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Sample records for acetyl coa carboxylase

  1. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  2. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Eun; Walsh, Matthew C.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; James, David E.; Wherry, E. John; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26367121

  3. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  4. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. PMID:27181349

  5. Chromium downregulates the expression of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 gene in lipogenic tissues of domestic goats: a potential strategy for meat quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Najafpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Zali, Abolfazl; Moradi-Shahrebabak, Hossein; Mousapour, Hojatollah

    2014-06-15

    Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carboxylation of Acetyl CoA to form Malonyl CoA, the key intermediate metabolite in fatty acid synthesis. In this study, the mRNA expression of the ACC1 gene was evaluated in four different tissues (liver, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and longissimus muscle) of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) kids feeding on four different levels of trivalent chromium (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5mg/day) as food supplementation. RT-qPCR technique was used for expression analyses and heat shock protein 90 gene (HSP-90) was considered as reference gene for data normalization. Our results revealed that 1.5mg/day chromium significantly reduced the expression of the ACC1 gene in liver, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat tissues, but not in longissimus muscles (P<0.05). We measured some phenotypic traits of kid's carcasses to detect their probable correlations with chromium-mediated downregulation of ACC1 expression. Interestingly, changes in ACC1 expression were accompanied with decreased accumulation of fats in adipose tissues such that the subcutaneous fat thickness and heart fat percentage decreased in kids feeding on chromium. By contrast, chromium supplemented kids showed higher percentage of muscles despite the fact that their total body weight did not differ from that of non-supplemented kids. Our study suggests that trivalent chromium alters the direction of energy accumulation towards muscles rather than fats and provides insights into application of chromium supplementation as a useful strategy for improvement of meat quality in domestic animals. PMID:24704275

  6. Cardiac-specific deletion of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) prevents metabolic remodeling during pressure-overload hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Olson, David P.; Marney, Luke C.; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Synovec, Robert E.; Tian, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) with increased reliance on glucose are hallmarks of metabolic remodeling that occurs in pathological cardiac hypertrophy and is associated with decreased myocardial energetics and impaired cardiac function. To date, it has not been tested whether prevention of the metabolic switch that occurs during the development of cardiac hypertrophy has unequivocal benefits on cardiac function and energetics. Objectives Since malonyl CoA production via acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid transport, we hypothesized that mice with a cardiac-specific deletion of ACC2 (ACC2H−/−) would maintain cardiac fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and improve function and energetics during the development of pressure-overload hypertrophy. Methods and Results ACC2 deletion led to a significant reduction in cardiac malonyl CoA levels. In isolated perfused heart experiments, left ventricular (LV) function and oxygen consumption were similiar in ACC2H−/− mice despite an ~60% increase in FAO compared to controls (CON). After 8 weeks of pressure-overload via transverse aortic constriction (TAC), ACC2H−/− mice exhibited a substrate utilization profile similar to sham animals while CON-TAC hearts had decreased FAO with increased glycolysis and anaplerosis. Myocardial energetics, assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and cardiac function were maintained in ACC2H−/− after 8 weeks of TAC. Furthermore, ACC2H−/−-TAC demonstrated an attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy with a significant reduction in fibrosis relative to CON-TAC. Conclusions These data suggest that reversion to the fetal metabolic profile in chronic pathological hypertrophy is associated with impaired myocardial function and energetics and maintenance of the inherent cardiac metabolic profile and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:22730442

  7. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  8. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  9. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  10. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity in Developing Seedlings and Chloroplasts of Barley and Its Virescens Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lawrence W.; Zalik, Saul

    1981-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity of whole tissue homogenates and chloroplast preparations was analyzed as the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of [14C]bicarbonate into an acid-stable product. The absolute requirement for ATP and MgCl2, the complete inhibition with avidin, and end-product analysis were consistent with the presence of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Little difference was found between the mutant and normal tissue homogenates from the 1- to 3-day growth stages, during which period both showed a 3-fold increase. However, by 4 days, the activity of the mutant exceeded that of the normal. Fractionation studies showed that the enzyme was a soluble protein present in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. The biotin content was also highest in the stroma, although it was found in the lamellar fraction as well. For both the mutant and the normal, the highest acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities were obtained in the stromal preparations from 4-day seedlings (54 and 31 nmoles per milligram protein per minute for the mutant and the normal, respectively) with a progressive decline by 6 and 8 days. The difference between the mutant and the normal was not due to the accumulation of an inhibitor in the normal. PMID:16661731

  11. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  12. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  13. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  14. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control.

  15. Kinetic studies on two isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from maize leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, D; Price, L J; Alban, C; Dehaye, L; Job, D; Cole, D J; Pallett, K E; Harwood, J L

    1996-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of two multifunctional isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) from maize leaves (a major isoform, ACCase1 and a minor isoform, ACCase2) have been investigated with respect to reaction mechanism, inhibition by two graminicides of the aryloxyphenoxypropionate class (quizalofop and fluazifop) and some cellular metabolites. Substrate interaction and product inhibition patterns indicated that ADP and P(i) products from the first partial reaction were not released before acetyl-CoA bound to the enzymes. Product inhibition patterns did not match exactly those predicted for an ordered Ter Ter or a random Ter Ter mechanism, but were close to those postulated for an ordered mechanism. ACCase2 was about 1/2000 as sensitive as ACCase1 to quizalofop but only about 1/150 as sensitive to fluazifop. Fitting inhibition data to the Hill equation indicated that binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase1 was non-cooperative, as shown by the Hill constant (n(app)) values of 0.86 and 1.16 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. Apparent inhibition constant values (K' from the Hill equation) for ACCase1 were 0.054 microM for quizalofop and 21.8 microM for fluazifop. On the other hand, binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase2 exhibited positive co-operativity, as shown by the (napp) values of 1.85 and 1.59 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. K' values for ACCase2 were 1.7 mM for quizalofop and 140 mM for fluazifop. Kinetic parameters for the co-operative binding of quizalofop to maize ACCase2 were close to those of another multifunctional ACCase of limited sensitivity to graminicide, ACC220 from pea. Inhibition of ACCase1 by quizalofop was mixed-type with respect to acetyl-CoA or ATP, but the concentration of acetyl-CoA had the greater effect on the level of inhibition. Neither ACCase1 nor ACCase2 was appreciably sensitive to CoA esters of palmitic acid (16:0) or oleic acid (18:1). Approximate IC50 values were 10 microM (ACCase2) and 50

  16. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-06-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves. PMID:7610168

  17. Regulation of Plant Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase by Adenylate Nucleotides 1

    PubMed Central

    Eastwell, Kenneth C.; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    The assay of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.2) does not follow ideal zero-order kinetics when assayed in a crude extract from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germ. Our results show that the lack of ideality is the consequence of contamination by ATPase and adenylate kinase. These enzyme activities generate significant amounts of ADP and AMP in the assay mixture, thus limiting the availability of ATP for the carboxylase reaction. Moreover, ADP and AMP are competitive inhibitors, with respect to ATP, of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Similar relationships between adenylate nucleotides and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are found in isolated chloroplasts. There is no evidence that acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in the extracts of the plant systems examined is altered by covalent modification, such as a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. A scheme is presented that illustrates the dependency of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthesis on the energy demands of the chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:16662980

  18. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  19. Dimerization of the Bacterial Biotin Carboxylase Subunit Is Required for Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acteyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC) is the first committed enzyme of the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Escherichia coli ACC is composed of four different proteins. The first enzymatic activity of the ACC complex, biotin carboxylase (BC), catalyzes the carboxylation of the protein-bound biotin moiety of another subunit with bicarbonate in an ATP-dependent reaction. Although BC is found as a dimer in cell extracts and the carboxylase activities of the two subunits of the dimer are interdependent, mutant BC proteins deficient in dimerization are reported to retain appreciable activity in vitro (Y. Shen, C. Y. Chou, G. G. Chang, and L. Tong, Mol. Cell 22:807–818, 2006). However, in vivo BC must interact with the other proteins of the complex, and thus studies of the isolated BC may not reflect the intracellular function of the enzyme. We have tested the abilities of three BC mutant proteins deficient in dimerization to support growth and report that the two BC proteins most deficient in dimerization fail to support growth unless expressed at high levels. In contrast, the wild-type protein supports growth at low expression levels. We conclude that BC must be dimeric to fulfill its physiological function. PMID:22037404

  20. Activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glutamate and Mg2+ is mediated by protein phosphatase-2A.

    PubMed Central

    Gaussin, V; Hue, L; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1996-01-01

    The activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by Na(+)-cotransported amino acids such as glutamine has been attributed mainly to the stimulation of its dephosphorylation by accumulating dicarboxylic acids, e.g. glutamate. We report here on a hepatic species of protein phosphatase-2A that activates acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the presence of physiological concentrations of glutamate or Mg2+ and, under these conditions, accounts for virtually all the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity. Glutamate also stimulated the dephosphorylation of a synthetic pentadecapeptide encompassing the Ser-79 phosphorylation site of rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but did not affect the dephosphorylation of other substrates such as phosphorylase. Conversely, protamine, which stimulated the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase, inhibited the activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. A comparison with various species of muscle protein phosphatase-2A showed that the stimulatory effects of glutamate and Mg2+ on the acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity are largely mediated by the regulatory A subunit. Glutamate and Mg2+ emerge from our study as novel regulators of protein phosphatase-2A when acting on acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:8645208

  1. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  2. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  3. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  4. Tissue Distribution of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase [acetyl-CoA—carbon dioxide ligase (ADP forming), EC 6.4.1.2] is a biotin-containing enzyme catalyzing the formation of malonyl-CoA. The tissue distribution of this enzyme was determined for leaves of C3- and C4-plants. The mesophyll tissues of the C3-plants Pisum sativum and Allium porrum contained 90% of the leaf acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, with the epidermal tissues containing the remainder. Western blotting of proteins fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using 125I-streptavidin as a probe, revealed biotinyl proteins of molecular weights 62,000, 51,000, and 32,000 in P. sativum and 62,000, 34,000, and 32,000 in A. porrum. In the C4-plant sorghum, epidermal protoplasts, mesophyll protoplasts and strands of bundle sheath cells contained 35, 47, and 17%, respectively, of the total leaf acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In Zea mays leaves the respective figures were 10% for epidermal protoplasts, 56% for mesophyll protoplasts, and 32% for bundle sheath strands. Biotinyl proteins of molecular weights 62,000 and 51,000 were identified in leaves of sorghum and Z. mays. The results are discussed with respect to each tissue's requirements for malonyl-CoA for various metabolic pathways. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663756

  5. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme. PMID:26794803

  6. Regulation and structure of the heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Salie, Matthew J; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) catalyzes the committed step of the de novo fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) pathway by converting acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. Two forms of ACCase exist in nature, a homomeric and heteromic form. The heteromeric form of this enzyme requires four different subunits for activity: biotin carboxylase; biotin carboxyl carrier protein; and α- and β-carboxyltransferases. Heteromeric ACCases (htACCase) can be found in prokaryotes and the plastids of most plants. The plant htACCase is regulated by diverse mechanisms reflected by the biochemical and genetic complexity of this multienzyme complex and the plastid stroma where it resides. In this review we summarize the regulation of the plant htACCase and also describe the structural characteristics of this complex from both prokaryotes and plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27091637

  7. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by cystamine may mediate the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-03-01

    Pantethine is a versatile and well-tolerated hypolipidemic agent whose efficacy in this regard appears to be mediated by its catabolic product cystamine, a nucleophile which avidly attacks disulfide groups. An overview of pantethine research suggests that the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine reflects cystamine-mediated inhibition of the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which can be expected to activate hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase as well as a more distal enzyme in the cholesterol synthetic pathway may account for pantethine's hypocholesterolemic effects. If pantethine does indeed effectively inhibit hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, it may have adjuvant utility in the hepatothermic therapy of obesity. As a safe and effective compound of natural origin, pantethine merits broader use in the management of hyperlipidemias. PMID:11359352

  8. Discovery of spirocyclic-diamine inhibitors of mammalian acetyl CoA-carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kung, Daniel W; Griffith, David A; Esler, William P; Vajdos, Felix F; Mathiowetz, Alan M; Doran, Shawn D; Amor, Paul A; Bagley, Scott W; Banks, Tereece; Cabral, Shawn; Ford, Kristen; Garcia-Irizarry, Carmen N; Landis, Margaret S; Loomis, Kathrine; McPherson, Kirk; Niosi, Mark; Rockwell, Kristin L; Rose, Colin; Smith, Aaron C; Southers, James A; Tapley, Susan; Tu, Meihua; Valentine, James J

    2015-11-15

    A novel series of spirocyclic-diamine based, isoform non-selective inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is described. These spirodiamine derivatives were discovered by design of a library to mimic the structural rigidity and hydrogen-bonding pattern observed in the co-crystal structure of spirochromanone inhibitor I. The lead compound 3.5.1 inhibited de novo lipogenesis in rat hepatocytes, with an IC50 of 0.30 μM. PMID:26411795

  9. Rapid changes in chick liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase indicative of phosphorylation control.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D

    1983-10-31

    Liver fatty acid synthesis was suppressed 75,95 and 90% within 1, 2 and 4 hrs respectively of depriving chicks of food. Accompanying this rapid drop in lipogenesis was a marked reduction in acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, i.e., 40 and 75% decrease after 2 and 4 hrs of fasting. Adding 10 mM citrate to the crude liver supernatant, or incubating the supernatant at 37 degrees, 30 min increased activity of the briefly fasted birds, but neither method restored carboxylase activity to fed level. Heat and citrate activation were additive and together resulted in an activity comparable to the fed condition. The heat-dependent activation was accelerated by exogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase, and completely blocked by 100 mM NaF. Thus, enhancement of carboxylase activity from liver of briefly fasted chicks appears to be a dephosphorylation process. This is the first report indicating acute changes in chick carboxylase activity may involve a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism. PMID:6140006

  10. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  11. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  12. Enhanced activity of acetyl CoA synthetase adsorbed on smart microgel: an implication for precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-01-28

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl CoA) is an essential precursor molecule for synthesis of metabolites such as the polyketide-based drugs (tetracycline, mitharamycin, Zocor, etc.) fats, lipids, and cholesterol. Acetyl CoA synthetase (Acs) is one of the enzymes that catalyzes acetyl CoA synthesis, and this enzyme is essentially employed for continuous supply of the acetyl CoA for the production of these metabolites. To achieve reusable and a more robust entity of the enzyme, we carried out the immobilization of Acs on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgels via adsorption. Cationic PNIPAm-PEI microgel was synthesized by one-step graft copolymerization of NIPAm and N,N-methylene bis-acrylamide (MBA) from PEI. Adsorption studies of Acs on microgel indicated high binding of enzymes, with a maximum binding capacity of 286 μg/mg of microgel for Acs was achieved. The immobilized enzymes showed improved biocatalytic efficiency over free enzymes, beside this, the reaction parameters and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy studies indicated no significant changes in the enzyme structure after immobilization. This thoroughly characterized enzyme bioconjugate was further immobilized on an ultrathin membrane to assess the same reaction in flow through condition. Bioconjugate was covalently immobilized on a thin layer of preformed microgel support upon polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track etched membrane. The prepared membrane was used in a dead end filtration device to monitor the bioconversion efficiency and operational stability of cross-linked bioconjugate. The membrane reactor showed consistent operational stability and maintained >70% of initial activity after 7 consecutive operation cycles. PMID:25561344

  13. Crystal structure of the 500 kD yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases1–6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope7,8. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250 kD, multi-domain enzymes and function as homo-dimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80 kD central region that shares no homology with other proteins. While the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known1,9–14, currently there is no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500 kD holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is strikingly different from those of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes explain why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A15,16 and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just prior to the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. PMID:26458104

  14. Crystal structure of the 500-kDa yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-10-29

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250-kilodalton (kDa), multi-domain enzymes and function as homodimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80-kDa central region that shares no homology with other proteins. Although the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known, there is currently no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500-kDa holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is remarkably different from that of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of the BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes reveal why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just before the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. PMID:26458104

  15. Correlation of ATP Citrate Lyase and Acetyl CoA Levels with Trichothecene Production in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-01-01

    Thecorrelation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride. PMID:24284828

  16. Mitochondrial SIRT4-type proteins in C. elegans and mammals interact with pyruvate carboxylase and other acetylated biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Martina; Karaca, Samir; Wenzel, Dirk; Ho, Linh; Tishkoff, Daniel; Lombard, David B.; Verdin, Eric; Urlaub, Henning; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The biological and enzymatic function of SIRT4 is largely uncharacterized. We show that the C. elegans SIR-2.2 and SIR-2.3 orthologs of SIRT4 are ubiquitously expressed, also localize to mitochondria and function during oxidative stress. Further, we identified conserved interaction with mitochondrial biotin-dependent carboxylases (PC, PCC, MCCC), key enzymes in anaplerosis and ketone body formation. The carboxylases were found acetylated on multiple lysine residues and detailed analysis of mPC suggested that one of these residues, K748ac, might regulate enzymatic activity. Nevertheless, no changes in mPC acetylation levels and enzymatic activity could be detected upon overexpression or loss of functional SIRT4. PMID:23438705

  17. Inhibition of biotin carboxylase by a reaction intermediate analog: implications for the kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C Z; Amspacher, D; Strongin, R; Waldrop, G L

    1999-12-20

    The first committed step in long-chain fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the multienzyme complex acetyl CoA carboxylase. One component of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex is biotin carboxylase which catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin. The Escherichia coli form of biotin carboxylase can be isolated from the other components of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex such that enzymatic activity is retained. The synthesis of a reaction intermediate analog inhibitor of biotin carboxylase has been described recently (Organic Lett. 1, 99-102, 1999). The inhibitor is formed by coupling phosphonoacetic acid to the 1'-N of biotin. In this paper the characterization of the inhibition of biotin carboxylase by this reaction-intermediate analog is described. The analog showed competitive inhibition versus ATP with a slope inhibition constant of 8 mM. Noncompetitive inhibition was found for the analog versus biotin. Phosphonoacetate exhibited competitive inhibition with respect to ATP and noncompetitive inhibition versus bicarbonate. Biotin was found to be a noncompetitive substrate inhibitor of biotin carboxylase. These data suggested that biotin carboxylase had an ordered addition of substrates with ATP binding first followed by bicarbonate and then biotin. PMID:10600526

  18. Studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase from rat mammary gland and mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, P M; Feltman, D S; Ahmad, F

    1982-01-01

    The activities of two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, were determined in two transplantable mammary adenocarcinomas (13762 and R3230AC) carried by non-pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats, and in mammary tissue of control animals (non-tumour-carrying) of comparable physiological states. During mammary-gland differentiation of control or tumour-carrying animals, the activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in the lactating gland increased by about 40--50-fold over the values found in non-pregnant animals. On the other hand, in tumours carried by lactating dams there were only modest increases (1.5--2-fold) in acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase compared with the neoplasms carried by non-pregnant animals. On the basis of the Km values for different substrates and immunodiffusion and immunotitration data, the fatty acid synthase of neoplastic tissues appeared to be indistinguishable from the control mammary-gland enzyme. However, a comparison of the immunotitration and immunodiffusion experiments indicated that the mammary-gland acetyl-CoA carboxylase might differ from the enzyme present in mammary neoplasms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6130760

  19. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors from avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruits.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, H; Ueda, C; Kawabata, J; Kasai, T

    2001-07-01

    A methanol extract of avocado fruits showed potent inhibitory activity against acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis. The active principles were isolated and identified as (5E,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-5,12,15-trienyl (1), (2R,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-12,15-dienyl (2), (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl (3) and (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl (4) acetates by instrumental analyses. The IC50 of the compounds were 4.0 x 10(-6), 4.9 x 10(-6), 9.4 x 10(-6), and 5.1 x 10(-6) M, respectively. PMID:11515553

  20. Different sites of inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by malonyl-CoA, and by acetyl-CoA and CoA, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zierz, S; Engel, A G

    1987-01-01

    The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT, EC 2.3.1.21) by malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and free CoA was studied in sonicated skeletal-muscle homogenates from normal human subjects and from five patients with a mutant CPT [Zierz & Engel (1985) Eur. J. Biochem. 149, 207-214]. (1) Malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and CoA were competitive inhibitors of CPT with palmitoyl-CoA. (2) Acetyl-CoA and CoA inhibited normal and mutant CPT to the same degree, whereas malonyl-CoA inhibited mutant CPT more than normal CPT. (3) Triton X-100 abolished the inhibition of normal CPT by malonyl-CoA, but not by acetyl-CoA or CoA. Triton X-100 by itself caused loss of activity of the mutant CPT. (4) In the concentration range 0.1-0.4 mM, the inhibitory effects of any two of the three inhibitors were synergistic. (5) The inhibitory constants (Ki) for acetyl-CoA and CoA were close to 45 microM. The Ki for malonyl-CoA was 200-fold lower, or 0.22 microM. Addition of 40 microM-acetyl-CoA or CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. Addition of 20 microM-CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. (6) The findings indicate that acetyl-CoA and CoA can inhibit CPT at the catalytic site or a nearby site which is different from that at which malonyl-CoA inhibits CPT. (7) The fact that small changes in the concentration of acetyl-CoA and CoA can antagonize the inhibitory effect of malonyl-CoA suggests that these compounds could modulate the inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA. PMID:3663146

  1. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  2. Insulin stimulates the dephosphorylation and activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Witters, L.A.; Watts, T.D.; Daniels, D.L.; Evans, J.L. )

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism underlying the ability of insulin to acutely activate acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been examined in Fao Reuber hepatoma cells. Insulin promotes the rapid activation of AcCoACase, as measured in cell lysates, and this stimulation persists to the same degree after isolation of AcCoACase by avidin-Sepharose chromatography. The insulin-stimulated enzyme, as compared with control enzyme, exhibits an increase in both citrate-independent and -dependent activity and a decrease in the K{sub a} for citrate. Direct examination of the phosphorylation state of isolated {sup 32}P-labeled AcCoACase after insulin exposure reveals a marked decrease in total enzyme phosphorylation coincident with activation. The dephosphorylation due to insulin appears to be restricted to the phosphorylation sites previously shown to regulate AcCoACase activity. All of these effects of insulin are mimicked by a low molecular weight autocrine factor, tentatively identified as an oligosaccharide, present in conditioned medium of hepatoma cells. These data suggest that insulin may activate AcCoACase by inhibiting the activity of protein kinase(s) or stimulating the activity of protein phosphatase(s) that control the phosphorylation state of the enzyme.

  3. Improving polyketide and fatty acid synthesis by engineering of the yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Wook; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2014-10-10

    Polyketides and fatty acids are important in the production of pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals, and biofuels. The synthesis of the malonyl-CoA building block, catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), is considered a limiting step to achieving high titers of polyketides and fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acc1 is deactivated by AMP-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (Snf1) when glucose is depleted. To prevent this deactivation, the enzyme was aligned with the Rattus norvegicus (rat) Acc1 to identify a critical amino acid (Ser-1157) for phosphorylation and deactivation. Introduction of a S1157A mutation into Acc1 resulted in 9-fold higher specific activity following glucose depletion. The enzyme was tested in yeast engineered to produce the polyketide 6-methylsalisylic acid (6-MSA). Both 6-MSA and native fatty acid levels increased by 3-fold. Utilization of this modified Acc1 enzyme will also be beneficial for other products built from malonyl-CoA. PMID:25078432

  4. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level. PMID:26482193

  5. Glucose and fat metabolism in adipose tissue of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, WonKeun; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi; Kordari, Parichher; Gu, Zeiwei; Shaikenov, Tattym; Chirala, Subrahmanyam S.; Wakil, Salih J.

    2005-01-01

    Acc2-/- mutant mice, when fed a high-fat/high-carbohydrate (HF/HC) diet, were protected against diet-induced obesity and diabetes. To investigate the role of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) in the regulation of energy metabolism in adipose tissues, we studied fatty acid and glucose oxidation in primary cultures of adipocytes isolated from wild-type and Acc2-/- mutant mice fed either normal chow or a HF/HC diet. When fed normal chow, oxidation of [14C]palmitate in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice was ≈80% higher than in adipocytes of WT mice, and it remained significantly higher in the presence of insulin. Interestingly, in addition to increased fatty acid oxidation, we also observed increased glucose oxidation in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that of WT mice. When fed a HF/HC diet for 4-5 months, adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice maintained a 25% higher palmitate oxidation and a 2-fold higher glucose oxidation than WT mice. The mRNA level of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) decreased several fold in the adipose tissue of WT mice fed a HF/HC diet; however, in the adipose tissue of Acc2-/- mutant mice, it was 7-fold higher. Moreover, lipolysis activity was higher in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that in WT mice. These findings suggest that continuous fatty acid oxidation in the adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice, combined with a higher level of glucose oxidation and a higher rate of lipolysis, are major factors leading to efficient maintenance of insulin sensitivity and leaner Acc2-/- mutant mice. PMID:15677334

  6. Mechanism of glucagon inhibition of liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Interrelationship of the effects of phosphorylation, polymer-protomer transition, and citrate on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Swenson, T L; Porter, J W

    1985-03-25

    The short-term regulation of rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glucagon has been studied in hepatocytes from rats that had been fasted and refed a fat-free diet. Glucagon inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can be accounted for by a direct correlation between phosphorylation, polymer-protomer ratio, and activity. Glucagon rapidly inactivates acetyl-CoA carboxylase with an accompanying 4-fold increase in the phosphorylation of the enzyme and 3-fold increase in the protomer-polymer ratio of enzyme protein. Citrate, an allosteric activator of acetyl-CoA carboxylase required for enzyme activity, has no effect on these phenomena, indicating a mechanism that is independent of citrate concentration within the cell. The observation of these effects of glucagon on acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity is absolutely dependent upon the minimization of proteolytic degradation of the enzyme after cell lysis. Therefore, for the first time, an interrelationship has been demonstrated between phosphorylation, protomer-polymer ratio, and citrate for the inactivation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glucagon. PMID:2857722

  7. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in isolated rat adipocytes incubated with glucagon. Interactions with the effects of insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Corstorphine, Clark G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Adipocytes isolated from epididymal fat-pads of fed rats were incubated with different concentrations of glucagon, insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase, and the effects of these agents on the `initial' activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the cells were studied. 2. Glucagon (at concentrations between 0.1 and 10nm) inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Maximal inhibition was approx. 70% of the `control' activity in the absence of added hormone, and the concentration of hormone required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.3–0.5nm-glucagon. 3. Incubation of cells with adenosine deaminase resulted in a similar inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Preincubation of adipocytes with adenosine deaminase did not alter either the sensitivity of carboxylase activity to increasing concentrations of glucagon or the maximal extent of inhibition. 4. Adrenaline inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase to the same extent as glucagon. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the sensitivity of enzyme activity to adrenaline or the degree of maximal inhibition. 5. Insulin activated the enzyme by 70–80% of `control' activity. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the concentration of insulin required to produce half the maximal stimulatory effect (about 12μunits of insulin/ml). The effects of insulin and glucagon appeared to be mediated completely independently, and were approximately quantitatively similar but opposite. These characteristics resulted in the mutual cancellation of the effects of the two hormones when they were both present at equally effective concentrations. 6. The implications of these findings with regard to current concepts about the mechanism of regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and to the regulation of the enzyme in vivo are discussed. PMID:6131671

  8. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  9. Association of polymorphisms in the promoter I of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha gene with beef fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter I (PI) region of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA) gene and evaluate the extent to which they were associated with lipid-related traits and fatty acid composition of beef. Eight novel SNPs w...

  10. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha(-1)) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha(-1)) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar (14)C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of (14)C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  11. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  12. [The protective effect of pantothenic acid derivatives and changes in the system of acetyl CoA metabolism in acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Dorofeev, B F; Omel'ianchik, S N

    1988-01-01

    Calcium pantothenate (CaP), calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CaPP), pantethine, panthenol, sulfopantetheine and CoA decrease acute toxicity of acetaldehyde in mice. All studied compounds diminish duration of the narcotic action of ethanol--ET (3.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and rats. In the latter this effect is realized at the expense of "long sleeping" and "middle sleeping" animals. CaP (150 mg/kg subcutaneously) and CaPP (100 mg/kg subcutaneously) prevent hypothermia and a decrease of oxygen consumption in rats induced by ET administration. Combined administration of ET, CaP and CaPP leads to a characteristic increase of acid-soluble CoA fractions in the rat liver and a relative decrease of acetyl CoA synthetase and N-acetyltransferase reactions. The antitoxic effect of preparations of pantothenic acid is not mediated by CoA-dependent reactions of detoxication, but most probably is due to intensification of ET oxidation and perhaps to its elimination from the organism. PMID:2905277

  13. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  14. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibition by ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, and modulates dyslipidemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, Geraldine; Greenwood, Jeremy; Bhat, Sathesh; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Ruiying; Paul, Debamita; Tong, Liang; Saha, Asish K.; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana; Harwood, H. James

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous inhibition of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) isozymes ACC1 and ACC2 results in concomitant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and may favorably affect the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Using structure-based drug design, we have identified a series of potent allosteric protein–protein interaction inhibitors, exemplified by ND-630, that interact within the ACC phosphopeptide acceptor and dimerization site to prevent dimerization and inhibit the enzymatic activity of both ACC isozymes, reduce fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in animals, and exhibit favorable drug-like properties. When administered chronically to rats with diet-induced obesity, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, reduces weight gain without affecting food intake, and favorably affects dyslipidemia. When administered chronically to Zucker diabetic fatty rats, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and reduces hemoglobin A1c (0.9% reduction). Together, these data suggest that ACC inhibition by representatives of this series may be useful in treating a variety of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and fatty liver disease. PMID:26976583

  15. A Different Mechanism for the Inhibition of the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Acetyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase by Tepraloxydim

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, S.; Callaghan, M; Watson, K; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and are attractive targets for drug discovery. Haloxyfop and tepraloxydim belong to two distinct classes of commercial herbicides and kill sensitive plants by inhibiting the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity of ACC. Our earlier structural studies showed that haloxyfop is bound near the active site of the CT domain, at the interface of its dimer, and a large conformational change in the dimer interface is required for haloxyfop binding. We report here the crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the CT domain of yeast ACC in complex with tepraloxydim. The compound has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT activity compared to haloxyfop, as well as the mammalian ACC inhibitor CP-640186. Tepraloxydim probes a different region of the dimer interface and requires only small but important conformational changes in the enzyme, in contrast to haloxyfop. The binding mode of tepraloxydim explains the structure-activity relationship of these inhibitors, and provides a molecular basis for their distinct sensitivity to some of the resistance mutations, as compared to haloxyfop. Despite the chemical diversity between haloxyfop and tepraloxydim, the compounds do share two binding interactions to the enzyme, which may be important anchoring points for the development of ACC inhibitors

  16. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  17. Genes encoding biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric ACCase that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin-carboxyl-carrier protein and CO2 to form carboxybiotin-carbo...

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    PubMed

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R; Jerry, Dean R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R.; Jerry, Dean R.; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  20. Modification of the Host Cell Lipid Metabolism Induced by Hypolipidemic Drugs Targeting the Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Impairs West Nile Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Casas, Josefina; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus transmitted by the bite of mosquitoes that causes meningitis and encephalitis in humans, horses, and birds. Several studies have highlighted that flavivirus infection is highly dependent on cellular lipids for virus replication and infectious particle biogenesis. The first steps of lipid synthesis involve the carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to malonyl-CoA that is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). This makes ACC a key enzyme of lipid synthesis that is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic target for different disorders, including cancers, obesity, diabetes, and viral infections. We have analyzed the effect of the ACC inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) on infection by WNV. Lipidomic analysis of TOFA-treated cells confirmed that this drug reduced the cellular content of multiple lipids, including those directly implicated in the flavivirus life cycle (glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol). Treatment with TOFA significantly inhibited the multiplication of WNV in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the antiviral effect of this drug showed that the inhibitory effect was related to a reduction of viral replication. Furthermore, treatment with another ACC inhibitor, 3,3,14,14-tetramethylhexadecanedioic acid (MEDICA 16), also inhibited WNV infection. Interestingly, TOFA and MEDICA 16 also reduced the multiplication of Usutu virus (USUV), a WNV-related flavivirus. These results point to the ACC as a druggable cellular target suitable for antiviral development against WNV and other flaviviruses. PMID:26503654

  1. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  2. Chloroplast acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity is 2-oxoglutarate–regulated by interaction of PII with the biotin carboxyl carrier subunit

    PubMed Central

    Feria Bourrellier, Ana Belen; Valot, Benoit; Guillot, Alain; Ambard-Bretteville, Françoise; Vidal, Jean; Hodges, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The PII protein is a signal integrator involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and plants. Upon sensing of cellular carbon and energy availability, PII conveys the signal by interacting with target proteins, thereby modulating their biological activity. Plant PII is located to plastids; therefore, to identify new PII target proteins, PII-affinity chromatography of soluble extracts from Arabidopsis leaf chloroplasts was performed. Several proteins were retained only when Mg-ATP was present in the binding medium and they were specifically released from the resin by application of a 2-oxoglutarate-containing elution buffer. Mass spectroscopy of SDS/PAGE-resolved protein bands identified the biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunits of the plastidial acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) and three other proteins containing a similar biotin/lipoyl-binding motif as putative PII targets. ACCase is a key enzyme initiating the synthesis of fatty acids in plastids. In in vitro reconstituted assays supplemented with exogenous ATP, recombinant Arabidopsis PII inhibited chloroplastic ACCase activity, and this was completely reversed in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, pyruvate, or oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect was PII-dose-dependent and appeared to be PII-specific because ACCase activity was not altered in the presence of other tested proteins. PII decreased the Vmax of the ACCase reaction without altering the Km for acetyl-CoA. These data show that PII function has evolved between bacterial and plant systems to control the carbon metabolism pathway of fatty acid synthesis in plastids. PMID:20018655

  3. Genes encoding the alpha-carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Wei-Bo; Guo, Huan; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hong; Guan, Rong-Zhan; Wang, Jing-Qiao; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2010-05-01

    Heteromeric acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase), a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, is a multi-enzyme complex consisting of biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase (alpha-CT and beta-CT). In the present study, four genes encoding alpha-CT were cloned from Brassica napus, and two were cloned from each of the two parental species, B. rapa and B. oleracea. Comparative and cluster analyses indicated that these genes were divided into two major groups. The major divergence between group-1 and group-2 occurred in the second intron. Group-2 alpha-CT genes represented the ancestral form in the genus Brassica. The divergence of group-1 and group-2 genes occurred in their common ancestor 12.96-17.78 million years ago (MYA), soon after the divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica (15-20 MYA). This time of divergence is identical to that reported for the paralogous subgenomes of diploid Brassica species (13-17 MYA). Real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression patterns of the two groups of genes were similar in different organs, except in leaves. To better understand the regulation and evolution of alpha-CT genes, promoter regions from two sets of orthologous gene copies from B. napus, B. rapa, and B. oleracea were cloned and compared. The function of the promoter of gene Bnalpha-CT-1-1 in group-1 and gene Bnalpha-CT-2-1 in group-2 was examined by assaying beta-glucuronidase activity in transgenic A. thaliana. Our results will be helpful in elucidating the evolution and regulation of ACCase in oilseed rape. PMID:20616867

  4. GENES ENCODING PLASTID ACETYL-COA CARBOXYLASE AND 3-PHOSPHOGLYCERATE KINASE OF THE TRITICUM/AEGILOPS COMPLEX AND THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF POLYPLOID WHEAT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D) , genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (T. turgidum AABB, and T. timopheevii AAAGG) and hexaploid (T. aestivum, AABBDD) species. The objective of this study was to a...

  5. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylases by soraphen A prevents lipid accumulation and adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordonier, Elizabeth L; Jarecke, Sarah K; Hollinger, Frances E; Zempleni, Janos

    2016-06-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC) 1 and 2 catalyze the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA and depend on biotin as a coenzyme. ACC1 localizes in the cytoplasm and produces malonyl-CoA for fatty acid (FA) synthesis. ACC2 localizes in the outer mitochondrial membrane and produces malonyl-CoA that inhibits FA import into mitochondria for subsequent oxidation. We hypothesized that ACCs are checkpoints in adipocyte differentiation and tested this hypothesis using the ACC1 and ACC2 inhibitor soraphen A (SA) in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 100nM SA for 8 days after induction of differentiation, the expression of PPARγ mRNA and FABP4 mRNA decreased by 40% and 50%, respectively, compared with solvent controls; the decrease in gene expression was accompanied by a decrease in FABP4 protein expression and associated with a decrease in lipid droplet accumulation. The rate of FA oxidation was 300% greater in SA-treated cells compared with vehicle controls. Treatment with exogenous palmitate restored PPARγ and FABP4 mRNA expression and FABP4 protein expression in SA-treated cells. In contrast, SA did not alter lipid accumulation if treatment was initiated on day eight after induction of differentiation. We conclude that loss of ACC1-dependent FA synthesis and loss of ACC2-dependent inhibition of FA oxidation prevent lipid accumulation in adipocytes and inhibit early stages of adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27041646

  6. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  7. Decreasing the rate of metabolic ketone reduction in the discovery of a clinical acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David A; Kung, Daniel W; Esler, William P; Amor, Paul A; Bagley, Scott W; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E; Southers, James A; Sweet, Laurel J; Turner, Scott M; Vajdos, Felix F

    2014-12-26

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  8. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  9. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in the valproic acid model of autism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianling; Wu, Wei; Fu, Yingmei; Yu, Shunying; Cui, Donghong; Zhao, Min; Du, Yasong; Li, Jijun; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in enzymes associated with fatty acid synthesis, namely fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the valproic acid (VPA)-induced animal model of autism. In this model, pregnant rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of VPA, and prefrontal cortex and cerebellum samples from their pups were analyzed. The results of western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of FASN, ACC and phospho-ACC (pACC) were increased in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism. Furthermore, in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism, AMPK expression is increased, whereas PI3K and Akt expression are unchanged. This suggests that disorder of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/FASN and/or adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/ACC pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of autism. It is hypothesized that fatty acid synthesis participates in autism through PI3K/Akt/FASN and AMPK/ACC pathways. PMID:27602061

  10. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Xu, C.; Zhao, H.; Parsons, E. P.; Kosma, D. K.; Xu, X.; Chao, D.; Lohrey, G.; Bangarusamy, D. K.; Wang, G.; Bressan, R. A.; Jenks, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C{sub 20:0} or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling.

  11. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, David A.; Kung, Daniel W.; Esler, William P.; Amor, Paul A.; Bagley, Scott W.; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D.; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M.; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A.; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E.; Southers, James A.; Sweet, Laurel J.; Turner, Scott M.; Vajdos, Felix F.

    2014-12-26

    We found that Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. Here, we disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.

  12. Maternal obesity reduces milk lipid production in lactating mice by inhibiting acetyl-CoA carboxylase and impairing fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saben, Jessica L; Bales, Elise S; Jackman, Matthew R; Orlicky, David; MacLean, Paul S; McManaman, James L

    2014-01-01

    Maternal metabolic and nutrient trafficking adaptations to lactation differ among lean and obese mice fed a high fat (HF) diet. Obesity is thought to impair milk lipid production, in part, by decreasing trafficking of dietary and de novo synthesized lipids to the mammary gland. Here, we report that de novo lipogenesis regulatory mechanisms are disrupted in mammary glands of lactating HF-fed obese (HF-Ob) mice. HF feeding decreased the total levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC), and this effect was exacerbated in obese mice. The relative levels of phosphorylated (inactive) ACC, were elevated in the epithelium, and decreased in the adipose stroma, of mammary tissue from HF-Ob mice compared to those of HF-fed lean (HF-Ln) mice. Mammary gland levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which catalyzes formation of inactive ACC, were also selectively elevated in mammary glands of HF-Ob relative to HF-Ln dams or to low fat fed dams. These responses correlated with evidence of increased lipid retention in mammary adipose, and decreased lipid levels in mammary epithelial cells, of HF-Ob dams. Collectively, our data suggests that maternal obesity impairs milk lipid production, in part, by disrupting the balance of de novo lipid synthesis in the epithelial and adipose stromal compartments of mammary tissue through processes that appear to be related to increased mammary gland AMPK activity, ACC inhibition, and decreased fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24849657

  13. Maternal Obesity Reduces Milk Lipid Production in Lactating Mice by Inhibiting Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase and Impairing Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Saben, Jessica L.; Bales, Elise S.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Orlicky, David; MacLean, Paul S.; McManaman, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal metabolic and nutrient trafficking adaptations to lactation differ among lean and obese mice fed a high fat (HF) diet. Obesity is thought to impair milk lipid production, in part, by decreasing trafficking of dietary and de novo synthesized lipids to the mammary gland. Here, we report that de novo lipogenesis regulatory mechanisms are disrupted in mammary glands of lactating HF-fed obese (HF-Ob) mice. HF feeding decreased the total levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC), and this effect was exacerbated in obese mice. The relative levels of phosphorylated (inactive) ACC, were elevated in the epithelium, and decreased in the adipose stroma, of mammary tissue from HF-Ob mice compared to those of HF-fed lean (HF-Ln) mice. Mammary gland levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which catalyzes formation of inactive ACC, were also selectively elevated in mammary glands of HF-Ob relative to HF-Ln dams or to low fat fed dams. These responses correlated with evidence of increased lipid retention in mammary adipose, and decreased lipid levels in mammary epithelial cells, of HF-Ob dams. Collectively, our data suggests that maternal obesity impairs milk lipid production, in part, by disrupting the balance of de novo lipid synthesis in the epithelial and adipose stromal compartments of mammary tissue through processes that appear to be related to increased mammary gland AMPK activity, ACC inhibition, and decreased fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24849657

  14. Genes encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of the Triticum/Aegilops complex and the evolutionary history of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoxing; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Su, Xiujuan; Faris, Justin; Gill, Bikram; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2002-06-11

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D), genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (Triticum turgidum AABB, and Triticum timopheevii AAGG) and hexaploid (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) species. We analyzed Acc-1 (plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and Pgk-1 (plastid 3-phosphoglycerate kinase) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among Triticum and Aegilops species of the wheat lineage and to establish the timeline of wheat evolution based on gene sequence comparisons. Triticum urartu was confirmed as the A genome donor of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The A genome of polyploid wheat diverged from T. urartu less than half a million years ago (MYA), indicating a relatively recent origin of polyploid wheat. The D genome sequences of T. aestivum and Aegilops tauschii are identical, confirming that T. aestivum arose from hybridization of T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii only 8,000 years ago. The diploid Triticum and Aegilops progenitors of the A, B, D, G, and S genomes all radiated 2.5-4.5 MYA. Our data suggest that the Acc-1 and Pgk-1 loci have different histories in different lineages, indicating genome mosaicity and significant intraspecific differentiation. Some loci of the S genome of Aegilops speltoides and the G genome of T. timophevii are closely related, suggesting the same origin of some parts of their genomes. None of the Aegilops genomes analyzed is a close relative of the B genome, so the diploid progenitor of the B genome remains unknown. PMID:12060759

  15. Expression and methylation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are associated with fatty liver syndrome in chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Qinghe; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yonghong; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Li, Peng; Cui, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Wen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The typical characteristic of fatty liver syndrome (FLS) is an increased hepatic triacylglycerol content, and a sudden decline in egg production often occurs. FLS may develop into fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS), characterized by sudden death from hepatic rupture and hemorrhage. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing, leading to the etiology and pathogenesis of some animal diseases. The roles of DNA methylation in the genesis of FLS, however, are largely unknown. The lipogenic methyl-deficient diet (MDD) caused FLS similar to human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). After 16 Jingxing-Huang (JXH) hens were fed MDD for 10 wk, eight exhibited FLS (designated as FLS-susceptible birds); the remainder, without FLS, served as controls (NFLS). Physiological and biochemical variables, gene expression levels, and DNA methylation were determined in the liver. The development of FLS in JXH hens was accompanied by abnormal lipid accumulation. Relative expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were significantly up-regulated in the FLS group in comparison with the NFLS group. The transcript abundance of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1c), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) did not differ between the two groups. Interestingly, MTTP and ACC mRNA abundance were negatively correlated with the level of promoter methylation. The extent of DNA methylation of the cytosine-guanine (CpG) sites in the SREBP-1c, FAS, PPARα, and LXRα promoter regions was also analyzed by direct sequencing but none differed between FLS and NFLS birds. Taken together, these results specify link DNA methylation to the pathogenesis of FLS in chickens. PMID:27083546

  16. Abundance and distribution of archaeal acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes indicative for putatively chemoautotrophic Archaea in the tropical Atlantic's interior.

    PubMed

    Bergauer, Kristin; Sintes, Eva; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Witte, Harry; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2013-06-01

    Recently, evidence suggests that dark CO2 fixation in the pelagic realm of the ocean does not only occur in the suboxic and anoxic water bodies but also in the oxygenated meso- and bathypelagic waters of the North Atlantic. To elucidate the significance and phylogeny of the key organisms mediating dark CO2 fixation in the tropical Atlantic, we quantified functional genes indicative for CO2 fixation. We used a Q-PCR-based assay targeting the bifunctional acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase (accA subunit), a key enzyme powering inter alia the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HP/HB) and the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA). Quantification of accA-like genes revealed a consistent depth profile in the upper mesopelagial with increasing gene abundances from subsurface layers towards the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), coinciding with an increase in archaeal amoA gene abundance. Gene abundance profiles of metabolic marker genes (accA, amoA) were correlated with thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances as well as CO2 fixation rates to link the genetic potential to actual rate measurements. AccA gene abundances correlated with archaeal amoA gene abundance throughout the water column (r(2)  = 0.309, P < 0.0001). Overall, a substantial genetic predisposition of CO2 fixation was present in the dark realm of the tropical Atlantic in both Archaea and Bacteria. Hence, dark ocean CO2 fixation might be more widespread among prokaryotes inhabiting the oxygenated water column of the ocean's interior than hitherto assumed. PMID:23330917

  17. Associations of polymorphisms in the promoter I of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha gene with beef fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Knight, T J; Reecy, J M; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Cundiff, L V; Beitz, D C

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter I (PI) region of the bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA) gene and to evaluate the extent to which they were associated with lipid-related traits. Eight novel SNPs were identified, which were AJ276223:g.2064T>A (SNP1), g.2155C>T (SNP2), g.2203G>T (SNP3), g.2268T>C (SNP4), g.2274G>A (SNP5), g.2340A>G (SNP6), g.2350T>C (SNP7) and g.2370A>G (SNP8). Complete linkage disequilibrium was observed among SNP1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8. Phenotypic data were collected from 573 cross-bred steers with six sire breeds, including Hereford, Angus, Brangus, Beefmaster, Bonsmara and Romosinuano. The genotypes of SNP1/2/4/5/6/8 were significantly associated with adjusted backfat thickness. The genotypes of SNP3 were significantly associated with triacylglycerol (TAG) content and fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) in Brangus-, Romosinuano- and Bonsmara-sired cattle. Cattle with g.2203GG genotype had greater concentrations of TAG, total lipid, total saturated fatty acid and total monounsaturated fatty acid than did cattle with g.2203GT genotype. The genotypes of SNP7 were significantly associated with fatty acid composition of LM. Cattle with genotype g.2350TC had greater amounts of several fatty acids in LM than did cattle with genotype g.2350CC. Our results suggested that the SNPs in the PI region of ACACA gene are associated with variations in the fatty acid contents in LM. PMID:20002363

  18. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation. PMID:20499260

  19. A Symmetrical Tetramer for S. aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase in Complex with Coenzyme A

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Xiang, S; Lasso, G; Gil, D; Valle, M; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a conserved metabolic enzyme with important cellular functions. We report crystallographic and cryo-electron microscopy (EM) studies of Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC) in complex with acetyl-CoA, an allosteric activator, and mutagenesis, biochemical, and structural studies of the biotin binding site of its carboxyltransferase (CT) domain. The disease-causing A610T mutation abolishes catalytic activity by blocking biotin binding to the CT active site, and Thr908 might play a catalytic role in the CT reaction. The crystal structure of SaPC in complex with CoA reveals a symmetrical tetramer, with one CoA molecule bound to each monomer, and cryo-EM studies confirm the symmetrical nature of the tetramer. These observations are in sharp contrast to the highly asymmetrical tetramer of Rhizobium etli PC in complex with ethyl-CoA. Our structural information suggests that acetyl-CoA promotes a conformation for the dimer of the biotin carboxylase domain of PC that might be catalytically more competent.

  20. The bacterial signal transduction protein GlnB regulates the committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis by acting as a dissociable regulatory subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Rodrigues, Thiago E; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Forchhammer, Karl; Huergo, Luciano F

    2015-03-01

    Biosynthesis of fatty acids is one of the most fundamental biochemical pathways in nature. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, the committed and rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a multi-subunit form of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase enzyme (ACC). This enzyme carboxylates acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which in turn acts as the building block for fatty acid elongation. In Escherichia coli, ACC is comprised of three functional modules: the biotin carboxylase (BC), the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) and the carboxyl transferase (CT). Previous data showed that both bacterial and plant BCCP interact with signal transduction proteins belonging to the PII family. Here we show that the GlnB paralogues of the PII proteins from E. coli and Azospirillum brasiliense, but not the GlnK paralogues, can specifically form a ternary complex with the BC-BCCP components of ACC. This interaction results in ACC inhibition by decreasing the enzyme turnover number. Both the BC-BCCP-GlnB interaction and ACC inhibition were relieved by 2-oxoglutarate and by GlnB uridylylation. We propose that the GlnB protein acts as a 2-oxoglutarate-sensitive dissociable regulatory subunit of ACC in Bacteria. PMID:25557370

  1. Potential Functional Replacement of the Plastidic Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunit (accD) Gene by Recent Transfers to the Nucleus in Some Angiosperm Lineages1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Huang, Xun; Higginson, Emily; Ayliffe, Michael; Day, Anil; Timmis, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells originated when an ancestor of the nucleated cell engulfed bacterial endosymbionts that gradually evolved into the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. Soon after these endosymbiotic events, thousands of ancestral prokaryotic genes were functionally transferred from the endosymbionts to the nucleus. This process of functional gene relocation, now rare in eukaryotes, continues in angiosperms. In this article, we show that the chloroplastic acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunit (accD) gene that is present in the plastome of most angiosperms has been functionally relocated to the nucleus in the Campanulaceae. Surprisingly, the nucleus-encoded accD transcript is considerably smaller than the plastidic version, consisting of little more than the carboxylase domain of the plastidic accD gene fused to a coding region encoding a plastid targeting peptide. We verified experimentally the presence of a chloroplastic transit peptide by showing that the product of the nuclear accD fused to green fluorescent protein was imported in the chloroplasts. The nuclear gene regulatory elements that enabled the erstwhile plastidic gene to become functional in the nuclear genome were identified, and the evolution of the intronic and exonic sequences in the nucleus is described. Relocation and truncation of the accD gene is a remarkable example of the processes underpinning endosymbiotic evolution. PMID:23435694

  2. Design of small molecule inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2 showing reduction of hepatic malonyl-CoA levels in vivo in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Christoffer; Blaho, Stefan; Saitton, David Blomberg; Brickmann, Kay; Broddefalk, Johan; Davidsson, Ojvind; Drmota, Tomas; Folmer, Rutger; Hallberg, Kenth; Hallén, Stefan; Hovland, Ragnar; Isin, Emre; Johannesson, Petra; Kull, Bengt; Larsson, Lars-Olof; Löfgren, Lars; Nilsson, Kristina E; Noeske, Tobias; Oakes, Nick; Plowright, Alleyn T; Schnecke, Volker; Ståhlberg, Pernilla; Sörme, Pernilla; Wan, Hong; Wellner, Eric; Oster, Linda

    2011-05-15

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylases has the potential for modulating long chain fatty acid biosynthesis and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Hybridization of weak inhibitors of ACC2 provided a novel, moderately potent but lipophilic series. Optimization led to compounds 33 and 37, which exhibit potent inhibition of human ACC2, 10-fold selectivity over inhibition of human ACC1, good physical and in vitro ADME properties and good bioavailability. X-ray crystallography has shown this series binding in the CT-domain of ACC2 and revealed two key hydrogen bonding interactions. Both 33 and 37 lower levels of hepatic malonyl-CoA in vivo in obese Zucker rats. PMID:21515056

  3. Reverse-Genetic Analysis of the Two Biotin-Containing Subunit Genes of the Heteromeric Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Indicates a Unidirectional Functional Redundancy1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Ilarslan, Hilal; Brachova, Libuse; Qian, Hui-Rong; Li, Ling; Che, Ping; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2011-01-01

    The heteromeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase catalyzes the first and committed reaction of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids. This enzyme is composed of four subunits: biotin carboxyl-carrier protein (BCCP), biotin carboxylase, α-carboxyltransferase, and β-carboxyltransferase. With the exception of BCCP, single-copy genes encode these subunits in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Reverse-genetic approaches were used to individually investigate the physiological significance of the two paralogous BCCP-coding genes, CAC1A (At5g16390, codes for BCCP1) and CAC1B (At5g15530, codes for BCCP2). Transfer DNA insertional alleles that completely eliminate the accumulation of BCCP2 have no perceptible effect on plant growth, development, and fatty acid accumulation. In contrast, transfer DNA insertional null allele of the CAC1A gene is embryo lethal and deleteriously affects pollen development and germination. During seed development the effect of the cac1a null allele first becomes apparent at 3-d after flowering, when the synchronous development of the endosperm and embryo is disrupted. Characterization of CAC1A antisense plants showed that reducing BCCP1 accumulation to 35% of wild-type levels, decreases fatty acid accumulation and severely affects normal vegetative plant growth. Detailed expression analysis by a suite of approaches including in situ RNA hybridization, promoter:reporter transgene expression, and quantitative western blotting reveal that the expression of CAC1B is limited to a subset of the CAC1A-expressing tissues, and CAC1B expression levels are only about one-fifth of CAC1A expression levels. Therefore, a likely explanation for the observed unidirectional redundancy between these two paralogous genes is that whereas the BCCP1 protein can compensate for the lack of BCCP2, the absence of BCCP1 cannot be tolerated as BCCP2 levels are not sufficient to support heteromeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase activity at a level that is required for

  4. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Shiyou; Zhao, Huayan; Parsons, Eugene P.; Xu, Changcheng; Kosma, Dylan K.; Xu, Xiaojing; Chao, Daiyin; Lohrey, Gregory; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K.; Wang, Guangchao; Bressan, Ray A.; Jenks, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C20:0 or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling. PMID:21949210

  5. Computational study of the three-dimensional structure of N-acetyltransferase 2-acetyl coenzyme a complex.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Kana; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is one of the most important polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plays a significant role in individual differences of drug efficacies and/or side effects. Coenzyme A (CoA) is a cofactor in the experimentally determined crystal structure of NAT2, although the acetyl source of acetylation reactions catalyzed by NAT is not CoA, but rather acetyl CoA. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of NAT2, including acetyl CoA, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. By substituting acetyl CoA for CoA the amino acid residue Gly286, which is known to transform into a glutamate residue by NAT2*7A and NAT2*7B, comes close to the cofactor binding site. In addition, the binding pocket around the sulfur atom of acetyl CoA expanded in the NAT2-acetyl CoA complex. PMID:20930369

  6. A comparative study of drug resistance mechanism associated with active site and non-active site mutations: I388N and D425G mutants of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-03-01

    A major concern in the development of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) herbicides is the emergence of resistance as a result of the selection of distinct mutations within the CT domain. Mutations associated with resistance have been demonstrated to include both active sites and non-active sites, including Ile-1781-Leu, Trp- 2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Gly-2096-Ala (numbered according to the Alopecurus myosuroides plastid ACCase). In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, were carried out to compare the molecular mechanisms of active site mutation (I388N) and non-active site mutation (D425G) in Alopecurus myosuroides resistance to some commercial herbicides targeting ACCase, including haloxyfop (HF), diclofop (DF) and fenoxaprop (FR). All of the computational model and energetic results indicated that both I388N and D425G mutations have effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket. The π-π interaction between ligand and Phe377 and Tyr161' residues, which make an important contribution to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation. As a result, the mutant-type ACCase has a lower affinity for the inhibitor than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will deepen our understanding of the interactions between ACCase and herbicides, which provides a molecular basis for the future design of a promising inhibitor with low resistance risk. PMID:22242795

  7. Isozyme-nonselective N-substituted bipiperidylcarboxamide acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors reduce tissue malonyl-CoA concentrations, inhibit fatty acid synthesis, and increase fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Harwood, H James; Petras, Stephen F; Shelly, Lorraine D; Zaccaro, Lawrence M; Perry, David A; Makowski, Michael R; Hargrove, Diane M; Martin, Kelly A; Tracey, W Ross; Chapman, Justin G; Magee, William P; Dalvie, Deepak K; Soliman, Victor F; Martin, William H; Mularski, Christian J; Eisenbeis, Shane A

    2003-09-26

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), with its resultant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation, has the potential to favorably affect the multitude of cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome. To achieve maximal effectiveness, an ACC inhibitor should inhibit both the lipogenic tissue isozyme (ACC1) and the oxidative tissue isozyme (ACC2). Herein, we describe the biochemical and acute physiological properties of CP-610431, an isozyme-nonselective ACC inhibitor identified through high throughput inhibition screening, and CP-640186, an analog with improved metabolic stability. CP-610431 inhibited ACC1 and ACC2 with IC50s of approximately 50 nm. Inhibition was reversible, uncompetitive with respect to ATP, and non-competitive with respect to bicarbonate, acetyl-CoA, and citrate, indicating interaction with the enzymatic carboxyl transfer reaction. CP-610431 also inhibited fatty acid synthesis, triglyceride (TG) synthesis, TG secretion, and apolipoprotein B secretion in HepG2 cells (ACC1) with EC50s of 1.6, 1.8, 3.0, and 5.7 microm, without affecting either cholesterol synthesis or apolipoprotein CIII secretion. CP-640186, also inhibited both isozymes with IC50sof approximately 55 nm but was 2-3 times more potent than CP-610431 in inhibiting HepG2 cell fatty acid and TG synthesis. CP-640186 also stimulated fatty acid oxidation in C2C12 cells (ACC2) and in rat epitrochlearis muscle strips with EC50s of 57 nm and 1.3 microm. In rats, CP-640186 lowered hepatic, soleus muscle, quadriceps muscle, and cardiac muscle malonyl-CoA with ED50s of 55, 6, 15, and 8 mg/kg. Consequently, CP-640186 inhibited fatty acid synthesis in rats, CD1 mice, and ob/ob mice with ED50s of 13, 11, and 4 mg/kg, and stimulated rat whole body fatty acid oxidation with an ED50 of approximately 30 mg/kg. Taken together, These observations indicate that isozyme-nonselective ACC inhibition has the potential to favorably affect risk

  8. Enzymatic Characterization of a Prokaryotic Urea Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Takeshi; Kanou, Norihisa; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-01-01

    We identified the first prokaryotic urea carboxylase (UCA) from a member of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, Oleomonas sagaranensis. This enzyme (O. sagaranensis Uca) was composed of 1,171 amino acids, and its N-terminal region resembled the biotin carboxylase domains of various biotin-dependent carboxylases. The C-terminal region of the enzyme harbored the Met-Lys-Met motif found in biotin carboxyl carrier proteins. The primary structure of the enzyme was 45% identical to that of the urea carboxylase domain of urea amidolyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. O. sagaranensis Uca did not harbor the allophanate hydrolase domain found in the yeast enzyme, but a separate gene with structural similarity was found to be adjacent to the uca gene. Purified recombinant O. sagaranensis Uca displayed ATP-dependent carboxylase activity towards urea (Vmax = 21.2 μmol mg−1 min−1) but not towards acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA, indicating that the gene encoded a bona fide UCA and not an acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The enzyme also exhibited high levels of activity towards acetamide and formamide. Kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction were determined with ATP, urea, acetamide, and formamide. O. sagaranensis could grow on urea, acetamide, and formamide as sole nitrogen sources; moreover, ATP-dependent urea-degrading activity was found in cells grown with urea but not in cells grown with ammonia. The results suggest that the UCA of this organism may be involved in the assimilation of these compounds as nitrogen sources. Furthermore, orthologues of the O. sagaranensis uca gene were found to be widely distributed among Bacteria. This implies that there are two systems of urea degradation in Bacteria, a pathway catalyzed by the previously described ureases and the UCA-allophanate hydrolase pathway identified in this study. PMID:15090492

  9. Rapid switch of hepatic fatty acid metabolism from oxidation to esterification during diurnal feeding of meal-fed rats correlates with changes in the properties of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but not of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I.

    PubMed Central

    Moir, A M; Zammit, V A

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the ingestion of a meal on the partitioning of hepatic fatty acids between oxidation and esterification were studied in vivo for meal-fed rats. The time course for the reversal of the starved state was extremely rapid and the process was complete within 2 h, in marked contrast with the reversal of the effects of starvation in rats fed ad libitum [A. M. B. Moir and V. A. Zammit (1993) Biochem. J. 289, 49-55]. This rapid reversal occurred in spite of the fact that, in the liver of the meal-fed animals before feeding, a similar degree of partitioning of fatty acids in favour of oxidation was observed as in 24 h-starved rats (previously fed ad libitum). This suggested that the lower degree of ketonaemia observed in meal-fed rats before a meal is not due to the inability of acylcarnitine formation to compete successfully with esterification of fatty acids to the glycerol moiety. Investigation of the possible mechanisms that could contribute towards the rapid switching-off of fatty acid oxidation revealed that this was correlated with a very rapid rise and overshoot in hepatic malonyl-CoA concentration, but not with any change in the activity, or sensitivity to malonyl-CoA, of the mitochondrial overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I). The role of these two parameters in the reversal of fasting-induced hepatic fatty acid oxidation was thus the inverse of that observed previously for refed 24 h-starved rats. The rapid increase in [malonyl-CoA] was accompanied by an immediate and complete reversion of the kinetic characteristics (Ka for citrate, expressed/total activity ratio) of acetyl-CoA carboxylase to those found in the post-meal animals, again in contrast with the time course observed in refed 24 h-starved rats [A. M. B. Moir and V. A. Zammit (1990) Biochem. J. 272, 511-517]. The rapidity with which these changes occurred was specific to the partitioning of acyl-CoA; the meal-induced diversion of glycerolipids towards phospholipid synthesis and the

  10. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms. PMID:14722082

  11. Structure and function of biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Biotin-dependent carboxylases include acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), geranyl-CoA carboxylase (GCC), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and urea carboxylase (UC). They contain biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have important functions in fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, polyketide biosynthesis, urea utilization, and other cellular processes. ACCs are also attractive targets for drug discovery against type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, microbial infections, and other diseases, and the plastid ACC of grasses is the target of action of three classes of commercial herbicides. Deficiencies in the activities of PCC, MCC or PC are linked to serious diseases in humans. Our understanding of these enzymes has been greatly enhanced over the past few years by the crystal structures of the holoenzymes of PCC, MCC, PC, and UC. The structures reveal unanticipated features in the architectures of the holoenzymes, including the presence of previously unrecognized domains, and provide a molecular basis for understanding their catalytic mechanism as well as the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC, MCC and PC. This review will summarize the recent advances in our knowledge on the structure and function of these important metabolic enzymes. PMID:22869039

  12. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  13. Recent NASA Dryden COA Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation concerns the experience that Dryden has had with Certificate of Authorization (COA) in reference to unmanned aerial systems (UAS). It reviews recent Certificate of Authorization UAS's i.e., 2005 Altair NOAA Mission, 2006 Altair Western States Fire Mission, and 2007 Ikhana. The priorities for the safety process is reviewed, as are typical UAS hazards. Slides also review the common COA provisions, best practices and lessons learned, the 2005 NOAA/NASA Science Demonstration Flights and the use of the UAS systems during fire emergencies.

  14. Deeper understanding of carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H

    2016-04-14

    In this issue of Blood, Tie et al report the development of a cleverly engineered, cell-based system for studying mutations in γ-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate residues in certain proteins to γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla). They use this cell-based assay system to help explain the clinical manifestations of some otherwise puzzling GGCX gene mutations in humans that cause phenotypes ranging from severe bleeding to Keutel syndrome. PMID:27081093

  15. Protein Acetylation and Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. PMID:25326522

  16. Activation and inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Zeczycki, Tonya N; Menefee, Ann L; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C; Attwood, Paul V; St Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W Wallace

    2011-11-15

    While crystallographic structures of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme revealed the location and probable positioning of the essential activator, Mg(2+), and nonessential activator, acetyl-CoA, an understanding of how they affect catalysis remains unclear. The current steady-state kinetic investigation indicates that both acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) assist in coupling the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain with pyruvate carboxylation in the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain. Initial velocity plots of free Mg(2+) vs pyruvate were nonlinear at low concentrations of Mg(2+) and a nearly complete loss of coupling between the BC and CT domain reactions was observed in the absence of acetyl-CoA. Increasing concentrations of free Mg(2+) also resulted in a decrease in the K(a) for acetyl-CoA. Acetyl phosphate was determined to be a suitable phosphoryl donor for the catalytic phosphorylation of MgADP, while phosphonoacetate inhibited both the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate (K(i) = 0.026 mM) and pyruvate carboxylation (K(i) = 2.5 mM). In conjunction with crystal structures of T882A R. etli PC mutant cocrystallized with phosphonoacetate and MgADP, computational docking studies suggest that phosphonoacetate could coordinate to one of two Mg(2+) metal centers in the BC domain active site. Based on the pH profiles, inhibition studies, and initial velocity patterns, possible mechanisms for the activation, regulation, and coordination of catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites in pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli by acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) are described. PMID:21958066

  17. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  18. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae. PMID:25922486

  19. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae. PMID:25922486

  20. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  1. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  2. The Fasted/Fed Mouse Metabolic Acetylome: N6-Acetylation Differences Suggest Acetylation Coordinates Organ-Specific Fuel Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Hartil, Kirsten; Robinson, Alan J.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The elucidation of extra-nuclear lysine acetylation has been of growing interest, as the co-substrate for acetylation, acetyl CoA, is at a key metabolic intersection. Our hypothesis was that mitochondrial and cytoplasmic protein acetylation may be part of a fasted/re-fed feedback control system for the regulation of the metabolic network in fuel switching, where acetyl CoA would be provided by fatty acid oxidation, or glycolysis, respectively. To test this we characterized the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylome in various organs that have a high metabolic rate relative to their mass, and/or switch fuels, under fasted and re-fed conditions (brain, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, white and brown adipose tissues). Using immunoprecipitation, coupled with LC-MSMS label free quantification, we show there is a dramatic variation in global quantitative profiles of acetylated proteins from different organs. In total, 733 acetylated peptides from 337 proteins were identified and quantified, out of which 31 acetylated peptides from the metabolic proteins that may play organ-specific roles were analyzed in detail. Results suggest that fasted/re-fed acetylation changes coordinated by organ-specific (de-)acetylases in insulin-sensitive versus insensitive organs may underlie fuel use and switching. Characterization of the tissue-specific acetylome should increase understanding of metabolic conditions wherein normal fuel switching is disrupted, such as in Type II diabetes. PMID:21728379

  3. Antagonism of P2Y1-induced vasorelaxation by acyl CoA: a critical role for palmitate and 3′-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Alefishat, E; Alexander, SPH; Ralevic, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acyl derivatives of CoA have been shown to act as antagonists at human platelet and recombinant P2Y1 receptors, but little is known about their effects in the cardiovascular system. This study evaluated the effect of these endogenous nucleotide derivatives at P2Y1 receptors natively expressed in rat and porcine blood vessels. Experimental Approach Isometric tension recordings were used to evaluate the effects of CoA, acetyl CoA, palmitoyl CoA (PaCoA) and 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA on concentration relaxation–response curves to ADP and uridine triphosphate (UTP). A FlexStation monitored ADP- and UTP-evoked calcium responses in HEK293 cells. Key Results Acetyl CoA and PaCoA, but not CoA, inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxations to ADP with apparent selectivity for P2Y1 receptors (over P2Y2/4 receptors) in rat thoracic aorta; PaCoA was more potent than acetyl CoA (331-fold vs. fivefold shift of ADP response curve evoked by 10 μM PaCoA and acetyl CoA, respectively); the apparent pA2 value for PaCoA was 6.44. 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA (10 μM) was significantly less potent than PaCoA (20-fold shift). In porcine mesenteric arteries, PaCoA and the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 blocked ADP-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations; in contrast, they were ineffective against ADP-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries (which does not involve P2Y1 receptors). Calcium responses evoked by ADP activation of endogenous P2Y1 receptors in HEK293 cells were inhibited in the presence of PaCoA, which failed to alter responses to UTP (acting at endogenous P2Y2/4 receptors). Conclusions and Implications Acyl derivatives of CoA can act as endogenous selective antagonists of P2Y1 receptors in blood vessels, and this inhibitory effect critically depends on the palmitate and 3′-ribose phosphate substituents on CoA. PMID:23215951

  4. Differences among Adult COAs and Adult Non-COAs on Levels of Self-Esteem, Depression, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, David T.; Roberts, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem, depression, and anxiety among 60 adult children of alcoholics (COAs) and 143 adult non-COAs. Subjects completed Children of Alcoholics Screening Test, demographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Found no significant differences between COAs and…

  5. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  7. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  8. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate carboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxylase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes lactic acid and other potentially toxic compounds to accumulate in ... features include developmental delay and a buildup of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis). Increased acidity in ...

  9. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of the carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Berkner, Kathleen L.; Pudota, B. Nirmala

    1998-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins require modification by the VKD-γ-glutamyl carboxylase, an enzyme that converts clusters of glus to glas in a reaction that requires vitamin K hydroquinone, for their activity. We have discovered that the carboxylase also carboxylates itself in a reaction dependent on vitamin K. When pure human recombinant carboxylase was incubated in vitro with 14CO2 and then analyzed after SDS/PAGE, a radiolabeled band corresponding to the size of the carboxylase was observed. Subsequent gla analysis of in vitro-modified carboxylase by base hydrolysis and HPLC showed that all of the radioactivity could be attributed to gla residues. Quantitation of gla, asp, and glu residues indicated 3 mol gla/mol carboxylase. Radiolabeled gla was acid-labile, confirming its identity, and was not observed if vitamin K was not included in the in vitro reaction. Carboxylase carboxylation also was detected in baculovirus(carboxylase)-infected insect cells but not in mock-infected insect cells, which do not express endogenous VKD proteins or carboxylase. Finally, we showed that the carboxylase was carboxylated in vivo. Carboxylase was purified from recombinant carboxylase BHK cells cultured in the presence or absence of vitamin K and analyzed for gla residues. Carboxylation of the carboxylase only was observed with carboxylase isolated from BHK cells cultured in vitamin K, and 3 mol gla/mol carboxylase were detected. Analyses of carboxylase and factor IX carboxylation in vitro suggest a possible role for carboxylase carboxylation in factor IX turnover, and in vivo studies suggest a potential role in carboxylase stability. The discovery of carboxylase carboxylation has broad implications for the mechanism of VKD protein carboxylation and Warfarin-based anti-coagulant therapies that need to be considered both retrospectively and in the future. PMID:9435215

  10. Crystal Structure of the alpha6beta6 Holoenzyme of propionyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Sadre-Bazzaz, K; Shen, Y; Deng, B; Zhou, Z; Tong, L

    2010-01-01

    Propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC), a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme, is essential for the catabolism of the amino acids Thr, Val, Ile and Met, cholesterol and fatty acids with an odd number of carbon atoms. Deficiencies in PCC activity in humans are linked to the disease propionic acidaemia, an autosomal recessive disorder that can be fatal in infants. The holoenzyme of PCC is an {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} dodecamer, with a molecular mass of 750 kDa. The {alpha}-subunit contains the biotin carboxylase (BC) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains, whereas the {beta}-subunit supplies the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity. Here we report the crystal structure at 3.2-{angstrom} resolution of a bacterial PCC {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} holoenzyme as well as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at 15-{angstrom} resolution demonstrating a similar structure for human PCC. The structure defines the overall architecture of PCC and reveals unexpectedly that the {alpha}-subunits are arranged as monomers in the holoenzyme, decorating a central {beta}{sub 6} hexamer. A hitherto unrecognized domain in the {alpha}-subunit, formed by residues between the BC and BCCP domains, is crucial for interactions with the {beta}-subunit. We have named it the BT domain. The structure reveals for the first time the relative positions of the BC and CT active sites in the holoenzyme. They are separated by approximately 55 {angstrom}, indicating that the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. The BCCP domain is located in the active site of the {beta}-subunit in the current structure, providing insight for its involvement in the CT reaction. The structural information establishes a molecular basis for understanding the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC and is relevant for the holoenzymes of other biotin-dependent carboxylases, including 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) and eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC).

  11. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  12. Structural evidence for substrate-induced synergism and half-sites reactivity in biotin carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Evdokimov, Artem; Lightle, Sandra; Yan, Chunhong; Stover, Charles Ken; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that consists of three separate proteins: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase (CT). Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a potentially attractive target for novel antibiotics because it catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In the first half-reaction, BC catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of BCCP. In the second half-reaction, the carboxyl group is transferred from carboxybiotinylated BCCP to acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA. A series of structures of BC from several bacteria crystallized in the presence of various ATP analogs is described that addresses three major questions concerning the catalytic mechanism. The structure of BC bound to AMPPNP and the two catalytically essential magnesium ions resolves inconsistencies between the kinetics of active-site BC mutants and previously reported BC structures. Another structure of AMPPNP bound to BC shows the polyphosphate chain folded back on itself, and not in the correct (i.e., extended) conformation for catalysis. This provides the first structural evidence for the hypothesis of substrate-induced synergism, which posits that ATP binds nonproductively to BC in the absence of biotin. The BC homodimer has been proposed to exhibit half-sites reactivity where the active sites alternate or “flip-flop” their catalytic cycles. A crystal structure of BC showed the ATP analog AMPPCF2P bound to one subunit while the other subunit was unliganded. The liganded subunit was in the closed or catalytic conformation while the unliganded subunit was in the open conformation. This provides the first structural evidence for half-sites reactivity in BC. PMID:18725455

  13. Hybrid Structure of a Dynamic Single-Chain Carboxylase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Anna; Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Maier, Timm

    2016-08-01

    Biotin-dependent acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylases (aCCs) are involved in key steps of anabolic pathways and comprise three distinct functional units: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyl transferase (CT). YCC multienzymes are a poorly characterized family of prokaryotic aCCs of unidentified substrate specificity, which integrate all functional units into a single polypeptide chain. We employed a hybrid approach to study the dynamic structure of Deinococcus radiodurans (Dra) YCC: crystal structures of isolated domains reveal a hexameric CT core with extended substrate binding pocket and a dimeric BC domain. Negative-stain electron microscopy provides an approximation of the variable positioning of the BC dimers relative to the CT core. Small-angle X-ray scattering yields quantitative information on the ensemble of Dra YCC structures in solution. Comparison with other carrier protein-dependent multienzymes highlights a characteristic range of large-scale interdomain flexibility in this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:27396827

  14. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  15. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency: clinical and biochemical response to anaplerotic diet therapy.

    PubMed

    Mochel, Fanny; DeLonlay, Pascale; Touati, Guy; Brunengraber, Henri; Kinman, Renee P; Rabier, Daniel; Roe, Charles R; Saudubray, Jean-Marie

    2005-04-01

    A six-day-old girl was referred for severe hepatic failure, dehydratation, axial hypotonia, and both lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis. Biotin-unresponsive pyruvate carboxylase deficiency type B was diagnosed. Triheptanoin, an odd-carbon triglyceride, was administrated as a source for acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic propionyl-CoA. Although this patient succumbed to a severe infection, during the six months interval of her anaplerotic and biochemical management, the following important observations were documented: (1) the immediate reversal (less than 48 h) of major hepatic failure with full correction of all biochemical abnormalities, (2) on citrate supplementation, the enhanced export from the liver of triheptanoin's metabolites, namely 5 carbon ketone bodies, increasing the availability of these anaplerotic substrates for peripheral organs, (3) the demonstration of the transport of C5 ketone bodies-representing alternative energetic fuel for the brain-across the blood-brain barrier, associated to increased levels of glutamine and free gamma-aminobutyric acid (f-GABA) in the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that pyruvate carboxylase is a key enzyme for anaplerosis, besides the new perspectives brought by anaplerotic therapies in those rare pyruvate carboxylase deficiencies, this therapeutic trial also emphasizes the possible extended indications of triheptanoin in various diseases where the citric acid cycle is impaired. PMID:15781190

  16. Computational redesign of bacterial biotin carboxylase inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal; Waldrop, Grover L

    2014-01-01

    As the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria steadily increases, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents. Because fatty acid synthesis is only used for membrane biogenesis in bacteria, the enzymes in this pathway are attractive targets for antibacterial agent development. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the committed and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three distinct protein components: biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase. Fragment-based screening revealed that amino-oxazole inhibits biotin carboxylase activity and also exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative organisms. In this report, we redesigned previously identified lead inhibitors to expand the spectrum of bacteria sensitive to the amino-oxazole derivatives by including Gram-positive species. Using 9,411 small organic building blocks, we constructed a diverse combinatorial library of 1.2×10⁸ amino-oxazole derivatives. A subset of 9×10⁶ of these compounds were subjected to structure-based virtual screening against seven biotin carboxylase isoforms using similarity-based docking by eSimDock. Potentially broad-spectrum antibiotic candidates were selected based on the consensus ranking by several scoring functions including non-linear statistical models implemented in eSimDock and traditional molecular mechanics force fields. The analysis of binding poses of the top-ranked compounds docked to biotin carboxylase isoforms suggests that: (1) binding of the amino-oxazole anchor is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds to residues 201, 202 and 204; (2) halogenated aromatic moieties attached to the amino-oxazole scaffold enhance interactions with a hydrophobic pocket formed by residues 157, 169, 171 and 203; and (3) larger substituents reach deeper into the binding pocket to form additional hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues 209 and 233. These structural insights into drug

  17. Evolutionary history and biotechnological future of carboxylases.

    PubMed

    Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Rosenthal, Raoul G; Erb, Tobias J

    2013-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a potent greenhouse gas whose presence in the atmosphere is a critical factor for global warming. At the same time atmospheric CO2 is also a cheap and readily available carbon source that can in principle be used to synthesize value-added products. However, as uncatalyzed chemical CO2-fixation reactions usually require quite harsh conditions to functionalize the CO2 molecule, not many processes have been developed that make use of CO2. In contrast to synthetical chemistry, Nature provides a multitude of different carboxylating enzymes whose carboxylating principle(s) might be exploited in biotechnology. This review focuses on the biochemical features of carboxylases, highlights possible evolutionary scenarios for the emergence of their reactivity, and discusses current, as well as potential future applications of carboxylases in organic synthesis, biotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:23702164

  18. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  19. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  20. Novel Insights into the Biotin Carboxylase Domain Reactions of Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Menefee, Ann L.; Adina-Zada, Abdussalam; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Surinya, Kathy H.; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; St. Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain of pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli (RePC) is common to the biotin-dependent carboxylases. The current site-directed mutagenesis study has clarified the catalytic functions of several residues proposed to be pivotal in MgATP-binding and cleavage (Glu218 and Lys245), HCO3− deprotonation (Glu305 and Arg301) and biotin enolization (Arg353). The E218A mutant was inactive for any reaction involving the BC domain and the E218Q mutant exhibited a 75-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction. The E305A mutant also showed a 75- and 80-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction, respectively. While Glu305 appears to be the active site base which deprotonates HCO3−, Lys245, Glu218 and Arg301 are proposed to contribute to catalysis through substrate binding interactions. The reactions of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domains were uncoupled in the R353M-catalyzed reactions, indicating that Arg353 may not only facilitate the formation of the biotin enolate, but also assist in coordinating catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites. The 2.5 and 4-fold increase in kcat for the full reverse reaction with the R353K and R353M mutants, respectively, suggests that mutation of Arg353 allows carboxybiotin increased access to the biotin carboxylase domain active site. The proposed chemical mechanism is initiated by the deprotonation of HCO3− by Glu305 and concurrent nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of MgATP. The trianionic carboxyphosphate intermediate formed reversibly decomposes in the active site to CO2 and PO43−. PO43− then acts as the base to deprotonate the tethered biotin at the N1-position. Stabilized by interactions between the ureido oxygen and Arg353, the biotin-enolate reacts with CO2 to give carboxybiotin. The formation of a distinct salt

  1. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  2. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  3. AMPK/Snf1 signaling regulates histone acetylation: Impact on gene expression and epigenetic functions.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its yeast homolog, Snf1, are critical regulators in the maintenance of energy metabolic balance not only stimulating energy production but also inhibiting energy-consuming processes. The AMPK/Snf1 signaling controls energy metabolism by specific phosphorylation of many metabolic enzymes and transcription factors, enhancing or suppressing their functions. The AMPK/Snf1 complexes can be translocated from cytoplasm into nuclei where they are involved in the regulation of transcription. Recent studies have indicated that AMPK/Snf1 activation can control histone acetylation through different mechanisms affecting not only gene transcription but also many other epigenetic functions. For instance, AMPK/Snf1 enzymes can phosphorylate the histone H3S10 (yeast) and H2BS36 (mammalian) sites which activate specific histone acetyltransferases (HAT), consequently enhancing histone acetylation. Moreover, nuclear AMPK can phosphorylate type 2A histone deacetylases (HDAC), e.g. HDAC4 and HDAC5, triggering their export from nuclei thus promoting histone acetylation reactions. AMPK activation can also increase the level of acetyl CoA, e.g. by inhibiting fatty acid and cholesterol syntheses. Acetyl CoA is a substrate for HATs, thus increasing their capacity for histone acetylation. On the other hand, AMPK can stimulate the activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) which increases the level of NAD(+). NAD(+) is a substrate for nuclear sirtuins, especially for SIRT1 and SIRT6, which deacetylate histones and transcription factors, e.g. those regulating ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic modification which subsequently can affect chromatin remodeling, e.g. via bromodomain proteins. We will review the signaling mechanisms of AMPK/Snf1 in the control of histone acetylation and subsequently clarify their role in the epigenetic regulation of ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks

  4. Expression of PEP carboxylase from Escherichia coli complements the phenotypic effects of pyruvate carboxylase mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flores, C L; Gancedo, C

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effects of the expression of the Escherichia coli ppc gene encoding PEP carboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants devoid of pyruvate carboxylase. Functional expression of the ppc gene restored the ability of the yeast mutants to grow in glucose-ammonium medium. Growth yield in this medium was the same in the transformed yeast than in the wild type although the growth rate of the transformed yeast was slower. Growth in pyruvate was slowed down in the transformed strain, likely due to a futile cycle produced by the simultaneous action of PEP carboxykinase and PEP carboxylase. PMID:9276461

  5. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase in Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhow, M. A.; Mcfadden, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase, enzymes in the reductive pentose-phosphate cycle, were measured in cell-free extracts of Prochloran didemni. The partial purification and characterization of RuBP carboxylase were described. Prochloron RuBP carboxylase, when purified by isopycnic centrifugation in reoriented linear 0.2 to 0.8 M sucrose gradients, sedimented to a position which corresponded to that of the 520,000-dalton spinach enzyme. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the Prochloron enzyme was composed of large and small subunits (MW = 57,500 and 18,800). Though results established that the enzymes RuBP carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase were present in levels comparable to other CO2-fixing microorganisms, it was suggested that other enzymes in the Calvin cycle limit growth or that additional enzymic insufficiencies exist.

  6. Characterizing the importance of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer for S. aureus pyruvate carboxylase catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda P. C.; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Choi, Philip H.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) is a conserved component among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin, using bicarbonate as the CO2 donor. Studies with E. coli BC have suggested long-range communication between the two active sites of a dimer, although its mechanism is not well understood. In addition, mutations in the dimer interface can produce stable monomers that are still catalytically active. A homologous dimer for the BC domain is observed in the structure of tetrameric pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme. We have introduced site-specific mutations in the BC domain dimer interface of S. aureus PC (SaPC), equivalent to those used for E. coli BC, and also made chimeras replacing the SaPC BC domain with the E. coli BC subunit (EcBC chimera) or the yeast ACC BC domain (ScBC chimera). We assessed the catalytic activities of these mutants and characterized their oligomerization states by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The K442E mutant and the ScBC chimera disrupted the BC dimer and were catalytically inactive, while the F403A mutant and the EcBC chimera were still tetrameric and retained catalytic activity. The R54E mutant was also tetrameric but was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures of the R54E, F403A and K442E mutants showed that they were tetrameric in the crystal, with conformational changes near the mutation site as well as in the tetramer organization. We have also produced the isolated BC domain of SaPC. In contrast to E. coli BC, the SaPC BC domain is monomeric in solution and catalytically inactive. PMID:23286247

  7. Characterizing the importance of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer for Staphylococcus aureus pyruvate carboxylase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda P C; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Choi, Philip H; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-22

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) is a conserved component among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin, using bicarbonate as the CO₂ donor. Studies with Escherichia coli BC have suggested long-range communication between the two active sites of a dimer, although its mechanism is not well understood. In addition, mutations in the dimer interface can produce stable monomers that are still catalytically active. A homologous dimer for the BC domain is observed in the structure of the tetrameric pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme. We have introduced site-specific mutations into the BC domain dimer interface of Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC), equivalent to those used for E. coli BC, and also made chimeras replacing the SaPC BC domain with the E. coli BC subunit (EcBC chimera) or the yeast ACC BC domain (ScBC chimera). We assessed the catalytic activities of these mutants and characterized their oligomerization states by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The K442E mutant and the ScBC chimera disrupted the BC dimer and were catalytically inactive, while the F403A mutant and the EcBC chimera were still tetrameric and retained catalytic activity. The R54E mutant was also tetrameric but was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures of the R54E, F403A, and K442E mutants showed that they were tetrameric in the crystal, with conformational changes near the mutation site as well as in the tetramer organization. We have also produced the isolated BC domain of SaPC. In contrast to E. coli BC, the SaPC BC domain is monomeric in solution and catalytically inactive. PMID:23286247

  8. Doping Induced Itinerant Ferromagnetism in CoAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia

    2013-03-01

    The magnetism in α-CoAs is dominated by strong spin fluctuations. In this study, we explore the effects of Phosphorus doping in α-CoAs. Phosphorus is isovalent with Arsenic, and the resulting doping introduces disorder and chemical pressure. In CoAs1-xPx, a cross-over from the spin fluctuation-dominated regime to an itinerant ferromagnetic (IFM) state take places around x = 0.04. The IFM state persists up to x <= 0.27. For compositions between x = 0.28 and 0.40, the magnetization data suggests a possible Stoner enhanced state. We acknowledge the support from DOD PECASE.

  9. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  10. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Structure, function and regulation of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Jitrapakdee, S; Wallace, J C

    1999-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC; EC 6.4.1.1), a member of the biotin-dependent enzyme family, catalyses the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate. PC has been found in a wide variety of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, PC plays a crucial role in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitter substances, and in glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. The reaction catalysed by PC and the physical properties of the enzyme have been studied extensively. Although no high-resolution three-dimensional structure has yet been determined by X-ray crystallography, structural studies of PC have been conducted by electron microscopy, by limited proteolysis, and by cloning and sequencing of genes and cDNA encoding the enzyme. Most well characterized forms of active PC consist of four identical subunits arranged in a tetrahedron-like structure. Each subunit contains three functional domains: the biotin carboxylation domain, the transcarboxylation domain and the biotin carboxyl carrier domain. Different physiological conditions, including diabetes, hyperthyroidism, genetic obesity and postnatal development, increase the level of PC expression through transcriptional and translational mechanisms, whereas insulin inhibits PC expression. Glucocorticoids, glucagon and catecholamines cause an increase in PC activity or in the rate of pyruvate carboxylation in the short term. Molecular defects of PC in humans have recently been associated with four point mutations within the structural region of the PC gene, namely Val145-->Ala, Arg451-->Cys, Ala610-->Thr and Met743-->Thr. PMID:10229653

  12. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of Malonyl CoA Decarboxylase Does Not Exacerbate Age-Related Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Zhang, Liyan; Mori, Jun; Sidhu, Vaninder K; Fukushima, Arata; Gopal, Keshav; Lopaschuk, David G; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-07-01

    Aging is associated with the development of chronic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A reduction in mitochondrial fat oxidation is postulated to be a key factor contributing to the progression of these diseases. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation toward age-related disease. Mice deficient for malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD(-/-)), a mouse model of reduced fat oxidation, were allowed to age while life span and a number of physiological parameters (glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, indirect calorimetry) were assessed. Decreased fat oxidation in MCD(-/-) mice resulted in the accumulation of lipid intermediates in peripheral tissues, but this was not associated with a worsening of age-associated insulin resistance and, conversely, improved longevity. This improvement was associated with reduced oxidative stress and reduced acetylation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 in muscle but not the liver of MCD(-/-) mice. These findings were recapitulated in aged mice treated with an MCD inhibitor (CBM-3001106), and these mice also demonstrated improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance. Therefore, our results demonstrate that in addition to decreasing fat oxidation, MCD inhibition also has novel effects on protein acetylation. These combined effects protect against age-related metabolic dysfunction, demonstrating that MCD inhibitors may have utility in the battle against chronic disease in the elderly. PMID:27207536

  13. Probing functional divergence of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hasik

    The conversion of AIR to CAIR catalyzed by AIR carboxylase represents the only carbon-carbon bond formation step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Prokaryotic and most eukaryotic AIR carboxylases utilize two proteins, PurK and PurE to accomplish the conversion of AIR to CAIR via N5-CAIR from AIR, ATP, and bicarbonate. In vertebrates, AIR carboxylases utilizes AIR and CO2 directly to produce CAIR without a free intermediate. NAIR is a slow-tight binding inhibitor for G. gallus AIR carboxylase while this compound is a simple competitive inhibitor in the case of the Escherichia coli system. The tight binding nature of NAIR suggested that this compound represents a transition state analog. A structure- activity study was extended in order to understand the role of ring electronics and substituents of NAIR for the tight-binding phenomenon. The analysis of inhibition data of azole nucleotide inhibitors was summarized as follows; (1) N3 of NAIR is not critical for binding, (2) ring electronics are important for binding in the nitro azole derivatives while they are not critical in the series of carboxy amino azole nucleotides, (3) the nitro group is a critical binding element for the tight-binding of NAIR, (4) the exocyclic amino group contributes to the optimum display of charge density of NAIR for tight-binding, (5) the carboxyl group of CAIR plays an import role for initial binding through electrostatic interactions. The fact that the gene for AIR carboxylase from both avian and methanogen can functionally complement E. coli purK and purE mutants despite the lack of any sequence homology with purK raised questions about the divergent functions of AIR carboxylases. The M. thermoautotrophicum AIR carboxylase was overexpressed and the catalytic function was established. Based on the stoichimetry of the ATP consumption, substrate specificities, and NAIR inhibition pattern, the methanogen AIR carboxylase is proposed to be distinctive from the E. coli and vertebrate forms and

  14. The Natural Mentors of Adolescent Children of Alcoholics (COAs): Implications for Preventive Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Meehan, Barbara T.; Heffer, Robert W.; Holladay, Janice J.

    2002-01-01

    Late adolescent children of alcoholics (COAs) were interviewed about their relationship with a natural mentor. Results showed that a typical mentor was a same-sex relative who had been responsible for initiating the mentor-like relationship. Differences in the reported adjustment of COAs with and without natural mentors are considered in light of…

  15. Carboxylases in Natural and Synthetic Microbial Pathways▿†

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylases are among the most important enzymes in the biosphere, because they catalyze a key reaction in the global carbon cycle: the fixation of inorganic carbon (CO2). This minireview discusses the physiological roles of carboxylases in different microbial pathways that range from autotrophy, carbon assimilation, and anaplerosis to biosynthetic and redox-balancing functions. In addition, the current and possible future uses of carboxylation reactions in synthetic biology are discussed. Such uses include the possible transformation of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into value-added compounds and the production of novel antibiotics. PMID:22003013

  16. Characterization of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase from Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Johnson, M. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activity in chemosynthetic autotrophs Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus, noting sedimentation and gel filtration characteristics

  17. The Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase in Fatty Acid Synthesis in Developing Arabidopsis Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jinshan; Behal, Robert H.; Back, Stephanie L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Oliver, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) formed within the plastid is the precursor for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and, through them, a range of important biomolecules. The source of acetyl-CoA in the plastid is not known, but two enzymes are thought to be involved: acetyl-CoA synthetase and plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To determine the importance of these two enzymes in synthesizing acetyl-CoA during lipid accumulation in developing Arabidopsis seeds, we isolated cDNA clones for acetyl-CoA synthetase and for the ptE1α- and ptE1β-subunits of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To our knowledge, this is the first reported acetyl-CoA synthetase sequence from a plant source. The Arabidopsis acetyl-CoA synthetase preprotein has a calculated mass of 76,678 D, an apparent plastid targeting sequence, and the mature protein is a monomer of 70 to 72 kD. During silique development, the spatial and temporal patterns of the ptE1β mRNA level are very similar to those of the mRNAs for the plastidic heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits. The pattern of ptE1β mRNA accumulation strongly correlates with the formation of lipid within the developing embryo. In contrast, the level of mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase does not correlate in time and space with lipid accumulation. The highest level of accumulation of the mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase during silique development is within the funiculus. These mRNA data suggest a predominant role for plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase in acetyl-CoA formation during lipid synthesis in seeds. PMID:10859180

  18. ATP-Citrate Lyase Is Required for Production of Cytosolic Acetyl Coenzyme A and Development in Aspergillus nidulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of cellular molecules. A source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA is essential for the production of fatty acids and sterols and for protein acetylation, including histone acetylation in the nucleus. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans acetyl-CoA is produced from acetate by cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, while in plants and animals acetyl-CoA is derived from citrate via ATP-citrate lyase. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, tandem divergently transcribed genes (aclA and aclB) encode the subunits of ATP-citrate lyase, and we have deleted these genes. Growth is greatly diminished on carbon sources that do not result in cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as glucose and proline, while growth is not affected on carbon sources that result in the production of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as acetate and ethanol. Addition of acetate restores growth on glucose or proline, and this is dependent on facA, which encodes cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, but not on the regulatory gene facB. Transcription of aclA and aclB is repressed by growth on acetate or ethanol. Loss of ATP-citrate lyase results in severe developmental effects, with the production of asexual spores (conidia) being greatly reduced and a complete absence of sexual development. This is in contrast to Sordaria macrospora, in which fruiting body formation is initiated but maturation is defective in an ATP-citrate lyase mutant. Addition of acetate does not repair these defects, indicating a specific requirement for high levels of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA during differentiation. Complementation in heterokaryons between aclA and aclB deletions for all phenotypes indicates that the tandem gene arrangement is not essential. PMID:20495057

  19. ATP-citrate lyase is required for production of cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A and development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Murray, Sandra L

    2010-07-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism and in the biosynthesis of cellular molecules. A source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA is essential for the production of fatty acids and sterols and for protein acetylation, including histone acetylation in the nucleus. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans acetyl-CoA is produced from acetate by cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, while in plants and animals acetyl-CoA is derived from citrate via ATP-citrate lyase. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, tandem divergently transcribed genes (aclA and aclB) encode the subunits of ATP-citrate lyase, and we have deleted these genes. Growth is greatly diminished on carbon sources that do not result in cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as glucose and proline, while growth is not affected on carbon sources that result in the production of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA, such as acetate and ethanol. Addition of acetate restores growth on glucose or proline, and this is dependent on facA, which encodes cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA synthetase, but not on the regulatory gene facB. Transcription of aclA and aclB is repressed by growth on acetate or ethanol. Loss of ATP-citrate lyase results in severe developmental effects, with the production of asexual spores (conidia) being greatly reduced and a complete absence of sexual development. This is in contrast to Sordaria macrospora, in which fruiting body formation is initiated but maturation is defective in an ATP-citrate lyase mutant. Addition of acetate does not repair these defects, indicating a specific requirement for high levels of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA during differentiation. Complementation in heterokaryons between aclA and aclB deletions for all phenotypes indicates that the tandem gene arrangement is not essential. PMID:20495057

  20. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Franco, E; Teixeira, A R

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a +5 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35S-labelled ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (< 1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photo-synthetic tissues. PMID:8761476

  1. A Delphi-based consensus clinical practice protocol for the diagnosis and management of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Georgianne L; Koeberl, Dwight D; Matern, Dietrich; Barshop, Bruce; Braverman, Nancy; Burton, Barbara; Cederbaum, Stephen; Fiegenbaum, Annette; Garganta, Cheryl; Gibson, James; Goodman, Stephen I; Harding, Cary; Kahler, Stephen; Kronn, David; Longo, Nicola

    2008-04-01

    3-MCC deficiency is among the most common inborn errors of metabolism identified on expanded newborn screening (1:36,000 births). However, evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management of this disorder are lacking. Using the traditional Delphi method, a panel of 15 experts in inborn errors of metabolism was convened to develop consensus-based clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of 3-MCC screen-positive infants and their mothers. The Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine system was used to grade the literature review and create recommendations graded from A (evidence level of randomized clinical trials) to D (expert opinion). Panelists reviewed the initial evaluation of the screen-positive infant-mother dyad, diagnostic guidelines, and management of diagnosed patients. Grade D consensus recommendations were made in each of these three areas. The panel did not reach consensus on all issues. This consensus protocol is intended to assist clinicians in the diagnosis and management of screen-positive newborns for 3-MCC deficiency and to encourage the development of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:18155630

  2. N-Acetylaspartate reductions in brain injury: impact on post-injury neuroenergetics, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Arun, Peethambaran; Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is employed as a non-invasive marker for neuronal health using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). This utility is afforded by the fact that NAA is one of the most concentrated brain metabolites and that it produces the largest peak in MRS scans of the healthy human brain. NAA levels in the brain are reduced proportionately to the degree of tissue damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the reductions parallel the reductions in ATP levels. Because NAA is the most concentrated acetylated metabolite in the brain, we have hypothesized that NAA acts in part as an extensive reservoir of acetate for acetyl coenzyme A synthesis. Therefore, the loss of NAA after TBI impairs acetyl coenzyme A dependent functions including energy derivation, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation reactions in distinct ways in different cell populations. The enzymes involved in synthesizing and metabolizing NAA are predominantly expressed in neurons and oligodendrocytes, respectively, and therefore some proportion of NAA must be transferred between cell types before the acetate can be liberated, converted to acetyl coenzyme A and utilized. Studies have indicated that glucose metabolism in neurons is reduced, but that acetate metabolism in astrocytes is increased following TBI, possibly reflecting an increased role for non-glucose energy sources in response to injury. NAA can provide additional acetate for intercellular metabolite trafficking to maintain acetyl CoA levels after injury. Here we explore changes in NAA, acetate, and acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in response to brain injury. PMID:24421768

  3. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive pantothenate kinase (coaA) mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vallari, D S; Rock, C O

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants conditionally defective in the conversion of pantothenate to coenzyme A were isolated and characterized. The gene was designated coaA and localized between argEH and rpoB near min 90 of the chromosome. The coaA15(Ts) mutation caused a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype and temperature-dependent inactivation of pantothenate kinase activity assayed both in vivo and in vitro. At 30 degrees C, coaA15(Ts) extracts contained less than 20% of the wild-type pantothenate kinase activity; the kinase had near normal kinetic constants for the substrates ATP and pantothenate and was inhibited by coenzyme A to the same degree as the wild-type enzyme. These data define the coaA gene as the structural gene for pantothenate kinase. PMID:2824448

  4. Mechanistic Insight with HBCH2CoA as a Probe to Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1–2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [3H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([3H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [3H]-sTCoA ([3H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([3H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([3H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [3H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([3H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [3H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation. PMID:24896226

  5. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and/or thiolase overexpression coupled with CoA transferase downregulation lead to higher alcohol titers and selectivity in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations.

    PubMed

    Sillers, Ryan; Al-Hinai, Mohab Ali; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic engineering (ME) of Clostridium acetobutylicum has led to increased solvent (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) production and solvent tolerance, thus demonstrating that further efforts have the potential to create strains of industrial importance. With recently developed ME tools, it is now possible to combine genetic modifications and thus implement more advanced ME strategies. We have previously shown that antisense RNA (asRNA)-based downregulation of CoA transferase (CoAT, the first enzyme in the acetone-formation pathway) results in increased butanol to acetone selectivity, but overall reduced butanol yields and titers. In this study the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (aad) gene (encoding the bifunctional protein AAD responsible for butanol and ethanol production from butyryl-CoA and acetyl-CoA, respectively) was expressed from the phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) promoter to enhance butanol formation and selectivity, while CoAT downregulation was used to minimize acetone production. This led to early production of high alcohol (butanol plus ethanol) titers, overall solvent titers of 30 g/L, and a higher alcohol/acetone ratio. Metabolic flux analysis revealed the likely depletion of butyryl-CoA. In order to increase then the flux towards butyryl-CoA, we examined the impact of thiolase (THL, thl) overexpression. THL converts acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, the first step of the pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA, and thus, combining thl overexpression with aad overexpression decreased, as expected, acetate and ethanol production while increasing acetone and butyrate formation. thl overexpression in strains with asRNA CoAT downregulation did not significantly alter product formation thus suggesting that a more complex metabolic engineering strategy is necessary to enhance the intracellular butyryl-CoA pool and reduce the acetyl-CoA pool in order to achieve improved butanol titers and selectivity. PMID:18726959

  7. Ultrasensitive regulation of anapleurosis via allosteric activation of PEP carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Fan; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Reaves, Marshall Louis; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    Anapleurosis is the filling of the TCA cycle with four-carbon units. The common substrate for both anapleurosis and glucose phosphorylation in bacteria is the terminal glycolytic metabolite, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Here we show that E. coli quickly and almost completely turns off PEP consumption upon glucose removal. The resulting build-up of PEP is used to quickly import glucose if it becomes re-available. The switch-like termination of anapleurosis results from depletion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an ultrasensitive allosteric activator of PEP carboxylase. E. coli expressing an FBP-insensitive point mutant of PEP carboxylase grow normally on steady glucose. However, they fail to build-up PEP upon glucose removal, grow poorly on oscillating glucose, and suffer from futile cycling at the PEP node on gluconeogenic substrates. Thus, bacterial central carbon metabolism is intrinsically programmed with ultrasensitive allosteric regulation to enable rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:22522319

  8. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  9. Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (Late Onset) Due to Deficiency of Biotinidase

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Debadatta; Das, Manoj Kumar; Dhar, Sandipan; Mukhopadhyay, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase is a ubiquitous mammalian cell enzyme occurring in liver, serum and kidney. It cleaves biotin from biocytin, which is a cofactor for biotin dependent enzymes, namely the human carboxylases. Biotinidase deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological, dermatological, immunological and ophthalmological abnormalities. This is a case of a 3-year-old boy presenting with delayed developmental milestones, tachypnea, progressively increasing ataxia, alopecia and dermatitis, all which dramatically responded to high doses of biotin. PMID:25284861

  10. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  11. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase in developing rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F. J.; Hanson, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase were measured in foetal, newborn and adult rat liver extracts by a radiochemical assay involving the fixation of [14C]bicarbonate. 2. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both foetal and adult liver occurs mainly in mitochondrial and nuclear fractions, with about 10% of the activity in the cytoplasm. 3. Similar studies of the intracellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase show that more than 90% of the activity is in the cytoplasm. However, in the 17-day foetal liver about 90% of the activity is in mitochondria and nuclei. 4. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both particulate and soluble fractions is very low in the 17-day foetal liver and increases to near adult levels before birth. 5. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase activity in the soluble cell fraction increases 25-fold in the first 2 days after birth. This same enzyme in the mitochondria has considerable activity in the foetal and adult liver and is lower in the newborn. 6. Kinetic and other studies on the properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase have shown no differences between the soluble and mitochondrial enzymes. 7. It is suggested that the appearance of the soluble phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase at birth initiates the rapid increase in overall gluconeogenesis at this stage. PMID:6049928

  12. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus , a New Twist on ATP Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; et al

    2016-08-16

    Syntrophus aciditrophicusis a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation byS. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome ofS. aciditrophicusleaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show thatS. aciditrophicususes AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1)more » for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA.acs1mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, ofS. aciditrophicusgrown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts ofS. aciditrophicushad low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified fromS. aciditrophicusand recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) inS. aciditrophicuscells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus,S. aciditrophicushas a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. We find bacteria use two enzymes, phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, to make ATP from acetyl-CoA, while acetate-forming archaea use a single enzyme, an ADP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase, to synthesize ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA.Syntrophus aciditrophicusapparently relies on a different approach to conserve energy during acetyl-CoA metabolism, as

  13. The world of protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Drazic, Adrian; Myklebust, Line M; Ree, Rasmus; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Acetylation is one of the major post-translational protein modifications in the cell, with manifold effects on the protein level as well as on the metabolome level. The acetyl group, donated by the metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A, can be co- or post-translationally attached to either the α-amino group of the N-terminus of proteins or to the ε-amino group of lysine residues. These reactions are catalyzed by various N-terminal and lysine acetyltransferases. In case of lysine acetylation, the reaction is enzymatically reversible via tightly regulated and metabolism-dependent mechanisms. The interplay between acetylation and deacetylation is crucial for many important cellular processes. In recent years, our understanding of protein acetylation has increased significantly by global proteomics analyses and in depth functional studies. This review gives a general overview of protein acetylation and the respective acetyltransferases, and focuses on the regulation of metabolic processes and physiological consequences that come along with protein acetylation. PMID:27296530

  14. Metabolic biology of 3-methylglutaconic acid-uria: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Su, Betty; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past twenty-five years a growing number of distinct syndromes / mutations associated with compromised mitochondrial function have been identified that share a common feature: urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA). In the leucine degradation pathway, carboxylation of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA leads to formation of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA while 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts this metabolite to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG CoA). In “primary” 3MGA-uria, mutations in the hydratase are directly responsible for the accumulation of 3MGA. On the other hand, in all “secondary” 3MGA-urias, no defect in leucine catabolism exists and the metabolic origin of 3MGA is unknown. Herein, a path to 3MGA from mitochondrial acetyl CoA is proposed. The pathway is initiated when syndrome-associated mutations / DNA deletions result in decreased Krebs cycle flux. When this occurs, acetoacetyl CoA thiolase condenses two acetyl CoA into acetoacetyl CoA plus CoASH. Subsequently, HMG CoA synthase 2 converts acetoacetyl CoA and acetyl CoA to HMG CoA. Under syndrome-specific metabolic conditions, 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts HMG CoA into 3-methylglutaconyl CoA in a reverse reaction of the leucine degradation pathway. This metabolite fails to proceed further up the leucine degradation pathway owing to the kinetic properties of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase. Instead, hydrolysis of the CoA moiety of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA generates 3MGA, which appears in urine. If experimentally confirmed, this pathway provides an explanation for the occurrence of 3MGA in multiple disorders associated with compromised mitochondrial function. PMID:24407466

  15. Downregulation of Rubisco Activity by Non-enzymatic Acetylation of RbcL.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Hong, Hui; Li, Wei-Chao; Yang, Lili; Huang, Jirong; Xiao, You-Li; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Chen, Gen-Yun

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is assimilated by the most abundant but sluggish enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Here we show that acetylation of lysine residues of the Rubisco large subunit (RbcL), including Lys201 and Lys334 in the active sites, may be an important mechanism in the regulation of Rubisco activities. It is well known that Lys201 reacts with CO2 for carbamylation, a prerequisite for both carboxylase and oxygenase activities of Rubisco, and Lys334 contacts with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). The acetylation level of RbcL in plants is lower during the day and higher at night, inversely correlating with the Rubisco carboxylation activity. A search of the chloroplast proteome database did not reveal a canonical acetyltransferase; instead, we found that a plant-derived metabolite, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (AMC), can non-enzymatically acetylate both native Rubisco and synthesized RbcL peptides spanning Lys334 or Lys201. Furthermore, lysine residues were modified by synthesized 4-methylumbelliferone esters with different electro- and stereo-substitutes, resulting in varied Rubisco activities. 1-Chloroethyl 4-methylcoumarin-7-yl carbonate (ClMC) could transfer the chloroethyl carbamate group to lysine residues of RbcL and completely inactivate Rubisco, whereas bis(4-methylcoumarin-7-yl) carbonate (BMC) improved Rubisco activity through increasing the level of Lys201 carbamylation. Our findings indicate that RbcL acetylation negatively regulates Rubisco activity, and metabolic derivatives can be designed to dissect and improve CO2 fixation efficiency of plants through lysine modification. PMID:27109602

  16. Evidence for Light-stimulated Synthesis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Leaves of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Donald R.; Sims, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    Illumination (22,000 lumens per meter2) of etiolated maize plants for 80 hours brings about a 5-fold increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity per unit of protein. An increase in carboxylase protein and incorporation of [35S]methionine into the protein occurs simultaneously with the activity increase. In green plants, the level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein and enzyme activity is dependent on the intensity of light during growth. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the activity increase results from light-stimulated de novo synthesis of phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase protein. Images PMID:16661464

  17. Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA) cooldown analysis for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coladonato, Robert J.; Irish, Sandra M.; Mosier, Carol L.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft, developed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), was successfully launched on November 18, 1989 aboard a Delta expendable launch vehicle. Two of the three instruments for this mission were mounted inside a liquid helium (LHe) dewar which operates at a temperature of 2 K. These two instruments are the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) and the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). They are mounted to a common Instrument Interface Structure (IIS) and the entire assembly is called the Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA). As part of the structural verification requirement, it was necessary to show that the entire COA exhibited adequate strength and would be capable of withstanding the launch environment. This requirement presented an unique challenge for COBE because the COA is built and assembled at room temperature (300 K), cooled to 2 K, and then subjected to launch loads. However, strength testing of the entire COA at 2 K could not be done because of facility limitations. Therefore, it was decided to perform the strength verification of the COA by analysis.

  18. Identification of the N-linked glycosylation sites of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and the effect of glycosylation on carboxylase function†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Pope, R. Marshall; Straight, David L.; Stafford, Darrel W.

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase is an integral membrane protein which is required for the post-translational modification of a variety of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Previous studies have suggested carboxylase is a glycoprotein with N-linked glycosylation sites. In the present study, we identified the N-glycosylation sites of carboxylase by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analyses combined with site-directed mutagenesis. Our mass spectrometric results show that the N-linked glycosylation in carboxylase occurs at positions N459, N550, N605, and N627. Eliminating these glycosylation sites by changing asparagine to glutamine caused the mutant carboxylase to migrate faster in SDS-PAGE gel analyses, adding further evidence that these sites are glycosylated. In addition, the mutation studies identified N525, a site not recoverable by mass spectroscopy analysis, as a glycosylation site. Furthermore, the potential glycosylation site at N570 is glycosylated only if all the five natural glycosylation sites are simultaneously mutated. Removal of the oligosaccharides by glycosidase from wild-type carboxylase or by eliminating the functional glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis did not affect either the carboxylation or epoxidation activity when the small pentapeptide FLEEL was used as substrate, suggesting that N-linked glycosylation is not required for the enzymatic function of carboxylase. In contrast, when site N570 and the five natural glycosylation sites were mutated simultaneously, the resulting carboxylase protein was degraded. Our results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not essential for carboxylase enzymatic activity but it is important for protein folding and stability. PMID:17144668

  19. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Purification and characterization of a cytoplasmic enzyme component of the Na+-activated malonate decarboxylase system of Malonomonas rubra: acetyl-S-acyl carrier protein: malonate acyl carrier protein-SH transferase.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, H; Dimroth, P

    1994-01-01

    Malonate decarboxylation by crude extracts of Malonomonas rubra was specifically activated by Na+ and less efficiently by Li+ ions. The extracts contained an enzyme catalyzing CoA transfer from malonyl-CoA to acetate, yielding acetyl-CoA and malonate. After about a 26-fold purification of the malonyl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, an almost pure enzyme was obtained, indicating that about 4% of the cellular protein consisted of the CoA transferase. This abundance of the transferase is in accord with its proposed role as an enzyme component of the malonate decarboxylase system, the key enzyme of energy metabolism in this organism. The apparent molecular weight of the polypeptide was 67,000 as revealed from SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A similar molecular weight was estimated for the native transferase by gel chromatography, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. Kinetic analyses of the CoA transferase yielded the following: pH-optimum at pH 5.5, an apparent Km for malonyl-CoA of 1.9mM, for acetate of 54mM, for acetyl-CoA of 6.9mM, and for malonate of 0.5mM. Malonate or citrate inhibited the enzyme with an apparent Ki of 0.4mM and 3.0mM, respectively. The isolated CoA transferase increased the activity of malonate decarboxylase of a crude enzyme system, in which part of the endogenous CoA transferase was inactivated by borohydride, about three-fold. These results indicate that the CoA transferase functions physiologically as a component of the malonate decarboxylase system, in which it catalyzes the transfer of acyl carrier protein from acetyl acyl carrier protein and malonate to yield malonyl acyl carrier protein and acetate. Malonate is thus activated on the enzyme by exchange for the catalytically important enzymebound acetyl thioester residues noted previously. This type of substrate activation resembles the catalytic mechanism of citrate lyase and citramalate lyase. PMID:18251085

  1. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  2. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination. PMID:27372278

  3. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  4. The COA360: a tool for assessing the cultural competency of healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    LaVeist, Thomas A; Relosa, Rachel; Sawaya, Nadia

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, non-Hispanic whites will be in the numerical minority. This rapid diversification requires healthcare organizations to pay closer attention to cross-cultural issues if they are to meet the healthcare needs of the nation and continue to maintain a high standard of care. Although scorecards and benchmarking are widely used to gauge healthcare organizations' performance in various areas, these tools have been underused in relation to cultural preparedness or initiatives. The likely reason for this is the lack of a validated tool specifically designed to examine cultural competency. Existing validated cultural competency instruments evaluate individuals, not organizations. In this article, we discuss a study to validate the Cultural Competency Organizational Assessment--360 or the COA360, an instrument designed to appraise a healthcare organization's cultural competence. The Office of Minority Health and the Joint Commission have each developed standards for measuring the cultural competency of organizations. The COA360 is designed to assess adherence to both of these sets of standards. For this validation study, we enlisted a panel of national experts. The panel rated each dimension of the COA360, and the combination of items for each of the scale's 14 dimensions was rated above 4.13 (on 5-point scale). Our conclusion points to the validity of the COA360. As such, it is a valuable tool not only for assessing a healthcare organization's cultural readiness but also for benchmarking its progress in addressing cultural and diversity issues. PMID:18720687

  5. Metabolic analysis of Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the carboxylating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, R.R.; Eiteman, M.A.; Altman, E.

    2000-05-01

    Fermentation patterns of Escherichia coli with and without the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) enzymes were compared under anaerobic conditions with glucose as a carbon source. Time profiles of glucose and fermentation product concentrations were determined and used to calculate metabolic fluxes through central carbon pathways during exponential cell growth. The presence of the Rhizobium etli pyc gene in E. coli (JCL1242/pTrc99A-pyc) restored the succinate producing ability of E. coli ppc null mutants (JCL1242), with PYC competing favorably with both pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase. Succinate formation was slightly greater by JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc than by cells which overproduced PPC(JCL1242/pPC201, ppc{sup +}), even though PPC activity in cell extracts of JCL1242/pPC201 (ppc{sup +}) was 40-fold greater than PYC activity in extracts of JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc. Flux calculations indicate that during anaerobic metabolism the pyc{sup +} strain had a 34% greater specific glucose consumption rate, a 37% greater specific rate of ATP formation, and a 6% greater specific growth rate compared to the ppc{sup +} strain. In light of the important position of pyruvate at the juncture of NADH-generating pathways and NADH-dissimilating branches, the results show that when PPC or PYC is expressed, the metabolic network adapts by altering the flux to lactate and the molar ratio of ethanol to acetate formation.

  6. Acetyl transfer in arylamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. N-Hydroxyacetamidoaryl compounds (hydroxamic acids) are metabolites of arylamides, and an enzyme that transfers the acetyl group from these derivatives to arylamines has been found in rat tissues. The reaction products were identified by thin-layer chromatography and a spectrophotometric method, with 4-amino-azobenzene as acetyl acceptor, was used to measure enzyme activity. 2. The acetyltransferase was in the soluble fraction of rat liver, required a thiol for maximum activity and had a pH optimum between 6·0 and 7·5. 3. The soluble fractions of various rat tissues showed decreasing activity in the following order: liver, adrenal, kidney, lung, spleen, testis, heart; brain was inactive. 4. With the exception of aniline and aniline derivatives all the arylamines tested were effective as acetyl acceptors but aromatic compounds with side-chain amino groups were inactive. 5. The N-hydroxyacetamido derivatives of 2-naphthylamine, 4-amino-biphenyl and 2-aminofluorene were active acetyl donors but N-hydroxyacetanilide showed only slight activity. Acetyl-CoA was not a donor. 6. Some properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other acetyltransferases. PMID:5969287

  7. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  8. Steady-state concentrations of coenzyme A, acetyl-coenzyme A and long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A in rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Shepherd, D.; Yates, D. W.

    1965-01-01

    1. Fluorimetric assays are described for CoASH, acetyl-CoA and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and are sensitive to at least 50μμmoles of each. 2. Application of these assays to rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate in the absence and presence of carnitine indicated two pools of intramitochondrial CoA. One pool could be acylated by palmitate and ATP, and the other pool acylated by palmitate with ATP and carnitine, or by palmitoylcarnitine alone. 3. The intramitochondrial content of acetyl-CoA is increased by the oxidation of palmitate both in the absence and presence of l-malate. 4. The conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into acetyl-CoA by β-oxidation takes place without detectable accumulation of acyl-CoA intermediates. PMID:16749169

  9. Targeting Pyruvate Carboxylase Reduces Gluconeogenesis and Adiposity and Improves Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumashiro, Naoki; Beddow, Sara A.; Vatner, Daniel F.; Majumdar, Sachin K.; Cantley, Jennifer L.; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Fat, Ioana; Guigni, Blas; Jurczak, Michael J.; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Kahn, Mario; Perler, Bryce K.; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Bhanot, Sanjay; Still, Christopher D.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Samuel, Varman T.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the mRNA and protein expression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes in human liver biopsy specimens and found that only hepatic pyruvate carboxylase protein levels related strongly with glycemia. We assessed the role of pyruvate carboxylase in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in rats through a loss-of-function approach using a specific antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to decrease expression predominantly in liver and adipose tissue. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO reduced plasma glucose concentrations and the rate of endogenous glucose production in vivo. Interestingly, pyruvate carboxylase ASO also reduced adiposity, plasma lipid concentrations, and hepatic steatosis in high fat–fed rats and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO had similar effects in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO did not alter de novo fatty acid synthesis, lipolysis, or hepatocyte fatty acid oxidation. In contrast, the lipid phenotype was attributed to a decrease in hepatic and adipose glycerol synthesis, which is important for fatty acid esterification when dietary fat is in excess. Tissue-specific inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase is a potential therapeutic approach for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatic insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23423574

  10. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  11. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus, a New Twist on ATP Formation

    PubMed Central

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; Rohlin, Lars; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Loo, Joseph A.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syntrophus aciditrophicus is a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation by S. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome of S. aciditrophicus leaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show that S. aciditrophicus uses AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1) for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA. acs1 mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, of S. aciditrophicus grown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts of S. aciditrophicus had low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified from S. aciditrophicus and recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) in S. aciditrophicus cells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus, S. aciditrophicus has a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. PMID:27531911

  12. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in the silkworm, Bombyx mori: involvement of acyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S

    1996-03-01

    In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, production of the sex pheromone bombykol is regulated by a neurohormone termed PBAN. We have detected the activity of acyl CoA reductase in the pheromone gland of B. mori by using palmitoyl CoA as a substrate. The acyl CoA reductase requires NADPH, but not NADH, as a proton dono. When the pheromone gland was incubated with the PBAN fragment peptide TKYFSPRLamide, palmitoyl CoA was incorporated and converted into the corresponding C16 alcohols. Radio HPLC analysis revealed that these C16 alcohols were hexadecan-1-ol (81.2%), (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol (12.3%), and (E, Z)-10, 12-hexadecadien-1-ol (= bombykol, 6.5%). The production of C16 alcohols in the pheromone gland was inhibited by the known bombykol biosynthesis inhibitors EDTA, LaCl3, W-7, trifluoperazine, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, NaF and compactin. By contrast, when the pheromone gland homogenate was incubated in the presence of palmitoyl CoA and NADPH, production of C16 alcohols was affected by compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine, but not by EDTA, LaCl3, p-nitrophenyl phosphate and NaF. These results indicate that compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine directly suppress the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase, whereas EDTA, LaCl3, pNPP, and NaF inhibit bombykol production by affecting other biochemical steps in the signal transduction of PBAN action. The present results also imply that PBAN regulates the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase and that palmitoyl CoA could be used as a substrate of the acyl CoA reductase that regulates bombykol biosynthesis. PMID:8900596

  13. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering. PMID:26660885

  14. Variations in the Localization of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase in Aerobic Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Jahnke, Linda

    1971-01-01

    In cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing aerobically for 24 hr, acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase [acetate: CoA ligase (AMP), EC 6.2.1.1] was localized principally in the microsomal fraction. On density gradients, the enzyme in such cells behaved as a low-density particle, readily separable from the soluble proteins. After 48 hr of incubation, the cells showed a bimodal distribution of enzyme, with most of the activity now sedimenting with the mitochondrial fraction and only a smaller amount with the microsomal fraction. By using density gradients, two forms of synthetase were obtained from these cells: one band denser and the other band less dense than the intact mitochondria. In all preparations containing synthetase activity, appreciable levels of phospholipids were also detected. Images PMID:4102333

  15. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  16. The Antibiotic CJ-15,801 is an Antimetabolite which Hijacks and then Inhibits CoA Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Westhuyzen, Renier; Hammons, Justin C.; Meier, Jordan L.; Dahesh, Samira; Moolman, Wessel J. A.; Pelly, Stephen C.; Nizet, Victor; Burkart, Michael D.; Strauss, Erick

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural product CJ-15,801 is an inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus, but not other bacteria. Its close structural resemblance to pantothenic acid, the vitamin precursor of coenzyme A (CoA), and its Michael acceptor moiety suggest that it irreversibly inhibits an enzyme involved in CoA biosynthesis or utilization. However, its mode of action and the basis for its specificity have not been elucidated to date. We demonstrate that CJ-15,801 is transformed by the uniquely selective S. aureus pantothenate kinase, the first CoA biosynthetic enzyme, into a substrate for the next enzyme, phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase, which is inhibited through formation of a tight-binding structural mimic of its native reaction intermediate. These findings reveal CJ-15,801 as a vitamin biosynthetic pathway antimetabolite with a mechanism similar to that of the sulfonamide antibiotics, and highlight CoA biosynthesis as a viable antimicrobial drug target. PMID:22633408

  17. Chemical and physical characterization of the activation of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere. 1 drawing.

  18. Chemical and Physical Characterization of the Activation of Ribulosebiphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Donnelly, M. I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F. C.

    1983-08-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere.

  19. Perspective of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the key catalyst in photosynthesis and photorespiration

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, B.A.

    1980-11-01

    Reported works dealing with the opposing processes photosynthesis and photorespiration, catalyzed by ribulose biphosphate carboxylase (RuBP) are summarized with 75 references being cited. Some recent findings that suggest that it should be possible to increase the RuBP carboxylase:oxygenase ratio by mutation and that this increase should lead to higher plant productivity are reported. It is pointed out that a better understanding of these catalytic mechanisms is necessary before the activities can be tailored to specific purposes. (BLM)

  20. Variations in Km(CO2) of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase among Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the Km(CO2) values of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from 60 grass species shows that enzyme from C3 grasses consistently exhibits lower Km(CO2) than does that from C4 grasses. Systematically ordered variation in Km(CO2) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylases from C3 and C4 grasses is also apparent and, among C4 grasses, this shows some correlation with C4 types. PMID:16661586

  1. Crystallization and structure of a recombinant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gunter; Lindqvist, Ylva; Brändén, Carl-Ivar; Lorimer, George

    1988-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is the key enzyme in photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation and photorespiration. The dimeric carboxylase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzyme has been crystallized in a number of different crystal forms. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme has been determined by X-ray crystallographic methods to 2.9Åresolution.

  2. Induction of pyruvate carboxylase apoenzyme and holoenzyme in 3T3-L1 cells during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Svend O.; Utter, Merton F.

    1980-01-01

    The specific activity of pyruvate carboxylase [pyruvate:carbon-dioxide ligase (ADP-forming); EC 6.4.1.1] in 3T3-L1 cells increases approximately 20-fold when these cells differentiate to an adipocyte-like form [Mackall, J. C. & Lane, M. D. (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 79, 720-725]. A specific antibody to the purified rat liver enzyme quantitatively precipitated pyruvate carboxylase from 3T3-L1 crude homogenates. Use of this immunological technique permitted us to demonstrate that the increase in pyruvate carboxylase activity is due to an increase in the intracellular concentration of the enzyme. The content of pyruvate carboxylase in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells is sufficiently high (1-2% of total protein) that the increase in this large protein (subunit Mr = 130,000) can be visualized when 3T3-L1 crude extracts are subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. When 3T3-L1 cells differentiated in the presence of avidin, they contained less than 5% of the pyruvate carboxylase activity of cells that differentiated in the absence of avidin. However, the immunoprecipitable pyruvate carboxylase content of the avidin-treated cells was essentially the same as that of cells that differentiated without avidin. Full activity of the enzyme was rapidly restored in the avidin-treated cells upon the addition of excess biotin. The recovery of activity was closely correlated with the incorporation of [14C]biotin into immunoprecipitable pyruvate carboxylase. The rapidity with which the activity was restored and the insensitivity of the process to inhibitors of protein synthesis strongly suggest that the apoenzyme of pyruvate carboxylase accumulates during differentiation in the presence of avidin. Images PMID:6929488

  3. Ameliorative effect of Withania coagulans on dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kirtikar; Dikshit, Piyush; Tyagi, Mool Kumar; Shukla, Rimi; Gambhir, Jasvinder K

    2012-10-01

    Present study aims to evaluate the effect of Withania coagulans fruit (aqWC) on diabetic-dyslipidemia and antioxidant/oxidant status in DM. Diabetic animals were treated with aqWC at a dose of 250 mg/kg bw for 30 days. Lipid profile, MDA, GSH, SOD, FRAP, HMG CoA reductase and acetyl CoA carboxylase activities were estimated in blood and tissues. Total cholesterol, TAG and LDL were significantly elevated whereas HDL was decreased in diabetic animals (p<0.05), simultaneously the lipid content and HMG CoA reductase activities were also increased, whereas acetyl CoA carboxylase activity decreased significantly in tissues of diabetic animals. MDA was increased and antioxidants such as SOD, GSH and FRAP decreased significantly in DM (p<0.05). Oral administration of aqWC to diabetic animals produced significant improvement in serum lipid profile and tissue lipid content. Activity of HMG CoA reductase decreased, whereas acetyl CoA carboxylase activity increased significantly in tissues after aqWC treatment. Administration of aqWC to diabetic animals also showed significant increase in antioxidant levels i.e., GSH, SOD, FRAP and reduced level of MDA in blood and tissue homogenates as compared to diabetic controls (p<0.05). These results suggest that aqWC treatment improved lipid profile and decreased oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. PMID:22842119

  4. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  5. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. PMID:25959673

  6. hCOA3 Stabilizes Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COX1) and Promotes Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly in Human Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Paula; Peralta, Susana; Cruz-Bermudez, Alberto; Echevarría, Lucía; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni; Fernandez-Moreno, Miguel A.; Garesse, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a fundamental role in energy production of aerobic cells. In humans, COX deficiency is the most frequent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Human COX is composed of 13 subunits of dual genetic origin, whose assembly requires an increasing number of nuclear-encoded accessory proteins known as assembly factors. Here, we have identified and characterized human CCDC56, an 11.7-kDa mitochondrial transmembrane protein, as a new factor essential for COX biogenesis. CCDC56 shares sequence similarity with the yeast COX assembly factor Coa3 and was termed hCOA3. hCOA3-silenced cells display a severe COX functional alteration owing to a decreased stability of newly synthesized COX1 and an impairment in the holoenzyme assembly process. We show that hCOA3 physically interacts with both the mitochondrial translation machinery and COX structural subunits. We conclude that hCOA3 stabilizes COX1 co-translationally and promotes its assembly with COX partner subunits. Finally, our results identify hCOA3 as a new candidate when screening for genes responsible for mitochondrial diseases associated with COX deficiency. PMID:23362268

  7. Acidosis Drives the Reprogramming of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Cancer Cells through Changes in Mitochondrial and Histone Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adán; Martherus, Ruben; Santiago de Jesus, João Pedro; Polet, Florence; Feron, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Bioenergetic preferences of cancer cells foster tumor acidosis that in turn leads to dramatic reduction in glycolysis and glucose-derived acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). Here, we show that the main source of this critical two-carbon intermediate becomes fatty acid (FA) oxidation in acidic pH-adapted cancer cells. FA-derived acetyl-CoA not only fuels the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and supports tumor cell respiration under acidosis, but also contributes to non-enzymatic mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation, thereby restraining complex I activity and ROS production. Also, while oxidative metabolism of glutamine supports the canonical TCA cycle in acidic conditions, reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate sustains FA synthesis. Concomitance of FA oxidation and synthesis is enabled upon sirtuin-mediated histone deacetylation and consecutive downregulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC2 making mitochondrial fatty acyl-CoA degradation compatible with cytosolic lipogenesis. Perturbations of these regulatory processes lead to tumor growth inhibitory effects further identifying FA metabolism as a critical determinant of tumor cell proliferation under acidosis. PMID:27508876

  8. Transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by phosphorus deficiency in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Koizumi, Nozomu; Sato, Fumihiko

    2003-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyses the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate using HCO(3)(-) to generate oxaloacetic acid, is an important enzyme in the primary metabolism of plants. Although the PEPC genes (ppc) comprise only a small gene family, the function of each gene is not clear, except for roles in C(4) photosynthesis and CAM. Three PEPC genes (Nsppc1-3) from the C(3) plant Nicotiana sylvestris were used to investigate their roles and regulation in a C(3) plant, and their regulation by phosphorus depletion in particular. First, the induction of PEPC by phosphorus depletion was confirmed. Next, Nsppc1 was determined to be mainly responsive to phosphorus deficiency at the transcriptional level. Further studies using transgenic tobacco harbouring a chimeric gene consisting of the 2.0 kb promoter region of Nsppc1 and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter showed that PEPC is transcriptionally induced. It was also found that sucrose had a synergistic effect on the induction of PEPC by phosphorus deficiency. A series of transgenic tobacco containing 5'-deletion mutants of Nsppc1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed that the -539 to -442 bp Nsppc1 promoter region, relative to the translation start site, was necessary for the response to phosphorus deficiency. Gain-of-function analysis using a construct containing three tandem repeats of the -539 to -442 bp region confirmed that this region was sufficient to induce the phosphorus-deficiency response in tobacco. PMID:12598567

  9. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  10. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from methanol-grown Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Shively, J M; Saluja, A; McFadden, B A

    1978-01-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans grows on methanol as the sole source of energy and carbon, which it assimilates aerobically via the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. This gram-negative bacterium grew rapidly on 50 mM methanol (generation time, 7 h, 30 degrees C) in excellent yield (3 g of wet-packed cells per liter of culture). Electron microscopic studies indicated that the late-log-phase cells were coccoid, having a thick envelope surrounding a layer of more diffuse electron-dense material and a relatively electron-transparent core. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in the 15,000 X g supernatant of fresh cells had specific activities (micromoles of CO2 fixed per minute per milligram of protein) of 0.026, 0.049, 0.085, 0.128, and 0.034 during the lag, early, mild-, and late log, and late stationary phases, respectively. The enzyme was purified 40-fold by pelleting at 159,000 X g, salting out, sedimentation into a 0.2 to 0.8 M linear sucrose gradient, and elution from a diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex column. The enzyme was homogeneous by the criteria of electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels polymerized from several acrylamide concentrations and sedimentation behavior. The molecular weight of the native enzyme, as measured by gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, averaged 525,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate dissociated the enzyme into two types of subunits with molecular weights of 55,000 and 13,600. The S20,w of the enzyme was 14.0 Km values for ribulose bisphosphate and CO2 were 0.166 and 0.051 mM, respectively, and the enzyme was inhibited to the extent of 94% by 1 mM 6-phosphogluconate. Images PMID:659365

  11. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  12. Metabolite Regulation of Partially Purified Soybean Nodule Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Turpin, David H.; Plaxton, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was purified 40-fold from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules to a specific activity of 5.2 units per milligram per protein and an estimated purity of 28%. Native and subunit molecular masses were determined to be 440 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is a homotetramer. The response of enzyme activity to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentration and to various effectors was influenced by assay pH and glycerol addition to the assay. At pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, the Km (PEP) was about twofold greater than at pH 7 in the presence of glycerol or at pH 8. At pH 7 or pH 8 the Km (MgPEP) was found to be significantly lower than the respective Km (PEP) values. Glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate activated PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but had no effect under the other assay conditions. Malate, aspartate, glutamate, citrate, and 2-oxoglutarate were potent inhibitors of PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but their effectiveness was decreased by raising the pH to 8 and/or by adding glycerol. In contrast, 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate were less effective inhibitors at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol than under the other assay conditions. Inorganic phosphate (up to 20 millimolar) was an activator at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol but an inhibitor under the other assay conditions. The possible significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is discussed in relation to the proposed functions of this enzyme in legume nodule metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667849

  13. A propionate CoA-transferase of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with broad substrate specificity catalyzing the CoA thioester formation of various carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lindenkamp, Nicole; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated a propionate CoA-transferase (Pct) homologue encoded in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16. The corresponding gene has been cloned into the vector pET-19b to yield a histidine-tagged enzyme which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analyses revealed that the enzyme exhibits a broad substrate specificity for carboxylic acids. The formation of the corresponding CoA-thioesters of acetate using propionyl-CoA as CoA donor, and of propionate, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropionate, crotonate, acrylate, lactate, succinate and 4-hydroxybutyrate using acetyl-CoA as CoA donor could be shown. According to the substrate specificity, the enzyme can be allocated in the family I of CoA-transferases. The apparent molecular masses as determined by gel filtration and detected by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 228 and 64 kDa, respectively, and point to a quaternary structure of the native enzyme (α4). The enzyme exhibited similarities in sequence and structure to the well investigated Pct of Clostridium propionicum. It does not contain the typical conserved (S)ENG motif, but the derived motif sequence EXG with glutamate 342 to be, most likely, the catalytic residue. Due to the homo-oligomeric structure and the sequence differences with the subclasses IA-C of family I CoA-transferases, a fourth subclass of family I is proposed, comprising - amongst others - the Pcts of R. eutropha H16 and C. propionicum. A markerless precise-deletion mutant R. eutropha H16∆pct was generated. The growth and accumulation behaviour of this mutant on gluconate, gluconate plus 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP), acetate and propionate was investigated but resulted in no observable phenotype. Both, the wild type and the mutant showed the same growth and storage behaviour with these carbon sources. It is probable that R. eutropha H16 is upregulating

  14. Mitochondrial Acetylation and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Payne, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, protein lysine acetylation has emerged as a prominent and conserved regulatory posttranslational modification that is abundant on numerous enzymes involved in the processes of intermediary metabolism. Well-characterized mitochondrial processes of carbon utilization are enriched in acetyl-lysine modifications. Although seminal discoveries have been made in the basic biology of mitochondrial acetylation, an understanding of how acetylation states influence enzyme function and metabolic reprogramming during pathological states remains largely unknown. This paper will examine our current understanding of eukaryotic acetate metabolism and present recent findings in the field of mitochondrial acetylation biology. The implications of mitochondrial acetylation for the aging process will be discussed, as well as its potential implications for the unique and localized metabolic states that occur during the aging-associated conditions of heart failure and cancer growth. PMID:21437190

  15. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories. PMID:27104508

  16. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  17. Propionyl Coenzyme A (Propionyl-CoA) Carboxylase in Haloferax mediterranei: Indispensability for Propionyl-CoA Assimilation and Impacts on Global Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) is an important intermediate during the biosynthesis and catabolism of intracellular carbon storage of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) in haloarchaea. However, the haloarchaeal propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) and its physiological significance remain unclear. In this study, we identified a PCC that catalyzed propionyl-CoA carboxylation with an acetyl-CoA carboxylation side activity in Haloferax mediterranei. Gene knockout/complementation demonstrated that the PCC enzyme consisted of a fusion protein of a biotin carboxylase and a biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (PccA [HFX_2490]), a carboxyltransferase component (PccB [HFX_2478]), and an essential small subunit (PccX [HFX_2479]). Knockout of pccBX led to an inability to utilize propionate and a higher intracellular propionyl-CoA level, indicating that the PCC enzyme is indispensable for propionyl-CoA utilization. Interestingly, H. mediterranei DBX (pccBX-deleted strain) displayed multiple phenotypic changes, including retarded cell growth, decreased glucose consumption, impaired PHBV biosynthesis, and wrinkled cells. A propionyl-CoA concentration equivalent to the concentration that accumulated in DBX cells was demonstrated to inhibit succinyl-CoA synthetase of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in vitro. Genome-wide microarray analysis showed that many genes for glycolysis, pyruvate oxidation, PHBV accumulation, electron transport, and stress responses were affected in DBX. This study not only identified the haloarchaeal PCC for the metabolism of propionyl-CoA, an important intermediate in haloarchaea, but also demonstrated that impaired propionyl-CoA metabolism affected global metabolism in H. mediterranei. PMID:25398867

  18. A Clinical Study to Validate the Pupil Rescaling Technique by using COAS Shack Hartmann Aberrometer.

    PubMed

    Kalikivayi, V; Kannan, K; Ganesan, A R

    2015-01-01

    In any optical system, optical aberrations of the imaging system affect the image quality. The human eye is also like an optical system which has optical aberrations influencing the quality of the retinal image. When pupil size exceeds 3 mm, ocular aberrations increase and play a major role on retinal image degradation. Pupil diameter is made constant in commercially available aberrometers by mathematically rescaling it. The aim of this study is to validate the pupil rescaling technique by using COAS (Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System)Shack Hartmann Aberrometer. Five subjects were recruited for this study. The measurements were taken over a moderately large pupil of 5mm in normal room illumination to allow for natural pupil dilation. The analyses diameter is fixed at 5 mm in COAS which means it rescales the aberration data to 5 mm if the pupil diameter recorded was more than 5 mm at the time of measurement. Ocular aberrations for natural and rescaled pupil sizes were analyzed. Estimation of ocular aberrations showed there was no statistical significance between natural pupil and rescaled pupil diameter. PMID:25996727

  19. Flexible DAQ card for detector systems utilizing the CoaXPress communication standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neue, G.; Hejtmánek, M.; Marčišovský, M.; Voleš, P.

    2015-04-01

    This work concerns the design and construction of a flexible FPGA based data acquisition system aimed for particle detectors. The interface card as presented was designed for large area detectors with millions of individual readout channels. Flexibility was achieved by partitioning the design into multiple PCBs, creating a set of modular blocks, allowing the creation of a wide variety of configurations by simply stacking functional PCBs together. This way the user can easily toggle the polarity of the high voltage bias supply or switch the downstream interface from CoaXPress to PCIe or stream directly HDMI. We addressed the issues of data throughput, data buffering, bias voltage generation, trigger timing and fine tuning of the whole readout chain enabling a smooth data transmission. On the current prototype, we have wire-bonded a MediPix2 MXR quad and connected it to a XILINX FPGA. For the downstream interface, we implemented the CoaXPress communication protocol, which enables us to stream data at 3.125 Gbps to a standard PC.

  20. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    PubMed

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM. PMID:27125317

  1. Association between the enterotoxin production and presence of Coa, Nuc genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources, in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Moghassem Hamidi, R; Hosseinzadeh, S; Shekarforoush, S. S.; Poormontaseri, M; Derakhshandeh, A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the frequency of coagulase (Coa) and thermonuclease (Nuc) genes and Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (Sea) production among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources in Shiraz. Moreover, the correlation between the Sea gene and coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes is also considered. A total of 100 S. aureus were isolated from various sources including 40 humans, 30 animals and 30 food samples by the routine biochemical tests. The frequency of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was evaluated by PCR assay. Correlation among those genes was finally evaluated by statistical analysis. The PCR results showed that the prevalence of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was 91%, 100% and 14%, respectively. The evaluation of the enterotoxin production indicated that 78.6% of the Sea gene was expressed. The presence of enterotoxin A was not necessarily correlated to the production of toxin. As a final conclusion to detect the enterotoxigenic strains, both genotypic and phenotypic methods are highly recommended. PMID:27175208

  2. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-25

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  3. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, GENGXIANG; ALLEWELL, NORMA M.; TUCHMAN, MENDEL; SHI, DASHUANG

    2013-01-01

    N -acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  4. Proteomic profiling of lysine acetylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the diversity of acetylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and highly regulated post-translational modification with the well demonstrated physiological relevance in eukaryotes. Recently, its important role in the regulation of metabolic processes in bacteria was highlighted. Here, we reported the lysine acetylproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a proteomic approach. We identified 430 unique peptides corresponding to 320 acetylated proteins. In addition to the proteins involved in various metabolic pathways, several enzymes contributing to the lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis were characterized as acetylated. This data set illustrated the abundance and the diversity of acetylated lysine proteins in P. aeruginosa and opens opportunities to explore the role of the acetylation in the bacterial physiology. PMID:25900529

  5. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  6. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  7. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Junhyun; Kwon, Seomun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:25288980

  8. Competing carboxylases: circadian and metabolic regulation of Rubisco in C3 and CAM Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed

    Davies, B N; Griffiths, H

    2012-07-01

    The temporal co-ordination of ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activities by Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. in C(3) and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) modes was investigated under conventional light-dark (LD) and continuous light (LL) conditions. When C(3) , net CO(2) assimilation rate increased during each subjective night under LL with maximum carboxylation unrelated to Rubisco activation state. The CAM circadian rhythm of CO(2) uptake was more pronounced, with CO(2) assimilation rate maximal towards the end of each subjective night. In vivo and in vitro techniques were integrated to map carboxylase enzyme regulation to the framework provided by CAM LL gas exchange activity. Rubisco was activated in vitro throughout each subjective dark period and consistently deactivated at each subjective dawn, similar to that observed at true dawn in constitutive CAM species. Instantaneous carbon isotope discrimination showed in vivo carboxylase co-dominance during the CAM subjective night, initially by Rubisco and latterly C(4) (PEPc), despite both enzymes seemingly activated in vitro. The circadian rhythm in titratable acidity accumulation was progressively damped over successive subjective nights, but maintenance of PEPc carboxylation capacity ensures that CAM plants do not become progressively more 'C(3) -like' with time under LL. PMID:22239463

  9. Isolation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multi-functional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a...

  10. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  11. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  12. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  13. Unraveling Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ChsE4-ChsE5 α2β2 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Initiates β-Oxidation of 3-Oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of host cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an important factor for both its virulence and pathogenesis, although how and why cholesterol metabolism is required is not fully understood. Mtb uses a unique set of catabolic enzymes that are homologous to those required for classical β-oxidation of fatty acids but are specific for steroid-derived substrates. Here, we identify and assign the substrate specificities of two of these enzymes, ChsE4-ChsE5 (Rv3504-Rv3505) and ChsE3 (Rv3573c), that carry out cholesterol side chain oxidation in Mtb. Steady-state assays demonstrate that ChsE4-ChsE5 preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA in the first cycle of cholesterol side chain β-oxidation that ultimately yields propionyl-CoA, whereas ChsE3 specifically catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA in the second cycle of β-oxidation that generates acetyl-CoA. However, ChsE4-ChsE5 can catalyze the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA as well as 3-oxo-4-pregnene-20-carboxyl-CoA. The functional redundancy of ChsE4-ChsE5 explains the in vivo phenotype of the igr knockout strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the loss of ChsE1-ChsE2 can be compensated for by ChsE4-ChsE5 during the chronic phase of infection. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ChsE4-ChsE5 was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å and represents the first high-resolution structure of a heterotetrameric acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Unlike typical homotetrameric ACADs that bind four flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, ChsE4-ChsE5 binds one FAD at each dimer interface, resulting in only two substrate-binding sites rather than the classical four active sites. A comparison of the ChsE4-ChsE5 substrate-binding site to those of known mammalian ACADs reveals an enlarged binding cavity that accommodates steroid substrates and highlights novel prospects for designing inhibitors against the committed β-oxidation step in the first

  14. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  15. Acetylation phenotypes in patients with bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Breitenfeld, L; Carvalho, A A; Manso, C F

    1988-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the possible association of bladder carcinoma with the slow acetylator phenotype in a portuguese population. 49 patients with bladder carcinoma were compared to a normal control group of 84 individuals. No statistically significant association was detected. But when subdividing the group of slow acetylators it is found that in the subgroup with 12-36% acetylation there is a higher percentage of patients, which is statistically significant. These results are in agreement with two other studies, using populations of similar ethnic origin. PMID:3265609

  16. Toxicity of Carboxylic Acid-Containing Drugs: The Role of Acyl Migration and CoA Conjugation Investigated.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Hokkanen, Juho; Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Mattila, Sampo; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-12-21

    Many carboxylic acid-containing drugs are associated with idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT), which may be caused by reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. The rate of acyl migration has been earlier suggested as a predictor of acyl glucuronide reactivity. Additionally, acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates are known to be reactive. Here, 13 drugs with a carboxylic acid moiety were incubated with human liver microsomes to produce acyl glucuronide conjugates for the determination of acyl glucuronide half-lives by acyl migration and with HepaRG cells to monitor the formation of acyl CoA conjugates, their further conjugate metabolites, and trans-acylation products with glutathione. Additionally, in vitro cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity experiments were performed with HepaRG cells to compare the predictability of toxicity. Clearly, longer acyl glucuronide half-lives were observed for safe drugs compared to drugs that can cause IDT. Correlation between half-lives and toxicity classification increased when "relative half-lives," taking into account the formation of isomeric AG-forms due to acyl migration and eliminating the effect of hydrolysis, were used instead of plain disappearance of the initial 1-O-β-AG-form. Correlation was improved further when a daily dose of the drug was taken into account. CoA and related conjugates were detected primarily for the drugs that have the capability to cause IDT, although some exceptions to this were observed. Cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity did not correlate to drug safety. On the basis of the results, the short relative half-life of the acyl glucuronide (high acyl migration rate), high daily dose and detection of acyl CoA conjugates, or further metabolites derived from acyl CoA together seem to indicate that carboxylic acid-containing drugs have a higher probability to cause drug-induced liver injury (DILI). PMID:26558897

  17. Mechanism of action and biological profile of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. A new therapeutic alternative.

    PubMed

    Slater, E E; MacDonald, J S

    1988-01-01

    Lovastatin (MK-803, mevinolin) and simvastatin (MK-733, synvinolin), 2 highly potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been heralded as breakthrough therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. This paper discusses the biochemical attributes of these HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, their structures and inhibitory properties in a variety of biological systems and presents the rationale for their therapeutic use. Not only do lovastatin and simvastatin potently inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis; they also can result in the induction of hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, thus increasing the catabolism of LDL-cholesterol. Lovastatin and simvastatin are the first HMG CoA reductase inhibitors to receive regulatory agency approval for marketed use. Their safety profiles are reviewed and 2 aspects of this evaluation are stressed. First, the objective in the clinical use of these inhibitors is to normalise plasma cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. This contrasts with the profound reductions in cholesterol obtained when normocholesterolaemic animals are treated by the high doses of these drugs required for toxicological assessment. Second, both lovastatin and simvastatin are administered as prodrugs in their lactone forms. As lactones, they readily undergo first-pass metabolism, hepatic sequestration and hydrolysis to the active form. Consequently, lovastatin and simvastatin achieve lower plasma drug levels than do other HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in clinical development. Low plasma levels have been established as an important determinant of safety in the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in both animal and human studies. PMID:3076125

  18. Competition between acetate and oleate for the formation of malonyl-CoA and mitochondrial acetyl-CoA in the perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Kasumov, Takhar; Jobbins, Kathryn A.; Minkler, Paul E.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Brunengraber, Henri

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that in the perfused rat heart, the capacity of n-fatty acids to generate mitochondrial acetyl-CoA decreases as their chain length increases. In the present study, we investigated whether the oxidation of a long-chain fatty acid, oleate, is inhibited by short-chain fatty acids, acetate or propionate (which do and do not generate mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, respectively). We perfused rat hearts with buffer containing 4 mM glucose, 0.2 mM pyruvate, 1 mM lactate, and various concentrations of either (i) [U-13C]acetate, (ii) [U-13C]acetate plus [1-13C]oleate, or (iii) unlabeled propionate plus [1-13C]oleate. Using mass isotopomer analysis, we determined the contributions of the labeled substrates to the acetyl moiety of citrate (a probe of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA) and to malonyl-CoA. We found that acetate, even at low concentration, markedly inhibits the oxidation of [1-13C]oleate in the heart, without change in malonyl-CoA concentration. We also found that propionate, at a concentration higher than 1 mM, decreases (i) the contribution of [1-13C]oleate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, and (ii) malonyl-CoA concentration. The inhibition by acetate or propionate of acetyl-CoA production from oleate probably results from a competition for mitochondrial CoA between the CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:17020764

  19. Impact of acetylation on tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of protein lysine residues is a reversible and dynamic process that is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs and SIRTs). Recent studies have revealed that acetylation modulates not only nuclear proteins but also cytoplasmic or mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In tumors, cellular metabolism is reprogrammed to provide intermediates for biosynthesis such as nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids, and thereby favor the rapid proliferation of cancer cells and tumor development. An increasing number of investigations have indicated that acetylation plays an important role in tumor metabolism. Here, we summarize the substrates that are modified by acetylation, especially oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and enzymes that are implicated in tumor metabolism. PMID:27308346

  20. Acetylator phenotypes in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Penketh, R J A; Gibney, S F A; Nurse, G T; Hopkinson, D A

    1983-01-01

    Acetylator phenotypes have been determined in 139 unrelated subjects from the hitherto untested populations of Papua New Guinea, and their relevance to current antituberculous isoniazid chemotherapy is discussed. PMID:6842533

  1. Posttranslational Modifications in the Amino- Terminal Region of the Large Subunit of Ribulose- 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Several Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Houtz, Robert L.; Poneleit, Loelle; Jones, Samantha B.; Royer, Malcolm; Stults, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A combination of limited tryptic proteolysis, reverse phasehigh performance liquid chromatography, Edman degradative sequencing, amino acid analysis, and fast-atom bombardment mass-spectrometry was used to remove and identify the first 14 to 18 N-terminal amino acid residues of the large subunit of higher plant-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Marchantia polymorpha, pea (Pisum sativum), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), soybean (Glycine max), petunia (Petunia x hybrida), cowpea (Vigna sinensis), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants. The N-terminal tryptic peptide from acetylated Pro-3 to Lys-8 of the large subunit of Rubisco was identical in all species, but the amino acid sequence of the penultimate N-terminal tryptic peptide varied. Eight of the 10 species examined contained a trimethyllysyl residue at position 14 in the large subunit of Rubisco, whereas Chlamydomonas and Marchantia contained an unmodified lysyl residue at this position. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668742

  2. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  3. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  4. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  5. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  6. Carbon dioxide assimilation in blue-green algae: initial studies on the structure of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Tabita, F R; Stevens, S E; Gibson, J L

    1976-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was purified from the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica (Lemm) by procedures involving acid precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The enzyme was homogeneous by the criterion of polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was a multimer of a single-size polypeptide chain of 54,000 daltons. The carboxylases from four species of blue-green algae (Anabaena, Nostoc strain MAC, Agmenellum quadruplicatum strain PR-6, and Anacystis nidulans strain TX20) were closely similar in molecular size, since enzyme activity was eluted at the same volume after sucrose gradient centrifugation. Further analysis by gel filtration indicated that the four blue-green algal carboxylases were nearly identical in molecular weight, ranging from 449 to 453,000. The amino acid composition of the Anabaena carboxylase was determined and was found to resemble closely the composition of the large subunit from eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. Images PMID:812868

  7. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  8. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: possible role of the substrate "propeptide" as an intracellular recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, J W; Hoskins, J A; Engelke, J; Hopfgartner, A; Ehrlich, H; Bang, N U; Belagaje, R M; Schoner, B; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    The liver microsomal vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of specific glutamate residues to gamma-carboxyglutamate residues in a limited number of proteins. A number of these proteins have been shown to contain a homologous basic amino acid-rich "propeptide" between the leader sequence and the amino terminus of the mature protein. Plasmids encoding protein C, a vitamin K-dependent protein, containing or lacking a propeptide region were constructed and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein products were assayed as substrates in an in vitro vitamin K-dependent carboxylase system. Only proteins containing a propeptide region were substrates for the enzyme. These data support the hypothesis that this sequence of the primary gene product is an important recognition site for this processing enzyme. PMID:3543932

  9. Localization of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase in the Guard Cells by an Indirect, Immunofluorescence Technique 1

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Soundararajan; Smith, Bruce N.

    1982-01-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, a key enzyme in the photosynthetic carboxylation process, has been localized through an indirect immunofluorescent technique in the guard cells of some of the 41 species of plants examined. This sample includes 17 families of both dicotyledons and monocotyledons, one gymnosperm, and one pteridophyte. Plants were selected to represent all of the three major photosynthetic categories, namely C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism. Antibodies raised against tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were used for this immunofluorescent study. A good degree of fluorescence was observed in the guard cells of seven out of 21 species exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. C3 plants exhibited a very low degree (almost negligible) of fluorescence, while the C4 species did not exhibit any fluorescence. Images PMID:16662174

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from pennywort (Umbilicus rupestris). Changes in properties after exposure to water stress.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P P; Bryant, J A; Woodward, F I

    1984-01-01

    Umbilicus rupestris (pennywort) switches from C3 photosynthesis to an incomplete form of crassulacean acid metabolism (referred to as 'CAM-idling') when exposed to water stress (drought). This switch is accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. This enzyme also shows several changes in properties, including a marked decrease in sensitivity to acid pH, a lower Km for phosphoenolpyruvate, very much decreased sensitivity to the allosteric inhibitor malate, and increased responsiveness to the allosteric effector glucose 6-phosphate. The Mr of the enzyme remains unchanged, at approx. 185 000. These changes in properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are discussed in relation to the roles of the enzyme in C3 and in CAM plants. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6712622

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-Acetyltransferase Domain of Human N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Synthase in Complex with N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Provides Insights into Its Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  12. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  13. Purification and Characterization of the Acetone Carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max

    2012-01-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α2β2γ2 and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  14. Purification and characterization of the acetone carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2012-06-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α(2)β(2)γ(2) and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  15. Light Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Etiolated Maize Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Kazumi; Sugiyama, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    An antibody for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was used to isolate and to quantitate the enzyme from greening maize (cv. KOU 6) leaves. The increase in enzyme activity during greening was due to de novo synthesis, which was paralleled by increases in enzyme protein and incorporation of leucine. The light-induced activity was due to one specific isoenzyme. The action spectrum for enzyme synthesis had red and blue peaks. Images PMID:16661613

  16. Regulation of pyc1 encoding pyruvate carboxylase isozyme I by nitrogen sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huet, C; Menendez, J; Gancedo, C; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the existence of PYC1 and PYC2 encoding cytosolic pyruvate carboxylase isoform I and II is rather puzzling, owing to the lack of potent differential gene regulation by the carbon sources. We report several findings indicating that these two genes are differentially regulated by the nature of the nitrogen source. In wild-type cells, the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, which is the sum of pyruvate carboxylase isoform I and II, was two- to fivefold lower in carbon medium containing aspartate, asparagine, glutamate or glutamine instead of ammonium as the nitrogen source, whereas it was 1.5- to threefold higher when the ammonium source was substituted by arginine, methionine, threonine or leucine. These enzymatic changes were independent of the nature of the carbon source and closely correlated to the changes in beta-galactosidase from PYC1-lacZ gene fusion and in PYC1 transcripts. Transfer of exponentially growing cells of the pyc2 mutant from an aspartate or a glutamate medium to an ammonium medium caused a fivefold increase in PYC1 mRNA in less than 30 min, whereas in the inverse experiment, PYC1 transcripts returned within 30 min to the low levels found in aspartate/glutamate medium. By contrast, these conditions affected neither the pyruvate carboxylase activity encoded by PYC2 nor PYC2 mRNA. Considering that changes in PYC1 expression inversely correlated with changes in alpha-ketoglutarate concentration or in alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate ratio following the nitrogen shift experiments, and taking into account the pivotal role of this metabolite in ammonium assimilation, it is suggested that changes in alpha-ketoglutarate or in the alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate ratio might be implicated in triggering the nitrogen effects on PYC1 expression. The physiological significance of the differential sensitivity of PYC1 and PYC2 genes with respect to the nitrogen source in the growth medium is also discussed. PMID:11082192

  17. Variations in Kinetic Properties of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylases among Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1981-01-01

    Studies of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase from taxonomically diverse plants show that the enzyme from C3 and crassulacean acid metabolism pathway species exhibits lower Km(CO2) values (12-25 micromolar) than does that from C4 species (28-34 micromolar). RuBP carboxylase from aquatic angiosperms, an aquatic bryophyte, fresh water and marine algae has yielded consistently high Km(CO2) values (30-70 micromolar), similar in range to that of the enzyme from C4 terrestrial plants. This variation in Km(CO2) is discussed in relation to the correlation between the existence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms for photosynthesis and the affinity of the enzyme for CO2. The Km(RuBP) of the enzyme from various sources ranges from 10 to 136 micromolar; mean ± sd = 36 ± 20 micromolar. This variation in Km(RuBP) does not correlate with different photosynthetic pathways, but shows taxonomic patterns. Among the dicotyledons, the enzyme from crassinucellate species exhibits lower Km(RuBP) (18 ± 4 micromolar) than does that from tenuinucellate species (25 ± 7 micromolar). Among the Poaceae, RuBP carboxylase from Triticeae, chloridoids, andropogonoids, Microlaena, and Tetrarrhena has yielded lower Km(RuBP) values (29 ± 11 micromolar) than has that from other members of the grass family (46 ± 10 micromolar). PMID:16661826

  18. Carbon dioxide assimilation by leaves, isolated chloroplasts, and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from spinach.

    PubMed

    Lilley, R M; Walker, D A

    1975-06-01

    The relationship between rate of photosynthesis and CO(2) concentration has been reinvestigated using isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. The apparently low CO(2) concentration required for half-maximal photosynthesis is shown to result partly from a ceiling imposed by electron transport. In double reciprocal plots of rate against CO(2) concentration, this ceiling results in departures from linearity at high CO(2) concentrations. If these rate limitations are disregarded in extrapolation the "true" CO(2) concentration required for half maximal carboxylation by intact chloroplasts is approximately 46 mum (CO(2)).When assayed under comparable conditions, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from these chloroplasts also shows an apparent Km (CO(2)) of approximately 46 mum, suggesting that its characteristics are not modified by extraction. An improved assay for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase yielded rates of carboxylation considerably higher than those previously reported, the highest maximal velocities recorded approaching 1000 mumoles CO(2) fixed mg(-1) chlorophyll hr(-1) at 20 C. With such Km and V(max), values the carboxylase would be able to achieve, at concentrations of CO(2) less than atmospheric, rates of CO(2) fixation equal to those displayed by the parent tissue or by the average plant under favorable conditions in its natural environment. PMID:16659216

  19. The distribution of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Poincelot, R P

    1972-09-01

    Extraction of maize (Zea mays) leaves by progressive grinding under suitably protective conditions yields total carbonic anhydrase activities (4800 units per milligram chlorophyll) comparable to the activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves. The total ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity was also equal to or greater than the best literature values for maize. Of the total leaf carbonic anhydrase, 72.5% on a chlorophyll basis was present in the mesophyll cells and 14.2% in the bundle-sheath cells. The distribution of the total leaf ribulose diphosphate carboxylase between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells was 42.0 and 48.7% respectively. There was three times as much total chlorophyll in extracts of the mesophyll cells compared with the bundle-sheath cells of maize. Similar results for the above distribution of the two enzymes were found using a differential grinding technique. The possible function of carbonic anhydrase in photosynthesis is discussed. The equal distribution of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells casts doubt upon the hypothesis that a rigid biochemical compartmentation exists between these cell types in maize. PMID:16658170

  20. A Substrate-induced Biotin Binding Pocket in the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp590 and Tyr628 and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes. PMID:23698000

  1. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  2. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism. PMID:23696451

  3. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-ming; Wilson, Ella V.; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:23060893

  4. Cloning, Expression and Purification of an Acetoacetyl CoA Thiolase from Sunflower Cotyledon

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, James H.; Maina, Anthony; Gomez, Iris D.; Cadet, Melissa; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolase I and II coexist as part of the glyoxysomal β-oxidation system in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons, the only system shown to have both forms. The importance of thiolases can be underscored not only by their ubiquity, but also by their involvement in a wide variety of processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Here we describe the cloning, expression and purification of acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT) in enzymatically active form. Use of the extensive amount of sequence information from the databases facilitated the efficient generation of the gene-specific primers used in the RACE protocols. The recombinant AACT (1233 bp) shares 75% similarity with other plant AACTs. Comparison of specific activity of this recombinant AACT to a previously reported enzyme purified from primary sunflower cotyledon tissue was very similar (263 nkat/mg protein vs 220 nkat/mg protein, respectively). Combining the most pure fractions from the affinity column, the enzyme was purified 88-fold with a 55% yield of the enzymatically active, 47 kDa AACT. PMID:20011134

  5. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein. PMID:24309513

  6. Oligomerization of heme o synthase in cytochrome oxidase biogenesis is mediated by cytochrome oxidase assembly factor Coa2.

    PubMed

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kim, Hyung; Watts, Talina; Perez-Martinez, Xochitl; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-08-01

    The synthesis of the heme a cofactor used in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is dependent on the sequential action of heme o synthase (Cox10) and heme a synthase (Cox15). The active state of Cox10 appears to be a homo-oligomeric complex, and formation of this complex is dependent on the newly synthesized CcO subunit Cox1 and the presence of an early Cox1 assembly intermediate. Cox10 multimerization is triggered by progression of Cox1 from the early assembly intermediate to downstream intermediates. The CcO assembly factor Coa2 appears important in coupling the presence of newly synthesized Cox1 to Cox10 oligomerization. Cells lacking Coa2 are impaired in Cox10 complex formation as well as the formation of a high mass Cox15 complex. Increasing Cox1 synthesis in coa2Δ cells restores respiratory function if Cox10 protein levels are elevated. The C-terminal segment of Cox1 is important in triggering Cox10 oligomerization. Expression of the C-terminal 54 residues of Cox1 appended to a heterologous matrix protein leads to efficient Cox10 complex formation in coa2Δ cells, but it fails to induce Cox15 complex formation. The state of Cox10 was evaluated in mutants, which predispose human patients to CcO deficiency and the neurological disorder Leigh syndrome. The presence of the D336V mutation in the yeast Cox10 backbone results in a catalytically inactive enzyme that is fully competent to oligomerize. Thus, Cox10 oligomerization and catalytic activation are separate processes and can be uncoupled. PMID:22669974

  7. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  8. [Coa biosynthesis and the structure of its reserve in the liver in mice with diabetes (db/db) after administration of pantothenic acid derivatives].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Efimov, A S; Sheĭbak, V M; Obrosova, I G; Gurinovich, V A

    1987-01-01

    In the liver of genetically diabetic mice (db/db) a rise of CoA and alterations in the structure of its moiety (an increase in CoA/short-chain fatty acyl-CoA and CoA/long-chain fatty acyl-CoA ratios) were found being one of the hyperlipogenesis-providing factors. A rise of the content of CoA in diabetes was caused by the activation of its biosynthesis from vitamin-containing precursors; an increase in the deposition of the latter in panthotenate-protein complexes was also noted. Panthetine and 4'-phosphopanthotenate administration to diabetic animals returned to normal the level of total and free CoA and the ratios of separate components in the structure of coenzyme moiety, and the content of CoA precursors (phosphopantheteine and dephospho-CoA) in the liver. PMID:3438267

  9. Beating the acetyl coenzyme A-pathway to the origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Wolfgang; Russell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to draft plausible scenarios for the origin of life have in the past mainly built upon palaeogeochemical boundary conditions while, as detailed in a companion article in this issue, frequently neglecting to comply with fundamental thermodynamic laws. Even if demands from both palaeogeochemistry and thermodynamics are respected, then a plethora of strongly differing models are still conceivable. Although we have no guarantee that life at its origin necessarily resembled biology in extant organisms, we consider that the only empirical way to deduce how life may have emerged is by taking the stance of assuming continuity of biology from its inception to the present day. Building upon this conviction, we have assessed extant types of energy and carbon metabolism for their appropriateness to conditions probably pertaining in those settings of the Hadean planet that fulfil the thermodynamic requirements for life to come into being. Wood–Ljungdahl (WL) pathways leading to acetyl CoA formation are excellent candidates for such primordial metabolism. Based on a review of our present understanding of the biochemistry and biophysics of acetogenic, methanogenic and methanotrophic pathways and on a phylogenetic analysis of involved enzymes, we propose that a variant of modern methanotrophy is more likely than traditional WL systems to date back to the origin of life. The proposed model furthermore better fits basic thermodynamic demands and palaeogeochemical conditions suggested by recent results from extant alkaline hydrothermal seeps. PMID:23754811

  10. A Novel Functional Site in the PB2 Subunit of Influenza A Virus Essential for Acetyl-CoA Interaction, RNA Polymerase Activity, and Viral Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m7GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to “snatch” the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m7GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m7GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. PMID:25063805