oxidation SAOB Syntrophic acetate-oxidising bacteria

155

Modification of wheat starch with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures I. Thermophysical and pasting properties.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of modification with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures on thermophysical and pasting properties of wheat starch. Starch was isolated from two wheat varieties and modified with mixtures of succinic acid and acetic anhydride, and azelaic acid and acetic anhydride in 4, 6 and 8 % (w/w). Thermophysical, pasting properties, swelling power, solubility and amylose content of modified starches were determined. The results showed that modifications with mixtures of afore mentioned dicarboxylic acids with acetic anhydride decreased gelatinisation and pasting temperatures. Gelatinisation enthalpy of Golubica starch increased, while of Srpanjka starch decreased by modifications. Retrogradation after 7 and 14 day-storage at 4 °C decreased after modifications of both starches. Maximum, hot and cold paste viscosity of both starches increased, while stability during shearing at high temperatures decreased. % setback of starches modified with azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixture decreased. Swelling power and solubility of both starches increased by both modifications. PMID:25328203

Subari?, Drago; A?kar, Dur?ica; Babi?, Jurislav; Saka?, Nikola; Jozinovi?, Antun

2014-10-01

156

Quantitative relationship between indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid during leaf growth in Coleus blumei  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative determinations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry ofindole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in growing leaves ofColeusblumei plants show parallel declines in leaf concentrations of bothhormones,except in leaf number 3 (about three-fourths of full size) where IAA level wasthe lowest of those measured. Expansion of the most recently unfurled leaf tofull size serves, in effect, to dilute both IAA and

Clifford LaMotte; Xiaoyue Li; William Jacobs; Ephraim Epstein

2002-01-01

157

Biosynthesis of the 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid subunit of component B of methanogenic bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Deuterium- and {sup 13}C-labeled precursors were used to establish the pathway for the biosynthesis of the 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid moiety of component B in methanogenic bacteria. The extent and position of the label incorporated into 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid were measured from the molecular and fragment ions in the mass spectrum of the methyl ester methylthiol derivative of the 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid. Deuterium from (2,2,2-{sup 2}H{sub 3})acetate was found to be incorporated into four separate positions of 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid. One deuterium was equally distributed between the C-2 and the C-3 of the 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid, and the remaining three were at carbons 4-6. The extent of incorporation of the C-2 and C-3 positions was the same as that observed for the incorporation of (2,2,2-{sup 2}H{sub 3})acetate into the {alpha}-ketoglutarate produced by the cells. (1,2-{sup 13}C{sub 2})Acetate was incorporated into four separate sites of the 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid molecule. On the basis of this and additional information, it is concluded that 7-mercaptoheptanoic acid is biosynthesized from {alpha}-ketosuberate, which arises from {alpha}-ketoglutarate by repeated {alpha}-keto acid chain elongation. The mechanism for the conversion of {alpha}-ketosuberate to a thiol appears to be analogous to that for the conversion of sulfopyruvate to coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid).

White, R.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

1989-01-24

158

Dilute Acetic Acid Exposure Enhances Electrolyte Leakage by Hydrilla verticillata and Potamogeton pectinatus Tubers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subterranean vegetative propagules are important life cycle stages for some species of rooted aquatic plants. Sedi- ments contain numerous compounds resulting from anaero- bic degradation of organic matter, including acetic acid. Tubers of hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle) and sago pondweed ( Potamogeton pectinatus L. ) were exposed to a range of acetic acid concentrations (0, 17.4, 87, 174, 348,

DAVID F. SPENCER; G. G. KSANDER

159

Acidbase equilibrium of ?-adrenoceptor blocking agents in acetic acid medium and methods for their titration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall dissociation constants and the formation constants of the perchlorate salts, in anhydrous acetic acid, of a series of ß-adrenoceptor blocking agents have been determined. On the basis of these values simple potentiometric and visual titration methods for the assay of ß-adrenoceptor blocking drugs in acetic acid are described.

José Barbosa; Maria Eleno Torrero

1991-01-01

160

DOI: 10.1002/chem.200700579 Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetic Acid on Dispersed  

E-print Network

, easily separated from organic reactants and products, and gas-phase process- es that avoid solid% ethanol conversion) were much higher than in previous re- ports. The presence of TiO2 during syn- thesis that are converted to acetic acid. Water increases acetic acid selec- tivity by inhibiting acetaldehyde syn- thesis

Iglesia, Enrique

161

Responses of Pisum sativum L. to exogenous indole acetic acid application under manganese toxicity.  

PubMed

Responses of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings to manganese (50, 100 and 250 ?M) and indole acetic acid (10 and 100 ?M) treatments were investigated. Single and combined exposure of pea to manganese and 100 ?M indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, protein and nitrogen while ammonium content increased compared to the control. Combined treatment of pea with 250 ?M manganese and 100 ?M indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass by 54% and 51%, chlorophyll and carotenoids by 31% and 26%, root and shoot protein by 47% and 44%, and root and shoot nitrogen by 44% and 40%, respectively. Activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were decreased by the exposure of manganese and 100 ?M indole acetic acid while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. Combined application of 250 ?M manganese and 100 ?M indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot glutamine synthetase activity by 44% and 39%, and glutamate synthase activity by 39% and 37% while root and shoot glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased by 47% and 42%, respectively compared to the control. In contrast, application of 10 ?M indole acetic acid together with manganese decreased the negative impacts of manganese, and promoted seedling growth compared to the manganese treatments alone. This study has shown that 10 ?M indole acetic acid protected pea seedlings appreciably from manganese toxicity by regulating ammonium content and the activities of enzymes of ammonium assimilation, while 100 ?M of indole acetic acid exhibited opposite response under manganese toxicity. PMID:21516457

Gangwar, Savita; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Maurya, Jagat Narayan

2011-06-01

162

Stress responses in lactic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of bacteria that are traditionally used to produce fermented foods. The industrialization of food bio-transformations increased the economical importance of LAB, as they play a crucial role in the development of the organoleptique and hygienic quality of fermented products. Therefore, the reliability of starter strains in terms of quality and functional properties (important for the development of aroma and texture), but also in terms of growth performance and robustness has become essential. These strains should resist to adverse conditions encountered in industrial processes, for example during starter handling and storage (freeze-drying, freezing or spray-drying). The development of new applications such as life vaccines and probiotic foods reinforces the need for robust LAB since they may have to survive in the digestive tract, resist the intestinal flora, maybe colonize the digestive or uro-genital mucosa and express specific functions under conditions that are unfavorable to growth (for example, during stationary phase or storage). Also in nature, the ability to quickly respond to stress is essential for survival and it is now well established that LAB, like other bacteria, evolved defense mechanisms against stress that allow them to withstand harsh conditions and sudden environmental changes. While genes implicated in stress responses are numerous, in LAB the levels of characterization of their actual role and regulation differ widely between species. The functional conservation of several stress proteins (for example, HS proteins, Csp, etc) and of some of their regulators (for example, HrcA, CtsR) renders even more striking the differences that exist between LAB and the classical model micro-organisms. Among the differences observed between LAB species and B. subtilis, one of the most striking is the absence of a sigma B orthologue in L. lactis ssp. lactis as well as in at least two streptococci and probably E. faecalis. The overview of LAB stress responses also reveals common aspects of stress responses. As in other bacteria, adaptive responses appear to be a usual mode of stress protection in LAB. However, the cross-protection to other stress often induced by the expression of a given adaptive response, appears to vary between species. This observation suggests that the molecular bases of adaptive responses are, at least in part, species (or even subspecies) specific. A better understanding of the mechanisms of stress resistance should allow to understand the bases of the adaptive responses and cross protection, and to rationalize their exploitation to prepare LAB to industrial processes. Moreover, the identification of crucial stress related genes will reveal targets i) for specific manipulation (to promote or limit growth), ii) to develop tools to screen for tolerant or sensitive strains and iii) to evaluate the fitness and level of adaptation of a culture. In this context, future genome and transcriptome analyses will undoubtedly complement the proteome and genetic information available today, and shed a new light on the perception of, and the response to, stress by lactic acid bacteria. PMID:12369188

van de Guchte, Maarten; Serror, Pascale; Chervaux, Christian; Smokvina, Tamara; Ehrlich, Stanislav D; Maguin, Emmanuelle

2002-08-01

163

Impact of trace element addition on degradation efficiency of volatile fatty acids, oleic acid and phenyl acetate and on microbial populations in a biogas digester.  

PubMed

The effect of trace element addition on anaerobic digestion of food industry- and household waste was studied using two semi-continuous lab-scale reactors, one (R30+) was supplied with Fe, Co and Ni, while the other (R30) acted as a control. Tracer analysis illustrated that methane production from acetate proceeded through syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) in both digesters. The effect of the trace elements was also evaluated in batch assays to determine the capacity of the microorganisms of the two digesters to degrade acetate, phenyl acetate, oleic acid or propionate, butyrate and valerate provided as a cocktail. The trace elements addition improved the performance of the process giving higher methane yields during start-up and early operation and lower levels of mainly acetate and propionate in the R30+ reactor. The batch assay showed that material from R30+ gave effects on methane production from all substrates tested. Phenyl acetate was observed to inhibit methane formation in the R30 but not in the R30+ assay. A real-time PCR analysis targeting methanogens on the order level as well as three SAO bacteria showed an increase in Methanosarcinales in the R30+ reactor over time, even though SAO continuously was the dominating pathway for methane production. Possibly, this increase explains the low VFA-levels and higher degradation rates observed in the R30+ batch incubations. These results show that the added trace elements affected the ability of the microflora to degrade VFAs as well as oleic acid and phenyl acetate in a community, where acetate utilization is dominated by SAO. PMID:22683024

Karlsson, Anna; Einarsson, Peter; Schnürer, Anna; Sundberg, Carina; Ejlertsson, Jörgen; Svensson, Bo H

2012-10-01

164

An investigation of the acid properties of heteropoly acids in acetone and acetic acid by the electrical conductivity method  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The authors have measured the electrical conductivity of heteropoly acids (HPA.) based on Mo(VI), W(VI), and V(V) with heteroatoms P and Si in acetone and acetic acid at 25°C. In acetone, H3PW12O40 and H4PW11VO40 are partially dissociated 3-1 electrolytes. In acetic acid, all the HPA investigated are 1-1 electrolytes.2.Using the Fuoss-Edelson and Fuoss-Kraus methods they have calculated the thermodynamic dissociation

S. M. Kulikov; I. V. Kozhevnikov

1981-01-01

165

Acetate/acetyl-CoA metabolism associated with cancer fatty acid synthesis: Overview and application.  

PubMed

Understanding cancer-specific metabolism is important for identifying novel targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Induced acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism is a notable feature that is related to fatty acid synthesis supporting tumor growth. In this review, we focused on the recent findings related to cancer acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism. We also introduce [1-(11)C]acetate positron emission tomography (PET), which is a useful tool to visualize up-regulation of acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism in cancer, and discuss the utility of [1-(11)C]acetate PET in cancer diagnosis and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24569091

Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

2015-01-28

166

Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.  

PubMed

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass. PMID:25087936

Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

2014-11-15

167

Direct oxidation of methane to acetic acid catalyzed by Pd2+ and Cu2+ in the presence of molecular oxygen  

E-print Network

Direct oxidation of methane to acetic acid catalyzed by Pd2+ and Cu2+ in the presence of molecular to acetic acid in concentrated sulfuric acid using a combination of Pd2+ and Cu2+ in the presence of oxygen. The conversion of methane to acetic acid has attracted recent interest as a pathway for the synthesis

Bell, Alexis T.

168

Hydrogen bonding in hydrates with one acetic acid molecule.  

PubMed

Hydrogen bonding (H-bond) interaction significantly influences the separation of acetic acid (HAc) from the HAc/H(2)O mixtures, especially the dilute solution, in distillation processes. It has been examined from the HAc mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrahydrates by analyzing the structures, binding energies, and infrared vibrational frequencies from quantum chemical calculations. For the first coordinate shell the 6-membered head-on ring is surely the most favorable structure because it has (1) the most favorable H-bonding parameters, (2) almost the largest binding energy per H-bond, (3) the biggest wavenumber shifts, and (4) the highest ring distribution (the AIMD simulations). Moreover, the comparison of the calculations with the experiments (the X-ray scattering data and IR frequencies) suggests that the possible structures in dilute aqueous solution are those involving two or more coordinate shells. The H-bonding in these water-surrounded HAc hydrates are the origin of the low-efficiency problem of isolating HAc from the dilute HAc/H(2)O mixtures. It is apparently a tougher work to break the H-bonds among HAc and the surrounded H(2)O molecules with respect to the case of more concentrated solutions, where the dominant structures are HAc or H(2)O aggregates. PMID:20853886

Pu, Liang; Sun, Yueming; Zhang, Zhibing

2010-10-14

169

IR plus vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of neutral and ionic organic acid molecules and clusters: Acetic acid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared (IR) vibrational spectroscopy of acetic acid (A) neutral and ionic monomers and clusters, employing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), 10.5eV single photon ionization of supersonically expanded and cooled acetic acid samples, is presented and discussed. Molecular and cluster species are identified by time of flight mass spectroscopy: the major mass features observed are AnH+(n=1-9), ACOOH+ (VUV ionization) without IR radiation present, and A+ with both IR and VUV radiation present. The intense feature ACOOH+ arises from the cleavage of (A)2 at the ?-CC bond to generate ACOOH++CH3 following ionization. The vibrational spectrum of monomeric acetic acid (2500-7500cm-1) is measured by nonresonant ionization detected infrared (NRID-IR) spectroscopy. The fundamentals and overtones of the CH and OH stretches and some combination bands are identified in the spectrum. Mass selected IR spectra of neutral and cationic acetic acid clusters are measured in the 2500-3800cm-1 range employing nonresonant ionization dip-IR and IR photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopies, respectively. Characteristic bands observed at approximately 2500-2900cm-1 for the cyclic ring dimer are identified and tentatively assigned. For large neutral acetic acid clusters An(n>2), spectra display only hydrogen bonded OH stretch features, while the CH modes (2500-2900cm-1) do not change with cluster size n. The IRPD spectra of protonated (cationic) acetic acid clusters AnH+ (n=1-7) exhibit a blueshift of the free OH stretch with increasing n. These bands finally disappear for n ?6, and one broad and weak band due to hydrogen bonded OH stretch vibrations at approximately 3350cm-1 is detected. These results indicate that at least one OH group is not involved in the hydrogen bonding network for the smaller (n?5) AnH+ species. The disappearance of the free OH stretch feature at n ?6 suggests that closed cyclic structures form for AnH+ for the larger clusters (n?6).

Hu, Y. J.; Fu, H. B.; Bernstein, E. R.

2006-11-01

170

Evaluation of the morphological changes of gastric mucosa induced by a low concentration of acetic acid using a rat model.  

PubMed

Oral ingestion of concentrated acetic acid causes corrosive injury of the gastrointestinal tract. To assess the effects of a low concentration of acetic acid on gastric mucosa, we examined the gastric mucosal changes in rats at 1 and 3 days after the injection of 5% or 25% acetic acid into the gastric lumen. The area of the gastric ulcerative lesions in the 25% acetic acid group was significantly larger than that in the 5% acetic acid group. The lesion area was reduced significantly at 3 days after injection in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas no significant difference in lesion area was observed at 1 and 3 days in the 25% acetic acid group. Histologically, corrosive necrosis was limited to the mucosal layer in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas necrosis extended throughout the gastric wall in the 25% acetic acid group. At 3 days post-injection, the 25% acetic acid group showed widespread persistent inflammation, whereas the 5% acetic acid group showed widespread appearance of fibroblasts indicative of a healing process. These results indicate that a low concentration of acetic acid damages the gastric mucosa and that the degree of mucosal damage depends on the concentration of acetic acid. PMID:24485432

Nakao, Ken-ichiro; Ro, Ayako; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

2014-02-01

171

Cyclization of ?-terpenols and their acetates by fluorosulfonic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been shown that the superacid cyclization of ?-terpenols and their acetates takes place with structural selectivity\\u000a and chemo- and stereospecificity and leads to cyclic isoprenoids with higher yields than the cyclization of the corresponding\\u000a ?-terpenols and their acetates.

N. D. Ungur; N. P. Popa; Nguen Van Tuen; P. F. Vlad

1993-01-01

172

Lactic acid bacteria of foods and their current taxonomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Application of molecular genetic techniques to determine the relatedness of food-associated lactic acid bacteria has resulted in significant changes in their taxonomic classification. During the 1980s the genus Streptococcus was separated into the three genera Enterococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus. The lactic acid bacteria associated with foods now include species of the genera Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus,

Michael E. Stiles; Wilhelm H. Holzapfel

1997-01-01

173

Fermentation of Fructooligosaccharides by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were screened of their ability to ferment fructooligosaccharides (FOS) on MRS agar. Of 28 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria examined, 12 of 16 Lactobacillus strains and 7 of 8 Bifidobacterium strains fermented FOS. Only strains that gave a positive reaction by the agar method reached high cell densities in broth containing FOS.

Handan Kaplan; Robert W. Hutkins

2000-01-01

174

Controlled overproduction of proteins by lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactic acid bacteria are widely used in industrial food fermentations, contributing to flavour, texture and preservation of the fermented products. Here we describe recent advances in the development of controlled gene expression systems, which allow the regulated overproduction of any desirable protein by lactic acid bacteria. Some systems benefit from the fact that the expression vectors, marker genes and inducing

O. P. Kuipers; Ruyter de P. G. G. A; M. Kleerebezem; Vos de W. M

1997-01-01

175

Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect

Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

2010-02-08

176

Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

PubMed

The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences. PMID:25093933

Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

2014-10-10

177

Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene  

PubMed Central

We characterized the biosynthesis of indole-3-acetic acid by the mycoherbicide Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene. Auxin production was tryptophan dependent. Compounds from the indole-3-acetamide and indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways were detected in culture filtrates. Feeding experiments and in vitro assay confirmed the presence of both pathways. Indole-3-acetamide was the major pathway utilized by the fungus to produce indole-3-acetic acid in culture. PMID:9835603

Robinson, M.; Riov, J.; Sharon, A.

1998-01-01

178

Hydrogen-exchange reaction of alkyl halides with formic and acetic acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.An investigation was made of the hydrogen exchange of alkyl halides in media differing in dielectric constant, namely formic and acetic acids.2.Tertiary halides (chloride, bromides, and iodides) undergo hydrogen exchange with formic acid-d, whereas secondary alkyl halides do not undergo hydrogen exchange under the same conditions. Tertiary chlorides do not undergo hydrogen exchange with acetic acid-d, whereas under the same

D. N. Kursanov; E. V. Bykova; V. N. Setkina

1959-01-01

179

Lactic acid bacteria from fermented table olives.  

PubMed

Table olives are one of the main fermented vegetables in the world. Olives can be processed as treated or natural. Both have to be fermented but treated green olives have to undergo an alkaline treatment before they are placed in brine to start their fermentation. It has been generally established that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are responsible for the fermentation of treated olives. However, LAB and yeasts compete for the fermentation of natural olives. Yeasts play a minor role in some cases, contributing to the flavour and aroma of table olives and in LAB development. The main microbial genus isolated in table olives is Lactobacillus. Other genera of LAB have also been isolated but to a lesser extent. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus are the predominant species in most fermentations. Factors influencing the correct development of fermentation and LAB, such as pH, temperature, the amount of NaCl, the polyphenol content or the availability of nutrients are also reviewed. Finally, current research topics on LAB from table olives are reviewed, such as using starters, methods of detection and identification of LAB, their production of bacteriocins, and the possibility of using table olives as probiotics. PMID:22475936

Hurtado, Albert; Reguant, Cristina; Bordons, Albert; Rozès, Nicolas

2012-08-01

180

Modeling the Effects of Sodium Chloride, Acetic Acid, and Intracellular pH on Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ? †  

PubMed Central

Microbiological safety has been a critical issue for acid and acidified foods since it became clear that acid-tolerant pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 can survive (even though they are unable to grow) in a pH range of 3 to 4, which is typical for these classes of food products. The primary antimicrobial compounds in these products are acetic acid and NaCl, which can alter the intracellular physiology of E. coli O157:H7, leading to cell death. For combinations of acetic acid and NaCl at pH 3.2 (a pH value typical for non-heat-processed acidified vegetables), survival curves were described by using a Weibull model. The data revealed a protective effect of NaCl concentration on cell survival for selected acetic acid concentrations. The intracellular pH of an E. coli O157:H7 strain exposed to acetic acid concentrations of up to 40 mM and NaCl concentrations between 2 and 4% was determined. A reduction in the intracellular pH was observed for increasing acetic acid concentrations with an external pH of 3.2. Comparing intracellular pH with Weibull model predictions showed that decreases in intracellular pH were significantly correlated with the corresponding times required to achieve a 5-log reduction in the number of bacteria. PMID:21115706

Hosein, Althea M.; Breidt, Frederick; Smith, Charles E.

2011-01-01

181

Severe renal function impairment in adult patients acutely poisoned with concentrated acetic acid.  

PubMed

Acetic acid is a widely used organic acid with corrosive properties that depend on its concentration. If acetic acid is ingested in concentrations above 30 % it may severely damage the upper gastrointestinal tract and cause intravascular haemolysis, which can result in severe kidney and liver disorders and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this retrospective study, we analysed acetic acid ingestion data collected at the University Clinic for Toxicology of Skopje, Macedonia from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011. The analysis included systemic complications, kidney damage, and the outcomes in particular. Over the ten years, 84 patients were reported at the Clinic to have ingested highly concentrated acetic acid. Twenty-eight developed kidney disorders, while the remaining 56 had no complications. Fatal outcome was reported for 11 patients, seven of whom had systemic complications and four severe gastrointestinal complications. PMID:23585201

Chibishev, Andon; Sikole, Aleksandar; Pereska, Zanina; Chibisheva, Vesna; Simonovska, Natasha; Orovchanec, Nikola

2013-01-01

182

Biosynthesis of the Halogenated Auxin, 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Seeds of several agriculturally important legumes are rich sources of the only halogenated plant hormone, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid. However, the biosynthesis of this auxin is poorly understood. Here, we show that in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid is synthesized via the novel intermediate 4-chloroindole-3-pyruvic acid, which is produced from 4-chlorotryptophan by two aminotransferases, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED1 and TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED2. We characterize a tar2 mutant, obtained by Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, the seeds of which contain dramatically reduced 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid levels as they mature. We also show that the widespread auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, is synthesized by a parallel pathway in pea. PMID:22573801

Tivendale, Nathan D.; Davidson, Sandra E.; Davies, Noel W.; Smith, Jason A.; Dalmais, Marion; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid I.; Quittenden, Laura J.; Sutton, Lily; Bala, Raj K.; Le Signor, Christine; Thompson, Richard; Horne, James; Reid, James B.; Ross, John J.

2012-01-01

183

Uptake kinetics of acetic acid and acetone on ice surfaces at 190 - 223 K  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterogeneous reactions of oxygenated organics may influence the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere with a direct impact on the tropospheric ozone budget. Direct trace gas measurements in the upper troposphere have revealed a high mixing ratio acetic acid (up to 1.9 ppb) and acetone (up to 3 ppb). In the present study we have examined the heterogeneous interactions of acetic

A. Terziyski; P. Behr; U. Scharfenort; K. Demiral; R. Zellner

2003-01-01

184

Chiral phosphoric acid directed regioselective acetalization of carbohydrate-derived 1,2-diols.  

PubMed

In control: A chiral phosphoric acid catalyst significantly enhances or completely overrides the inherent regioselective acetalization profiles exhibited by monosaccharide-derived 1,2-diol substrates. This study represents the first example of chiral-catalyst-directed regio- and enantioselective intermolecular acetalizations, which are complementary to existing methods for substrate-controlled functionalization of polyols. PMID:24123751

Mensah, Enoch; Camasso, Nicole; Kaplan, Will; Nagorny, Pavel

2013-12-01

185

Acute intestinal injury induced by acetic acid and casein: prevention by intraluminal misoprostol  

SciTech Connect

Acute injury was established in anesthetized rabbits by intraluminal administration of acetic acid with and without bovine casein, into loops of distal small intestine. Damage was quantified after 45 minutes by the blood-to-lumen movement of {sup 51}Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged bovine serum albumin as well as luminal fluid histamine levels. The amount of titratable acetic acid used to lower the pH of the treatment solutions to pH 4.0 was increased by the addition of calcium gluconate. Luminal acetic acid caused a 19-fold increase in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA accumulation over saline controls; casein did not modify this effect. In saline controls, loop fluid histamine levels bordered on the limits of detection (1 ng/g) but were elevated 19-fold by acetic acid exposure and markedly increased (118-fold) by the combination of acid and casein. Intraluminal misoprostol (3 or 30 micrograms/mL), administered 30 minutes before acetic acid, significantly attenuated the increase in epithelial permeability (luminal {sup 51}Cr-EDTA, fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin accumulation) and histamine release (P less than 0.05). Diphenhydramine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, and indomethacin (5 mg/kg IV) were not protective. It is concluded that exposure of the epithelium to acetic acid promotes the transepithelial movement of casein leading to enhanced mast cell activation and mucosal injury. Damage to the epithelial barrier can be prevented by misoprostol.

Miller, M.J.; Zhang, x.J.; Gu, x.A.; Clark, D.A. (Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans (USA))

1991-07-01

186

Technological, phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of wild lactic acid bacteria involved  

E-print Network

Technological, phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of wild lactic acid bacteria involved of the research was to investigate the dynamics of wild lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involved in Bitto production Keywords Lactic acid bacteria . Raw milk cheese . Bitto . Technological characterization . Antimicrobial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Importance of lactic acid bacteria in Asian fermented foods  

PubMed Central

Lactic acid bacteria play important roles in various fermented foods in Asia. Besides being the main component in kimchi and other fermented foods, they are used to preserve edible food materials through fermentation of other raw-materials such as rice wine/beer, rice cakes, and fish by producing organic acids to control putrefactive microorganisms and pathogens. These bacteria also provide a selective environment favoring fermentative microorganisms and produce desirable flavors in various fermented foods. This paper discusses the role of lactic acid bacteria in various non-dairy fermented food products in Asia and their nutritional and physiological functions in the Asian diet. PMID:21995342

2011-01-01

188

Percutaneous Sclerotherapy Using Acetic Acid After Failure of Alcohol Ablation in an Intra-abdominal Lymphangioma  

SciTech Connect

We report a case of percutaneous sclerotherapy using acetic acid in a 22-year-old woman with an intra-abdominal cystic lymphangioma who was not successfully treated with ethanol despite multiple trials.

Park, Sang Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: psw0224@kku.ac.kr; Cha, In Ho; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Hong, Suk Joo; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

2004-09-15

189

21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test...

2011-04-01

190

21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.  

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test...

2014-04-01

191

Recovery of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions using catalytic dehydrative esterification with ethanol.  

PubMed

We have developed a direct esterification of aqueous acetic acid with ethanol (molar ratio=1:1) catalyzed by polystyrene-supported or homogeneous sulfonic acids toward the recovery of acetic acid from wastewater in chemical plants. The equilibrium yield was significantly increased by the addition of toluene, which had a high ability to extract ethyl acetate from the aqueous phase. It was shown that low-loading and alkylated polystyrene-supported sulfonic acid efficiently accelerated the reaction. These results suggest that the construction of hydrophobic reaction environments in water was critical in improving the chemical yield. Addition of inorganic salts was also effective for the reaction under not only biphasic conditions (toluene-water) but also toluene-free conditions, because the mutual solubility of ethyl acetate and water was suppressed by the salting-out effect. Among the tested salts, CaCl(2) was found to be the most suitable for this reaction system. PMID:23290939

Yagyu, Daisuke; Ohishi, Tetsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi; Okumura, Yoshikuni; Nakajo, Tetsuo; Mori, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Sh?

2013-03-01

192

Hydrogen peroxide resistance of Acetobacter pasteurianus NBRC3283 and its relationship to acetic acid fermentation.  

PubMed

The bacterium Acetobacter pasteurianus can ferment acetic acid, a process that proceeds at the risk of oxidative stress. To understand the stress response, we investigated catalase and OxyR in A. pasteurianus NBRC3283. This strain expresses only a KatE homolog as catalase, which is monofunctional and growth dependent. Disruption of the oxyR gene increased KatE activity, but both the katE and oxyR mutant strains showed greater sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide as compared to the parental strain. These mutant strains showed growth similar to the parental strain in the ethanol oxidizing phase, but their growth was delayed when cultured in the presence of acetic acid and of glycerol and during the acetic acid peroxidation phase. The results suggest that A. pasteurianus cells show different oxidative stress responses between the metabolism via the membrane oxidizing pathway and that via the general aerobic pathway during acetic acid fermentation. PMID:18838821

Okamoto-Kainuma, Akiko; Ehata, Yasunori; Ikeda, Manami; Osono, Takemasa; Ishikawa, Morio; Kaga, Takayuki; Koizumi, Yukimichi

2008-10-01

193

Effects of Exogenously Applied Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) to Cotton  

E-print Network

There is a need in the cotton industry for cultivars with enhanced lint yield potential and high-quality fiber properties. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a phytohormone that is predominantly responsible for cell elongation and required for primary...

Clement, Jenny D.

2011-08-08

194

Complexation of chitosan with acetic acid according to Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of the interaction between the protonated chitosan (CHI) macromolecule and the acetate ion in dilute acetic acid solutions were studied by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and quantum-chemical modeling. The complexation of CHI with the acetate ion showed itself as the 934 cm-1 band in the Raman spectrum, which suggests the formation of [CHI+ · CH3COO-] type ion pairs. It was concluded that a comparative analysis of the integrated intensities of the Raman bands in the range 880-940 cm-1 makes it possible to judge about the relative content of hydrated acetate ions, CHI macromolecules of the [CHI+ · CH3COO-] complex, and acetic acid molecules not involved in CHI protonation.

Mikhailov, G. P.; Tuchkov, S. V.; Lazarev, V. V.; Kulish, E. I.

2014-06-01

195

The feeding value of water and acetic acid reconstituted sorghum grain for lactating dairy cows  

E-print Network

THE FEEDING VALUE OF WATER AND ACETIC ACID RECONSTITUTED SORGHUM GRAIN FOR LACTATING DAIRY COWS A Thesis by DAVID HEINIE BADE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition THE FEEDING VALUE OF WATER AND ACETIC ACID RECONSTITUTED SORGHUM GRAIN FOR LACTATING DAIRY COWS A Thesis by DAVID HEINIE BADE Approved as to style and content by: C ' man o Committee...

Bade, David Heinie

2012-06-07

196

Molecular properties of 4-substituted indole-3-acetic acids affecting pea pericarp elongation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pea (Pisum sativum L.) fruit naturally contain the auxins, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA). However, only 4-Cl-IAA can substitute for the seeds in maintaining pea fruit growth in planta. The importance of the substituent at the 4-position of the indole ring was tested by comparing the molecular properties of 4-X-IAA (X = H, Me, Et, F, or Cl)

Dennis M. Reinecke; Jocelyn A. Ozga; Nebojša Ili?; Volker Magnus; Biserka koji?-Prodi?

1999-01-01

197

Differential effects of the microbial metabolite, acetic acid, on sprouting of aquatic plant propagules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Subterranean vegetative propagules are important life cycle stages for some species of rooted aquatic plants. Sediments contain numerous compounds resulting from anaerobic degradation of organic matter, including acetic acid. Tubers, turions, and winter buds of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle, Potamogeton gramineus L., and Potamogeton pectinatus L. were exposed to acetic acid concentrations from 0 to 696 mmol l?1 for 1–8

David F. Spencer; Gregory G. Ksander

1995-01-01

198

Dissociation of acetic acid in 50 mass % ethylene carbonate-water from 20 to 55°C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dissociation constant of acetic acid in 50 mass % ethylene carbonate-water solvents has been determined at eight temperatures from 20 to 55°C by emf measurements of cells without liquid-junction containing hydrogen electrodes and silver-silver chloride electrodes. Acetic acid is weaker in the mixed solvent than in pure water. At 25°C, pK is 5.645 as compared with 4.756 in water,

J-C Hallé; Roger G. Bates

1975-01-01

199

Controlling grey and blue mould diseases of apple fruits using acetic acid vapours  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of acetic acid vapours at three application times on grey and blue moulds on the incidence of apple fruits was studied. Acetic acid vapour at 6 µl\\/l caused complete inhibition of linear growth and spore germination of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium sp. The most effective concentration was AA at 4 µl\\/l, which reduced spore germination and linear growth by more

Yehia Omar Fotouh

2009-01-01

200

Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil 1. Dry season  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have determined the atmospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase, in aerosols, and in rain during the dry season (July--August 1985) in the Amazonia region of Brazil. At ground level the average concentrations of gas phase formic and acetic acid were 1.6 +- 0.6 and 2.2 +- 1.0 ppb, respectively. The diurnal behavior of both

M. O. Andreae; R. W. Talbot; T. W. Andreae; R. C. Harriss

1988-01-01

201

Molecular biology and genetics of the acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetate conversion to methane and C0â by the methanogenic archaebacteria is a primary rate limiting step in anaerobic biodegradative processes in nature. However, the genetic study of these organisms has not been experimentally tractable due to the inability to grow and plate the organisms as single cells, and to extract high molecular weight DNA and RNA without shearing. The acetate-utilizing

Gunsalus

1991-01-01

202

Comparative analysis of CRISPR loci in lactic acid bacteria genomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are hypervariable loci widely distributed in bacteria and archaea, that provide acquired immunity against foreign genetic elements. Here, we investigate the occurrence of CRISPR loci in the genomes of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), including members of the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla. A total of 102 complete and draft genomes across 11 genera were

Philippe Horvath; Anne-Claire Coûté-Monvoisin; Dennis A. Romero; Patrick Boyaval; Christophe Fremaux; Rodolphe Barrangou

2009-01-01

203

DEGRADATION OF AMINO ACIDS BY PURE CULTURES OF RUMEN BACTERIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Amino Acid (AA) degradation profiles of five major genera of rumen bacteria were determined using physiological levels of AA under in vitro conditions. The results indicated that (1) not all AA are degraded by all strains of rumen bacteria and (2) degradation occurs at different rates. The genera Megaspbaera, Eubacterium and Streptococcus isolate 19D degraded all 14 AA tested.

Curtis Scheifinger; Neville Russell; William Chalupa

204

Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Michigan Cherry Wines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many factors contribute to the final flavor of wine. One factor is malolactic fermentation, during which lactic acid bacteria (LAB) transform the harsh tasting malic acid into a more drinkable lactic acid in grape wine. The role of LAB in the production of cherry wine is completely unknown. The goal of this study is to identify the species of LAB

Emily Henk; Margaret Dietrich; Terri Weese

2008-01-01

205

Continuous Ethanol Production with a Membrane Bioreactor at High Acetic Acid Concentrations  

PubMed Central

The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for 2nd generation ethanol production. The undissociated form of acetic acid can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger several toxic effects, such as uncoupling and lowered intracellular pH. The effect of acetic acid on the ethanol production was investigated in continuous cultivations by adding medium containing 2.5 to 20.0 g·L?1 acetic acid at pH 5.0, at a dilution rate of 0.5 h?1. The cultivations were performed at both high (~25 g·L?1) and very high (100–200 g·L?1) yeast concentration by retaining the yeast cells inside the reactor by a cross-flow membrane in a membrane bioreactor. The yeast was able to steadily produce ethanol from 25 g·L?1 sucrose, at volumetric rates of 5–6 g·L?1·h?1 at acetic acid concentrations up to 15.0 g·L?1. However, the yeast continued to produce ethanol also at a concentration of 20 g·L?1 acetic acid but at a declining rate. The study thereby demonstrates the great potential of the membrane bioreactor for improving the robustness of the ethanol production based on lignocellulosic raw materials. PMID:25028956

Ylitervo, Paivi; Franzen, Carl Johan; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

2014-01-01

206

Hydrogen-bonding interactions in acetic acid monohydrates and dihydrates by density-functional theory calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Equilibrium structures and the respective binding energies of acetic acid monohydrates and dihydrates have been determined by density-functional theory calculations with different basis sets, including 6-31+G(3d,p), 6-311++G(d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd). Given that the C ?O and OH groups in acetic acid provide the predominant hydrogen-bonding interactions with water, six stable conformer structures have been found each for the monohydrate and syn-dihydrate. Of the three syn- and three anti-conformers of acetic acid with water, the most stable monohydrate structure is found to be that of the syn-conformer bonding with water in a cyclic double H-bonded geometry. Similarly, the syn-conformer bonding with two water molecules in a cyclic double H-bonded geometry has also been determined to be the most stable among the six plausible structures for the syn-dihydrate. Frequency analysis of the stable conformers has been performed and the vibrational spectra of the most stable monohydrate and dihydrate structures are compared with the experimental gas-phase and matrix data. Furthermore, the calculated binding energies between an acetic acid and a water molecule for both monohydrate and dihydrate are larger than that between two water molecules, which supports our recent experimental observation of coevaporation of acetic acid with water upon annealing acetic acid on ice.

Gao, Q.; Leung, K. T.

2005-08-01

207

The Carbon Isotopic Content and Concentration of Ambient Formic and Acetic Acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

A direct method for source determination of atmospheric formic and acetic acid, through carbon isotopic analysis of the ambient acids and their potential sources, has been successfully developed and tested. These first carbon isotopic measurements of formic acid in the atmosphere were found to be fairly constant, regardless of location. This is consistent with a single dominating source of formic

Bryan Jay Johnson

1991-01-01

208

Inactive Methyl Indole-3-Acetic Acid Ester Can Be Hydrolyzed and Activated by Several Esterases Belonging  

E-print Network

(salicylic acid binding protein 2) hydrolyzes methyl salicylate to salicylic acid. There are 20 homologsInactive Methyl Indole-3-Acetic Acid Ester Can Be Hydrolyzed and Activated by Several Esterases, and peptides. We have recently shown that IAA could be converted to its methyl ester (MeIAA) by the Arabidopsis

Pichersky, Eran

209

Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA binding probes propidium iodide (PI) and TOTO-1 were tested for live\\/dead discrimination using a Lactococcus, a Streptococcus,

CHRISTINE J. BUNTHOF; KAREN BLOEMEN; PIETER BREEUWER; FRANK M. ROMBOUTS; TJAKKO ABEE

2001-01-01

210

Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria  

PubMed Central

Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 106 acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm?3 in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments. PMID:22572639

Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

2012-01-01

211

Synthesis and in vitro transdermal penetration enhancing activity of lactam N-acetic acid esters.  

PubMed

A homologous series of N-acetic acid esters of 2-pyrrolidinone and 2-piperidinone has been prepared and evaluated for its ability to enhance the skin content and flux of hydrocortisone 21-acetate in hairless mouse skin in vitro. Enhancement ratios (ER) were determined for flux (J), 24-hour diffusion cell receptor cell concentrations (Q24), and 24-h full-thickness mouse skin steroid content (SC) and compared to control values (no enhancer present). In addition, in an attempt to abrogate toxicity, these dermal penetration enhancers were designed to have the potential for biodegradation by dermal esterases. 2-Oxopyrrolidine-alpha acetic acid dodecyl ester (5) showed the highest enhancement ratios for J (ER 67.33) and Q24 (ER 180.66). 2-Oxopiperidine-alpha-acetic acid decyl ester (10) showed a high Q24 (ER 162.07) but a lower J (ER 12.67). 2-Oxopyrrolidine-alpha-acetic acid decyl ester (3) showed the highest enhancement ratio for SC (ER 8.7). The ER Q24 for 3, 5 and 10, as well as other lactam N-acetic acid esters in this work, were significantly higher than the ER found using Azone as enhancer. PMID:8683439

Michniak, B B; Player, M R; Sowell, J W

1996-02-01

212

Performance of dairy cows fed high levels of acetic acid or ethanol.  

PubMed

Ethanol and acetic acid are common end products from silages. The main objective of this study was to determine whether high concentrations of ethanol or acetic acid in total mixed ration would affect performance in dairy cows. Thirty mid-lactation Holstein cows were grouped in 10 blocks and fed one of the following diets for 7 wk: (1) control (33% Bermuda hay + 67% concentrates), (2) ethanol [control diet + 5% ethanol, dry matter (DM) basis], or (3) acetic acid (control diet + 5% acetic acid, DM basis). Ethanol and acetic acid were diluted in water (1:2) and sprayed onto total mixed rations twice daily before feeding. An equal amount of water was mixed with the control ration. To adapt animals to these treatments, cows were fed only half of the treatment dose during the first week of study. Cows fed ethanol yielded more milk (37.9 kg/d) than those fed the control (35.8 kg/d) or acetic acid (35.3 kg/d) diets, mainly due to the higher DM intake (DMI; 23.7, 22.2, and 21.6 kg/d, respectively). The significant diet × week interaction for DMI, mainly during wk 2 and 3 (when acetic acid reached the full dose), was related to the decrease in DMI observed for the acetic acid treatment. There was a diet × week interaction in excretion of milk energy per DMI during wk 2 and 3, due to cows fed acetic acid sustained milk yield despite lower DMI. Energy efficiency was similar across diets. Blood metabolites (glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, ethanol, and ?-glutamyl transferase activity) and sensory characteristics of milk were not affected by these treatments. Animal performance suggested similar energy value for the diet containing ethanol compared with other diets. Rumen conversion of ethanol to acetate and a concomitant increase in methane production might be a plausible explanation for the deviation of the predicted energy value based on the heat of combustion. Therefore, the loss of volatile compounds during the drying process in the laboratory should be considered when calculating energy content of fermented feedstuffs. PMID:23141834

Daniel, J L P; Amaral, R C; Sá Neto, A; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Bispo, A W; Zopollatto, M; Cardoso, T L; Spoto, M H F; Santos, F A P; Nussio, L G

2013-01-01

213

Photoproduction of H 2 from acetate by syntrophic cocultures of green sulfur bacteria and sulfur-reducing bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The marine green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme strain 1930 produced H2 and elemental sulfur from sulfide or thiosulfate under N limitation in the light. H2 production depended on nitrogenase and occurred only in the absence of ammonia. Methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the switch-off by ammonia. In defined syntrophic cocultures of the acetate-oxidizing, sulfur-reducing bacterium Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

Rolf Warthmann; Heribert Cypionka; Norbert Pfennig

1992-01-01

214

Potentiometric investigations of (acid + base) equilibria in ( n-butylamine + acetic acid) systems in binary (acetone + cyclohexane) solvent mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

By using the potentiometric titration method, standard equilibrium constants have been determined of acid dissociation of molecular acid, Ka(HA), cationic acid, Ka(BH+), of anionic and cationic homoconjugation, KAHA-andKBHB+, respectively, and of molecular heteroconjugation, KAHB (KBHA), in (acid+base) systems without proton transfer consisting of n-butylamine and acetic acid in binary (acetone+cyclohexane) solvent mixtures. The results have shown that both the pKa(HA)

Ma?gorzata Czaja; Anna Kozak; Mariusz Makowski; Lech Chmurzy?ski

2005-01-01

215

Lactic acid bacteria, probiotics and immune system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mucous membranes of the body are in direct contact with the outside environment and they are colonised by a large number of different bacteria. ?rough mucous membranes, the organism is in permanent con - tact with different antigens. Mucous surfaces are protected by many defence mechanisms that ensure a permanent and effective protection. ?ey include the production of secretory IgA,

R. HERICH; M. LEVKUT

2002-01-01

216

Influence of Medium Buffering Capacity on Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Growth by Acetic and Lactic Acids  

PubMed Central

Acetic acid (167 mM) and lactic acid (548 mM) completely inhibited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae both in minimal medium and in media which contained supplements, such as yeast extract, corn steep powder, or a mixture of amino acids. However, the yeast grew when the pH of the medium containing acetic acid or lactic acid was adjusted to 4.5, even though the medium still contained the undissociated form of either acid at a concentration of 102 mM. The results indicated that the buffer pair formed when the pH was adjusted to 4.5 stabilized the pH of the medium by sequestering protons and by lessening the negative impact of the pH drop on yeast growth, and it also decreased the difference between the extracellular and intracellular pH values (?pH), the driving force for the intracellular accumulation of acid. Increasing the undissociated acetic acid concentration at pH 4.5 to 163 mM by raising the concentration of the total acid to 267 mM did not increase inhibition. It is suggested that this may be the direct result of decreased acidification of the cytosol because of the intracellular buffering by the buffer pair formed from the acid already accumulated. At a concentration of 102 mM undissociated acetic acid, the yeast grew to higher cell density at pH 3.0 than at pH 4.5, suggesting that it is the total concentration of acetic acid (104 mM at pH 3.0 and 167 mM at pH 4.5) that determines the extent of growth inhibition, not the concentration of undissociated acid alone. PMID:11916676

Thomas, K. C.; Hynes, S. H.; Ingledew, W. M.

2002-01-01

217

Effects of humic acids on the growth of bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of humic acids of different origins on the growth of bacterial cultures of different taxa isolated from the soil and the digestive tracts of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa)—habitats with contrasting conditions—was studied. More than half of the soil and intestinal isolates from the 170 tested strains grew on the humic acid of brown coal as the only carbon source. The specific growth rate of the bacteria isolated from the intestines of the earthworms was higher than that of the soil bacteria. The use of humic acids by intestinal bacteria confirms the possibility of symbiotic digestion by earthworms with the participation of bacterial symbionts. Humic acids at a concentration of 0.1 g/l stimulated the growth of the soil and intestinal bacteria strains (66 strains out of 161) on Czapek’s medium with glucose (1 g/l), probably, acting as a regulator of the cell metabolism. On the medium with the humic acid, the intestinal bacteria grew faster than the soil isolates did. The most active growth of the intestinal isolates was observed by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Delftia acidovorans, Microbacterium terregens, and Aeromonas sp.; among the soil ones were the representatives of the Pseudomonas genus. A response of the bacteria to the influence of humic acids was shown at the strain level using the example of Pseudomonas representatives. The Flexom humin preparation stimulated the growth of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. This effect can be used for creating a new compound with the elevated activity of bacteria that are destroyers of oil and oil products.

Tikhonov, V. V.; Yakushev, A. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Byzov, B. A.; Demin, V. V.

2010-03-01

218

Production of the Phytohormone Indole-3-Acetic Acid by Estuarine Species of the Genus Vibrio?  

PubMed Central

Strains of Vibrio spp. isolated from roots of the estuarine grasses Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The colorimetric Salkowski assay was used for initial screening of IAA production. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) was then employed to confirm and quantify IAA production. The accuracy of IAA quantification by the Salkowski assay was examined by comparison to GC-MS assay values. Indole-3-acetamide, an intermediate in IAA biosynthesis by the indole-3-acetamide pathway, was also identified by GC-MS. Multilocus sequence typing of concatenated 16S rRNA, recA, and rpoA genes was used for phylogenetic analysis of environmental isolates within the genus Vibrio. Eight Vibrio type strains and five additional species-level clades containing a total of 16 environmental isolates and representing five presumptive new species were identified as IAA-producing Vibrio species. Six additional environmental isolates similar to four of the Vibrio type strains were also IAA producers. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IAA production by species of the genus Vibrio or by bacteria isolated from an estuarine environment. PMID:19218411

Gutierrez, Casandra K.; Matsui, George Y.; Lincoln, David E.; Lovell, Charles R.

2009-01-01

219

Exogenous treatment with indole-3-acetic acid and salicylic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat seedlings.  

PubMed

The seedlings of wheat were grown in the presence of CdCl2 (500 or 1000 ?M Cd), were applied with 500 ?M of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 500 ?M salicylic acid (SA) as seed soaking and were sampled at 56 days after sowing. The plants exposed to Cd exhibited a substantial decline in growth, pigment content, relative water content (RWC) activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) and leaf structure. However, pretreatment with IAA or SA mitigated the stress generated by Cd and markedly improved the aforesaid parameters. The Cd increased proline content, electrolyte leakage and plant Cd content. However, the IAA or SA treatment attenuated the adverse effects of Cd on these attributes. The results showed that pretreatment with IAA or SA enhanced the antioxidant defense activities in Cd stressed wheat, thus alleviating Cd induced oxidative damage and enhancing Cd tolerance and leaf anatomy. PMID:23684274

Agami, Ramadan A; Mohamed, Gamal F

2013-08-01

220

A case report of a chemical burn due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid.  

PubMed

As young and elastic skin is what everyone dreams of, various measures have been implemented including chemical, laser resurfacing and dermabrasion to improve the condition of ageing skin. However, the high cost of these procedures prevents the poor from having access to treatment. Glacial acetic acid is widely used as a substitute for chemical peeling because it is readily easily available and affordable. However, its use can result in a number of serious complications. A 28-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with deep second-degree chemical burns on her face caused by the application of a mixture of glacial acetic acid and flour for chemical peeling. During a 6-month follow-up, hypertrophic scarring developed on the both nasolabial folds despite scar management. Glacial acetic acid is a concentrated form of the organic acid, which gives vinegar its sour taste and pungent smell, and it is also an important reagent during the production of organic compounds. Unfortunately, misleading information regarding the use of glacial acetic acid for chemical peeling is causing serious chemical burns. Furthermore, there is high possibility of a poor prognosis, which includes inflammation, hypertrophic scar formation and pigmentation associated with its misuse. Therefore, we report a case of facial chemical burning, due to the misuse of glacial acetic acid, and hope that this report leads to a better understanding regarding the use of this reagent. PMID:20708991

Yoo, Jun-Ho; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo; Moon, Ji-Hyun

2010-12-01

221

Enantioselective Additions of Boronates to Chromene Acetals Catalyzed by a Chiral Brønsted acid-Lewis acid System  

PubMed Central

Chiral ?,?-dihydroxy carboxylic acids catalyze the enantioselective addition of alkenyl- and aryl boronates to chromene acetals. The optimal carboxylic acid is a tartaric acid amide, easily synthesized via a 3-step procedure. The reaction is enhanced by the addition of Lanthanide triflate salts such as cerium(IV)-and ytterbium(III) triflate. The chiral Brønsted acid and metal Lewis acid may be used in as low as 5 mol % relative to acetal substrate. Optimization of the reaction conditions can lead to yields >70% and enantiomeric ratios as high as 99:1. Spectroscopic and kinetic mechanistic studies demonstrate an exchange process leading to a reactive dioxoborolane intermediate leading to enantioselective addition to the pyrylium generated from the chromene acetal. PMID:20721997

Moquist, Philip N.; Kodama, Tomohiro; Schaus, Scott E.

2011-01-01

222

Psychrotrophic, lactic acid-producing bacteria from anoxic waters in Ace Lake, Antarctica; Carnobacterium funditum sp. nov. and Carnobacterium alterfunditum sp. nov  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterofermentative, lactic acid-producing, gram-positive, motile bacteria were isolated from the waters of Ace Lake, Antarctica. All strains produced virtually only l(+)lactic acid from d(+)glucose. d(-)ribose was fermented to lactic, acetic, and formic acids, and ethanol. Cell walls contained meso-diaminopimaleic acid. The strains did not grow at 30°C and were psychrotrophic. Whole cells contained 18:1cis 9 as a major component of

P. D. Franzmann; P. Höpfl; N. Weiss; B. J. Tindall

1991-01-01

223

Electrochemical generation of manganese (III) at glassy carbon electrode in acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conditions were established for the electrochemical generation of manganese(III) at glassy carbon in acetic acid. In the oxidation of manganese-(II) in potassium acetate supporting electrolyte high current efficiencies were achieved in a wide range of current densities at the working electrode, whereas in the presence of sodium perchlorate a successful generation of manganese(III) could be performed only at low current

Tibor J. Pastor; Vojka V. Antonijevi?

1990-01-01

224

Radiolabeled acetate kinetics and tricarboxylic acid cycle flux in the rat heart  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positron-emitting (1-¹¹C)acetate has been proposed as a tracer for noninvasive study of regional myocardial oxidative metabolism in humans with positron emission tomography (PET). To examine the relationship between tissue tracer kinetics and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux, (1-¹⁴C)acetate was administered as a bolus to Langendorf-perfused rat hearts and effluent ¹⁴COâ and labeled metabolites measured. ¹⁴COâ cleared monoexponentially between 5 and

M. Schwaiger; H. R. Schelbert; M. E. Phelps; A. Nguyen; D. B. Buxton

1987-01-01

225

Volatile acetic acid and formaldehyde emission from plywood treated with boron compound  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of plywood on formaldehyde and volatile acetic acid emissions treated with borax and boric acid were investigated. The treated plywood samples were manufactured by using two different methods; each veneer was first impregnated by a dipping method before the first group of plywood was manufactured. The second group of plywood panels was produced by adding preservatives (borax, boric

S. Colak; G. Colakoglu

2004-01-01

226

Structural, Biochemical, and Phylogenetic Analyses Suggest That Indole-3-Acetic Acid Methyltransferase  

E-print Network

methylate the nitrogen atom or carboxyl groups found in a variety of plant small molecules. Salicylic acid-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of natural chemicals encompassing widely divergent structures. Indole-3- acetic acid (IAA methylation of IAA's free carboxyl group. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IAMT (At

Pichersky, Eran

227

Acetic acid detection threshold in synthetic wine samples of a portable electronic nose.  

PubMed

Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L. PMID:23262483

Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

2013-01-01

228

Candida zemplinina Can Reduce Acetic Acid Produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Sweet Wine Fermentations  

PubMed Central

In this study we investigated the possibility of using Candida zemplinina, as a partner of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in mixed fermentations of must with a high sugar content, in order to reduce its acetic acid production. Thirty-five C. zemplinina strains, which were isolated from different geographic regions, were molecularly characterized, and their fermentation performances were determined. Five genetically different strains were selected for mixed fermentations with S. cerevisiae. Two types of inoculation were carried out: coinoculation and sequential inoculation. A balance between the two species was generally observed for the first 6 days, after which the levels of C. zemplinina started to decrease. Relevant differences were observed concerning the consumption of sugars, the ethanol and glycerol content, and acetic acid production, depending on which strain was used and which type of inoculation was performed. Sequential inoculation led to the reduction of about half of the acetic acid content compared to the pure S. cerevisiae fermentation, but the ethanol and glycerol amounts were also low. A coinoculation with selected combinations of S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina resulted in a decrease of ?0.3 g of acetic acid/liter, while maintaining high ethanol and glycerol levels. This study demonstrates that mixed S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina fermentation could be applied in sweet wine fermentation to reduce the production of acetic acid, connected to the S. cerevisiae osmotic stress response. PMID:22247148

Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Dolci, Paola; Giacosa, Simone; Torchio, Fabrizio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Torriani, Sandra; Suzzi, Giovanna; Rolle, Luca

2012-01-01

229

Conductance of HCl, NaCl, Na acetate, and acetic acid in water-ethylene carbonate solvent mixtures at 25 and 40°C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molar conductances of solutions of hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride, sodium acetate, and acetic acid were measured in water-ethylene carbonate (EC) solvent mixtures at 25 and 40°C. These solvents have dielectric constants higher than that of water. Four solvent compositions, in which the mole fraction (x2) of EC was 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, were studied at 25°C. For HCl

Barry R. Boerner; Roger G. Bates

1978-01-01

230

Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.  

PubMed

Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

2014-08-29

231

Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health  

PubMed Central

Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

2014-01-01

232

High pressure vapour–liquid equilibria of the binary and some of the ternary and multicomponent mixtures of the carbon dioxide + acetic anhydride + ?-methylbenzyl alcohol + acetic acid + ?-methylbenzyl acetate system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bubble-point pressures of the binary systems CO2+acetic anhydride, CO2+?-methylbenzyl alcohol, and CO2+?-methylbenzyl acetate were measured in the temperature range of 283–363K up to 15MPa in a high pressure capillary glass tube apparatus, using the synthetic method. The binary mixture CO2+acetic acid was measured for x=0.4962 and compared with previously published results. For the system CO2+?-methylbenzyl alcohol, data of the three-phase

Lourdes Calvo; Theo W. de Loos

2006-01-01

233

Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria having modified diacetyl reductase activities  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria having a reduced or lacking or enhanced diacetyl reductase activity, acetoin reductase activity and/or butanediol dehydrogenase activity are provided. Such bacteria are used in starter cultures in the production of food products including dairy products where it is desired to have a high content of diacetyl and for reducing or completely removing diacetyl in beverages including beers, fruit juices and certain types of wine, where the presence of diacetyl is undesired.

2002-07-02

234

Remediation of acid mine drainage with sulfate reducing bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed changes in dissolved metal concentrations and pH. Using synthetic acid mine drainage and combinations of inputs, students monitor their bioreactors for decreases in dissolved copper and iron concentrations.

Hauri, J.F.; Schaider, L.A. [Assumption College, Worcester, MA (USA)

2009-02-15

235

Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid  

PubMed Central

Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralevic, Masa; Marra, Ersilia

2013-01-01

236

Effect of water-soluble vitamins on the production of indole-3-acetic acid by Azospirillum brasilense  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of six water-soluble vitamins on tryptophandependent synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid in Azospirillum brasilense were investigated. A multifactorial regression analysis was employed to produce models of indole-3-acetic acid synthesis versus concentrations of tryptophan and the vitamins added to the growth medium. Very low levels of the B-group vitamins added at 10 to 100?g 1?1 affected production of indole-3-acetic acid

Elena A. Zakharova; Alexander D. Iosipenko; Vladimir V. Ignatov

2000-01-01

237

Acetate non-utilizing mutants of Arabidopsis: evidence that organic acids influence carbohydrate perception in germinating seedlings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A phenotypic screen was employed to isolate Arabidopsis plants that are deficient in their ability to utilize or sense acetate. The screening strategy, based on resistance to the toxic acetate analogue monofluoroacetic acid, was adapted from one that has been used successfully to identify important metabolic and regulatory genes involved in acetate metabolism in fungi. Following conventions established from the

M. A. Hooks; J. E. Turner; E. C. Murphy; I. A. Graham

2004-01-01

238

Effect of acetic acid on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of cervical epithelium.  

PubMed

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used as an adjunct to colposcopy in the identification of precancerous and cancerous cervical lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acetic acid on OCT imaging. OCT images were taken from unsuspicious and suspicious areas of fresh conization specimens immediately after resection and 3 and 10 min after application of 6 % acetic acid. A corresponding histology was obtained from all sites. The images taken 3 and 10 min after application of acetic acid were compared to the initial images with respect to changes in brightness, contrast, and scanning depth employing a standard nonparametric test of differences of proportions. Further, mean intensity backscattering curves were calculated from all OCT images in the histological groups CIN3, inflammation, or normal epithelium. Mean difference profiles within each of these groups were determined, reflecting the mean differences between the condition before application of acetic acid and the exposure times 3 and 10 min, respectively. According to the null hypothesis, the difference profiles do not differ from profiles fluctuating around zero in a stationary way, which implies that the profiles do not differ significantly from each other. The null hypothesis was tested employing the KPSS test. The visual analysis of 137 OCT images from 46 sites of 10 conization specimens revealed a statistically significant increase in brightness for all three groups and a statistically significant decrease in contrast for normal epithelium after 10 min. Further, an increase in scanning depth was noted for normal epithelium after 10 min and for CIN3 after 3 min. The analysis of mean intensity profiles showed an increased backscattering intensity after application of acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly affects the quality of OCT images. Overall brightness and scanning depth increase with the opposite effect regarding the image contrast. Whether the observed changes facilitate the distinction between dysplastic lesions in a clinical setting needs to be shown in further studies. PMID:24828107

Gallwas, Julia; Stanchi, Anna; Dannecker, Christian; Ditsch, Nina; Mueller, Susanna; Mortensen, Uwe; Stepp, Herbert

2014-11-01

239

A Possible Source of Error in the Chemical Detection of Indolyl Acetic Acid in Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

DURING investigations on the growth substances of fruits of cacao and bananas (Musa spp.), it was of interest to find that a substance was present in seeded bananas which gave a pink colour with ferric chloride\\/perchloric acid or p-dimethyl amino-benz-aldehyde\\/hydrochloric acid, corresponding to the RF of indolyl acetic acid and to the zone of bioassay using the wheat coleoptile straight-growth

R. Nichols

1958-01-01

240

Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).  

PubMed

Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ?0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen. PMID:24929724

Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

2014-09-01

241

Comparative Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels in the Slender Pea and Other Pea Phenotypes 1  

PubMed Central

Free indole-3-acetic acid levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in three ultra-tall `slender' Pisum sativum L. lines differing in gibberellin content. Measurements were made for apices and stem elongation zones of light-grown plants and values were compared with wild-type, dwarf, and nana phenotypes in which internode length is genetically regulated, purportedly via the gibberellin level. Indole-3-acetic acid levels of growing stems paralleled growth rates in all lines, and were high in all three slender genotypes. Growth was inhibited by p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, demonstrating the requirement of auxin activity for stem elongation, and also by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. It is concluded that the slender phenotype may arise from constant activation of a gibberellin receptor or transduction chain event leading directly or indirectly to elevated levels of indole-3-acetic acid, and that increased indole-3-acetic acid levels are a significant factor in the promotion of stem elongation. PMID:16667653

Law, David M.; Davies, Peter J.

1990-01-01

242

Inhibition of microbial xylitol production by acetic acid and its relation with fermentative parameters.  

PubMed

Precipitated sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing acetic acid was fermented by Candida guilliermondii FTI20037 under different operational conditions (pH 4.0 and 7.0, three aeration rates). At pH 7.0 and kLa of 10 (0.75 vvm) and 22.5/h (3.0 vvm) the acetic acid had not been consumed until the end of the fermentations, whereas at the same pH and kLa of 35/h (4.5 vvm) the acid was rapidly consumed and acetic acid inhibition was not important. On the other hand, fermentations at an initial pH of 4.0 and kLa of 22.5 and 35/h required less time for the acid uptake than fermentations at kLa of 10/h. The acetic acid assimilation by the yeast indicates the ability of this strain to ferment in partially detoxified medium, making possible the utilization of the sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate in this bio-process. The effects on xylitol yield and production are reported. PMID:10849838

Morita, T A; Silva, S S

2000-01-01

243

Ferric hydroxide and ferric hydroxysulfate precipitation by bacteria in an acid mine drainage lagoon  

E-print Network

Ferric hydroxide and ferric hydroxysulfate precipitation by bacteria in an acid mine drainage communities growing in an acid mine drainage lagoon sediment has confirmed that microorganisms were also: Ferrihydrite; Ferric hydroxysulfate; Bacteria; Biomineralization; Acid mine drainage Contents 1. Introduction

Konhauser, Kurt

244

Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 ?M-10 mM) was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

Tan, Y.; Lim, Y. B.; Altieri, K. E.; Seitzinger, S. P.; Turpin, B. J.

2012-01-01

245

Bidentate Structures of Acetic Acid on Ge(100): The Role of Carboxyl Oxygen Eunkyung Hwang,, Do Hwan Kim,,, Yun Jeong Hwang, Ansoon Kim,  

E-print Network

Bidentate Structures of Acetic Acid on Ge(100): The Role of Carboxyl Oxygen Eunkyung Hwang,,§ Do structures of acetic acid on the Ge(100) surface at room temperature have been investigated by using both of acetic acid to acetate on the Ge(100) surface occurs through dissociation of the O-H bond

Kim, Sehun

246

Isolation and partial characterization of bacteria in an anaerobic consortium that mineralizes 3-chlorobenzoic acid  

SciTech Connect

A methanogenic consortium able to use 3-chlorobenzoic acid as its sole energy and carbon source was enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge. Seven bacteria were isolated from the consortium in mono- or coculture. They included: one dechlorinating bacterium, one benzoate-oxidizing bacterium, two butyrate-oxidizing bacteria, two H/sub 2/-consuming methanogens (methanospirillum hungatei PM-1 and Methanobacterium sp. strain PM-2), and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp.). The dechlorinating bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe with a unique collar surrounding the cell. A medium containing rumen fluid supported minimal growth; pyruvate was the only substrate found to increase growth. The bacterium had a generation time of 4 to 5 days. 3-Chlorobenzoate was dechlorinated stoichiometrically to benzoate, which accumulated in the medium; the rate of dechlorination was ca. 0.1 pmol bacterium/sup -1/ day/sup -1/. The benzoate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe and could only be grown as a syntroph. Benzoate was the only substrate observed to support growth, and, when grown in coculture with M. hungatei, it was fermented to acetate and CH/sub 4/. One butyrate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, non-sporeforming, obligate anaerobe; the other was a gram-positive, sporeforming, obligate anaerobe. Both could only be grown as syntrophs. The substrates observed to support growth of both bacteria were butyrate, 2-DL-methylbutyrate, valerate, and caproate; isobutyrate supported growth of only the sporeforming bacterium. Fermentation products were acetate and CH/sub 4/ or acetate, propionate, and CH/sub 4/ when grown in coculture with M. hungatei. A mutualism among at least the dechlorinating, benzoate-oxidizing, and methane-forming members was apparently required for utilization of the 3-chlorobenzoate substrate. 21 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Shelton, D.R.; Tiedje, J.M.

1984-10-01

247

Isolation and Partial Characterization of Bacteria in an Anaerobic Consortium That Mineralizes 3-Chlorobenzoic Acid †  

PubMed Central

A methanogenic consortium able to use 3-chlorobenzoic acid as its sole energy and carbon source was enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge. Seven bacteria were isolated from the consortium in mono- or coculture. They included: one dechlorinating bacterium (strain DCB-1), one benzoate-oxidizing bacterium (strain BZ-2), two butyrate-oxidizing bacteria (strains SF-1 and NSF-2), two H2-consuming methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei PM-1 and Methanobacterium sp. strain PM-2), and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp. strain PS-1). The dechlorinating bacterium (DCB-1) was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe with a unique “collar” surrounding the cell. A medium containing rumen fluid supported minimal growth; pyruvate was the only substrate found to increase growth. The bacterium had a generation time of 4 to 5 days. 3-Chlorobenzoate was dechlorinated stoichiometrically to benzoate, which accumulated in the medium; the rate of dechlorination was ca. 0.1 pmol bacterium?1 day?1. The benzoate-oxidizing bacterium (BZ-2) was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe and could only be grown as a syntroph. Benzoate was the only substrate observed to support growth, and, when grown in coculture with M. hungatei, it was fermented to acetate and CH4. One butyrate-oxidizing bacterium (NSF-2) was a gram-negative, non-sporeforming, obligate anaerobe; the other (SF-1) was a gram-positive, sporeforming, obligate anaerobe. Both could only be grown as syntrophs. The substrates observed to support growth of both bacteria were butyrate, 2-dl-methylbutyrate, valerate, and caproate; isobutyrate supported growth of only the sporeforming bacterium (SF-1). Fermentation products were acetate and CH4 (from butyrate, isobutyrate, or caproate) or acetate, propionate, and CH4 (from 2-dl-methylbutyrate or valerate) when grown in coculture with M. hungatei. A mutualism among at least the dechlorinating, benzoate-oxidizing, and methane-forming members was apparently required for utilization of the 3-chlorobenzoate substrate. Images PMID:16346648

Shelton, Daniel R.; Tiedje, James M.

1984-01-01

248

Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil 1. Dry season  

SciTech Connect

We have determined the atmospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase, in aerosols, and in rain during the dry season (July--August 1985) in the Amazonia region of Brazil. At ground level the average concentrations of gas phase formic and acetic acid were 1.6 +- 0.6 and 2.2 +- 1.0 ppb, respectively. The diurnal behavior of both acids at ground level and their vertical distribution in the forest canopy point to the existence of vegetative sources as well as to production by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Dry deposition of the gaseous acids appears to be a major sink. The concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than concentrations of the corresponding species in the atmospheric aerosol. About 50--60%/sub 0/ of the aerosol (total) formate and acetate were in the size fraction below 1.0 ..mu..m diameter.

Andreae, M.O.; Talbot, R.W.; Andreae, T.W.; Harriss, R.C.

1988-02-20

249

Influence of 5-Methyltryptophan-Resistant Bradyrhizobium japonicum on Soybean Root Nodule Indole-3-Acetic Acid Content †  

PubMed Central

Bradyrhizobium japonicum mutants resistant to 5-methyltryptophan were isolated. Some of these mutants were found to accumulate indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and tryptophan in culture. In greenhouse studies, nodules from control plants inoculated with wild-type bradyrhizobia contained 0.04, 0.10, and 0.58 ?g of free, ester-linked, and peptidyl IAA g (fresh weight) of nodules?1, respectively. Nodules from plants inoculated with 5-methyltryptophan-resistant bradyrhizobia contained 0.94, 1.30, and 10.6 ?g of free, ester-linked, and peptidyl IAA g (fresh weight) of nodules?1, respectively. This manyfold increase in nodule IAA content indicates that the Bradyrhizobium inoculum can have a considerable influence on the endogenous IAA level of the nodule. Further, these data imply that much of the IAA that accumulated in the high-IAA-containing nodules was of bacterial rather than plant origin. These high-IAA-producing 5-methyltryptophan-resistant bacteria were poor symbiotic nitrogen fixers. Plants inoculated with these bacteria had a lower nodule mass and fixed less nitrogen per gram of nodule than did plants inoculated with wild-type bacteria. PMID:16347335

Hunter, William J.

1987-01-01

250

Effect of different concentrations of acetic, citric, and propionic acid dipping solutions on bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin.  

PubMed

Bacterial contamination of raw, processed poultry may include spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens. We evaluated different combinations of organic acid (OA) wash solutions for their ability to reduce bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin and to inhibit growth of spoilage bacteria and pathogens on skin during refrigerated storage. In experiment 1, raw chicken skin samples were dipped into a suspension of either 10(8) cfu/mL of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, or Listeria monocytogenes for 30 s and then immersed in PBS or an OA wash solution mixture of 0.8% citric, 0.8% acetic, and 0.8% propionic acid (at equal wt/vol concentrations) for an additional 30 s. In experiment 2, three different concentrations of the OA wash solution (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6% at equal wt/vol concentrations) were tested against chicken skin samples contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. Viable pathogenic bacteria on each skin sample were enumerated after 1 and 24 h of storage at 4°C in both experiments. In experiment 3, skin samples were initially treated on d 1 with PBS or 2 concentrations of the OA mixture (0.4 and 0.8%), and total aerobic bacteria were enumerated during a 2-wk storage period. In all experiments, significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed when skin samples were treated with the OA wash solution and no spoilage organisms were recovered at any given time point, whereas increasing log10 numbers of spoilage organisms were recovered over time in PBS-treated skin samples. These results suggest that 0.2 to 0.8% concentrations of an equal-percentage mixture of this OA combination may reduce pathogens and spoilage organisms and improve food safety properties of raw poultry. PMID:23873572

Menconi, A; Shivaramaiah, S; Huff, G R; Prado, O; Morales, J E; Pumford, N R; Morgan, M; Wolfenden, A; Bielke, L R; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

2013-08-01

251

Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.  

PubMed

Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used. PMID:16842908

Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

2006-12-01

252

Taxonomy and physiology of probiotic lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current taxonomy of probiotic lactic acid bacteria is reviewed with special focus on the genera Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Enterococcus. The physiology and taxonomic position of species and strains of these genera were investigated by phenotypic and genomic methods. In total, 176 strains, including the type strains, have been included. Phenotypic methods applied were based on biochemical, enzymatical and physiological

Günter Klein; Alexander Pack; Christine Bonaparte; Gerhard Reuter

1998-01-01

253

Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus

D. W. Schafner; R. L. Beuchat

1986-01-01

254

Polyphasic characterization of the lactic acid bacteria in kefir  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lactic acid bacteria of kefir were isolated and characterized using phenotypical, biochemical, and genotypical methods. Polyphasic analyses of results permitted the identification of the microflora to the strain level. The genus Lactobacillus was represented by the species Lb. kefir and Lb. kefiranofaciens. Both subspecies of Lactococcus lactis (lactis and cremoris) were isolated. Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris was also found.The

Isabelle Mainville; Normand Robert; Byong Lee; Edward R. Farnworth

2006-01-01

255

GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF CD-1 DAY-8 EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLORO ACETIC ACID  

EPA Science Inventory

Gene expression patterns of CD-1 day-8 embryo cultures exposed to bromochloro acetic acid Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III* ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductiv...

256

Detection of Acetic Acid in wine by means of an electronic nose  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A portable electronic nose (see Fig.1) based on metal oxide semiconductor thin-film sensors has been developed to detect acetic acid present in four types of wines. The wines analyzed are from the same cellar but are made with different varieties of grapes. Data analysis was performed by two pattern recognition methods: principal component analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN).

Lozano, Jesús; Álvarez, Fernando; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, Carmen

2011-09-01

257

Cervical cancer screening using visual inspection with acetic acid: operational experiences from Ghana and Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thailand in 2000 and Ghana in 2001 initiated cervical cancer prevention programmes using a single-visit approach with visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) with cryotherapy for pre-cancerous lesions. This service was integrated into existing reproductive health services, provided by trained nurses. The providers maintained a high level of competence and performance, including after the withdrawal of external funding. In Ghana,

Harshad Sanghvi; Khunying Kobchitt Limpaphayom; Marya Plotkin; Elaine Charurat; Amy Kleine; Enriquito Lu; Wachara Eamratsameekool; Buncha Palanuwong

2008-01-01

258

Corticosteroid Pretreatment Prevents Small Intestinal Mucosal Lesion Induced by Acetic Acid-Perfusion Model in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the important problems in experimentally induced small intestinal lesions is that there is no reproducible model of diffuse and stable mucosal lesion. In this paper, we studied in detail the effects of continuous perfusion of various concentrations of acetic acid on the rat small intestinal mucosa. In order to evaluate its applicability for screening of the preventive effect

Ivan Pacheco; Michiro Otaka; Mario Jin; Hideaki Sasahara; Akira Iwabuchi; Masaru Odashima; Noriaki Konishi; Isao Wada; Osamu Masamune; Sumio Watanabe

2000-01-01

259

Review of Croatian guidelines for use of eicosapentaenoic acid and megestrol acetate in cancer cachexia syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2007, Croatian guidelines were developed for the use of eicosapentaenoic acid and megestrol acetate in cancer cachexia syndrome. These guidelines were first published in the Croatian medical journal Lijecnicki vjesnik (Krznaric et al. Lijec Vjesn 2007; 129: 381-6) in Croatian. After nu- merous contacts and discussions with colleagues from the international medical community, we decid- ed to present our

Z. KRZNARIC; A. JURETIC; D. ANZULOVIC

260

A shaking bioreactor equipped with twin ceramic membranes for acetic acid production using Acetobacter pasteurianus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A shaking bioreactor system with twin internal ceramic membranes was developed for effective perfusion culture and applied to the continuous production of acetic acid using Acetobacter pasteurianus. The system makes it possible to carry out the back-washing of the membrane without stopping the continuous operation because one membrane can be washed by medium feed flow while another membrane provides filtration

J. Horiuchi; M. Narumi; K. Tada; M. Kobayashi; T. Kanno; T. Suzuki

2002-01-01

261

Acidic ionic liquid as "quasi-homogeneous" catalyst for controllable synthesis of cellulose acetate.  

PubMed

In this paper, we demonstrated that acidic ionic liquids (ILs) can be used as "quasi-homogeneous" catalysts for the efficient acetylation of cellulose. Unlike existing techniques that use large amount of ILs as solvent to dissolve and acetylate cellulose, a small amount of acidic ILs was used as catalyst in this study to overcome the low efficiency associated with relatively high viscosity and costs of ILs during homogeneous acetylation. Fully substituted cellulose acetate with a conversion of 88.8% was obtained by using only 9mol% IL 1-vinyl-3-(3-sulfopropyl) imidazolium hydrogen sulfate as catalyst, which is much higher than that of common commercialized solid acid catalysts. The degree of substitution and solubility of the obtained cellulose acetate can be facilely controlled by varying the concentration of ILs and reaction time. The dual function of swelling and catalyzing of acidic ILs for the acetylation of cellulose is responsible for the excellent catalytic performance. PMID:25256462

Tian, Dong; Han, Yangyang; Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Yuan, Guiping

2014-11-26

262

Uptake kinetics of acetic acid and acetone on ice surfaces at 190 - 223 K  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heterogeneous reactions of oxygenated organics may influence the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere with a direct impact on the tropospheric ozone budget. Direct trace gas measurements in the upper troposphere have revealed a high mixing ratio acetic acid (up to 1.9 ppb) and acetone (up to 3 ppb). In the present study we have examined the heterogeneous interactions of acetic acid and acetone with H2O- or D2O-ice (for acetic acid) surfaces using the coated wall flow-tube technique with the detection of gaseous species and reaction products by molecular beam QMS. The experiments were carried in a temperature range between 198 K and 223 K at total pressures ranging from routinely 1 to 5 mbar. The ice surface was prepared by flowing water vapour with nitrogen as a carrier gas through the sliding injector and moving the injector slowly until a thin uniform ice surface was formed. The adsorption-desorption equilibrium of both substances on ice surfaces were measured using initial trace gas concentration between 5 x E+11 and 2 x E+14 molecules cm-3. The calculated adsorption enthalpy was 52(±10) kJ mol-1 for acetic acid and 44(±10) kJ mol-1 for acetone as derived from Langmuir isotherms measured in a temperature range between 190 and 223 K. For desorbing acetic acid molecules we observed first order kinetics with a desorption rate constant of 6?E-2 s-1 at the lowest temperature (i.e.198 K). Using this value together with the assumption of an Arrhenius like temperature dependence for desorption (kdes=Ades exp(-EA/RT)), where Ades ˜ E+13 s-1 we obtain EA,des ˜ 60 kJ mol-1. At slightly higher temperatures (203 K, 208 K) an increasing deviation from first order kinetic behavior is observed. At the same time the desorption peak is broadening and shifted to longer residence times. To estimate the residence time, the extent of dissociation and thermodynamic data of the intermediate adsorbed acetic acid molecules we performed proton exchange experiments using a D2O-ice surface. A measured proton exchange probability for acetic acid of 0.01 at 208 K leads to the assumption of a selected orientation of the molecules which dissociate on the surface. With decreasing temperature we also observe an increasing time shift (?) between the adsorption and desorption signal. At 208 K we measured ? = 3 s. The observed temperature dependence of time shifts corresponds to an activation energy for desorption of 56(±10) kJ mol-1, in good agreement with direct desorption measurements.

Terziyski, A.; Behr, P.; Scharfenort, U.; Demiral, K.; Zellner, R.

2003-04-01

263

REACTIONS OF SAMARIUM IONS WITH ETHYLENEDIAMINETETRA ACETIC ACID  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specific electric conductivity and electromotive forces of isomolar ; serles and series with constant concentrations of samarium were measured in SmCl--; NaâHâY--HâO, SmClâNaâHY--HâO, and Sm(NOâ; )â--NaY--HâO systems. It was found that in acid media the solution ; forms an H (SmY) which dissociates into H\\/sup +\\/ and STASmY!⁻. In alkali ; media a complex anion STASmY!⁻ is formed. The constant

I. V. Tananaev; G. V. Shevchenko

1961-01-01

264

Energetics of Sheep Concerned with the Utilization of Acetic Acid1'2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficiency of utilization for growth-fattening, of the energy of diets resulting in high (5.4:1) and low (3.1:1) ratios of acetic acid to propionic acid in the ruminai ingesta was determined in 24 intact male and 24 female sheep by means of a slaughter-analysis experiment. To establish the chemical composition and energy value of the body at the beginning of

L. S. BULL; J. T. REID; E. JOHNSON

2010-01-01

265

Kinetic and safety assessment for salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid system.  

PubMed

The nitration process of salicylic acid for the production of the important intermediate 5-nitrosalicylic acid is studied from thermokinetic and safety points of view. Investigations carried out by considering, as process deviations, the loss of the thermal control point out the possibility of runaway phenomena due to the occurrence of polynitration reactions. Isothermal experiments are carried out in various conditions to assess the involved reaction network and reaction kinetics. PMID:16343755

Andreozzi, R; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

2006-06-30

266

The efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal from real wastewater affected by different ratios of acetic to propionic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of different ratios of propionic to acetic acid on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from real wastewater supplemented with volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was investigated. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were used to acclimate two types (SBR1 and SBR2) of biomass. They were cultured and studied using real wastewater with an average propionic to acetic

Yinguang Chen; Andrew A. Randall; Terrence McCue

2004-01-01

267

The use of static and dynamic physical property measurements to infer structural properties of associated liquids: Acetic acid–water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anomalies which occur in most static and dynamic physical property measurements on solutions of water in acetic acid can be used with critical analysis to infer associative molecular structures. The anomalies indicate significant structural changes. Proton magnetic resonance chemical shifts for acetic acid–water solutions show a significant structural change occurring in the region of equal molar concentration. Literature values

Robert W. Sims; M. Robert Willicott III; R. R. Inners

1979-01-01

268

The use of static and dynamic physical property measurements to infer structural properties of associated liquids: Acetic acid-water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anomalies which occur in most static and dynamic physical property measurements on solutions of water in acetic acid can be used with critical analysis to infer associative molecular structures. The anomalies indicate significant structural changes. Proton magnetic resonance chemical shifts for acetic acid-water solutions show a significant structural change occurring in the region of equal molar concentration. Literature values

Robert W. Sims; M. Robert Willicott III; R. R. Inners

1979-01-01

269

Broiler chick responses to anorectic agents: dietary acetic and propionic acids and the blood metabolites.  

PubMed

The effects of dietary supplementation with acetic or propionic acid, given at a level of 3% of diets containing 2,500 or 2,750 kcal of metabolizable energy per kg, on levels of blood glucose, and on lipid, protein, and energy metabolisms were studied in female broiler chicks. Voluntary feed and energy intakes, as well as body weight gain, decreased significantly with the inclusion of the acids in either diet, in decreasing order of effect: propionate > acetate > nonsupplemented controls. The relative weight of the abdominal adipose tissue decreased significantly with the inclusion of either acid, but was unaffected by dietary energy level. In contrast, the weight of the liver was higher in birds fed the low-energy diet, but was unaffected by the anorectic agents. Inclusion of the acids increased the concentration of volatile fatty acids in the cecum and blood plasma. The rate of clearance of plasma propionate was greater than that of acetate. Anorectic agents and dietary energy density exhibited a synergistic effect on feed intake. These agents altered blood metabolites involved in lipid and energy metabolisms, but not in that of protein. Plasma metabolites and enzymes, particularly beta-hydroxybutyrate and alkaline phosphatase, reflected the degree of feed restriction, supporting the hypothesis that the hypophagic effect of these acids is due to metabolic intervention. PMID:7625770

Pinchasov, Y; Elmaliah, S

1995-01-01

270

Sulfate Reducing Rate of SRB with Acetic, Propionic, n-Butyric Acids as Carbon Sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this work was to determine the kind of short-chain volatile fatty acid, which is apt to be used by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB was feed with culture media used sodium lactate as carbon source. Sulfate reducing rate and different short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA) utilization rate with SRB were studied. Sulfate variation curves were drawn and

Xiulan Song; Zhimin Zhang

2011-01-01

271

The effect of marination on lactic acid bacteria communities in raw broiler fillet strips  

PubMed Central

Marination with marinade containing salt, sugar, and acetic acid is commonly used in Finland to enhance the value of raw broiler meat. In this study, we investigated the effect of marination, marinade components and storage time on composition of bacterial communities in modified atmosphere-packaged (MAP) broiler fillet strips. The communities were characterized using two culture-independent methods: 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. In unmarinated broiler fillet strips, Lactococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. predominated at the early storage phase but were partially replaced by Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. when the chilled storage time was extended. In the marinated fillet strips, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. predominated independent from the storage time. By mixing the different marinade components with broiler meat, we showed that marination changed the community composition and favored Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. by the combined effect of carbohydrates and acetic acid in marinade. Marination increased the maximum level of lactic acid bacteria in broiler meat and enhanced CO2 production and acidification of meat during the chilled storage. Accumulation of CO2 in package head-space due to the enhanced growth of Leuconostoc spp. in marinated meat may lead to bulging of packages, which is a spoilage defect frequently associated with marinated and MAP raw broiler preparations in Finland. PMID:23087685

Nieminen, T. T.; Valitalo, H.; Sade, E.; Paloranta, A.; Koskinen, K.; Bjorkroth, J.

2012-01-01

272

The effect of marination on lactic acid bacteria communities in raw broiler fillet strips.  

PubMed

Marination with marinade containing salt, sugar, and acetic acid is commonly used in Finland to enhance the value of raw broiler meat. In this study, we investigated the effect of marination, marinade components and storage time on composition of bacterial communities in modified atmosphere-packaged (MAP) broiler fillet strips. The communities were characterized using two culture-independent methods: 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. In unmarinated broiler fillet strips, Lactococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. predominated at the early storage phase but were partially replaced by Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. when the chilled storage time was extended. In the marinated fillet strips, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. predominated independent from the storage time. By mixing the different marinade components with broiler meat, we showed that marination changed the community composition and favored Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. by the combined effect of carbohydrates and acetic acid in marinade. Marination increased the maximum level of lactic acid bacteria in broiler meat and enhanced CO(2) production and acidification of meat during the chilled storage. Accumulation of CO(2) in package head-space due to the enhanced growth of Leuconostoc spp. in marinated meat may lead to bulging of packages, which is a spoilage defect frequently associated with marinated and MAP raw broiler preparations in Finland. PMID:23087685

Nieminen, T T; Välitalo, H; Säde, E; Paloranta, A; Koskinen, K; Björkroth, J

2012-01-01

273

Occurrence of Crithidia Factors and Folic Acid in Various Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Crithidia factors and folic acid were found to be widely distributed in culture fluids and in cells of 27 species of bacteria, when cultured under aerobic conditions into the stationary phase. Most bacteria excreted more Crithidia factors and folic acid than they retained in their cells. One Crithidia factor produced by Serratia indica and one produced by Bacillus cereus differed from biopterin in their chromatographic behavior. The factor excreted by S. indica appeared to be a 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-substituted pteridine on the basis of KMnO4 oxidation and ultraviolet absorption spectra. One of the folate compounds excreted by this organism was shown to be identical to 5,10-methylidynetetrahydrofolic acid by bioautography. PMID:5473887

Iwai, K.; Kobashi, M.; Fujisawa, H.

1970-01-01

274

Firmness and cell wall characteristics of pasteurized jalapeno pepper rings affected by acetic acid, calcium chloride and preheating  

E-print Network

pasteurization and storage, especially when high acid brines are used. Development of treatments to retard softening may result in a higher quality product. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCI2), acetic acid...

Burma, Prashanthi V

2012-06-07

275

STABILITY OF MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED PDMS MEMBRANES DURING PERVAPORATIVE ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES CONTAINING ACETIC ACID  

EPA Science Inventory

Pervaporation is a potential process for recovering bioethanol produced from biomass fermentation. Fermentation broths contain ethanol, water, and a variety of other compounds, often including carboxylic acids. The effects of acetic acid on long-term pervaporation of aqueous et...

276

Surface Binding of Aflatoxin B1 by Lactic Acid Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Specific lactic acid bacterial strains remove toxins from liquid media by physical binding. The stability of the aflatoxin B1 complexes formed with 12 bacterial strains in both viable and nonviable (heat- or acid-treated) forms was assessed by repetitive aqueous extraction. By the fifth extraction, up to 71% of the total aflatoxin B1 remained bound. Nonviable bacteria retained the highest amount of aflatoxin B1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (ATCC 53103) and L. rhamnosus strain LC-705 (DSM 7061) removed aflatoxin B1 from solution most efficiently and were selected for further study. The accessibility of bound aflatoxin B1 to an antibody in an indirect competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay suggests that surface components of these bacteria are involved in binding. Further evidence is the recovery of around 90% of the bound aflatoxin from the bacteria by solvent extraction. Autoclaving and sonication did not release any detectable aflatoxin B1. Variation in temperature (4 to 37°C) and pH (2 to 10) did not have any significant effect on the amount of aflatoxin B1 released. Binding of aflatoxin B1 appears to be predominantly extracellular for viable and heat-treated bacteria. Acid treatment may permit intracellular binding. In all cases, binding is of a reversible nature, but the stability of the complexes formed depends on strain, treatment, and environmental conditions. PMID:11425726

Haskard, Carolyn A.; El-Nezami, Hani S.; Kankaanpää, Pasi E.; Salminen, Seppo; Ahokas, Jorma T.

2001-01-01

277

A nitrilo-tri-acetic-acid/acetic acid route for the deposition of epitaxial cerium oxide films as high temperature superconductor buffer layers  

SciTech Connect

A water based cerium oxide precursor solution using nitrilo-tri-acetic-acid (NTA) and acetic acid as complexing agents is described in detail. This precursor solution is used for the deposition of epitaxial CeO{sub 2} layers on Ni-5at%W substrates by dip-coating. The influence of the complexation behavior on the formation of transparent, homogeneous solutions and gels has been studied. It is found that ethylenediamine plays an important role in the gelification. The growth conditions for cerium oxide films were Ar-5% gas processing atmosphere, a solution concentration level of 0.25 M, a dwell time of 60 min at 900 {sup o}C and 5-30 min at 1050 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), pole figures and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize the CeO{sub 2} films with different thicknesses. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) was used to determine the carbon residue level in the surface of the cerium oxide film, which was found to be lower than 0.01%. Textured films with a thickness of 50 nm were obtained. - Graphical abstract: Study of the complexation and hydrolysis behavior of Ce{sup 4+} ions in the presence of nitrilo-tri-acetic acid and the subsequent development of an aqueous chemical solution deposition route suited for the processing of textured CeO{sub 2} buffer layers on Ni-W tapes.

Thuy, T.T.; Lommens, P.; Narayanan, V.; Van de Velde, N.; De Buysser, K.; Herman, G.G.; Cloet, V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 - S3, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Driessche, I., E-mail: Isabel.Vandriessche@UGent.b [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 - S3, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

2010-09-15

278

Isolating and evaluating lactic acid bacteria strains for effectiveness of Leymus chinensis silage fermentation.  

PubMed

Five LAB strains were evaluated using the acid production ability test, morphological observation, Gram staining, physiological, biochemical and acid tolerance tests. All five strains (LP1, LP2, LP3, LC1 and LC2) grew at pH 4·0, and LP1 grew at 15°C. Strains LP1, LP2 and LP3 were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, whereas LC1 and LC2 were classified as Lactobacillus casei by sequencing 16S rDNA. The five isolated strains and two commercial inoculants (PS and CL) were added to native grass and Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel. for ensiling. All five isolated strains decreased the pH and ammonia nitrogen content, increased the lactic acid content and LP1, LP2 and LP3 increased the acetic content and lactic/acetic acid ratio of L. chinensis silage significantly. The five isolated strains and two commercial inoculants decreased the butyric acid content of the native grass silage. LP2 treatment had lower butyric acid content and ammonia nitrogen content than the other treatments. The five isolated strains improved the quality of L. chinensis silage. The five isolated strains and the two commercial inoculants were not effective in improving the fermentation quality of the native grass silage, but LP2 performed better comparatively. Significance and impact of the study: Leymus chinensis is an important grass in China and Russia, being the primary grass of the short grassland 'steppe' regions of central Asia. However, it has been difficult to make high-quality silage of this species because of low concentration of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC). Isolating and evaluating lactic acid bacteria strains will be helpful for improving the silage quality of this extensively grown species. PMID:24888497

Zhang, Q; Li, X J; Zhao, M M; Yu, Z

2014-10-01

279

Acetic Acid Recovery from Fast Pyrolysis Oil. An Exploratory Study on Liquid-Liquid Reactive Extraction using Aliphatic Tertiary Amines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2–10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of acetic acid using long-chain tertiary amines in a batch set-up. Factors affecting the

F. H. Mahfud; F. P. van Geel; R. H. Venderbosch; H. J. Heeres

2008-01-01

280

In vaginal fluid, bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis can be suppressed with lactic acid but not hydrogen peroxide  

PubMed Central

Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by vaginal lactobacilli is generally believed to protect against bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), and strains of lactobacilli that can produce H2O2 are being developed as vaginal probiotics. However, evidence that led to this belief was based in part on non-physiological conditions, antioxidant-free aerobic conditions selected to maximize both production and microbicidal activity of H2O2. Here we used conditions more like those in vivo to compare the effects of physiologically plausible concentrations of H2O2 and lactic acid on a broad range of BV-associated bacteria and vaginal lactobacilli. Methods Anaerobic cultures of seventeen species of BV-associated bacteria and four species of vaginal lactobacilli were exposed to H2O2, lactic acid, or acetic acid at pH 7.0 and pH 4.5. After two hours, the remaining viable bacteria were enumerated by growth on agar media plates. The effect of vaginal fluid (VF) on the microbicidal activities of H2O2 and lactic acid was also measured. Results Physiological concentrations of H2O2 (< 100 ?M) failed to inactivate any of the BV-associated bacteria tested, even in the presence of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) that increases the microbicidal activity of H2O2. At 10 mM, H2O2 inactivated all four species of vaginal lactobacilli but only one of seventeen species of BV-associated bacteria. Moreover, the addition of just 1% vaginal fluid (VF) blocked the microbicidal activity of 1 M H2O2. In contrast, lactic acid at physiological concentrations (55-111 mM) and pH (4.5) inactivated all the BV-associated bacteria tested, and had no detectable effect on the vaginal lactobacilli. Also, the addition of 10% VF did not block the microbicidal activity of lactic acid. Conclusions Under optimal, anaerobic growth conditions, physiological concentrations of lactic acid inactivated BV-associated bacteria without affecting vaginal lactobacilli, whereas physiological concentrations of H2O2 produced no detectable inactivation of either BV-associated bacteria or vaginal lactobacilli. Moreover, at very high concentrations, H2O2 was more toxic to vaginal lactobacilli than to BV-associated bacteria. On the basis of these in vitro observations, we conclude that lactic acid, not H2O2, is likely to suppress BV-associated bacteria in vivo. PMID:21771337

2011-01-01

281

Extraction and sorption of acetic acid at pH above pK{sub a} to form calcium magnesium acetate  

SciTech Connect

The use of rock salt for deicing roads has many negative effects on automobiles, highway systems, and the environment. Calcium magnesium acetate, hence-forth denoted CMA, has been identified as a more desirable, environmentally benign solid deicer for high-ways, airport runaways, and similar applications. CMA is also of interest as an additive for scavenging sulfur in combustion processes so as to reduce emissions of sulfur oxides and as a catalyst for coal gasification. Different extractants (trioctylphosphine oxide and secondary, tertiary, and quaternary amines) and solid sorbents (tertiary and quaternary amines) were investigated as agents for recovery of acetic acid as part of a process for production of CMA from fermentation acetic acid. The pH and temperature dependencies for uptake of acetic acid by these extractants and sorbents were measured, along with the degrees of regeneration by aqueous suspensions of slaked dolomitic lime. These results enable identification of agents having optimal basicity. Among the extractants, the secondary amine Amberlite LA-2 gave the best combined performance for extraction and regeneration. Among the sorbents, a tertiary amine, Amberlite IRA-35, gave the best performance. Trioctylphosphine oxide does not maintain capacity in the pH range (about 6) most attractive for acetic acid fermentation. Slurred crushed dolomite is not sufficiently basic to accomplish regeneration.

Reisinger, H.; King, C.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-03-01

282

Increases in jasmonic acid caused by indole-3-acetic acid and auxin herbicides in cleavers (Galium aparine).  

PubMed

The effects of indole-3-acetic acid and auxin herbicides on endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were studied in relation to changes in ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) levels in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root-treated with increasing concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), ethylene biosynthesis was stimulated in response to the accumulation of endogenous IAA in the shoot tissue. Within 25h of treatment, stimulated ethylene formation was accompanied by increases in immunoreactive concentrations of JA and ABA, which reached maxima of 4.5-fold and 26-fold of the control, respectively, at 100 microM of applied IAA. Corresponding effects were obtained using synthetic auxins and when the ethylene-releasing compound ethephon was applied exogenously. This represents the first report, to our knowledge, of an auxin-mediated increase in JA levels. The increase in JA may be triggered by ethylene. PMID:15310070

Grossmann, Klaus; Rosenthal, Cindy; Kwiatkowski, Jacek

2004-07-01

283

Kinetics and energetics of hydrogen bond dissociation in isolated acetic acid- d 1 and - d 4 and trifluoroactic acid dimers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantitative determination of the rate constant, activation energy, entropy, and enthalpy of dissociation of hydrogen bonds in deuterated acetic acid-d1, -d4, and trifluoroacetic acid dimers in the gas phase was performed by resonant CO2 laser photoacoustic spectroscopy. Within the experimental error, the kinetics and energetics of hydrogen bond dissociation were found to be independent of deuterium substitution of the

H. Sauren; A. Winkler; P. Hess

1995-01-01

284

Developmental Regulation of Indole-3-Acetic Acid Turnover in Scots Pine Seedlings1  

PubMed Central

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) homeostasis was investigated during seed germination and early seedling growth in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). IAA-ester conjugates were initially hydrolyzed in the seed to yield a peak of free IAA prior to initiation of root elongation. Developmental regulation of IAA synthesis was observed, with tryptophan-dependent synthesis being initiated around 4 d and tryptophan-independent synthesis occurring around 7 d after imbibition. Induction of catabolism to yield 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid and irreversible conjugation to indole-3-acetyl-N-aspartic acid was noticed at the same time as de novo synthesis was first detected. As a part of the homeostatic regulation IAA was further metabolized to two new conjugates: glucopyranosyl-1-N-indole-3-acetyl-N-aspartic acid and glucopyranosyl-1-N-indole-3-acetic acid. The initial supply of IAA thus originates from stored pools of IAA-ester conjugates, mainly localized in the embryo itself rather than in the general nutrient storage tissue, the megagametophyte. We have found that de novo synthesis is first induced when the stored pool of conjugated IAA is used up and additional hormone is needed for elongation growth. It is interesting that when de novo synthesis is induced, a distinct induction of catabolic events occurs, indicating that the seedling needs mechanisms to balance synthesis rates for the homeostatic regulation of the IAA pool. PMID:11154354

Ljung, Karin; Ostin, Anders; Lioussanne, Laetitia; Sandberg, Goran

2001-01-01

285

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Progress report, May 15, 1989--May 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH{sub 4}. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

Zinder, S.H.

1993-06-01

286

The potential of dairy lactic acid bacteria to metabolise amino acids via non-transaminating reactions and endogenous transamination.  

PubMed

The metabolism of amino acids by 22 starter and 49 non-starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was studied in a system consisting of amino acids and non-growing cells without added amino acceptors such as alpha-ketoglutarate. There were significant inter- and intra-species differences in the metabolism of amino acids. Some amino acids such as alanine, arginine, aspartate, serine and branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) were utilised, whereas other amino acids such as glycine, ornithine and citrulline were produced. Alanine and aspartate were utilised by some LAB and accumulated during the incubation of other LAB. Arginine was degraded not only by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (the lactococcal subspecies known to catabolise arginine), but also by pediococci, heterofermentative lactobacilli (Lactobacillus brevis and Lb. fermentum) and some unidentified homofermentative lactobacilli. Serine was utilised predominantly by homofermentative Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei, Lb. rhamnosus and Lb. plantarum. Of the LAB studied, Lb. brevis and Lb. fermentum were the most metabolically active, utilising alanine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and branched-chain amino acids. Leuconostocs were the least metabolically active, showing little potential to metabolise amino acids. The formation of ammonia and acetate from amino acid metabolism varied both between species and between strains within species. These findings suggest that the potential of LAB for amino acid metabolism via non-transaminating reactions and endogenous transamination will impact both on the physiology of LAB and on cheese ripening, especially when transamination is rate-limiting in the absence of an exogenous amino acceptor such as alpha-ketoglutarate. PMID:12915037

Liu, S-Q; Holland, R; Crow, V L

2003-09-15

287

Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria  

PubMed Central

The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

2014-01-01

288

Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Acetate-Utilizing Methanogenic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect

Methane biosynthesis by the Methanosarcina species, in contrast to other methanogens, occurs from the full range of methanogenic substrates that include acetate, methanol, tri-methyl, di-methyl, and methyl-amine, methyl-sulfides, and in limited instances, H2/CO2. The Methanosarcina are also versatile in their ability to adapt and grow in habitats of varying osmolarity ranging from fresh water environments, marine environments, and to hyper saline environments (ca to 1.2 M NaCl). To facilitate studies that address the biochemistry, molecular biology and physiology of these organisms, we have constructed a whole-genome microarray to identify classes of differentially expressed genes in M. mazei strain Goe1. We propose to further identify and examine how genes and their proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of osmolytes in the cell are regulated. These compounds include N-epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, alpha-glutamate, betaine, and potassium whose levels within the cell are modulated in order to provide appropriate osmotic balance. We will identify differentially expressed genes involved in hydrogen and carbon dioxide sequestration since M. mazei strain Goe1 is currently the only practical model for such study. Finally, we will explore the essential roles of two metals, molybdate and tungstate, in methanogen regulation and metabolism of these environmentally essential organsims. The above studies will advance our general understanding of how methanogens respond to their environmental signals, and adapt by adjusting their physiology to thrive in changing anaerobic habitats whether natural or man-made.

Robert P. Gunsalus

2003-07-21

289

Regulation of Acetate Kinase Isozymes and Its Importance for Mixed-Acid Fermentation in Lactococcus lactis  

PubMed Central

Acetate kinase (ACK) converts acetyl phosphate to acetate along with the generation of ATP in the pathway for mixed-acid fermentation in Lactococcus lactis. The reverse reaction yields acetyl phosphate for assimilation purposes. Remarkably, L. lactis has two ACK isozymes, and the corresponding genes are present in an operon. We purified both enzymes (AckA1 and AckA2) from L. lactis MG1363 and determined their oligomeric state, specific activities, and allosteric regulation. Both proteins form homodimeric complexes, as shown by size exclusion chromatography and static light-scattering measurements. The turnover number of AckA1 is about an order of magnitude higher than that of AckA2 for the reaction in either direction. The Km values for acetyl phosphate, ATP, and ADP are similar for both enzymes. However, AckA2 has a higher affinity for acetate than does AckA1, suggesting an important role under acetate-limiting conditions despite the lower activity. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and phospho-enol-pyruvate inhibit the activities of AckA1 and AckA2 to different extents. The allosteric regulation of AckA1 and AckA2 and the pool sizes of the glycolytic intermediates are consistent with a switch from homolactic to mixed-acid fermentation upon slowing of the growth rate. PMID:24464460

Puri, Pranav; Goel, Anisha; Bochynska, Agnieszka

2014-01-01

290

Dynamics of three organic acids (malic, acetic and succinic acid) in sunflower exposed to cadmium and lead.  

PubMed

Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) has been considered as a good candidate for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In the present study, sunflower was used to enrich the cadmium and lead in sand culture during 90 days. Biomass, Cd and Pb uptake, three organic acids and pH in cultures were investigated. Results showed that the existence of Cd and Pb showed different interactions on the organic acids exudation. In single Cd treatments, malic and acetic acids in Cd10 showed an incremental tendency with time. In the mixed treatments of Cd and Pb, malic acids increased when 10 and 40 mg x L(-1) Cd were added into Pb50, but acetic acids in Pb50 were inhibited by Cd addition. The Cd10 supplied in Pb10 stimulated the secretion of malic and succinic acids. Moreover, the Cd or Pb uptake in sunflower showed various correlations with pH and some organic acids, which might be due to the fact that the Cd and Pb interfere with the organic acids secretion in rhizosphere of sunflower, and the changes of organic acids altered the form and bioavailability of Cd and Pb in cultures conversely. PMID:23819268

Niu, Zhixin; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

2013-01-01

291

Influence of Acidic pH on Hydrogen and Acetate Production by an Electrosynthetic Microbiome  

PubMed Central

Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (?5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at ?600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ?5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ?6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at ?765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at ?800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying ?800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (?2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate (?=?4.7 kg CO2 captured). PMID:25333313

LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.

2014-01-01

292

Decadal variations of rainwater formic and acetic acid concentrations in Wilmington, NC, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentrations of formic and acetic acid from January 2008 through March 2009 were compared to two previous studies at this location (conducted in 1987-1990 and 1996-1998) in order to quantify the extent to which temporal changes in DOC and pH can be explained by changes in these organic acids. The volume weighted 2008 formic and acetic acid concentrations (5.6 and 2.6 ?M respectively) have decreased dramatically compared with those observed during the 1996-1998 study (9.9 and 7.3 ?M) and are also lower than concentrations observed in the 1987-1990 study (7.4 and 3.6 ?M). Changes in formic and acetic acids between 1996-97 and 2008 can account for approximately 50% of the DOC change and 40% of the H + change in rainwater over this same time period. These changes are most pronounced during the growing season, which is also the tourist and high traffic season at this location. Determining causation of these changes is difficult due to multiple biogenic and anthropogenic sources. However, the ratio of formic to acetic acid has also reverted back to a value consistent with reduced vehicular emissions, possibly related to the introduction of improved emission control technology including the use of reformulated gasoline in the late 1990's. Long term monitoring of seasonal, annual, and decadal trends will be of critical importance for evaluating the effects of future changes to atmospheric inputs such as the increased use of ethanol and other alternative fuels.

Willey, Joan D.; Glinski, Donna A.; Southwell, Melissa; Long, Michael S.; Avery, G. Brooks, Jr.; Kieber, Robert J.

2011-02-01

293

Method for the preparation of stabile microencapsulated lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A method to produce viable and stabile dry microorganisms for food and agricultural purposes was developed. Spray-dried, freeze-dried or liquid culture concentrates of lactic acid-producing bacteria were mixed with various bulking agents to form a homogeneous wet granulation having a water content of 35–60% (w\\/w). The wet granulation was extruded through a dye onto a spinning plate (350–500 rpm)

H. S. Kim; B. J. Kamara; I. C. Good; G. L. Enders

1988-01-01

294

Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quorum sensing in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involves peptides that are directly sensed by membrane-located histidine kinases, after which the signal is transmitted to an intracellular response regulator. This regulator in turn activates transcription of target genes, that commonly include the structural gene for the inducer molecule. The two-component signal-transduction machinery has proven to be indispensable for transcription activation and

Oscar P. Kuipers; Michiel Kleerebezem; Willem M. de Vos

1998-01-01

295

Identification of lactic acid bacteria and yeast from boza  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boza is a low-alcohol beverage produced from the fermentation of barley, oats, millet, maize, wheat or rice. The number of lactic acid bacteria isolated from three boza samples ranged from 9×106 to 5×107CFU\\/mL. Carbohydrate fermentation reactions and PCR with species-specific primers classified the isolates as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum.

Angela Botes; Svetoslav D. Todorov; Johan W. von Mollendorff; Alfred Botha; Leon M. T. Dicks

2007-01-01

296

Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives. PMID:24066293

Kaur, Baljinder; Kumar, Balvir

2013-01-01

297

Symbionts as Major Modulators of Insect Health: Lactic Acid Bacteria and Honeybees  

E-print Network

Symbionts as Major Modulators of Insect Health: Lactic Acid Bacteria and Honeybees Alejandra Va), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well recognized beneficial Modulators of Insect Health: Lactic Acid Bacteria and Honeybees. PLoS ONE 7(3): e33188. doi:10.1371/journal

Paxton, Robert

298

Theoretical study of the hydration of atmospheric nucleation precursors with acetic Acid.  

PubMed

While atmosphere is known to contain a significant fraction of organic substance and the effect of acetic acid to stabilize hydrated sulfuric acids is found to be close that of ammonia, the details about the hydration of (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 are poorly understood, especially for the larger clusters with more water molecules. We have investigated structural characteristics and thermodynamics of the hydrates using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. The phenomena of the structural evolution may exist during the early stage of the clusters formation, and we tentatively proposed a calculation path for the Gibbs free energies of the clusters formation via the structural evolution. The results in this study supply a picture of the first deprotonation of sulfuric acids for a system consisting of two sulfuric acid molecules, an acetic acid molecule, and up to three waters at 0 and 298.15 K, respectively. We also replace one of the sulfuric acids with a bisulfate anion in (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 to explore the difference of acid dissociation between two series of clusters and interaction of performance in clusters growth between ion-mediated nucleation and organics-enhanced nucleation. PMID:25143013

Zhu, Yu-Peng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Huang, Wei

2014-09-11

299

Stability of MFI zeolite-filled PDMS membranes during pervaporative ethanol recovery from aqueous mixtures containing acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pervaporation is a potential process for recovering bioethanol produced from biomass fermentation. Fermentation broths contain ethanol, water, and a variety of other compounds, often including carboxylic acids. The effects of acetic acid on long-term pervaporation of aqueous ethanol mixtures through high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS; silicone rubber) membranes were investigated. Acetic acid was shown to reduce the ethanol removal effectiveness

Travis C. Bowen; Richard G. Meier; Leland M. Vane

2007-01-01

300

Recognition of 2-aminothiazole-4-acetic acid derivatives by the peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The H+\\/peptide cotransporters PEPT1 and PEPT2 have gained considerable interest in pharmaceutical sciences as routes for drug delivery. It is, therefore, of interest to develop uncommon artificial substrates for the two carriers. This study was initiated to investigate the binding affinity of 2-aminothiazole-4-acetic acid (ATAA) conjugates with amino acids to PEPT1 and PEPT2. The 2-aminothiazole-4-acetic acid derivatives have been synthesised

Annegret Biegel; Sabine Gebauer; Bianka Hartrodt; Ilka Knütter; Klaus Neubert; Matthias Brandsch; Iris Thondorf

2007-01-01

301

Anodic generation of cerium (IV) at glassy carbon in acetic acid and coulometric titrations with the generated reagent  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conditions for electrochemical generation of cerium(IV) at glassy carbon in acetic acid in the presence of alkali-metal acetates and sodium perchlorate, respectively, were investigated. A high current efficiency was achieved in anodic oxidation of cerium(III) in acetate supporting electrolytes. Coulometric titration methods for the determination of reducing substances with the generated oxidant were also developed. The end-points were determined by

Tibor J. Pastor; Vojka V. Antonijevi?

1993-01-01

302

Kinetic analysis on formation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) from acetic acid by Ralstonia eutropha under chemically defined conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Batch cultures of Ralstonia eutropha in chemically defined media with acetic acid (HAc) as the sole carbon source were conducted to investigate acetate utilization,\\u000a formation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and growth of active biomass (ABM) under different carbon to nitrogen (C\\/N) weight\\u000a ratios. The specific acetate utilization rate based on ABM approached 0.16 g\\/g ABM h?1, which was not affected very

J Wang; J Yu

2001-01-01

303

DFT computation and experimental analysis of vibrational and electronic spectra of phenoxy acetic acid herbicides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An absolute vibrational analysis has been attempted on the basis of experimental FTIR and NIR-FT Raman spectra with calculated vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of phenoxy acetic acids. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated with the help of B3LYP method with Dunning correlation consistent basis set aug-cc-pVTZ. The electronic structures of molecular fragments were described in terms of natural bond orbital analysis, which shows intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The electronic absorption spectra with different solvents have been investigated in combination with time-dependent density functional theory calculation. The pKa values of phenoxy acetic acids were compared.

Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

2013-05-01

304

Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?  

PubMed

The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host's immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20 x 1012 probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host's oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot'a), 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals' eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients. PMID:25404621

Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Rybka, Joanna; Gackowska, Lidia

2014-01-01

305

Kinetics and energetics of hydrogen bond dissociation in isolated acetic acid- d1 and - d4 and trifluoroactic acid dimers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative determination of the rate constant, activation energy, entropy, and enthalpy of dissociation of hydrogen bonds in deuterated acetic acid- d1, - d4, and trifluoroacetic acid dimers in the gas phase was performed by resonant CO 2 laser photoacoustic spectroscopy. Within the experimental error, the kinetics and energetics of hydrogen bond dissociation were found to be independent of deuterium substitution of the hydroxy-hydrogen for pressures below 100 mbar. On the other hand, the dynamics, but not the energetics, of H bond dissociation are affected by the chemical nature of the rest group R (e.g., CH 3, CD 3, or CF 3) of the carboxylic acid.

Sauren, H.; Winkler, A.; Hess, P.

1995-06-01

306

Solvation model for acetic acid in binary mixtures of cyclohexane–1,2-dichloroethane  

Microsoft Academic Search

The partition of acetic acid between aqueous solutions and various binary mixtures of 1,2-dichloroethane and cyclohexane were studied at 30.0°C. The observed nonlinearities of both monomer partition coefficient and dimerization constant in the organic phase with the mole fraction of 1,2-dichloroethane are interpreted in terms of the preferential solvation of various solvation sites of the involved species. Two polar sites

A. I. Abu-Shady; H. F. Al-Mudhaf; M. F. Hegazi

2004-01-01

307

Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production by Arthrobacter species isolated from Azolla.  

PubMed

Arthrobacter species, isolated from the leaf cavities and the microsporocarps of the aquatic fern species Azolla pinnata and Azolla filiculoides, produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in culture when the precursor tryptophan was added to the medium. No IAA production was detected in the absence of tryptophan. Maximum IAA formation was obtained in the first 2 d of incubation. Part of the tryptophan was transformed to N alpha-acetyl-L-tryptophan. PMID:1564446

Forni, C; Riov, J; Grilli Caiola, M; Tel-Or, E

1992-02-01

308

(Aminooxy)acetic acid inhibits petunia growth and gibberellin- and cytokinin-stimulated growth in bioassays  

Microsoft Academic Search

(Aminooxy)acetic acid (AOA) was applied to greenhouse-grown petunias and was used in bioassays for three plant growth hormones\\u000a so that its growth regulator properties could be studied. In greenhouse studies foliar sprays of 4.8–12 mm AOA inhibited vegetative growth of petunia seedlings (Petunia xhybrida Vilm. ‘White Flash’). When gibberellin A 3 (GA3) was applied to shoot tips previously treated with

Philip E. Hammer; David S. Koranski; Richard J. Gladont

1995-01-01

309

On the unusual IR spectra of the acetic acid-trimethylamine complex in low temperature matrices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Usually the stretching vibration of the A-H group in hydrogen-bonded complexes gives an intense, broad absorption in the IR spectrum. However in a few complexes it has proved difficult to detect this absorption in low temperature matrices. In this work the Ratajczak-Yaremko vibrational model of the hydrogen bond has been applied to simulate the IR spectrum obtained for one such complex: the acetic acid-trimethylamine, ACA-TMA, hydrogen bonded complex isolated in an argon matrix.

Ratajczak, Henryk; Wierzejewska, Maria; Barnes, Austin J.; Yaremko, Anatoly M.; Virko, Serdej V.

2014-06-01

310

Paper chromatography of unsaturated fatty acid esters as their mercuric acetate addition compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A method is described by which unsaturated fatty acid esters can be separated and identified by reversed-phase paper chromatography.\\u000a The procedure is based upon the formation of the mercuric acetate addition compounds of the esters and the detection of the\\u000a compounds on the chromatograms, using the sensitive color reaction with diphenylcarbazone. The application of this technique\\u000a to the analysis of

Yoshiyuki Inouye; Manjiro Noda; Osamu Hirayama

1955-01-01

311

Effect of yeast extract on Escherichia coli growth and acetic acid production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fed batch cultures were performed to investigate the effect of yeast extract concentration on the kinetics of growth and acetic acid production of recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 in a synthetic medium. Three runs were performed with 40g\\/l total glucose concentration. The yeast extract\\/glucose ratio (YE\\/G; w\\/w), was 0.1, 0.05 and 0.025 in the feed. These decreasing YE\\/G values did not

D. C. Suárez; C. W. Liria; B. V. Kilikian

1998-01-01

312

Determination of Endogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Plagiochila arctica (Hepaticae) 1  

PubMed Central

Endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was found in axenically cultured gametophytes of the leafy liverwort, Plagiochila arctica Bryhn and Kaal., by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Identification of the methylated auxin was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Addition of 57 micromolar IAA to cultures increased relative production of ethylene. This is the first definitive (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) demonstration of the natural occurrence of IAA in a bryophyte. PMID:16664164

Law, David M.; Basile, Dominick V.; Basile, Margaret R.

1985-01-01

313

Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Hydroquinone by Tetrabutylammonium Tribromide Ion in Aqueous Acetic Acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oxidation of hydroquinone by environmentally benign tetrabutyl ammonium tribromide (TBATB) was carried out in 50% V\\/V\\u000a aqueous acetic acid medium under pseudo-first-order conditions, keeping a large excess of hydroquinone over the oxidant. The\\u000a main reactive species of oxidant and substrate were found to be the ion and hydroquinone, respectively. The reaction proceeds with prior complex formation between the reactants

S. N. Zende; V. A. Kalantre; G. S. Gokavi

2010-01-01

314

The possible action mechanisms of indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in Arabidopsis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We previously reported that Arabidopsis indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-methyltransferase-1 (IAMT1) catalyzes the conversion of IAA, an essential phytohormone, to methyl-IAA\\u000a (MeIAA) and that IAMT1 plays an important role in leaf development. Here, we present the possible mechanisms of action of MeIAA in Arabidopsis. We showed that MeIAA was more potent than IAA in the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and that MeIAA

Linchuan Li; Xianhui Hou; Tomohiko Tsuge; Maoyu Ding; Takashi Aoyama; Atsuhiro Oka; Hongya Gu; Yunde Zhao; Li-Jia Qu

2008-01-01

315

Biomass retention and performance of anaerobic fixed-film reactors treating acetic acid wastewater  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acetic-acid-based synthetic wastewater of different organic concentrations was successfully treated at 35 degrees C in anaerobic downflow fixed-film reactors operated at high organic loading rates and short hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Substrate removal and methane production rates close to theoretical values of complete volumetric chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and maximum methane conversion were obtained. A high concentration of

M. F. Hamoda; K. J. Kennedy

1987-01-01

316

Effect of glyphosate on indole-3-acetic acid metabolism in tolerant and susceptible plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison study was conducted on the effect of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl]glycine) on indole-3-[2-14C]acetic acid (IAA) metabolism, ethylene production, and growth of 7-day-old seedlings of different plants. The plants tested\\u000a were American germander (Teucrium canadense L.), soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.), pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska and Little marvel), mungbean (Vigna radiata L.), and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). A spray

T. T. Lee; T. Dumas

1985-01-01

317

Alkaline pre-treatment of rice hulls for hydrothermal production of acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

To solve the blockage caused by silica during the hydrothermal conversion of rice hulls into acetic acid in a continuous-flow reactor, the removal of silica from rice hulls and the retainment of organics by alkaline extraction were carried out in a range of pH values from 5 to 12 and temperatures from 30 to 85°C. It was found that the

Yamin Hsieh; Yingxun Du; Fangming Jin; Zhouyu Zhou; Heiji Enomoto

2009-01-01

318

The lifespan-promoting effect of acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, various natural substances and commercial health-food supplements were screened to evaluate their effects on longevity. Among the substances tested, acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide fraction 3 (RF3) were shown to increase the expression of the lifespan and longevity-related transcription factor DAF-16 in C. elegans. We have shown that RF3 activates DAF-16 expression via

Ming-Hong Chuang; Shyh-Horng Chiou; Chun-Hao Huang; Wen-Bin Yang; Chi-Huey Wong

2009-01-01

319

Oxidative Decarboxylation of Indole3-acetic Acid by Mangani-Versene and by Wheat Leaf Enzyme  

Microsoft Academic Search

THERE is little agreement concerning either the pathway or the final products of the enzymic oxidation of heteroauxin1. The stoichiometry of the oxidative decarboxylation seems to be reasonably well established1, one mole of oxygen being taken up and one of carbon dioxide evolved for every mole of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) reacting. Galston2 reported that no indole-3-aldehyde was formed when IAA

R. A. Abramovitch; K. S. Ahmed

1961-01-01

320

Antibacterial action of acetic acid soluble material isolated from Mucor rouxii and its application onto textile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetic acid soluble material (AcSM) is a chitosan-rich fraction isolated from the fungal cell wall materials. The final step in the traditional production of fungal chitosan is the separation of chitosan from the cell wall AcSM via raising the pH to 9–10 followed by centrifugation. This step results in further undesirable economic and environmental effects. The goal of this paper

Shaaban Moussa; Atef Ibrahim; Adel Okba; Hanafy Hamza; Klaus Opwis; Eckhard Schollmeyer

2011-01-01

321

Membrane lipid physiology and toxin catabolism underlie ethanol and acetic acid tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Drosophila melanogaster has evolved the ability to tolerate and utilize high levels of ethanol and acetic acid encountered in its rotting-fruit niche. Investigation of this phenomenon has focused on ethanol catabolism, particularly by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. Here we report that survival under ethanol and acetic acid stress in D. melanogaster from high- and low-latitude populations is an integrated consequence of toxin catabolism and alteration of physical properties of cellular membranes by ethanol. Metabolic detoxification contributed to differences in ethanol tolerance between populations and acclimation temperatures via changes in both alcohol dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA synthetase mRNA expression and enzyme activity. Independent of changes in ethanol catabolism, rapid thermal shifts that change membrane fluidity had dramatic effects on ethanol tolerance. Cold temperature treatments upregulated phospholipid metabolism genes and enhanced acetic acid tolerance, consistent with the predicted effects of restoring membrane fluidity. Phospholipase D was expressed at high levels in all treatments that conferred enhanced ethanol tolerance, suggesting that this lipid-mediated signaling enzyme may enhance tolerance by sequestering ethanol in membranes as phophatidylethanol. These results reveal new candidate genes underlying toxin tolerance and membrane adaptation to temperature in Drosophila and provide insight into how interactions between these phenotypes may underlie the maintenance of latitudinal clines in ethanol tolerance. PMID:16985200

Montooth, Kristi L; Siebenthall, Kyle T; Clark, Andrew G

2006-10-01

322

Antibacterial power of sodium hypochlorite combined with surfactants and acetic Acid.  

PubMed

The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antibacterial power of 1% NaOCl with 1% acetic acid, 5.25% NaOCl and two commercially available NaOCl modified with surfactants in bovine root dentin. A total of 120 dentin tubes prepared from intact bovine incisors were infected for 21 days with Enterococcus faecalis and randomly divided into six groups as follows: 5.25%NaOCl; Hypoclean; Chlor-Xtra; 1% NaOCl with 1% acetic acid; infected dentin tubes (positive control); and sterile dentin tubes (negative control). At experimental times of 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, dentin chips were collected using sequential round burs with increasing diameters in separate test tubes containing 3 mL of freshly prepared BHI. Statistical analysis were performed using parametric methods (one-way ANOVA, and Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test, ?=0.01). After culturing, the number of colony-forming units (CFU) was counted. All the NaOCl solutions showed small number of CFU over 28 days. ChlorXtra and Hypoclean had the smallest number of CFU at all times with greater antimicrobial efficacy than 5.25% NaOCl and 1% NaOCl solution with 1% acetic acid. PMID:25250491

Giardino, Luciano; Estrela, Carlos; Mohammadi, Zahed; Palazzi, Flavio

2014-01-01

323

Synthesis of  -Aminobutyric Acid by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from a Variety of Italian Cheeses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentrations of -aminobutyric acid (GABA) in 22 Italian cheese varieties that differ in several technological traits markedly varied from 0.26 to 391 mg kg1. Presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated from each cheese variety (total of 440 isolates) and screened for the capacity to synthesize GABA. Only 61 isolates showed this activity and were identified by partial sequencing of

S. Siragusa; M. De Angelis; R. Di Cagno; C. G. Rizzello; R. Coda; M. Gobbetti

2007-01-01

324

Deciphering the origin of cooperative catalysis by dirhodium acetate and chiral spiro phosphoric acid in an asymmetric amination reaction.  

PubMed

The mechanism of asymmetric amination of diazo-acetate by tert-butyl carbamate catalyzed by dirhodium tetra(trifluoro)acetate and chiral SPINOL-phosphoric acid is examined using DFT (M06 and B3LYP) computations. A cooperative participation of both catalysts is noticed in the stereo-controlling transition state of the reaction. PMID:25313895

Kisan, Hemanta K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

2014-12-01

325

Influence of Dilute Acetic Acid Treatments on American Pondweed Winter Buds in the Nevada Irrigation District, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

American pondweed ( Potamogeton nodosus Poir.) is com- monly found in northern California irrigation canals. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exposure of American pondweed winter buds to dilute acetic acid un- der field conditions would result in reduced subsequent bio- mass. The treatment consisted of adding either 1703 or 3406 L of 2.3% acetic

D. F. SPENCER; C. L. ELMORE; G. G. KSANDER; J. A. RONCORONI

326

Chemical Behaviour of Zirconium Oxychloride Octahydrate and Acetic Acid in Precursor Solution for Zirconia Film Formation on Glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Precursor solutions for zirconia films on soda lime silica glass substrate were prepared from zirconium oxychloride octahydrate (ZOO) and acetic acid (HOAC) maintaining the mol ratios, [HOAC]\\/[ZOO] = 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. A characteristic UV absorption band at ~280 nm in the ~120 h aged precursor solutions was identified for acetate group of the zirconium acetato complexed species.

Sunirmal Jana; K. Biswas

1997-01-01

327

Isolation of thermophilic L-lactic acid producing bacteria showing homo-fermentative manner under high aeration condition.  

PubMed

By applying non-sterile open fermentation of food waste, various thermotolerant l-lactic acid-producing bacteria were isolated and identified. The predominant bacterial isolates showing higher accumulation of l-lactic acid belong to 3 groups of Bacillus coagulans, according to their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities. B. coagulans strains M21 and M36 produced high amounts of l-lactic acid of high optical purity and lactic acid selectivity in model kitchen refuse medium and glucose-yeast extract-peptone medium. Other thermotolerant isolates resembling to Bacillus humi, B. ruris, B. subtilis, B. niacini and B. soli were also identified. These bacteria produced low amounts of l-lactic acid of more than 99% optical purity. All isolated strains showed the highest growth rate at temperatures around 55-60°C. They showed unique responses to various oxygen supply conditions. The majority of isolates produced l-lactic acid at a low overall oxygen transfer coefficient (KLa); however, acetic acid was produced instead of l-lactic acid at a high KLa. B. coagulans M21 was the only strain that produced high, consistent, and reproducible amounts of optically pure l-lactic acid (>99% optical purity) under high and low KLa conditions in a homo-fermentative manner. PMID:24119530

Tongpim, Saowanit; Meidong, Ratchanu; Poudel, Pramod; Yoshino, Satoshi; Okugawa, Yuki; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Sakai, Kenji

2014-03-01

328

Identification of acetate-oxidizing bacteria in a coastal marine surface sediment by RNA-stable isotope probing in anoxic slurries and intact cores.  

PubMed

We investigated the terminal electron-accepting pathways and the acetate-oxidizing bacteria in surface sediment (0-5 mm depth) of Aarhus Bay, Denmark, in anoxic slurry and intact core incubations. In the intact cores, oxygen, nitrate, oxides of manganese and iron, and sulfate were all available and likely all used as electron acceptors by the microbial community, whereas microbial iron and sulfate reduction dominated in the slurries. The availability of electron acceptors clearly affected which organisms were labeled by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Members of the Oceanospirillaceae were identified as (13) C-acetate oxidizers in both types of incubations, but bacteria related to Colwellia and Arcobacter oxidized acetate in the intact core, while members of the Desulfuromonadales and Acidithiobacillaceae did so in the slurry incubation. Desulfuromonadales sequences also dominated 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the highest positive dilution of the acetate-oxidizing most probable number cultures with manganese and iron oxides. Thus, members of Desulfuromonadales are likely important for acetate oxidation coupled to iron and manganese reduction in situ, while the identified Gammaproteobacteria and affiliates of Arcobacter may utilize oxygen, nitrate and manganese oxides. Our study further highlights some of the biases that are associated with the use of RNA-SIP as well as slurry and intact core incubations. PMID:23289443

Vandieken, Verona; Thamdrup, Bo

2013-05-01

329

Lipid Metabolism of Rumen Ciliates and Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The total lipid and free fatty acid contents of Isotricha intestinalis, Entodinium simplex, and the rumen bacterial flora of the respective protozoa were determined. Warburg manometric data showed that the sodium salts of tributyrin, oleic, and acetic acids stimulated gas production in I. intestinalis, whereas tributyrin was stimulatory with E. simplex and less active with oleic and acetic acids. Rumen bacteria provided fatty acids produced lower manometric gaseous increases when compared with the protozoa. Volatile fatty acids were produced by I. intestinalis and rumen bacteria with tributyrin, but not with tripalmitin. Sodium oleate gave little volatile fatty acid response with I. intestinalis or rumen bacteria. Washed suspensions of I. intestinalis and rumen bacteria concentrated C14-labeled oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids within the cells during short incubation periods. Autoradiographs demonstrated the conversion of C14-labeled oleic, palmitic, stearic, linoleic, and acetic acids in the rumen protozoa and bacterial cells. PMID:14000915

Williams, P. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Davis, R. E.

1963-01-01

330

The potential of lactic acid bacteria for the production of safe and wholesome food.  

PubMed

By tradition lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are involved in the production of fermented foods. These constitute one quarter of our diet and are characterized by a safe history, certain beneficial health effects, and an extended shelf life when compared with raw materials. The various fermenting substrates are habitats for specific LAB that differ in their metabolic potential. The health effects exerted by LAB are the following: 1. Production of lactic acid and minor amounts of acetic and formic acid. These cause: a drop in pH and thereby growth inhibition of food spoiling or poisoning bacteria; killing of certain pathogens; detoxification by degradation of noxious compounds of plant origin (usually in combination with plant-derived enzymatic activities). 2. Production of antimicrobial compounds (e.g. bacteriocins, H2O2, fatty acids). 3. Probiotic effects as live organisms in food. The wholesomeness of LAB can also be extended to fields outside human nutrition, as they may act as probiotics in animal production or as plant protectives in agriculture and thus contribute to healthy raw materials for food production. Modern concepts or perspectives of the application of LAB include the following: 1. Selection of the best adapted and safely performing LAB strains. 2. Selection of strains with probiotic effects. 3. Selection of strains with health-promoting effects (e.g. production of vitamins or essential amino acids, anti-tumour activity). 4. Selection of strains with food protective activities (inhibiting spoilage or food pathogens). These strains can be added to food or used as starters in food fermentations. They may be found as wild-type organisms or can be obtained by genetic engineering.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8178575

Hammes, W P; Tichaczek, P S

1994-03-01

331

Acetic Acid Activates the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Bovine Hepatocytes  

PubMed Central

The effect of acetic acid on hepatic lipid metabolism in ruminants differs significantly from that in monogastric animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the regulation mechanism of acetic acid on the hepatic lipid metabolism in dairy cows. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. In vitro, bovine hepatocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of sodium acetate (neutralized acetic acid) and BML-275 (an AMPK? inhibitor). Acetic acid consumed a large amount of ATP, resulting in an increase in AMPK? phosphorylation. The increase in AMPK? phosphorylation increased the expression and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?, which upregulated the expression of lipid oxidation genes, thereby increasing lipid oxidation in bovine hepatocytes. Furthermore, elevated AMPK? phosphorylation reduced the expression and transcriptional activity of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and the carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein, which reduced the expression of lipogenic genes, thereby decreasing lipid biosynthesis in bovine hepatocytes. In addition, activated AMPK? inhibited the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Consequently, the triglyceride content in the acetate-treated hepatocytes was significantly decreased. These results indicate that acetic acid activates the AMPK? signaling pathway to increase lipid oxidation and decrease lipid synthesis in bovine hepatocytes, thereby reducing liver fat accumulation in dairy cows. PMID:23861826

Li, Xinwei; Chen, Hui; Guan, Yuan; Li, Xiaobing; Lei, Liancheng; Liu, Juxiong; Yin, Liheng; Liu, Guowen; Wang, Zhe

2013-01-01

332

Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acetic acid is an important intermediate in aqueous methylglyoxal oxidation and a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. Altieri et al. (2008) proposed that acetic acid was the precursor of oligoesters observed in methylglyoxal oxidation. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid at concentrations relevant to atmospheric waters (20 ?M-10 mM) was oxidized by OH radical. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. The formation of glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids were observed. In contrast to methylglyoxal oxidation, succinic acid and oligomers were not detected. Using results from these and methylglyoxal + OH radical experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

Tan, Y.; Lim, Y. B.; Altieri, K. E.; Seitzinger, S. P.; Turpin, B. J.

2011-06-01

333

Growth and Metabolism of Lactic Acid Bacteria during and after Malolactic Fermentation of Wines at Different pH  

PubMed Central

Commercially produced red wines were adjusted to pH 3.0, 3.2, 3.5, 3.7, or 4.0 and examined during and after malolactic fermentation for growth of lactic acid bacteria and changes in the concentrations of carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, and acetaldehyde. With one exception, Leuconostoc oenos conducted the malolactic fermentation in all wines and was the only species to occur in wines at pH below 3.5. Malolactic fermentation by L. oenos was accompanied by degradation of malic, citric, and fumaric acids and production of lactic and acetic acids. The concentrations of arginine, histidine, and acetaldehyde also decreased at this stage, but the behavior of hexose and pentose sugars was complicated by other factors. Pediococcus parvulus conducted the malolactic fermentation in one wine containing 72 mg of total sulfur dioxide per liter. Fumaric and citric acids were not degraded during this malolactic fermentation, but hexose sugars were metabolized. P. parvulus and species of Lactobacillus grew after malolactic fermentation in wines with pH adjusted above 3.5. This growth was accompanied by the utilization of wine sugars and production of lactic and acetic acids. PMID:16347015

Davis, C. R.; Wibowo, D. J.; Lee, T. H.; Fleet, G. H.

1986-01-01

334

Sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over central Amazonia. II - Wet season  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potential sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over the Amazon forest were investigated using a photochemical model and data collected on gas phase concentrations of these acids in the forest canopy, boundary layer, and free troposphere over the central Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season. It was found that the atmospheric reactions previously suggested in the literature as sources of carboxylic acids (i.e., the gas phase decomposition of isoprene, the reaction between CH3CO3 and a peroxide, and aqueous phase oxidation of CH2O) appear to be too slow to explain the observed concentrations, suggesting that other atmospheric reactions, so far unidentified, could make a major contribution to the carboxylic acid budgets.

Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Beecher, K. M.

1990-01-01

335

Genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in lactic acid bacteria  

PubMed Central

Background Genome scale annotation of regulatory interactions and reconstruction of regulatory networks are the crucial problems in bacterial genomics. The Lactobacillales order of bacteria collates various microorganisms having a large economic impact, including both human and animal pathogens and strains used in the food industry. Nonetheless, no systematic genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulation has been previously made for this taxonomic group. Results A comparative genomics approach was used for reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in 30 selected genomes of lactic acid bacteria. The inferred networks comprise regulons for 102 orthologous transcription factors (TFs), including 47 novel regulons for previously uncharacterized TFs. Numerous differences between regulatory networks of the Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae groups were described on several levels. The two groups are characterized by substantially different sets of TFs encoded in their genomes. Content of the inferred regulons and structure of their cognate TF binding motifs differ for many orthologous TFs between the two groups. Multiple cases of non-orthologous displacements of TFs that control specific metabolic pathways were reported. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in lactic acid bacteria. In each of 30 studied genomes the obtained regulatory network contains on average 36 TFs and 250 target genes that are mostly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, metal homeostasis and amino acids biosynthesis. The inferred networks can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and evolutionary analysis. All reconstructed regulons are captured within the Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae collections in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). PMID:23398941

2013-01-01

336

Contribution of lactic acid bacteria to flavour compound formation in dairy products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cheese flavour cannot be produced without starter bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria convert lactose to lactic acid and this together with their production of diacetyl and acetaldehyde are their main contributions to the flavour of cultured milks and fresh cheeses. In matured cheeses, the starter bacteria die out quickly and the rate at which they lyse and release their enzymes into

G. Urbach

1995-01-01

337

[Clinical application of testing methods on acid-fast bacteria].  

PubMed

Clinical bacteriology pertaining to acid-fast bacteria has made marked advances over the past decade, initiated by the development of a DNA probe kit for identification of acid-fast bacteria. Wide-spread use of nucleic acid amplification for rapid detection of tubercle bacillus contributed more greatly than any other factor to such advances in this field. At present, 90% of all kits used for nucleic acid amplification in the world are consumed in Japan. Unfortunately, not a few clinicians in Japan have a false idea that the smear method and nucleic acid amplification are necessary but culture is not. In any event nucleic acid amplification has exerted significant impacts on the routine works at bacteriology laboratories. Among others, collecting bacteria by pretreatment with NALC-NaOH has simplified the introduction of the collective mode smear method and liquid media. Furthermore, as clinicians have become increasingly more experienced with various methods of molecular biology, it now seems possible to apply these techniques for detection of genes encoding drug resistance and for utilization of molecular epidemiology in routine laboratory works. Meanwhile, attempts to diagnose acid-fast bacteriosis by checking blood for antibody have also been made, primarily in Japan. At present, two kits for detecting antibodies to glycolipids (LAM, TDM, etc.) are covered by national health insurance in Japan. We have an impression that in Japan clinicians do not have adequate knowledge and skill to make full use of these new testing methods clinically. We, as the chairmen of this symposium, hope that this symposium will help clinicians increase their skill related to new testing methods, eventually leading to stimulation of advances in clinical practices related to acid-fast bacteria in Japan. 1. Smear microscopy by concentration method and broth culture system: Kazunari TSUYUGUCHI (Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Kinki-chuo Chest Medical Center) Smear microscopy and culture still remain the cornerstone to diagnose tuberculosis. However, the classical methods in Japan using direct microscopy and Ogawa solid media were not sufficient for clinical use. In recent years substantial advance has been made in these fields. Concentration of clinical samples by centrifugation improves the sensitivity of smear microscopy with excellent reproducibility. The Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) system using liquid media yields high sensitivity and rapidity. Using these methods, more and more tuberculosis cases would be correctly diagnosed and treated adequately based on drug susceptibility testing. 2. New technologies for anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing: Satoshi MITARAI (Bacteriology Division, Reference Centre for Mycobacterium, Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) Several new technologies have been developed to obtain anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing (AST) results rapidly, utilising liquid culture and molecular technologies. Mycobacterium Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT), as a popular liquid culturing and AST system, was evaluated for its accuracy and usefulness. As for isoniazid, MGIT showed 12.6% of discordant result comparing with standard method. These MGIT resistant and Ogawa susceptible strains had relatively high MICs ranging 0.13 to 2.0 microg/ml. The molecular detection of resistant gene mutation is also a useful method to estimate drug resistance rapidly. The rpoB mutation detection is reliable with high sensitivity and specificity. 3. Nucleic acid amplification and novel diagnostic methods: Shunji TAKAKURA (Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine) Sensitivities of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for the diagnosis of tuberculosis meet clinical requirement that patients with high-risk of transmission should be identified within a day. Comparison of the performance of various NAATs is difficult because of the difference in sample processing and in samples tested among methods and reports. Con

Ichiyama, Satoshi; Suzuki, Katsuhiro

2005-02-01

338

Investigations of the pore formation in the lead selenide films using glacial acetic acid- and nitric acid-based electrolyte  

PubMed Central

We report a novel synthesis of porous PbSe layers on Si substrates by anodic electrochemical treatment of PbSe/CaF2/Si(111) epitaxial structures in an electrolyte solution based on glacial acetic acid and nitric acid. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and local chemical microanalysis investigation results for the porous layers are presented. Average size of the synthesized mesopores with approximately 1010 cm?2 surface density was determined to be 22 nm. The observed phenomenon of the active selenium redeposition on the mesopore walls during anodic treatment is discussed. PMID:22726822

2012-01-01

339

Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1  

E-print Network

1 Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1 , M. Bouchard1VNbO catalysts could be made up from (VNbMo)5O14-type microdomains embedded in MoO3 matrix seems still topical. Keywords MoVNbO catalysts; acetic acid; ethylene; mild oxidation of ethane; nanosized (VNbMo)5O14

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Ions in Aqueous Acetic Acid Mixtures: Solvent Reorganization around Protons and Gibbs Energies of Transfer from Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The photo-absorbing, basic sensor, 4-nitroaniline, has been used to determine theequilibrium constant for solvent reorganization around the proton in mixtures ofvarying composition of water with acetic acid. In all the mixtures used, theself-ionization of the acetic acid was suppressed. In contrast to mixtures of waterwith the related ethanol or acetone, this equilibrium is shifted more toward thewater-solvated species as the

Cecil F. Wells

2000-01-01

341

Indole acetic acid mimics the effect of salt stress in relation to enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in chickpea seedlings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of addition of indole acetic acid (3 µM) andNaCl (75 mM) on growth and enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism inchickpea seedlings was compared. In comparison with control seedlings, theseedlings growing in the presence of indole acetic acid (IAA) had reducedamylase activity in cotyledons and enhanced sucrose synthase (SS) and sucrosephosphate synthase (SPS) activities in cotyledons and shoots at all

Satvir Kaur; Anil K. Gupta; Narinder Kaur

2003-01-01

342

Dissociation Constant of Acetic Acid in (N,N-Dimethylformamide?+?Water) Mixtures at the Temperature 298.15 K  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present work the thermodynamic dissociation constants of acetic acid were determined in (N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)?+?water)\\u000a mixtures over the DMF mole fraction range from 0 to 0.65 at the temperature 298.15 K by the potentiometric titration method.\\u000a The dissociation constant in pure DMF was obtained by extrapolation and comparative calculation methods. The dependence of\\u000a the acetic acid dissociation constant on

Yuliya A. Fadeeva; Lyubov P. Safonova

2011-01-01

343

Dissociation constant of acetic acid in N-methylpropionamide from 5 to 55°C and related thermodynamic quantities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dissociation constant of acetic acid in N-methylpropionamide (NMP) has been determined at 11 temperatures from 5 to 55°C by measurement of the electromotive force of cells without liquid junction containing hydrogen gas electrodes and silver-silver chloride electrodes. The pK at 25°C was found to be 7.995 (molal scale) as compared with 4.756 in water; thus, acetic acid is much

Edgar S. Etz; R. A. Robinson; Roger G. Bates

1972-01-01

344

Wall Teichoic Acids of Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The peptidoglycan layers of many gram-positive bacteria are densely functionalized with anionic glycopolymers called wall teichoic acids (WTAs). These polymers play crucial roles in cell shape determination, regulation of cell division, and other fundamental aspects of gram-positive bacterial physiology. Additionally, WTAs are important in pathogenesis and play key roles in antibiotic resistance. We provide an overview of WTA structure and biosynthesis, review recent studies on the biological roles of these polymers, and highlight remaining questions. We also discuss prospects for exploiting WTA biosynthesis as a target for new therapies to overcome resistant infections. PMID:24024634

Brown, Stephanie; Santa Maria, John P.; Walker, Suzanne

2013-01-01

345

Densities and excess molar volumes of formic acid, acetic acid and propionic acid in pure water and in water?+?Surf Excel solutions at different temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Densities, ? of the systems formic acid, acetic acid and propionic acid in water and in 0.05% and 0.1% Surf Excel (SE) solutions in water were measured at temperatures 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15 and 323.15?K respectively covering the whole composition range. Excess molar volumes, for the systems were found to be negative and their values were found to increase with

M. A. Motin; M. H. Kabir; E. M. Huque

2005-01-01

346

CTAB and acetic acid effect in the nanocrystallite growth of spray deposited CdO thin films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CdO thin films were deposited on glass substrates from cadmium acetate dihydrate along with precursor additives, acetic acid and CTAB using home built splay pyrolysis unit. XRD studies imply that the CdO thin films to be preferably oriented in the (1 1 1) plane. The Williamson-Hall plot indicates the presence of microstrain, especially high with acetic acid additive. Surface morphology was found to be closely packed spherical crystallite with precursor additives. Optical studies reveal a considerable change in the transmittance and band gap. Peak position is shifted in the Raman spectra, due to precursor additives.

Pavithra, S.; Balamurugan, D.; Pandeeswari, R.; Jeyaprakash, B. G.

2014-11-01

347

Effect of Diet on Amino and Nucleic Acids of Rumen Bacteria and Protozoa1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amino acid composition and nucleic acid content of pure cultures of rumen bacteria (17 species) were analyzed. Amino acid composition between gram- positive and -negative organisms was not different. The total nitrogen content of gram-negative bacteria (10.8%) was signif- icantly higher than gram-positive or- ganisms (9.9%). Deoxyribonucleic acid- nitrogen:total nitrogen (rag\\/g) differed between gram-positive (8.8) and gram- negative (18.9) bacteria,

M. J. Arambel; E. E. Bartley; G. S. Dufva; T. G. Nagaraja; A. D. Dayton

1982-01-01

348

Involvement of Yeast HSP90 Isoforms in Response to Stress and Cell Death Induced by Acetic Acid  

PubMed Central

Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2? by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress. PMID:23967187

Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belem; Fernandes, Angela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Ludovico, Paula

2013-01-01

349

Probiotic lactic acid bacteria detoxify N-nitrosodimethylamine.  

PubMed

Humans can be exposed to N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) due to many environmental sources, as well as endogenous formation. The main nitrosamine found in food products and also synthesised in vivo by intestinal microbiota is N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). It can cause cancer of the stomach, kidney and colon. The effect of four probiotic Lactobacillus strains on NDMA was studied under different culture conditions (24 h in MRS, 168 h in modified MRS N, and 168 h in phosphate buffer). HPLC and GC-TEA methods were used for NDMA determination in supernatants. The influence of lactic acid bacteria on NDMA genotoxicity was investigated by means of the comet assay. Additionally, the effect of NDMA (2-100 µg ml(-1)) on the growth and survival of the probiotic strains was studied. The results indicate that the bacteria decreased NDMA concentration by up to 50%, depending on the culture conditions, time of incubation, NDMA concentration, pH and bacterial strain. Lb. brevis 0945 lowered the concentration and genotoxicity of NDMA most effectively by up to 50%. This could be due to either adsorption or metabolism. The growth and survival of the bacteria was not affected by any of the tested NDMA concentrations. PMID:25010287

Nowak, Adriana; Kuberski, S?awomir; Libudzisz, Zdzis?awa

2014-10-01

350

Diversity of lactic acid bacteria of the bioethanol process  

PubMed Central

Background Bacteria may compete with yeast for nutrients during bioethanol production process, potentially causing economic losses. This is the first study aiming at the quantification and identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) present in the bioethanol industrial processes in different distilleries of Brazil. Results A total of 489 LAB isolates were obtained from four distilleries in 2007 and 2008. The abundance of LAB in the fermentation tanks varied between 6.0 × 105 and 8.9 × 108 CFUs/mL. Crude sugar cane juice contained 7.4 × 107 to 6.0 × 108 LAB CFUs. Most of the LAB isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus according to rRNA operon enzyme restriction profiles. A variety of Lactobacillus species occurred throughout the bioethanol process, but the most frequently found species towards the end of the harvest season were L. fermentum and L. vini. The different rep-PCR patterns indicate the co-occurrence of distinct populations of the species L. fermentum and L. vini, suggesting a great intraspecific diversity. Representative isolates of both species had the ability to grow in medium containing up to 10% ethanol, suggesting selection of ethanol tolerant bacteria throughout the process. Conclusions This study served as a first survey of the LAB diversity in the bioethanol process in Brazil. The abundance and diversity of LAB suggest that they have a significant impact in the bioethanol process. PMID:21092306

2010-01-01

351

The Partitioning of Acetic, Formic, and Phosphoric Acids Between Liquid Water and Steam  

SciTech Connect

The chemical carryover of impurities and treatment chemicals from the boiler to the steam phase, and ultimately to the low-pressure turbine and condenser, can be quantified based on laboratory experiments preformed over ranges of temperature, pH, and composition. The two major assumptions are that thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained and no deposition, adsorption or decomposition occurs. The most recent results on acetic, formic and phosphoric acids are presented with consideration of the effects of hydrolysis and dimerization reactions. Complications arising from thermal decomposition of the organic acids are discussed. The partitioning constants for these acids and other solutes measured in this program have been incorporated into a simple thermodynamic computer code that calculates the effect of chemical and mechanical carryover on the composition of the condensate formed to varying extents in the water/steam cycle.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Marshall, S.L.; Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.

1999-06-22

352

Effects of acetic acid and its assimilation in fed-batch cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli containing human-like collagen cDNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary processing problem in recombinant Escherichia coli fermentation is the production of acetic acid, which can inhibit both cell growth and recombinant protein production. The ability of E. coli to assimilate acetate permits it to solve this problem in a rather creative manner. In this study, the effects of acetic acid assimilation through a glucose starvation period at different

Wenjiao Xue; Daidi Fan; Longan Shang; Chenhui Zhu; Xiaoxuan Ma; Xiaoli Zhu; Yuanyuan Yu

2010-01-01

353

Graft Loss Due to Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of a Lymphocele Using Acetic Acid After Renal Transplantation  

SciTech Connect

Development of lymphoceles after renal transplantation is a well-described complication that occurs in up to 40% of recipients. The gold standard approach for the treatment of symptomatic cases is not well defined yet. Management options include simple aspiration, marsupialization by a laparotomy or laparoscopy, and percutaneous sclerotherapy using different chemical agents. Those approaches can be associated, and they depend on type, dimension, and localization of the lymphocele. Percutaneous sclerotherapy is considered to be less invasive than the surgical approach; it can be used safely and effectively, with low morbidity, in huge, rapidly accumulating lymphoceles. Moreover, this approach is highly successful, and the complication rate is acceptable; the major drawback is a recurrence rate close to 20%. We herewith report a renal transplant case in which the patient developed a symptomatic lymphocele that was initially treated by ultrasound-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy with ethanol and thereafter using acetic acid for early recurrence. A few hours after injection of acetic acid in the lymphatic cavity, the patient started to complain of acute pain localized to the renal graft and fever. An ultrasound of the abdomen revealed thrombosis of the renal vein and artery. The patient was immediately taken to the operating room, where the diagnosis of vascular thrombosis was confirmed and the graft was urgently explanted. In conclusion, we strongly suggest avoiding the use of acetic acid as a slerosating agent for the percutaneous treatment of post-renal transplant lymphocele because, based on our experience, it could be complicated by vascular thrombosis of the kidney, ending in graft loss.

Adani, Gian Luigi, E-mail: adanigl@hotmail.com; Baccarani, Umberto; Bresadola, Vittorio; Lorenzin, Dario [University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Transplantation (Italy); Montanaro, Domenico [AOSMM, Sauta Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Division of Nephrology (Italy); Risaliti, Andrea; Terrosu, Giovanni [University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Transplantation (Italy); Sponza, Massimo [AOSMM, Sauta Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy); Bresadola, Fabrizio [University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Transplantation (Italy)

2005-12-15

354

Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions II: Acetic acid  

E-print Network

Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH$_3$COOH), a glycine (NH$_2$CH$_2$COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH$_3$COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH$_3$CO$^+$, COOH$^+$ and CH$_3^+$ ions are the main fragments, and the presence of the former may indicate that the production-destruction process of acetic acid in hot molecular cores (HMCs) could decrease the H$_2$O abundance since the net result of this process converts H$_2$O into OH + H$^+$. The COOH$^+$ ion plays an important role in ion-molecule reactions to form large biomolecules like glycine.

S. Pilling; A. C. F. Santos; H. M. Boechat-Roberty

2005-12-22

355

Simultaneous determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid by first derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective method for simultaneously determining 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) and Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in mixtures has been developed using derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy based on their synchronous fluorescence. The synchronous fluorescence spectra were obtained with ??=100 nm in a pH 8.5 NaH2PO4-NaOH buffer solution, and the detected wavelengths of quantitative analysis were set at 239 nm for BNOA and 293 nm for IAA respectively. The over lapped fluorescence spectra were well separated by the synchronous derivative method. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were 0.003 ?g/mL for BNOA and 0.012 ?g/mL for IAA. This method is simple and expeditious, and it has been successfully applied to the determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid in fruit juice samples with satisfactory results. The samples were only filtrated through a 0.45 ?m membrane filter, which was free from the tedious separation procedures. The obtaining recoveries were in the range of 83.88-87.43% for BNOA and 80.76-86.68% for IAA, and the relative standard deviations were all less than 5.0%. Statistical comparison of the results with high performance liquid chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method revealed good agreement and proved that there were no significant difference in the accuracy and precision between these two methods. PMID:23651742

Liu, Xiangxiang; Wan, Yiqun

2013-07-01

356

Simultaneous determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid by first derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective method for simultaneously determining 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) and Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in mixtures has been developed using derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy based on their synchronous fluorescence. The synchronous fluorescence spectra were obtained with ?? = 100 nm in a pH 8.5 NaH2PO4-NaOH buffer solution, and the detected wavelengths of quantitative analysis were set at 239 nm for BNOA and 293 nm for IAA respectively. The over lapped fluorescence spectra were well separated by the synchronous derivative method. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were 0.003 ?g/mL for BNOA and 0.012 ?g/mL for IAA. This method is simple and expeditious, and it has been successfully applied to the determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid in fruit juice samples with satisfactory results. The samples were only filtrated through a 0.45 ?m membrane filter, which was free from the tedious separation procedures. The obtaining recoveries were in the range of 83.88-87.43% for BNOA and 80.76-86.68% for IAA, and the relative standard deviations were all less than 5.0%. Statistical comparison of the results with high performance liquid chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method revealed good agreement and proved that there were no significant difference in the accuracy and precision between these two methods.

Liu, Xiangxiang; Wan, Yiqun

2013-07-01

357

Hydrogen peroxide measurement in seawater by (p-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid dimerization  

SciTech Connect

The dimerization of (p-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of peroxidase has been adapted to the determination of hydrogen peroxide in seawater. The fluorometric method presented requires only one mixed reagent for sample analysis and produces a stable product that does not require immediate measurement. Changes in reaction stoichiometry resulting from naturally occurring organic material have been addressed. The detection limit, defined as 3 times the standard deviation of the blank, is 4 and 4 nM for open ocean and coastal seawater, respectively.

Miller, W.L.; Kester, D.R.

1988-12-15

358

Identification of the metabolites of Indole3-acetic acid in growing hypocotyls of Lupinus albus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The products of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) metabolism by incubating hypocotyl sections and decapitated seedlings of Lupinus albus were investigated. Single treatments using [1-14C]-IAA, [2-14C]-IAA or [5-3H]-IAA and double treatments using [1-14C]-IAA+[5-3H]-IAA were carried out. Extracts from treated plant material were analyzed by paper chromatography (PC), Thin layer chromatography (TLC), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). When hypocotyl sections were incubated

J. Sánchez-Bravo; A. Ortuño; J. M. Botía; J. A. Del Río; M. Caballero; M. Acosta; F. Sabater

1990-01-01

359

A new CO 2 disposal process via artificial weathering of calcium silicate accelerated by acetic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new disposal process for anthropogenic CO2 via an artificially accelerated weathering reaction is proposed to counteract global warming. The process is essentially composed of the following two steps:(1)CaSiO3+2CH3COOH?Ca2++2CH3COO?+H2O+SiO2(2)Ca2++2CH3COO?+CO2+H2O?CaCO3?+2CH3COOHStep (1) is the extraction of calcium ions by acetic acid from calcium silicate, for example, wollastonite rocks. Step (2) is the deposition of calcium carbonate from the solution of calcium ions

M. Kakizawa; A. Yamasaki; Y. Yanagisawa

2001-01-01

360

Further modification on phenyl acetic acid based quinolines as liver X receptor modulators.  

PubMed

A series of phenyl acetic acid based quinolines was prepared as LXR modulators. An SAR study in which the C-3 and C-8 positions of the quinoline core were varied led to the identification of two potent LXR agonists 23 and 27. Both compounds displayed good binding affinity for LXRbeta and LXRalpha, and increased expression of ABCA1 in THP-1 cells. These two compounds also had desirable pharmacokinetic profiles in mice and displayed in vivo efficacy in a 12-week Apo E knockout mouse lesion model. PMID:17391964

Hu, Baihua; Jetter, James; Kaufman, David; Singhaus, Robert; Bernotas, Ronald; Unwalla, Rayomand; Quinet, Elaine; Savio, Dawn; Halpern, Anita; Basso, Michael; Keith, James; Clerin, Valerie; Chen, Liang; Liu, Qiang-Yuan; Feingold, Irene; Huselton, Christine; Azam, Farooq; Goos-Nilsson, Annika; Wilhelmsson, Anna; Nambi, Ponnal; Wrobel, Jay

2007-05-15

361

Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria  

PubMed Central

Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA), epimerase (NanE), and kinase (NanK), necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster), are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body. The Nan region shows a mosaic evolution with NanA from Bacteroidetes, Vibrio and Yersinia branching closely together with NanA from eukaryotes. PMID:19470179

Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Boyd, E Fidelma

2009-01-01

362

The effect of addition of lactic acid bacteria inoculum to wheat and corn silages in Israel  

E-print Network

The effect of addition of lactic acid bacteria inoculum to wheat and corn silages in Israel Zwi under farm conditions as well. The rates of change in pH, water soluble carbohydrates (WSC), lactic acid counts and the numbers of epiphytic lactic-acid bacteria on wheat plants before ensiling were studied

Boyer, Edmond

363

Isolation, screening and identification of lactic acid bacteria from traditional food fermentation processes and culture collections  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes a search for lactic acid bacteria capable of exo?polysaccharide production or exhibiting antimicrobial or proteolytic activities. About 400 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from traditional fermented foods (sour dough, sausages, table olives, cheese and other dairy products). Together with almost 200 lactic acid bacterial strains obtained from culture collections, these strains were screened for exo?polysaccharide production, bacteriocin

Dick J. C. van den Berg; Annelies Smits; Bruno Pot; Aat M. Ledeboer; Karel Kersters; John M. A. Verbake; C. Theo Verrips

1993-01-01

364

Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

2009-04-01

365

Preliminary analysis of monterey kerogen by mild stepwise oxidation with sodium dichromate in glacial acetic acid  

SciTech Connect

Kerogen from Monterey shale was degraded by a controlled, mild stepwise oxidation with sodium dichromate in acetic acid. The products of each step were examined by capillary gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of their methyl esters. Major oxidation products were saturated normal monocarboxylic acids (C/sub 6/-C/sub 34/), saturated normal, ..cap alpha..,omega-dicarboxylic acids (C/sub 4/-C/sub 34/), and isoprenoid acids (C/sub 14/-C/sub 21/, except C/sub 18/). Less dominant were aromatic acids, branched monocarboxylic acids (C/sub 6/-C/sub 16/), cyclic structures, heterocyclic compounds, as well as some unidentified compounds. On the basis of the evidence obtained from the qualitative and quantitative variation of the products with duration of oxidation, the following results were obtained: (a) the kerogen nucleus is mainly composed of long-chain polymethylene, cross-lined aliphatic structure from which protrude n-alkyl chains and minor amounts of isoprenoid and non-isoprenoid branched hydrocarbons; (b) the periphery, compared to the nucleus, contains a greater proportion of n-alkyl and isoprenoid moieties, particularly the C/sub 14/, C/sub 16/, and C/sub 18/ n-alkyl chains as well as the C/sub 15/ and C/sub 16/ isoprenoid chains; (c) other subordinate structures present include phenyl and tolyl groups as well as alicyclic and heterocyclic compounds.

Barakat, A.O.; Yen, T.F.

1988-02-01

366

Core Fluxome and Metafluxome of Lactic Acid Bacteria under Simulated Cocoa Pulp Fermentation Conditions  

PubMed Central

In the present work, simulated cocoa fermentation was investigated at the level of metabolic pathway fluxes (fluxome) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are typically found in the microbial consortium known to convert nutrients from the cocoa pulp into organic acids. A comprehensive 13C labeling approach allowed to quantify carbon fluxes during simulated cocoa fermentation by (i) parallel 13C studies with [13C6]glucose, [1,2-13C2]glucose, and [13C6]fructose, respectively, (ii) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of secreted acetate and lactate, (iii) stoichiometric profiling, and (iv) isotopomer modeling for flux calculation. The study of several strains of L. fermentum and L. plantarum revealed major differences in their fluxes. The L. fermentum strains channeled only a small amount (4 to 6%) of fructose into central metabolism, i.e., the phosphoketolase pathway, whereas only L. fermentum NCC 575 used fructose to form mannitol. In contrast, L. plantarum strains exhibited a high glycolytic flux. All strains differed in acetate flux, which originated from fractions of citrate (25 to 80%) and corresponding amounts of glucose and fructose. Subsequent, metafluxome studies with consortia of different L. fermentum and L. plantarum strains indicated a dominant (96%) contribution of L. fermentum NCC 575 to the overall flux in the microbial community, a scenario that was not observed for the other strains. This highlights the idea that individual LAB strains vary in their metabolic contribution to the overall fermentation process and opens up new routes toward streamlined starter cultures. L. fermentum NCC 575 might be one candidate due to its superior performance in flux activity. PMID:23851099

Adler, Philipp; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Dohnt, Katrin; Hansen, Carl Erik

2013-01-01

367

High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.  

PubMed

Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications. PMID:24706214

Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

2014-07-01

368

Studies on the male antifertility agent gossypol acetic acid: in vitro studies on the effect of gossypol acetic acid on human spermatozoa.  

PubMed

The hypothesis that gossypol (an active ingredient associated with cottonseed oil) affects enzymes and other constituents of spermatozoa, resulting in alterations in motility and sperm viability after in vitro treatment, was tested using human semen samples. At a gossypol acetic acid concentration (and a 30 minute incubation) of .01 mcg, the percent motility was 71+ or -2.5 (P .01); at .1 mcg concentration, percent motility was 69+ or -4 (P .01); at 1 mcg motility was 66+ or -5 (P .005); at 10 cg, motility was 38.5+ or -3.5 (P .001). Control values for sperm motility were 77+ or -3. These investigations suggested that treatment with gossypol depletes production of adenosine triphosphate in the sperms and thus their metabolism does not proceed normally, rendering them immotile. It appears that the high vulnerability of the testis to gossypol and the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in the respiratory chain of mitochondria of germ cells may be the mechanism responsible for infertility induction. PMID:12336803

Kalla, N R; Vasudev, M

1980-06-01

369

Protective effect of Dillenia indica L. on acetic acid induced colitis in mice.  

PubMed

The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic, immune mediated and chronic inflammation of the intestine. The study aimed to elucidate the ameliorative effect of methanolic extract of Dillenia indica (DIME), hexane fraction (HFDI) and chloroform fraction (CFDI) of Dillenia indica in acetic acid induced experimental colitis in mice. Macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), and histological changes were recorded after the treatment regimen of 7 days. Intra-rectal instillation of acetic acid caused enhanced macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic MPO, MDA, and TNF-alpha level. It caused significant decreased level of CAT, SOD and GSH. DIME (800 mg/kg), HFDI (200 mg/kg) and CFDI (200 mg/kg) treatment exhibited significant effect in lowering macroscopic score, colon weight, MPO, MDA, TNF-alpha levels and elevation of CAT, GSH and SOD levels. The results suggest that D. indica has ameliorating effects on experimental colitis by inhibiting the proinflammatory mediators like TNF-alpha production. PMID:25241587

Somani, S J; Badgujar, L B; Sutariya, B K; Saraf, M N

2014-09-01

370

Dissociative Electron-Ion Recombination of the Protonated Interstellar Species Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Methyl Formate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, the prebiotic molecule and primitive sugar glycolaldehyde and its structural isomers acetic acid and the abundant methyl formate have been detected in the interstellar medium(ISM). Understanding the processes involving these molecules is vital to understand the ISM, where stars are formed. The rate constants, ?e, for dissociative electron-ion recombination of protonated gycolaldehyde, (HOCH2CHO)H^+, and protonated methyl formate, (HCOOCH3)H^+, have been determined at 300K in a variable temperature flowing afterglow using a Langmuir probe to determine the electron density. The ?e at 300K are 3.2 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated methyl formate and 7.5 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated glycolaldehyde. The ?e of protonated acetic acid could not be directly measured due to difficulty in producing the ion, but it appears to have a recombination rate constant, ?e, on the ˜10-7 cm^3 s-1 scale. Additional temperature dependence information was obtained. The astrochemical implications of the ?e measurements and protonation routes are also discussed.

Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

2011-10-01

371

Molecular biology and genetics of the acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacteria. Progress report, [July 1, 1988June 30, 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetate conversion to methane and C0â by the methanogenic archaebacteria is a primary rate limiting step in anaerobic biodegradative processes in nature. However, the genetic study of these organisms has not been experimentally tractable due to the inability to grow and plate the organisms as single cells, and to extract high molecular weight DNA and RNA without shearing. The acetate-utilizing

Gunsalus

1991-01-01

372

A novel kinetic model for polysaccharide dissolution during atmospheric acetic acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.  

PubMed

Acetic acid (AcH) pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with the catalysis of sulfuric acid (SA) could greatly enhance the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. However, polysaccharide dissolution happened inevitably during the pretreatment. It was found that the simplest model, which assumes that the total polysaccharides were reactive to be dissolved, could not well describe the kinetic behavior of polysaccharide dissolution. A novel pseudo-homogenous kinetic model was thus developed by introducing a parameter termed as "potential dissolution degree" (?(d)) based on the multilayered structure of cell wall. It was found that solid xylan and glucan dissolutions were a first-order reaction with respect to the dissolvable fraction. Due to the delignification action of AcH, polysaccharide dissolutions were enhanced in AcH media compared with those in aqueous system. Acetylizations of cellulose and sugars were also observed, and AcH concentration showed a significant influence on the degree of acetylization. PMID:24215769

Zhao, Xuebing; Morikawa, Yuichi; Qi, Feng; Zeng, Jing; Liu, Dehua

2014-01-01

373

Euphorbia escula L. Root and Root Bud Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels at Three Phenologic Stages.  

PubMed

Endogenous indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels of Euphorbia esula L. primary root and root buds were examined at three phenologic stages. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using (13)C(6)[benzene ring]-indole-3-acetic acid as internal standard, were used to measure root bud free and bound IAA levels in vegetative, full flower, and post-flower plants. Highest levels of free IAA (103 nanograms per gram fresh weight) were found in root buds during full flower. Esterified and amide IAA increased significantly in root buds of full flower and post-flower plants, but were not detectable in root buds of vegetative plants. Primary rootfree IAA was highest in vegetative and full flower plants (34.5 nanograms per gram fresh weight) and decreased by 50% in post-flower plants. PMID:16665432

Nissen, S J; Foley, M E

1987-06-01

374

Synthesis and evaluation of mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid linked to 2-phenylbenzoxazole-2-yl-5-acetic acid in ulcerative colitis  

PubMed Central

In this study, the syntheses of 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid, (an analogue of a known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID]) and 5-[4-(benzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid)phenylazo]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (a novel mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA]) are reported. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using infrared (IR), hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS) spectroscopy. Incubation of the azo compound with rat cecal contents demonstrated the susceptibility of the prepared azo prodrug to bacterial azoreductase enzyme. The azo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were evaluated for inflammatory bowel diseases, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB)-induced colitis in rats. The synthesized diazo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were found to be as effective as 5-aminosalicylic acid for ulcerative colitis. The results of this work suggest that the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid may represent a new lead for treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23983456

Jilani, Jamal A; Shomaf, Maha; Alzoubi, Karem H

2013-01-01

375

Lactic Acid Bacteria Convert Human Fibroblasts to Multipotent Cells  

PubMed Central

The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by a vast community of symbionts and commensals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) form a group of related, low-GC-content, gram-positive bacteria that are considered to offer a number of probiotic benefits to general health. While the role of LAB in gastrointestinal microecology has been the subject of extensive study, little is known about how commensal prokaryotic organisms directly influence eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate the generation of multipotential cells from adult human dermal fibroblast cells by incorporating LAB. LAB-incorporated cell clusters are similar to embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells and can differentiate into endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal cells in vivo and in vitro. LAB-incorporated cell clusters express a set of genes associated with multipotency, and microarray analysis indicates a remarkable increase of NANOG, a multipotency marker, and a notable decrease in HOX gene expression in LAB-incorporated cells. During the cell culture, the LAB-incorporated cell clusters stop cell division and start to express early senescence markers without cell death. Thus, LAB-incorporated cell clusters have potentially wide-ranging implications for cell generation, reprogramming, and cell-based therapy. PMID:23300571

Ohta, Kunimasa; Kawano, Rie; Ito, Naofumi

2012-01-01

376

Bioprotective potential of lactic acid bacteria in malting and brewing.  

PubMed

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are naturally associated with many foods or their raw ingredients and are popularly used in food fermentation to enhance the sensory, aromatic, and textural properties of food. These microorganisms are well recognized for their biopreservative properties, which are achieved through the production of antimicrobial compounds such as lactic acid, diacetyl, bacteriocins, and other metabolites. The antifungal activity of certain LAB is less well characterized, but organic acids, as yet uncharacterized proteinaceous compounds, and cyclic dipeptides can inhibit the growth of some fungi. A variety of microbes are carried on raw materials used in beer brewing, rendering the process susceptible to contamination and often resulting in spoilage or inferior quality of the finished product. The application of antimicrobial-producing LAB at various points in the malting and brewing process could help to negate this problem, providing an added hurdle for spoilage organisms to overcome and leading to the production of a higher quality beer. This review outlines the bioprotective potential of LAB and its application with specific reference to the brewing industry. PMID:18724772

Rouse, Susan; van Sinderen, Douwe

2008-08-01

377

Production of indole-3-acetic acid and related indole derivatives from L-tryptophan by Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2.  

PubMed

Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 produces indoles with simultaneous utilization of L-tryptophan. Fifteen chromatographically distinct indole derivatives were detected from the L-tryptophan-supplemented cultures of R. benzoatilyticus JA2. Nine of these were identified as, indole 3-acetamide, Methoxyindole-3-aldehyde, indole 3-aldehyde, methoxyindole-3-acetic acid, indole 3-acetic acid, indole-3-carboxylic acid, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole, and trisindoline. Tryptophan stable isotope feeding confirmed the indoles produced are from the supplemented L-tryptophan. Indole 3-acetic acid is one of the major products of L-tryptophan catabolism by R. benzoatilyticus JA2 and its production was influenced by growth conditions. Identification of indole 3-acetamide and tryptophan monooxygenase activity suggests indole 3-acetamide routed IAA biosynthesis in R. benzoatilyticus JA2. The study also indicated the possible multiple pathways of IAA biosynthesis in R. benzoatilyticus JA2. PMID:20972782

Mujahid, Md; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

2011-02-01

378

Enantioselective Synthesis of Piperidines through the Formation of Chiral Mixed Phosphoric Acid Acetals: Experimental and Theoretical Studies.  

PubMed

An enantioselective intramolecular chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed cyclization of unsaturated acetals has been utilized for the synthesis of functionalized chiral piperidines. The chiral enol ether products of these cyclizations undergo subsequent in?situ enantioenrichment through acetalization of the minor enantiomer. A new computational reaction exploration method was utilized to elucidate the mechanism and stereoselectivity of this transformation. Rather than confirming the originally postulated cyclization proceeding directly through a vinyl oxocarbenium ion, simulations identified an alternative two-step mechanism involving the formation of a mixed chiral phosphate acetal, which undergoes a concerted, asynchronous SN 2'-like displacement to yield the product with stereoselectivity in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:25196818

Sun, Zhankui; Winschel, Grace A; Zimmerman, Paul M; Nagorny, Pavel

2014-10-13

379

Chemical behaviour of zirconium oxychloride octahydrate and acetic acid in precursor solution for zirconia film formation on glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Precursor solutions for zirconia films on soda lime silica glass substrate were prepared from zirconium oxychloride octahydrate\\u000a (ZOO) and acetic acid (HOAC) maintaining the mol ratios, [HOAC]\\/[ZOO]=2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. A characteristic UV absorption band\\u000a at ?280 nm in the ?120h aged precursor solutions was identified for acetate group of the zirconium acetato complexed species.\\u000a The presence of

Sunirmal Jana; Prasanta K. Biswas

1997-01-01

380

Acetic-acid-catalyzed and subcritically dried carbon aerogels with a nanometer-sized structure and a wide density range  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic acids used as catalysts allow for the preparation of resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) and carbon aerogels without any metallic impurities. In this paper we present RF aerogels originating from an aqueous gelation and subcritical drying after the exchange of the pore water against acetone. In contrast to earlier attempts, very high catalyst concentrations of the weak acetic acid were used. The

R. Brandt; J. Fricke

2004-01-01

381

Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture  

EPA Science Inventory

The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

382

Acetal-linked branched poly(dimethyl-aminoethyl methacrylate) as an acid cleavable gene vector with reduced cytotoxicity.  

PubMed

An acid labile branched PDMAEMA/acetal copolymer with amino group was synthesized by the DE-ATRP and followed by Michael addition. The degradation of the polymer was strongly pH-dependent. High nucleic acid transfection efficiency with low cytotoxicity was observed compared to its non-degradable copolymer counterpart. PMID:25358033

Cao, H L; Dong, Y X; Aied, A; Zhao, T Y; Chen, X; Wang, W X; Pandit, A

2014-12-21

383

Determination of pools of tricarboxylic acid cycle and related acids in bacteria.  

PubMed Central

Methods for sampling, extracting, and quantitating the metabolic pools of organic acids from bacteria have been developed. The concentration of these metabolites was determined by a new gas chromatographic method that can quantitatively determine the levels of lactate, pyruvate, fumarate, succinate, malate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Values obtained were confirmed by fluorimetric analyses of five of the individual acids. In Escherichia coli, pools range from about 1 to 5 mumol/g of dry weight, with a variation in replicate samples of 5 to 15%. Under similar conditions, these pools in Bacillus licheniformis are in the same range, although the pyruvic acid pool is significantly larger. PMID:337897

Siegel, W H; Donohue, T; Bernlohr, R W

1977-01-01

384

Degradation of fructans by epiphytic and inoculated lactic acid bacteria during ensilage of normal and sterile ryegrass  

E-print Network

Degradation of fructans by epiphytic and inoculated lactic acid bacteria during ensilage of normal is readily available for fermentation in the silo by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and other silage bacteria of whether microbial fructan hydrolase activity, particularly in lactic acid bacteria, is a prerequisite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01

386

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 5 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1998-09-15

387

Amino acid profiles of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from kefir grains and kefir starter made from them  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of cell growth, lactic acid production, amino acid release and consumption by single-strain cultures of lactic acid bacteria (isolated from kefir grains), and by a multiple-strain kefir starter prepared from them, were studied. The change in the levels of free amino acids was followed throughout the kefir process: single-strain kefir bacteria and the kefir starter (Lactococcus lactis C15–1%+Lactobacillus

Emilina Simova; Zhelyasko Simov; Dora Beshkova; Ginka Frengova; Zhechko Dimitrov; Zdravko Spasov

2006-01-01

388

ACUTE TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS TO ACETATE-UTILIZING MIXED CULTURES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA: EC100 AND EC50  

EPA Science Inventory

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned mines and acid mine pitlakes is an important environmental contaminant concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Since sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of AMD, knowledge of acute m...

389

Continuous cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria for fatty acids production.  

PubMed

In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations. At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomplete substrate degradation. By installing a membrane unit to CFSTR, a stable performance was observed under much higher substrate loading (lactate 100mM and HRT 1.5d). A maximum cell concentration of 16.2g dcw/L, cell productivity of 1.9 g dcw/L/d, and FA productivity of 665 mg FA/L/d were attained, and these values were comparable with those achieved using microalgae. The FA content of R. sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7). PMID:24055970

Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

2013-11-01

390

Metal-organic coordination architectures of azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups, [Co( L1) 2] n ( 1) , [Cu L1N 3] n ( 2), [Cu( L2) 2·0.5C 2H 5OH·H 2O] n ( 3) and [Co( L2) 2] n ( 4) (here, H L1=1H-imidazole-1-yl-acetic acid, H L2=1H-benzimidazole-1-yl-acetic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal structure analysis shows that 3 and 4 are 2D complexes with 4 4-sql topologies, while another 2D complex 1 has a (4 3) 2(4 6)-kgd topology. And 2 is a 3D complex composed dinuclear ?1,1-bridging azido Cu II entities with distorted rutile topology. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied.

Hu, Bo-Wen; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Yang, Qian; Hu, Tong-Liang; Du, Wen-Ping; Bu, Xian-He

2009-10-01

391

Rate of electrophilic addition of acetic acid to 1-hexene when catalyzed by heteropoly acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The catalytic activity of heteropoly acids (HPA) in the reaction for the electrophilic addition of AcOH to 1-hexene is slightly dependent on the composition of the HPA and substantially exceeds the activity of H2SO4. The catalytic activity correlates with the dissociation constants of the acids.2.The activity of the W HPA is higher than that of the Mo HPA due to

S. M. Kulikov; I. V. Kozhevnikov

1982-01-01

392

Autophagy and cathepsin L are involved in the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in a mouse acetic acid-writhing model  

PubMed Central

Aim: 2-(3?,5?-Dimethoxybenzylidene) cyclopentanone (DMBC) is a novel synthetic compound with antinociceptive activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway in the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in a mouse acetic acid-writhing model. Methods: Mouse acetic acid-writhing test and hotplate test were used to assess the antinociceptive effects of DMBC, 3-MA (autophagy inhibitor) and Clik148 (cathepsin L inhibitor). The drugs were administered peripherally (ip) or centrally (icv). Results: Peripheral administration of 3-MA (7.5–30 mg/kg) or Clik148 (10–80 mg/kg) produced potent antinociceptive effect in acetic acid-writhing test. Central administration of 3-MA or Clik148 (12.5–50 nmol/L) produced comparable antinociceptive effect in acetic acid-writhing test. Peripheral administration of DMBC (25–50 mg/kg) produced potent antinociceptive effects in both acetic acid-writhing and hotplate tests. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect produced by peripheral administration of DMBC (50 mg/kg) in acetic acid-writhing test was antagonized by low doses of 3-MA (3.75 mg/kg) or Clik148 (20 mg/kg) peripherally administered, but was not affected by 3-MA or Clik148 (25 nmol/L) centrally administered. Conclusion: Activation of central autophagy and cathepsin L is involved in nociception in mice, whereas peripheral autophagy and cathepsin L contributes, at least in part, to the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in mice. PMID:23912553

Gu, Wei-wei; Ao, Gui-zhen; Zhu, Yong-ming; Sun, Shi-chang; Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Jia-hong; Nobuhiko, Katunuma; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Zhang, Hui-ling; Gao, Xiu-mei

2013-01-01

393

Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The winemaking process includes two main steps: lactic acid bacteria are responsible for the malolactic fermentation which follows the alcoholic fermentation by yeasts. Both types of microorganisms are present on grapes and on cellar equipment. Yeasts are better adapted to growth in grape must than lactic acid bacteria, so the alcoholic fermentation starts quickly. In must, up to ten lactic

Aline Lonvaud-Funel

1999-01-01

394

Isolation and Characterization of Esters of Indole-3-Acetic Acid from the Liquid Endosperm of the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus species) 1  

PubMed Central

Esters of indole-3-acetic acid were extracted and purified from the liquid endosperm of immature fruits of various species of the horse chestnut (Aesculus parviflora, A. baumanni, A.pavia rubra, and A. pavia humulis). The liquid endosperm contained, at least 12 chromatographically distinct esters. One of these compounds was purified and characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and myo-inositol. A second compound was found to be an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and the disaccharide rutinose (glucosyl-rhamnose). A third compound was partially characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and a desoxyaminohexose. PMID:11539676

Domagalski, Wojciech; Schulze, Aga; Bandurski, Robert S.

1987-01-01

395

Vapor phase ketonization of acetic acid on ceria based metal oxides  

SciTech Connect

The activities of CeO2, Mn2O3-CeO2 and ZrO2-CeO2 were measured for acetic acid ketonization under reaction conditions relevant to pyrolysis vapor upgrading. We show that the catalyst ranking changed depending on the reaction conditions. Mn2O3-CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 350 oC, while ZrO2 - CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 450 oC. Under high CO2 and steam concentration in the reactants, Mn2O3-CeO2 was the most active catalyst at 350 and 450 °C. The binding energies of steam and CO2 with the active phase were calculated to provide the insight into the tolerance of Mn2O3-CeO2 to steam and CO2.

Liu, Changjun; Karim, Ayman M.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Yong

2013-12-01

396

A molecular molybdenum electrocatalyst for generating hydrogen from acetic acid or water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reaction of 2-pyridylamino-N,N-bis(2-methylene-4,6-difluorophenol) (H2L?) and MoCl5 affords a molybdenum(VI) complex [MoL?(O)2] 1, a new molecular electrocatalyst, which has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical studies show that a molybdenum(IV) intermediate is responsible for the reductive proton to generate H2, and 1 can catalyze hydrogen evolution from acetic acid or aqueous buffer. Turnover frequency (TOF) reaches a maximum of 50.6 (in DMF) and 756 (in buffer, pH 6.0) moles of hydrogen per mole of catalyst per hour, respectively. Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs at glassy carbon (GC) electrode to give H2 over a 72 h electrolysis period and no observable decomposition of the catalyst.

Cao, Jie-Ping; Zhou, Ling-Ling; Fu, Ling-Zhi; Zhan, Shuzhong

2014-12-01

397

Competitive Oxidation of Volatile Fatty Acids by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria from an Oil Field in Argentina? †  

PubMed Central

Acetate, propionate, and butyrate, collectively referred to as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are considered among the most important electron donors for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) in oil fields. Samples obtained from a field in the Neuquén Basin, western Argentina, had significant activity of mesophilic SRB, hNRB, and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). In microcosms, containing VFA (3 mM each) and excess sulfate, SRB first used propionate and butyrate for the production of acetate, which reached concentrations of up to 12 mM prior to being used as an electron donor for sulfate reduction. In contrast, hNRB used all three organic acids with similar kinetics, while reducing nitrate to nitrite and nitrogen. Transient inhibition of VFA-utilizing SRB was observed with 0.5 mM nitrite and permanent inhibition with concentrations of 1 mM or more. The addition of nitrate to medium flowing into an upflow, packed-bed bioreactor with an established VFA-oxidizing SRB consortium led to a spike of nitrite up to 3 mM. The nitrite-mediated inhibition of SRB led, in turn, to the transient accumulation of up to 13 mM of acetate. The complete utilization of nitrate and the incomplete utilization of VFA, especially propionate, and sulfate indicated that SRB remained partially inhibited. Hence, in addition to lower sulfide concentrations, an increase in the concentration of acetate in the presence of sulfate in waters produced from an oil field subjected to nitrate injection may indicate whether the treatment is successful. The microbial community composition in the bioreactor, as determined by culturing and culture-independent techniques, indicated shifts with an increasing fraction of nitrate. With VFA and sulfate, the SRB genera Desulfobotulus, Desulfotignum, and Desulfobacter as well as the sulfur-reducing Desulfuromonas and the NR-SOB Arcobacter were detected. With VFA and nitrate, Pseudomonas spp. were present. hNRB/NR-SOB from the genus Sulfurospirillum were found under all conditions. PMID:18502934

Grigoryan, Aleksandr A.; Cornish, Sabrina L.; Buziak, Brenton; Lin, Shiping; Cavallaro, Adriana; Arensdorf, Joseph J.; Voordouw, Gerrit

2008-01-01

398

Catalytic wet air oxidation of acetic acid on carbon-supported ruthenium catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Ruthenium catalysts prepared by ion exchange of active carbons and high-surface-area graphites are active for the wet air oxidation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid (5-20 g/liter). A total conversion into CO{sub 2} can be achieved between 448 and 473 K using air as oxidizing agent. No leaching of ruthenium can be detected which indicates that the reaction proceeds on the heterogeneous catalysts. For the same particle size (1 nm), graphite-supported ruthenium catalysts are much more active (up to 0.4 mol h{sup -1} g{sub RU}{sup -1} at 473 K in a stirred batch reactor pressurized with air at 10 MPa) than active carbon-supported catalysts. The lower activities of the latters could be due to internal diffusion limitation since the 1-nm Ru particles are located inside the micropores. However, graphite-supported catalysts might be intrinsically more active because of an electron transfer from graphite to metal particles which would increase the resistance of ruthenium to oxygen poisoning. It was also shown that the activity of ruthenium is particle size dependent: the smaller the sizes, the lower the activities. This effect could be interpreted by the higher adsorption energy of oxygen on the small particles which produces a poisoning of the metal surface. From measurements of the reaction rates on the Ru/HSAG graphite catalyst at different temperatures, pressures, and acetic acid concentrations, it was established that the reaction orders were zero and 0.65 with respect to the concentration and oxygen pressure, respectively; the activation energy of the reaction was 100.5 kJ mol{sup -1}. An equation describing the reaction kinetics was proposed. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Gallezot, P.; Chaumet, S.; Perrard, A. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, Villeurbanne (France)] [and others] [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, Villeurbanne (France); and others

1997-05-01

399

THE USE OF ACETIC ACID IONTOPHORESIS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SOFT TISSUE INJURY  

PubMed Central

Background: Contusions are common injuries that occur in athletics. If repeated, complications like myositis ossificans can occur. This case describes the examination and treatment of an athlete with an acute soft tissue injury. Objective: To describe the treatment approach used with a hockey player who sustained a soft tissue injury in his upper extremity. Case Description: A 19 year old male sustained a soft tissue injury to his upper arm while playing hockey. The athlete complained of pain rated a 2-3 out of 10. He had a well circumscribed, firm, 8 by 5 centimeter palpable mass present along the lateral arm, and was able to passively flex his elbow from 56° to 135°, demonstrating a 56° loss of elbow extension. Functionally, he was able to perform most activities of daily living, but he was unable to play hockey. Over 29 days, the athlete was treated one time with pulsed ultrasound and ice and nine times with iontophoresis using a 2% acetic acid solution. Additionally, the athlete performed pain-free active range of motion exercises for the elbow. Outcome: Following treatment, the athlete's pain resolved, the palpable mass disappeared, and his passive range of motion at the elbow was 0° to 135°. Most importantly, the athlete was able to resume playing hockey. Discussion: Acetic acid iontophoresis may be a successful intervention for soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. In this case, it appeared helpful in decreasing the athlete's impairments and contributed to quicker resumption of all functional activities in less time than previously reported in the literature using traditional treatment interventions. PMID:21655380

Ebaugh, David

2010-01-01

400

Evaluation of curcumin acetates and amino acid conjugates as proteasome inhibitors.  

PubMed

Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main active ingredient of turmeric, a traditional herbal medicine and food of south Asia. Curcumin has been found to have a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Curcumin is currently being tested in clinical trials for treatment of various types of cancers, including multiple myeloma, pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Although no toxicity associated with curcumin (even at very high doses) has been observed, the effects of curcumin in other solid tumors have been modest, primarily due to poor water solubility and poor bioavailability in tissues remote from the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, there is a need for the discovery of curcumin analogs with better water solubility or greater bioavailability for the treatment of solid tumors such as prostate cancer. In this study, curcumin acetates and amino acid conjugates of curcumin were studied in terms of their proteasome inhibitory and antiproliferative effects against several human cancer cell lines. It was found that the water soluble amino acid conjugates of curcumin showed a potent antiproliferative effect and are potent proteasome inhibitors. Docking studies of the curcumin amino acid conjugates for proteasome inhibition were carried out to explain their biological activities. It is suggested that they may serve as the water soluble analogs of curcumin. PMID:20818481

Wan, Sheng Biao; Yang, Huanjie; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Chen, Di; Kanwar, Jyoti; Mohammad, Imthiyaz; Dou, Q Ping; Chan, Tak Hang

2010-10-01

401

Relationship among lipoperoxides, jasmonates and indole-3-acetic acid formation in potato tuber after wounding.  

PubMed

Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress can be mediated by oxidised products and in this study we analysed the relation among some of them and the growth factor indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The plant material used was potato tuber sliced below bud and incubated for different lengths of time before analysis. Wounding in potato tuber leads, in a very short time (0-30?min), to the generation of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). These reactive species could cause a subsequent increase of 9 and 13-lipoxygenase (LOX, E.C.1.13.12.12.), analysed by RT-PCR and spectrophotometric assay, LOOH, Jasmonates and IAA all quantified by GC-MS analysis. The activation of 9 and 13-LOX, using different timing, leads to the formation of LOOH with a subsequent generation of jasmonates and IAA as highlighted by the addition on the potato tuber slices of salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), an inhibitor of LOX activity. A correlation between jasmonates and IAA resulted by testing their reciprocal influence during wounding in potato tuber. The relationship occurring among each hormone analysed during wounding underlines the fact that the jasmonates level can be regulated in situ and this can suggest a role for these compounds in potato tuber which has been underestimated up to now. PMID:16036342

Reverberi, Massimo; Fanelli, Corrado; Zjalic, Slaven; Briganti, Stefania; Picardo, Mauro; Ricelli, Alessandra; Fabbri, Anna Adele

2005-06-01

402

PolarIndole-3-acetic AcidDiffusion inNonliving and  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polarindole-3-acetic acidmovementwasobserved inkilled plantsegments andinartificial modelsystems. Thepolar dif- fusion ofindole-3-acetic acidwasobserved intissue killed by chemical orphysical meansinan agar-plant systemandina multicelled Plexiglas dialysis chambercontaining hypocotyl tissue gradients orgradients ofanionexchange material. Itwassuggested thatpolar indole-3-acetic acidmovement in excised segments maybeareflection ofthediffusion ofindole- 3-acetic acidthrough asymmetric gradients ofmaterials with binding characteristics somewhatsimilar toionexchange. Thatpolar movementofIAA isan active process, pre- sumably dependent upon\\

W. R. KRUL

403

Microbicidal activity of tripotassium phosphate and fatty acids toward spoilage and pathogenic bacteria associated with poultry.  

PubMed

The ability of solutions of tripotassium phosphate (TPP) and fatty acids (lauric and myristic acids) to reduce populations of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms associated with processed poultry was examined. In vitro studies were conducted with cultures of bacteria (Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and yeasts (Candida ernobii and Yarrowia lipolytica). Cultures of the bacteria and yeasts were suspended in solutions of TPP or mixtures of TPP with lauric or myristic acid and mixed for 5 min. Viable numbers (log CFU per milliliter) in the suspensions were enumerated on microbiological agar. Results indicated that TPP solutions are highly bactericidal toward gram-negative bacteria and that mixtures of TPP and fatty acids are highly microbicidal toward gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts. The microbicidal activity of mixtures of TPP and fatty acids toward the native bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler carcasses was also examined. Skin samples were washed in mixtures of TPP and fatty acid, and the populations of total aerobic bacteria, campylobacters, enterococci, E. coli, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, staphylococci, and yeasts in the skin rinsates were enumerated on the appropriate microbiological media. Results indicated that washing the skin in mixtures of TPP and fatty acids produced significant reductions in the number of aerobic bacteria, campylobacters, E. coli, pseudomonads, and yeasts recovered from skin rinsates, but there was no significant reduction in the populations of enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, or staphylococci. These findings indicate that mixtures of TPP and fatty acids possess microbicidal activity against several microorganisms associated with processed poultry and that these solutions could be useful as microbicides to reduce the populations of some bacteria and yeasts associated with some poultry processing operations. PMID:16013388

Hinton, Arthur; Ingram, Kimberly D

2005-07-01

404

Effect of acetic acid present in bagasse hydrolysate on the activities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in Candida guilliermondii.  

PubMed

The first two steps in xylose metabolism are catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) (EC 1.1.1.21) and NAD(P)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) (EC 1.1.1.9), which lead to xylose-->xylitol-->xylulose conversion. Xylitol has high commercial value, due to its sweetening and anticariogenic properties, as well as several clinical applications. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse allows the separation of a xylose-rich hemicellulosic fraction that can be used as a substrate for Candida guilliermondii to produce xylitol. However, the hydrolysate contains acetic acid, an inhibitor of microbial metabolism. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on the activities of XR and XDH and on xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii were studied. For this purpose, fermentations were carried out in bagasse hydrolysate and in synthetic medium. The activities of XR and XDH were higher in the medium containing acetic acid than in control medium. Moreover, none of the fermentative parameters were significantly altered during cell culture. It was concluded that acetic acid does not interfere with xylitol formation since the increase in XR activity is proportional to XDH activity, leading to a greater production of xylitol and its subsequent conversion to xylulose. PMID:15107950

Lima, Luanne Helena Augusto; das Graças de Almeida Felipe, Maria; Vitolo, Michele; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

2004-11-01

405

Use of sulfate reducing bacteria in acid mine drainage treatment  

SciTech Connect

The environmental impacts caused by Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) were first recorded in 1556 by Georgius Agricola. In the United States 10,000 miles of streams and 29,000 surface acres of impoundments are estimated to be seriously affected by AMD. Abandoned surface mines are estimated to contribute about 15% of the drainage, while active mines (40%) and shaft and drift mines (45%) contribute the remainder. AMD results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), come in contact with oxygen and water. Acid generation occurs when metal sulfide minerals are oxidized according to the Initiator Reaction: FeS{sub 2}(pyrite) + 3 1/2O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {yields} Fe{sup 2+} + 2SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + 2H{sup +}. This reaction is one of many that results in increased metal mobility and increased acidity (lowered pH) of the mine water. The oxidation of ferrous sulfate is accelerated by bacterial action of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, a naturally occurring bacterium that at pH 3.5 or less, can rapidly accelerate the conversion of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} (ferrous iron) to Fe{sup 3+} (ferric iron), and can act as an oxidant for the oxidation of pyrite. Ferric ions, as well as other metal ions, and the sulfuric acid have a deleterious influence on the biota of streams receiving AMD. The Lilly/Orphan Boy Mine, located in the Elliston Mining District of Powell County, Montana, was selected as the Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) technology demonstration site. The mine is situated on a patented claim on Deerlodge National Forest Land about 11 miles south of Elliston, Montana. This abandoned mining operation consists of a 250-foot shaft, four horizontal workings, and some stopping. The shaft is flooded with AMD to the 74-foot level and is discharging about 3 gallons per minute (gpm) at a pH of 3.0 from the adit associated with this level.

Powers, T.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-10-01

406

Metabolizable Energy Values and Amino Acid Availability of Vetch (Vicia sativa) and Ervil (Vicia ervilia) Seeds Soaked in Water and Acetic Acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

In two experiments we evaluated the effect of water and acetic acid soaking on ME, apparent amino acid (AA) availability, and true AA availability of vetch (V) and ervil (E) seeds. In Experiment 1, the feedstuffs were untreated (U) V or coarsely ground V soaked in water (1:10, wt\\/vol) at 40 C for 72 h with a water change every

M. T. Farran; G. W. Barbour; M. G. Uwayjan; V. M. Ashkarian

407

Animal rennets as sources of dairy lactic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

The microbial composition of artisan and industrial animal rennet pastes was studied by using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Pyrosequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene allowed to identify 361 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the genus/species level. Among lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus thermophilus and some lactobacilli, mainly Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus reuteri, were the most abundant species, with differences among the samples. Twelve groups of microorganisms were targeted by viable plate counts revealing a dominance of mesophilic cocci. All rennets were able to acidify ultrahigh-temperature-processed (UHT) milk as shown by pH and total titratable acidity (TTA). Presumptive LAB isolated at the highest dilutions of acidified milks were phenotypically characterized, grouped, differentiated at the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Only 18 strains were clearly identified at the species level, as Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus, while the other strains, all belonging to the genus Enterococcus, could not be allotted into any previously described species. The phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains might represent different unknown species. All strains were evaluated for their dairy technological performances. All isolates produced diacetyl, and 10 of them produced a rapid pH drop in milk, but only 3 isolates were also autolytic. This work showed that animal rennet pastes can be sources of LAB, mainly enterococci, that might contribute to the microbial diversity associated with dairy productions. PMID:24441167

Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Ercolini, Danilo; Scatassa, Maria L; De Filippis, Francesca; Mancuso, Isabella; La Storia, Antonietta; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

2014-04-01

408

Animal Rennets as Sources of Dairy Lactic Acid Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The microbial composition of artisan and industrial animal rennet pastes was studied by using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Pyrosequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene allowed to identify 361 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the genus/species level. Among lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus thermophilus and some lactobacilli, mainly Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus reuteri, were the most abundant species, with differences among the samples. Twelve groups of microorganisms were targeted by viable plate counts revealing a dominance of mesophilic cocci. All rennets were able to acidify ultrahigh-temperature-processed (UHT) milk as shown by pH and total titratable acidity (TTA). Presumptive LAB isolated at the highest dilutions of acidified milks were phenotypically characterized, grouped, differentiated at the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Only 18 strains were clearly identified at the species level, as Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus, while the other strains, all belonging to the genus Enterococcus, could not be allotted into any previously described species. The phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains might represent different unknown species. All strains were evaluated for their dairy technological performances. All isolates produced diacetyl, and 10 of them produced a rapid pH drop in milk, but only 3 isolates were also autolytic. This work showed that animal rennet pastes can be sources of LAB, mainly enterococci, that might contribute to the microbial diversity associated with dairy productions. PMID:24441167

Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Ercolini, Danilo; Scatassa, Maria L.; De Filippis, Francesca; Mancuso, Isabella; La Storia, Antonietta; Moschetti, Giancarlo

2014-01-01

409

Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria of kefir grains.  

PubMed

A Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus HP1 strain with high exopolysaccharide activity was selected from among 40 strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from kefir grains. By associating the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus HP1 strain with Streptococcus thermophilus T15, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C15, Lactobacillus helveticus MP12, and Sacharomyces cerevisiae A13, a kefir starter was formed. The associated cultivation of the lactobacteria and yeast had a positive effect on the exopolysaccharide activity of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus HP1. The maximum exopolysaccharide concentration of the starter culture exceeded the one by the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus HP1 monoculture by approximately 1.7 times, and the time needed to reach the maximum concentration (824.3 mg exopolysacharides/l) was shortened by 6 h. The monomer composition of the exopolysaccharides from the kefir starter culture was represented by glucose and galactose in a 1.0:0.94 ratio, which proves that the polymer synthesized is kefiran. PMID:12440716

Frengova, Ginka I; Simova, Emilina D; Beshkova, Dora M; Simov, Zhelyasko I

2002-01-01

410

Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms) to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX), neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3), C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2)) from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2) was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2%) was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%). There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo. PMID:25046082

Vasama, Mari; Kumar, Himanshu; Salminen, Seppo; Haskard, Carolyn A.

2014-01-01

411

The Conjugated Auxin Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Aspartic Acid Promotes Plant Disease Development[C][W  

PubMed Central

Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone that regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. Auxin signaling is also known to promote plant disease caused by plant pathogens. However, the mechanism by which this hormone confers susceptibility to pathogens is not well understood. Here, we present evidence that fungal and bacterial plant pathogens hijack the host auxin metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana, leading to the accumulation of a conjugated form of the hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-Asp, to promote disease development. We also show that IAA-Asp increases pathogen progression in the plant by regulating the transcription of virulence genes. These data highlight a novel mechanism to promote plant susceptibility to pathogens through auxin conjugation. PMID:22374398

Gonzalez-Lamothe, Rocio; El Oirdi, Mohamed; Brisson, Normand; Bouarab, Kamal

2012-01-01

412

Amino acid-decarboxylase activity of bacteria isolated from fermented pork sausages  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of amino acid-decarboxylase activity in 92 strains of lactic acid bacteria, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Spanish fermented pork sausages was investigated. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth was determined by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography with o-phtalaldehyde post-column derivatization. Among the 66 lactic acid bacteria strains tested, 21 lactobacilli (in particular, Lactobacillus

Sara Bover-Cid; Marta Hugas; Maria Izquierdo-Pulido; M. Carmen Vidal-Carou

2001-01-01

413

The effects of citric and acetic acids on the formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite at 38 °C  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is concerned with the formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite at physiological temperature. Isothermal calorimetry, solution chemistry, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area analyses and FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterize the kinetics of HAp formation and the microstructure of the HAp formed in varying concentrations of citric and acetic acids, and in deionized water. The kinetics of HAp formation

K. S. Tenhuisen; P. W. Brown

1994-01-01

414

Metal-organic coordination architectures of azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

Four new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups, [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [CuL{sup 1}N{sub 3}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(L{sup 2}){sub 2}.0.5C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH.H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (3) and [Co(L{sup 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) (here, HL{sup 1}=1H-imidazole-1-yl-acetic acid, HL{sup 2}=1H-benzimidazole-1-yl-acetic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal structure analysis shows that 3 and 4 are 2D complexes with 4{sup 4}-sql topologies, while another 2D complex 1 has a (4{sup 3}){sub 2}(4{sup 6})-kgd topology. And 2 is a 3D complex composed dinuclear mu{sub 1,1}-bridging azido Cu{sup II} entities with distorted rutile topology. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. - Graphical Abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups are reported.

Hu Bowen; Zhao Jiongpeng; Yang Qian; Hu Tongliang; Du Wenping [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Bu Xianhe, E-mail: buxh@nankai.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2009-10-15

415

Kinetics of esterification of acetic acid with n-amyl alcohol in the presence of Amberlyst-36  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of esterification of acetic acid with amyl alcohol has been studied in the presence of Amberlyst-36 in its H+ form in a batch reactor. Experimental findings showed that the reaction is controlled by chemical step rather than external and internal mass transfer steps. Experimental data well fitted the kinetic model based on homogeneous reversible reaction. Temperature dependency of

Elif Öde? Akbay; Mehmet R. Alt?okka

2011-01-01

416

Effect of Acetic Acid, pH and MEG on the CO2 Top of the Line Corrosion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research work presents a study of Top of the Line Corrosion (TLC) on carbon steels in the presence of carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The influence of different parameters such as the presence of mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) and the use of pH control were studied in a 4\\

Concepcion Mendez; Michael Joosten; Yves Gunaltun; Alvaro Comacho; Srdjan Nesic; Yuhua Sun; Sandra Hernandez; Marc Singer

2005-01-01

417

Kinetics and Mechanism of Ethane Oxidation to Acetic Acid on Catalysts Based on Mo-V-Nb Oxides  

E-print Network

Kinetics and Mechanism of Ethane Oxidation to Acetic Acid on Catalysts Based on Mo-V-Nb Oxides and isotopic studies showed that C-H bond activation in ethane by surfaces essentially saturated with lattice oxygens is the sole kinetically relevant step in ethane oxidation on Mo-V-NbOx mixed oxides

Iglesia, Enrique

418

Liquid phase esterification of acetic acid over WO3 promoted ?-SiC in a solvent free system.  

PubMed

A series of tungstate promoted ?-SiC catalysts was synthesized by a wetness impregnation method. The as synthesized catalysts were unambiguously characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-Vis DRS, TEM, BET surface areas and FE-SEM, and simultaneously the total amount of the acidity of the catalysts was estimated by NH(3)-TPD. The catalytic activities of the synthesized materials were tested in the liquid phase esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol in a solvent free medium. The reaction parameters were optimized to a temperature of 120 °C, molar ratio of butanol and acetic acid of 1:2 and a reaction time of 6 h after performing a number of experiments. Under the optimum conditions, the catalytic esterification revealed a significant effect of 88% conversion with 100% selectivity to butyl acetate in 20 wt% WO(3)/?-SiC. This is the first report on the effective utilization of ?-SiC as a catalyst support for liquid phase esterification of acetic acid. PMID:23042240

Mishra, Gopa; Behera, Gobinda C; Singh, S K; Parida, K M

2012-12-21

419

Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in isolated axes from germinating bean seeds: The effect of wounding on the biosynthetic pathway  

E-print Network

Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in isolated axes from germinating bean seeds: The effect pathways were analyzed in isolated axes of germinating bean seedlings at various times after cotyledon are primarily responsible for the IAA biosynthesis occurring in isolated axes of germinating bean seedlings

Cooke, Todd J.

420

ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER ADSORPTION FROM BINARY AND TERNARY LIQUID MIXTURES ON HIGH-SILICA ZEOLITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a h...

421

Phase equilibria of the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-pentanol  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of organic acids from dilute solutions resulting from fermentation processes is becoming very important and many solvents have been tried to improve such recovery. Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary system water + acetic acid + 1-pentanol were measured over a temperature range of (288 to 323) K. The results were used to estimate the interaction parameters between each of the three compounds for the NRTL and UNIQUAC models and between each of the main groups of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 2} (paraffinic CH{sub 2}), OH, and COOH for the UNIFAC model as a function of temperature. The estimated interaction parameters were successfully used to predict the equilibrium compositions by the three models. The NRTL and UNIQUAC models were almost equally good in predicting the overall equilibrium compositions of the studied system. The UNIFAC model satisfactorily predicted the equilibrium compositions. On the basis of this work, the distribution coefficients were also calculated and compared with the experimental values.

Fahim, M.A.; Al-Muhtaseb, S.A.; Al-Nashef, I.M. [U.A.E. Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering] [U.A.E. Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1996-05-01

422

Adaptive mutation of Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108 enhances acetic acid fermentation ability at high temperature.  

PubMed

In vitro adaptation is one of the most challenging subjects in biology to understand adaptive evolution. Microbial adaptation to temperature is not only interesting in terms of understanding the adaptation mechanism, but also useful for industrial applications. In this study, we attempted the in vitro adaptation of Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108 by repeating its cultivation under high-temperature acetic acid fermentation conditions. As a result, thermo-adapted strains having the higher fermentation ability than the wild-type strain were obtained. Mutations and/or disruptions in several proteins of the adapted strains were detected with NGS sequencing technology. In particular, two different adapted strains had mutations or disruptions in three specific genes in common, suggesting that these genes are essential for thermotolerance or fermentation at higher temperature. In order to clarify their involvement in thermotolerance, two of the three genes were disrupted and their phenotype was examined. The results showed that mutations of the two proteins, MarR and an amino acid transporter, are partly responsible for higher fermentation ability and/or thermotolerance. Thus, it was suggested that these elevated abilities of the adapted strains are acquired by assembling several single gene mutations including the above two mutations. PMID:23524057

Matsutani, Minenosuke; Nishikura, Mitsuteru; Saichana, Natsaran; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Masud-Tippayasak, Uraiwan; Theergool, Gunjana; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

2013-05-20

423

Sol-gel process for preparation of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} from acidic acetates/ammonia/ascorbic acid systems  

SciTech Connect

YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub x} sols were prepared by addition of ammonia to acidic acetate solutions of Y{sup 3+}, Ba{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+}. Ascorbic acid was added to part of the sol. The resultant sols were gelled to a shard or a coating by evaporation at 60 C. Addition of ethanol to the sols facilitated formation of gel coatings, fabricated by a dipping technique, on Ag or glass or substrates. At 100 C, gels formed in the presence of ascorbic acid were perfectly amorphous, in contrast to crystalline acetate gels. The quality of coatings prepared from ascorbate gels was superior to that of acetate gel coatings.

Deptula, A.; Lada, W.; Olczak, T. [Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)] [Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Goretta, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Bartolomeo, A.; Casadio, S. [C.R.E. Casaccia, Rome (Italy)] [C.R.E. Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

1997-03-01

424

MoVO-based catalysts for the oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid. Influence of niobium and/or palladium on physicochemical  

E-print Network

1 MoVO-based catalysts for the oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid. Influence to acetic acid and ethylene is examined. Catalysts without molybdenum (VNb031Pd3e-4Ox) are also studied for comparison. The structural properties of the precursors and of the catalysts obtained by calcination

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

Acetic Acid as a Sclerosing Agent for Renal Cysts: Comparison with Ethanol in Follow-Up Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare follow-up results of sclerotherapy for renal cyst using 50% acetic acid with those using 99% ethanol as sclerosing agents.Methods: Eighty-one patients underwent sclerotherapy and 58 patients, 23 males, 35 females, aged 6-76 years, having a total of 60 cysts, were included in this study; the others were lost to follow-up. The renal cysts were diagnosed by sonography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sclerotherapy was performed using 50% acetic acid for 32 cysts in 31 patients and 99% ethanol for 28 cysts in 27 patients. Under fluoroscopic guidance, cystic fluid was aspirated as completely as possible. After instillation of a sclerosing agent corresponding to 11.7%-25% (4-100 ml) of the aspirated volume, the patient changed position for 20 min and then the agent was removed. Patients were followed up by sonography for a period of 1-49 months. The volume of the renal cyst after sclerotherapy was compared with that of the renal cyst calculated before sclerotherapy. Medical records were reviewed to analyze complications.Results: The mean volume after sclerotherapy of the 17 cysts followed for 3-4 months in the acetic acid group was 5.1% of the initial volume, and for the 14 cysts in the ethanol group it was 10.2%. Complete regression during follow-up was shown in 21 cysts (66%) in the acetic acid group; the mean volume of these cysts before the procedure was 245 ml. The mean volume of the nine (32%) completely regressed cysts in the ethanol group was 184 ml. Mild flank pain, which occurred in three patients in each group, was the only complication and resolved the next day.Conclusion: Acetic acid was an effective and safe sclerosing agent for renal cysts, tending to induce faster and more complete regression than ethanol.

Seo, Tae-Seok; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Joo Won; Park, Seong Jin [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Hoeki-dong 1, Dongdaemun-ku, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Sung-Goo [Department of Urology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Hoeki-dong 1, Dongdaemun-ku Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yang Hyeon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Hoeki-dong 1, Dongdaemun-ku, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of)

2000-03-15

426

Efficacy of Single-Session Percutaneous Drainage and 50% Acetic Acid Sclerotherapy for Treatment of Simple Renal Cysts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of single-session 50% acetic acid sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts, and to compare the therapeutic results of 5 and 20 min sclerosant dwell techniques. Methods. During the past 9 years, 50% acetic acid sclerotherapy was performed on 67 cysts in 66 patients. An acetic acid volume corresponding to a mean of 23% of the aspirated cyst volume was injected into the cysts. A 20 min dwell time with position changes was performed in 32 cysts (31 patients; group I) and 8% of volume for a 5 min dwell time in 35 cysts (35 patients; group II). Three- and 6-month sonographic or CT follow-up was performed for a minimum of 1 year. Complete regression was defined as no remaining cyst measurable on sonography with or without a scar at the renal cortex. Partial regression was defined as a decreased cyst volume compared with that before sclerotherapy. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the therapeutic results between the two groups. Results. For 67 simple renal cysts, complete regression on follow-up was observed in 21 of 32 cysts (66%; group I) and 22 of 35 cysts (63%; group II); the remaining 24 cysts all showed partial regression. The partial reduction rate of the cyst's volume was 97.4% (91.3-99.4%) in group I and 96.9% (90.8-99.5 %) in group II. There were no procedure-related major complications, and no statistically significant differences in the complete regression and partial volume reduction rates between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion. Fifty percent acetic acid is an effective and safe sclerosing agent for simple renal cysts. Fifty percent acetic acid sclerotherapy with a 5 min sclerosant dwell time, using a volume of about 10% of the aspirated volume, is sufficient for satisfactory results of simple renal cyst sclerotherapy.

Kwon, Se Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ohjh6108@hanmail.net; Seo, Tae-Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ho Chul [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

2007-11-15

427

Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.  

PubMed

A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels. PMID:22483872

Shekhar, R

2012-05-15

428

Influence of salt concentration and temperature on the fatty acid compositions of Ectothiorhodospira and other halophilic phototrophic purple bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influences of the salt concentration on the fatty acid composition of Ectothiorhodospira species and other phototrophic purple bacteria have been analysed. Major fatty acids in bacteria of the genera Rhodobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Chromatium, and Ectothiorhodospira were straight chain saturated and monounsaturated C-16 and C-18 fatty acids. Salt-dependent responses of all investigated bacteria revealed relations to their salt optima. Minimum values of

Johannes F. Imhoff; Bernhard Thiemann

1991-01-01

429

Fermentative degradation of dipicolinic acid (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) by a defined coculture of strictly anaerobic bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Degradation of dipicolinic acid (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) under strictly anaerobic conditions was studied in enrichment cultures from marine and freshwater sediments. In all cases, dipicolinic acid was completely degraded. From an enrichment culture from a marine sediment, a defined coculture of two bacteria was isolated. The dipicolinic acid-fermenting bacterium was a Gram-negative, non-sporeforming strictly anaerobic short rod which utilized dipicolinic acid

Birgit Seyfried I; Bernhard Schink

1990-01-01

430

Effect of aflatoxin B-1 on the proteolytic activity of some lactic-acid bacteria.  

PubMed

The proteolytic activity of five (ATCC) strains of lactic acid bacteria were investigated in the presence of different concentrations of aflatoxin B-1. The presented data revealed that aflatoxin in milk can affect the lactic acid bacteria which are used in the manufacture of dairy products. Such effect depends on toxin concentration and the species of lactic acid bacteria. This investigation is of practical value because it may explain the effect which occurs during cheese manufacture. This defect can be characterized by off flavour which can be very undesirable for a ripened cheese. PMID:6429542

Mohran, M A; Mega