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Sample records for acetylcholine enhances neural

  1. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  2. Dynamical State Transition by Neuromodulation Due to Acetylcholine in Neural Network Model for Oscillatory Phenomena in Thalamus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Horiguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2004-12-01

    We propose a two-layered neural network model for oscillatory phenomena in the thalamic system and investigate an effect of neuromodulation due to the acetylcholine on the oscillatory phenomena by numerical simulations. The proposed model consists of a layer of the thalamic reticular neurons and that of the cholinergic neurons. We introduce a dynamics of concentration of the acetylcholine which depends on a state of the cholinergic neurons, and assume that the conductance of the thalamic reticular neurons is dynamically regulated by the acetylcholine. From the results obtained by numerical simulations, we find that a dynamical transition between a bursting state and a resting state occurs successively in the layer of the thalamic reticular neurons due to the acetylcholine. Therefore it turns out that the neuromodulation due to the acetylcholine is important for the dynamical state transition in the thalamic system.

  3. Clitoria ternatea root extract enhances acetylcholine content in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rai, K S; Murthy, K D; Karanth, K S; Nalini, K; Rao, M S; Srinivasan, K K

    2002-12-01

    Treatment with 100 mg/kg of Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract (CTR), for 30 days in neonatal and young adult age groups of rat, significantly increased acetylcholine (ACh) content in their hippocampi as compared to age matched controls. Increase in ACh content in their hippocampus may be the neurochemical basis for their improved learning and memory. PMID:12490229

  4. Acetylcholine enhances excitability by lowering the threshold of spike generation in olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Mahito; Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2013-11-01

    Olfactory perception is influenced by behavioral states, presumably via efferent regulation. Using the whole cell version of patch-clamp recording technique, we discovered that acetylcholine, which is released from efferent fibers in the olfactory mucosa, can directly affect the signal encoding in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Under current-clamp conditions, application of carbachol, an acetylcholine receptor agonist, increased the spike frequency of ORCs and lowered their spike threshold. When a 3-pA current to induce near-threshold depolarization was injected into ORCs, 0.0 spikes/s were generated in control solution and 0.5 spikes/s in the presence of carbachol. By strong stimuli of injection of a 13-pA current into ORCs, 9.1 and 11.0 spikes/s were generated in control and carbachol solutions, respectively. A similar result was observed by bath application of 50 μM acetylcholine. Under voltage-clamp conditions, carbachol increased the peak amplitude of a voltage-gated sodium current by 32% and T-type calcium current by 39%. Atropine, the specific muscarinic receptor antagonist, blocked the enhancement by carbachol of the voltage-gated sodium current and T-type calcium current, suggesting that carbachol increases those currents via the muscarinic receptor rather than via the nicotinic receptor. In contrast, carbachol did not significantly change the amplitude of the L-type calcium current or the delayed rectifier potassium current in the ORCs. Because T-type calcium current is known to lower the threshold in ORCs, we suggest that acetylcholine enhance excitability by lowering the threshold of spike generation in ORCs via the muscarinic receptor. PMID:23926039

  5. NeuroD1 mediates nicotine-induced migration and invasion via regulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in a subset of neural and neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Jihan K.; Guerra, Marcy L.; Gonzales, Joshua X.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Minna, John D.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for acquisition of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A role has been demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 in the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancer, including SCLC. In the present study we investigate the possible function of NeuroD1 in established tumors, as well as actions early on in pathogenesis, in response to nicotine. We demonstrate that nicotine up-regulates NeuroD1 in immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cells and a subset of undifferentiated carcinomas. Increased expression of NeuroD1 subsequently leads to regulation of expression and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cluster of α3, α5, and β4. In addition, we find that coordinated expression of these subunits by NeuroD1 leads to enhanced nicotine-induced migration and invasion, likely through changes in intracellular calcium. These findings suggest that aspects of the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancers may be affected by a nicotine- and NeuroD1-induced positive feedback loop. PMID:24719457

  6. AzoCholine Enables Optical Control of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Damijonaitis, Arunas; Broichhagen, Johannes; Urushima, Tatsuya; Hüll, Katharina; Nagpal, Jatin; Laprell, Laura; Schönberger, Matthias; Woodmansee, David H; Rafiq, Amir; Sumser, Martin P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Gottschalk, Alexander; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-05-20

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are essential for cellular communication in higher organisms. Even though a vast pharmacological toolset to study cholinergic systems has been developed, control of endogenous neuronal nAChRs with high spatiotemporal precision has been lacking. To address this issue, we have generated photoswitchable nAChR agonists and re-evaluated the known photochromic ligand, BisQ. Using electrophysiology, we found that one of our new compounds, AzoCholine, is an excellent photoswitchable agonist for neuronal α7 nAChRs, whereas BisQ was confirmed to be an agonist for the muscle-type nAChR. AzoCholine could be used to modulate cholinergic activity in a brain slice and in dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we demonstrate light-dependent perturbation of behavior in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:25741856

  7. Enhancing neural-network performance via assortativity.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Johnson, Samuel; Torres, Joaquín J

    2011-03-01

    The performance of attractor neural networks has been shown to depend crucially on the heterogeneity of the underlying topology. We take this analysis a step further by examining the effect of degree-degree correlations--assortativity--on neural-network behavior. We make use of a method recently put forward for studying correlated networks and dynamics thereon, both analytically and computationally, which is independent of how the topology may have evolved. We show how the robustness to noise is greatly enhanced in assortative (positively correlated) neural networks, especially if it is the hub neurons that store the information. PMID:21517565

  8. Enhancing neural-network performance via assortativity

    SciTech Connect

    Franciscis, Sebastiano de; Johnson, Samuel; Torres, Joaquin J.

    2011-03-15

    The performance of attractor neural networks has been shown to depend crucially on the heterogeneity of the underlying topology. We take this analysis a step further by examining the effect of degree-degree correlations - assortativity - on neural-network behavior. We make use of a method recently put forward for studying correlated networks and dynamics thereon, both analytically and computationally, which is independent of how the topology may have evolved. We show how the robustness to noise is greatly enhanced in assortative (positively correlated) neural networks, especially if it is the hub neurons that store the information.

  9. Boosting visual cortex function and plasticity with acetylcholine to enhance visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Il; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system is a potent neuromodulatory system that plays critical roles in cortical plasticity, attention and learning. In this review, we propose that the cellular effects of acetylcholine (ACh) in the primary visual cortex during the processing of visual inputs might induce perceptual learning; i.e., long-term changes in visual perception. Specifically, the pairing of cholinergic activation with visual stimulation increases the signal-to-noise ratio, cue detection ability and long-term facilitation in the primary visual cortex. This cholinergic enhancement would increase the strength of thalamocortical afferents to facilitate the treatment of a novel stimulus while decreasing the cortico-cortical signaling to reduce recurrent or top-down modulation. This balance would be mediated by different cholinergic receptor subtypes that are located on both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons of the different cortical layers. The mechanisms of cholinergic enhancement are closely linked to attentional processes, long-term potentiation (LTP) and modulation of the excitatory/inhibitory balance. Recently, it was found that boosting the cholinergic system during visual training robustly enhances sensory perception in a long-term manner. Our hypothesis is that repetitive pairing of cholinergic and sensory stimulation over a long period of time induces long-term changes in the processing of trained stimuli that might improve perceptual ability. Various non-invasive approaches to the activation of the cholinergic neurons have strong potential to improve visual perception. PMID:25278848

  10. Conservation of neural nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila to vertebrate central nervous systems.

    PubMed Central

    Bossy, B; Ballivet, M; Spierer, P

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are found both in vertebrate and insect central nervous systems. We have isolated a Drosophila gene by crosshybridization with a vertebrate probe. Structural conservation of domains of the deduced protein and of intron/exon boundaries indicate that the Drosophila gene encodes an nAChR alpha-like subunit (ALS). That the Drosophila gene product most resembles the neuronal set of vertebrate nAChRs alpha-subunits is also indicated by the failure of an ALS-beta-galactosidase fusion protein to bind alpha-bungarotoxin on blots in contrast to vertebrate endplate alpha-subunit constructions. The ALS encoding gene exceeds 54 kb in length and the transcript has a very long and unusual 5' leader. As we found previously for a gene whose product is also involved in cholinergic synapses, acetylcholinesterase, the leader encodes short open reading frames, which might be involved in translation control. We also note the presence of opa repeats in the gene, as has been found for various Drosophila genes expressed in the nervous system. Images PMID:2840281

  11. Increasing hippocampal acetylcholine levels enhance behavioral performance in an animal model of diencephalic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Roland, Jessica J; Mark, Katherine; Vetreno, Ryan P; Savage, Lisa M

    2008-10-01

    Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) was used to produce a rodent model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that results in acute neurological disturbances, thalamic lesions, and learning and memory impairments. There is also cholinergic septohippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model. Systemic (Experiment 1) and intrahippocampal (Experiment 2) injections of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine were administered to determine if increasing acetylcholine levels would eliminate the behavioral impairment produced by PTD. Prior to spontaneous alternation testing, rats received injections of either physostigmine (systemic=0.075 mg/kg; intrahippocampal=20, 40 ng/muL) or saline. In Experiment 2, intrahippocampal injections of physostigmine significantly enhanced alternation rates in the PTD-treated rats. In addition, although intrahippocampal infusions of 40 ng of physostigmine increased the available amount of ACh in both pair-fed (PF) and PTD rats, it did so to a greater extent in PF rats. The increase in ACh levels induced by the direct hippocampal application of physostigmine in the PTD model likely increased activation of the extended limbic system, which was dysfunctional, and therefore led to recovery of function on the spontaneous alternation task. In contrast, the lack of behavioral improvement by intrahippocampal physostigmine infusion in the PF rats, despite a greater rise in hippocampal ACh levels, supports the theory that there is an optimal range of cholinergic tone for optimal behavioral and hippocampal function. PMID:18706897

  12. Burst Firing Enhances Neural Output Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ho Ka; Yang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Changsong; Nowotny, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks. PMID:27242499

  13. Nanoparticle-enhanced infrared neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paviolo, Chiara; Thompson, Alexander C.; Yong, Jiawey; Brown, William G. A.; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recent research has demonstrated that nerves can be stimulated by transient heating associated with the absorption of infrared light by water in the tissue. There is a great deal of interest in using this technique in neural prostheses, due to the potential for increased localization of the stimulus and minimization of contact with the tissue. However, thermal modelling suggests that the full benefits of increased localization may be reduced by cumulative heating effects when multiple stimulus sites and/or high repetition rates are used. Approach. Here we review recent in vitro and in vivo results suggesting that the transient heating associated with plasmon absorption in gold nanorods can also be used to stimulate nerves. Main results. Patch clamp experiments on cultured spiral ganglion neurons exhibited action potentials when exposed to 780 nm light at the plasmon absorption peak, while the amplitude of compound action potentials in the rat sciatic nerve were increased by laser irradiation of gold nanorods in the vicinity of the plasma membrane. Similarly, calcium imaging studies of NG108-15 neuronal cells incubated with Au nanorods revealed an increased level of intracellular calcium activity synchronized with laser exposure. Significance. Given that the plasmon absorption peak of gold nanorods can be matched with the transparency window of biological tissues, these results demonstrate that nanorod absorbers hold great promise to enhance the process of infrared neural stimulation for future applications in neural prostheses and fundamental studies in neuroscience.

  14. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Guanfacine enhances cardiac acetylcholine release with little effect on norepinephrine release in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shuji; Kawada, Toru; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Turner, Michael James; Shishido, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    An α2A-adrenergic agonist guanfacine improves autonomic imbalance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, suggesting that it may be useful to correct autonomic imbalance in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. To investigate the effects of guanfacine on cardiac autonomic nerve activities, a microdialysis technique was applied to anesthetized rabbit heart. Acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations in atrial dialysates were measured as indices of cardiac autonomic nerve activities. Guanfacine at a dose of 100 μg/kg significantly decreased heart rate and increased dialysate ACh concentration without decreasing sympathetic NE release. Guanfacine may be useful for vagal activation therapy in CHF patients. PMID:25498385

  16. Menthol Enhances the Desensitization of Human α3β4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Ton, Hoai T; Smart, Amanda E; Aguilar, Brittany L; Olson, Thao T; Kellar, Kenneth J; Ahern, Gerard P

    2015-08-01

    The α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype is widely expressed in the peripheral and central nervous systems, including in airway sensory nerves. The nAChR subtype transduces the irritant effects of nicotine in tobacco smoke and, in certain brain areas, may be involved in nicotine addiction and/or withdrawal. Menthol, a widely used additive in cigarettes, is a potential analgesic and/or counterirritant at sensory nerves and may also influence nicotine's actions in the brain. We examined menthol's effects on recombinant human α3β4 nAChRs and native nAChRs in mouse sensory neurons. Menthol markedly decreased nAChR activity as assessed by Ca(2+) imaging, (86)Rb(+) efflux, and voltage-clamp measurements. Coapplication of menthol with acetylcholine or nicotine increased desensitization, demonstrated by an increase in the rate and magnitude of the current decay and a reduction of the current integral. These effects increased with agonist concentration. Pretreatment with menthol followed by its washout did not affect agonist-induced desensitization, suggesting that menthol must be present during the application of agonist to augment desensitization. Notably, menthol acted in a voltage-independent manner and reduced the mean open time of single channels without affecting their conductance, arguing against a simple channel-blocking effect. Further, menthol slowed or prevented the recovery of nAChRs from desensitization, indicating that it probably stabilizes a desensitized state. Moreover, menthol at concentrations up to 1 mM did not compete for the orthosteric nAChR binding site labeled by [(3)H]epibatidine. Taken together, these data indicate that menthol promotes desensitization of α3β4 nAChRs by an allosteric action. PMID:25964258

  17. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wortwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia; Dencker, Ditte; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Molander, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system and involved in regulation of cholinergic and dopaminergic transmission. Here we investigate, for the first time, the role of the M4 receptor in alcohol consumption using M4 knockout (M4(-/-)) and wild-type (M4(+/+)) mice. Experimentally naïve M4(-/-) and M4(+/+) mice were trained to orally self-administer 5%, 8% and 10% alcohol in 60min sessions, 6 days/week, after having undergone a standard sucrose fading training procedure on a fixed ratio schedule. The mice were further subjected to an extinction period followed by a 1 day reinstatement trial. M4(-/-) mice consumed more alcohol at 5% and 8% compared to their M4(+/+) littermates. The highest alcohol concentration used (10%) did not immediately result in divergent drinking patterns, but after 4 weeks of 10% alcohol self-administration, baseline levels as well as a pattern of M4(-/-) mice consuming more alcohol than their M4(+/+) controls were re-established. Moreover, the M4(-/-) mice displayed a reduced capacity to extinguish their alcohol-seeking behavior. Taken together, alcohol consumption is elevated in M4(-/-) mice, indicating that the M4 receptor is involved in mediating the reinforcing effects of alcohol. The M4 receptor should be further explored as a potential target for pharmacological (positive allosteric modulators or future agonists) treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:25445043

  18. Adiponectin at Physiologically Relevant Concentrations Enhances the Vasorelaxative Effect of Acetylcholine via Cav-1/AdipoR-1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunhui; Li, Rui; Lau, Wayne Bigond; Zhao, Jianli; Lopez, Bernard; Christopher, Theodore A.; Ma, Xin-Liang; Wang, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have identified hypoadiponectinemia as an independent hypertension risk factor. It is known that adiponectin (APN) can directly cause vasodilation, but the doses required exceed physiologic levels several fold. In the current study, we determine the effect of physiologically relevant APN concentrations upon vascular tone, and investigate the mechanism(s) responsible. Physiologic APN concentrations alone induced no significant vasorelaxation. Interestingly, pretreatment of wild type mouse aortae with physiologic APN levels significantly enhanced acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasorelaxation (P<0.01), an endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated process. Knockout of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) or caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a cell signaling facilitating molecule), but not adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) abolished APN-enhanced ACh-induced vasorelaxation. Immunoblot assay revealed APN promoted the AdipoR1/Cav1 signaling complex in human endothelial cells. Treatment of HUVECs with physiologic APN concentrations caused significant eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production (P<0.01), an effect abolished in knockdown of either AdipoR1 or Cav-1. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time physiologic APN levels enhance the vasorelaxative response to ACh by inducing NO production through AdipoR1/Cav-1 mediated signaling. In physiologic conditions, APN plays an important function of maintaining vascular tone. PMID:27023866

  19. High school music classes enhance the neural processing of speech.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Krizman, Jennifer; Skoe, Erika; Johnston, Kathleen; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Should music be a priority in public education? One argument for teaching music in school is that private music instruction relates to enhanced language abilities and neural function. However, the directionality of this relationship is unclear and it is unknown whether school-based music training can produce these enhancements. Here we show that 2 years of group music classes in high school enhance the neural encoding of speech. To tease apart the relationships between music and neural function, we tested high school students participating in either music or fitness-based training. These groups were matched at the onset of training on neural timing, reading ability, and IQ. Auditory brainstem responses were collected to a synthesized speech sound presented in background noise. After 2 years of training, the neural responses of the music training group were earlier than at pre-training, while the neural timing of students in the fitness training group was unchanged. These results represent the strongest evidence to date that in-school music education can cause enhanced speech encoding. The neural benefits of musical training are, therefore, not limited to expensive private instruction early in childhood but can be elicited by cost-effective group instruction during adolescence. PMID:24367339

  20. High school music classes enhance the neural processing of speech

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam; Krizman, Jennifer; Skoe, Erika; Johnston, Kathleen; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Should music be a priority in public education? One argument for teaching music in school is that private music instruction relates to enhanced language abilities and neural function. However, the directionality of this relationship is unclear and it is unknown whether school-based music training can produce these enhancements. Here we show that 2 years of group music classes in high school enhance the neural encoding of speech. To tease apart the relationships between music and neural function, we tested high school students participating in either music or fitness-based training. These groups were matched at the onset of training on neural timing, reading ability, and IQ. Auditory brainstem responses were collected to a synthesized speech sound presented in background noise. After 2 years of training, the neural responses of the music training group were earlier than at pre-training, while the neural timing of students in the fitness training group was unchanged. These results represent the strongest evidence to date that in-school music education can cause enhanced speech encoding. The neural benefits of musical training are, therefore, not limited to expensive private instruction early in childhood but can be elicited by cost-effective group instruction during adolescence. PMID:24367339

  1. Selective Activation of M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reverses MK-801-Induced Behavioral Impairments and Enhances Associative Learning in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4 PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25137629

  2. α-Conotoxin dendrimers have enhanced potency and selectivity for homomeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jingjing; Huang, Johnny X; Vetter, Irina; Mobli, Mehdi; Lawson, Joshua; Tae, Han-Shen; Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Cooper, Matthew A; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2015-03-11

    Covalently attached peptide dendrimers can enhance binding affinity and functional activity. Homogenous di- and tetravalent dendrimers incorporating the α7-nicotinic receptor blocker α-conotoxin ImI (α-ImI) with polyethylene glycol spacers were designed and synthesized via a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition of azide-modified α-ImI to an alkyne-modified polylysine dendron. NMR and CD structural analysis confirmed that each α-ImI moiety in the dendrimers had the same 3D structure as native α-ImI. The binding of the α-ImI dendrimers to binding protein Ac-AChBP was measured by surface plasmon resonance and revealed enhanced affinity. Quantitative electrophysiology showed that α-ImI dendrimers had ∼100-fold enhanced potency at hα7 nAChRs (IC50 = 4 nM) compared to native α-ImI (IC50 = 440 nM). In contrast, no significant potency enhancement was observed at heteromeric hα3β2 and hα9α10 nAChRs. These findings indicate that multimeric ligands can significantly enhance conotoxin potency and selectivity at homomeric nicotinic ion channels. PMID:25710197

  3. Activation of 5-HT2 receptors enhances the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sunila G; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2004-09-15

    The role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release was examined in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus using in vivo microdialysis. The 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist +/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl) -2- aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the extracellular concentration of ACh in both brain regions, and this response was attenuated in rats treated with the 5-HT(2A/2B/2C) antagonist LY-53,857 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Treatment with LY-53,857 alone did not significantly alter ACh release in either brain region The 5-HT(2C) agonist 6-chloro-2-(1-piperazinyl)-pyrazine) (MK-212) (5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the release of ACh in both the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, whereas the 5-HT2 agonist mescaline (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a 2-fold increase in ACh release only in the prefrontal cortex. Intracortical, but not intrahippocampal, infusion of DOI (100 microM) significantly enhanced the release of ACh, and intracortical infusion of LY-53,857 (100 microM) significantly attenuated this response. These results suggest that the release of ACh in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus is influenced by 5-HT2 receptor mechanisms. The increase in release of ACh induced by DOI in the prefrontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus, appears to be due to 5-HT2 receptor mechanisms localized within this brain region. Furthermore, it appears that the prefrontal cortex is more sensitive than the dorsal hippocampus to the stimulatory effect of 5-HT2 agonists on ACh release. PMID:15266551

  4. Repeated administration of almonds increases brain acetylcholine levels and enhances memory function in healthy rats while attenuates memory deficits in animal model of amnesia.

    PubMed

    Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Tabassum, Saiqa; Madiha, Syeda; Rafiq, Sahar; Tariq, Sumayya; Batool, Tuba Sharf; Saleem, Sadia; Naqvi, Fizza; Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nutrients may play a vital role in protecting the brain from age-related memory dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. Tree nuts including almonds have shown potential to combat age-associated brain dysfunction. These nuts are an important source of essential nutrients, such as tocopherol, folate, mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. These components have shown promise as possible dietary supplements to prevent or delay the onset of age-associated cognitive dysfunction. This study investigated possible protective potential of almond against scopolamine induced amnesia in rats. The present study also investigated a role of acetylcholine in almond induced memory enhancement. Rats in test group were orally administrated with almond suspension (400 mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Both control and almond-treated rats were then divided into saline and scopolamine injected groups. Rats in the scopolamine group were injected with scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) five minutes before the start of each memory test. Memory was assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM), Morris water maze (MWM) and novel object recognition (NOR) task. Cholinergic function was determined in terms of hippocampal and frontal cortical acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity. Results of the present study suggest that almond administration for 28 days significantly improved memory retention. This memory enhancing effect of almond was also observed in scopolamine induced amnesia model. Present study also suggests a role of acetylcholine in the attenuation of scopolamine induced amnesia by almond. PMID:26548495

  5. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Dolezal, V; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2004-01-01

    Thiochrome (2,7-dimethyl-5H-thiachromine-8-ethanol), an oxidation product and metabolite of thiamine, has little effect on the equilibrium binding of l-[3H]N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]NMS) to the five human muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5) at concentrations up to 0.3 mM. In contrast, it inhibits [3H]NMS dissociation from M1 to M4 receptors at submillimolar concentrations and from M5 receptors at 1 mM. These results suggest that thiochrome binds allosterically to muscarinic receptors and has approximately neutral cooperativity with [3H]NMS at M1 to M4 and possibly M5 receptors. Thiochrome increases the affinity of acetylcholine (ACh) 3- to 5-fold for inhibiting [3H]NMS binding to M4 receptors but has no effect on ACh affinity at M1 to M3 or M5 receptors. Thiochrome (0.1 mM) also increases the direct binding of [3H]ACh to M4 receptors but decreases it slightly at M2 receptors. In agreement with the binding data, thiochrome does not affect the potency of ACh for stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) to membranes containing M1 to M3 receptors, but it increases ACh potency 3.5-fold at M4 receptors. It also selectively reduces the release of [3H]ACh from potassium-stimulated slices of rat striatum, which contain autoinhibitory presynaptic M4 receptors, but not from hippocampal slices, which contain presynaptic M2 receptors. We conclude that thiochrome is a selective M4 muscarinic receptor enhancer of ACh affinity and has neutral cooperativity with ACh at M1 to M3 receptors; it therefore demonstrates a powerful new form of selectivity, "absolute subtype selectivity", which is derived from cooperativity rather than from affinity. PMID:14722259

  6. Increases in cholinergic neurotransmission measured by using choline-sensitive microelectrodes: enhanced detection by hydrolysis of acetylcholine on recording sites?

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Chiara; Parikh, Vinay; Ward, Josh.R.; Chiamulera, Christian; Sarter, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that second-based transient increases in choline concentrations measured by electrodes coated with choline oxidase (ChOx) and the amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide validly indicate the depolarization-dependent release of acetylcholine (ACh) and its hydrolysis by endogenous acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Therefore, choline-sensitive microelectrodes have become valuable tools in neuropharmacological and behavioral research. The present experiments were designed to test the possibility that co-immobilization of ChOx plus AChE on recording sites increases the level of detection for evoked ACh release in the brain. If newly released ACh is not completely hydrolyzed by endogenous AChE and capable of reaching the extracellular space, currents recorded via sites equipped with both enzymes should be greater when compared with sites coated with ChOx only. Pairs of Platinum-recordings sites were coated either with AChE plus ChOx or ChOx alone. Potassium or nicotine-evoked currents were recorded throughout the entire dorsal-ventral extent of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The amplitudes of evoked cholinergic signals did not differ significantly between AChE+ChOx and ChOx-only coated recording sites. Additional experiments controlling for several potential confounds suggested that, in vivo, ACh levels ≥150 fmol were detected by recordings sites featuring dual enzyme coating. Collectively, these results indicate that co-coating of microelectrodes with AChE does not enhance the detection of cholinergic activity in the cortex compared with measurements via recording sites coated only with ChOx. PMID:18346819

  7. Supervised learning in hierarchical neural networks for edge enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si W.; Szeto, Anthony

    1992-09-01

    Hierarchical artificial neural networks are designed to enhance edge measurement. The neural network comprises four subnets: the Edge Contour Detection subnet, the Maximum Detection subnet, the Gradient Adjustment subnet, and the Orientation Determination subnet. The interconnections between these subnets are fashioned in a hierarchical manner. In order for the neural network system to perform correctly and accurately, each of the neural subnets must be given suitable weights by learning. The learning is very difficult for the hierarchical neural networks because of the complicated hierarchical structure. In our learning algorithm the modularity is introduced for fast learning and good generalization, based on the analysis of the local concept and the distributed concept represented by the module. The amount of information which the nets need to learn is drastically reduced. Therefore, only a small number of training patterns are required to train the nets and still derive suitable weights for the nets to perform accurately and efficiently. The neural network is simulated on a MIPS M120-S machine running UNIX. For the test images degraded by random noise up to 20%, the true edges are detected and enhanced, the false edges are suppressed, the noise is eliminated, the weak edges are reinforced, and the missing edge elements are interpolated.

  8. Loop 2 of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b binds with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and enhances intracranial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Yan, Zhiqiang; Xie, Cao; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-12-01

    Three-finger snake neurotoxins have been widely investigated for their high binding affinities with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are widely expressed in the central nervous system including the blood-brain barrier and thus mediate intracranial drug delivery. The loop 2 segments of three-finger snake neurotoxins are considered as the binding domain with nAChRs, and thus, they may have the potential to enhance drug or drug delivery system intracranial transport. In the present work, binding of the synthetic peptides to the neuronal nAChRs was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of (125)I-α-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The loop 2 segment of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b (KC2S) showed high binding affinity, and the competitive binding IC(50) value was 32.51 nM. Furthermore, the brain targeting efficiency of KC2S had been investigated in vitro and in vivo. The specific uptake by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) demonstrated that KC2S could be endocytosized after binding with nAChRs. In vivo, the qualitative and quantitative biodistribution results of fluorescent dyes (DiR or coumarin-6) indicated that KC2S modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) micelles (KC2S-PEG-PLA micelles) could enhance intracranial drug delivery. Furthermore, intravenous treatment with paclitaxel-encapsulated KC2S-PEG-PLA micelles (KC2S-PEG-PLA-PTX micelles) afforded robust inhibition of intracranial glioblastoma. The median survival time of KC2S-PEG-PLA-PTX-micelle-treated mice (47.5 days) was significantly longer than that of mice treated by mPEG-PLA-PTX micelles (41.5 days), Taxol (38.5 days), or saline (34 days). Compared with the short peptide derived from rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) that has been previously reported as an excellent brain targeting ligand, KC2S has a similar binding affinity with neuronal nAChRs but fewer amino acid residues. Thus, we concluded that the loop 2 segment of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b could bind

  9. B6eGFPChAT mice overexpressing the vesicular acetylcholine transporter exhibit spontaneous hypoactivity and enhanced exploration in novel environments

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Paul M; Aubert, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation is extensive throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Among its many roles, the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) contributes to the regulation of motor function, locomotion, and exploration. Cholinergic deficits and replacement strategies have been investigated in neurodegenerative disorders, particularly in cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Focus has been on blocking acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and enhancing ACh synthesis to improve cholinergic neurotransmission. As a first step in evaluating the physiological effects of enhanced cholinergic function through the upregulation of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), we used the hypercholinergic B6eGFPChAT congenic mouse model that has been shown to contain multiple VAChT gene copies. Analysis of biochemical and behavioral paradigms suggest that modest increases in VAChT expression can have a significant effect on spontaneous locomotion, reaction to novel stimuli, and the adaptation to novel environments. These observations support the potential of VAChT as a therapeutic target to enhance cholinergic tone, thereby decreasing spontaneous hyperactivity and increasing exploration in novel environments. PMID:24381809

  10. Noise-enhanced convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Audhkhasi, Kartik; Osoba, Osonde; Kosko, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Injecting carefully chosen noise can speed convergence in the backpropagation training of a convolutional neural network (CNN). The Noisy CNN algorithm speeds training on average because the backpropagation algorithm is a special case of the generalized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm and because such carefully chosen noise always speeds up the EM algorithm on average. The CNN framework gives a practical way to learn and recognize images because backpropagation scales with training data. It has only linear time complexity in the number of training samples. The Noisy CNN algorithm finds a special separating hyperplane in the network's noise space. The hyperplane arises from the likelihood-based positivity condition that noise-boosts the EM algorithm. The hyperplane cuts through a uniform-noise hypercube or Gaussian ball in the noise space depending on the type of noise used. Noise chosen from above the hyperplane speeds training on average. Noise chosen from below slows it on average. The algorithm can inject noise anywhere in the multilayered network. Adding noise to the output neurons reduced the average per-iteration training-set cross entropy by 39% on a standard MNIST image test set of handwritten digits. It also reduced the average per-iteration training-set classification error by 47%. Adding noise to the hidden layers can also reduce these performance measures. The noise benefit is most pronounced for smaller data sets because the largest EM hill-climbing gains tend to occur in the first few iterations. This noise effect can assist random sampling from large data sets because it allows a smaller random sample to give the same or better performance than a noiseless sample gives. PMID:26700535

  11. A cortical neural prosthesis for restoring and enhancing memory

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Theodore W; Hampson, Robert E; Song, Dong; Goonawardena, Anushka; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective in developing a neural prosthesis is to replace neural circuitry in the brain that no longer functions appropriately. Such a goal requires artificial reconstruction of neuron-to-neuron connections in a way that can be recognized by the remaining normal circuitry, and that promotes appropriate interaction. In this study, the application of a specially designed neural prosthesis using a multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear model is demonstrated by using trains of electrical stimulation pulses to substitute for MIMO model derived ensemble firing patterns. Ensembles of CA3 and CA1 hippocampal neurons, recorded from rats performing a delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) memory task, exhibited successful encoding of trial-specific sample lever information in the form of different spatiotemporal firing patterns. MIMO patterns, identified online and in real-time, were employed within a closed-loop behavioral paradigm. Results showed that the model was able to predict successful performance on the same trial. Also, MIMO model-derived patterns, delivered as electrical stimulation to the same electrodes, improved performance under normal testing conditions and, more importantly, were capable of recovering performance when delivered to animals with ensemble hippocampal activity compromised by pharmacologic blockade of synaptic transmission. These integrated experimental-modeling studies show for the first time that, with sufficient information about the neural coding of memories, a neural prosthesis capable of real-time diagnosis and manipulation of the encoding process can restore and even enhance cognitive, mnemonic processes. PMID:21677369

  12. A cortical neural prosthesis for restoring and enhancing memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Theodore W.; Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Goonawardena, Anushka; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-08-01

    A primary objective in developing a neural prosthesis is to replace neural circuitry in the brain that no longer functions appropriately. Such a goal requires artificial reconstruction of neuron-to-neuron connections in a way that can be recognized by the remaining normal circuitry, and that promotes appropriate interaction. In this study, the application of a specially designed neural prosthesis using a multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear model is demonstrated by using trains of electrical stimulation pulses to substitute for MIMO model derived ensemble firing patterns. Ensembles of CA3 and CA1 hippocampal neurons, recorded from rats performing a delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) memory task, exhibited successful encoding of trial-specific sample lever information in the form of different spatiotemporal firing patterns. MIMO patterns, identified online and in real-time, were employed within a closed-loop behavioral paradigm. Results showed that the model was able to predict successful performance on the same trial. Also, MIMO model-derived patterns, delivered as electrical stimulation to the same electrodes, improved performance under normal testing conditions and, more importantly, were capable of recovering performance when delivered to animals with ensemble hippocampal activity compromised by pharmacologic blockade of synaptic transmission. These integrated experimental-modeling studies show for the first time that, with sufficient information about the neural coding of memories, a neural prosthesis capable of real-time diagnosis and manipulation of the encoding process can restore and even enhance cognitive, mnemonic processes.

  13. Blocking mPTP on Neural Stem Cells and Activating the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 Subunit on Microglia Attenuate Aβ-Induced Neurotoxicity on Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingzhuang; Wang, Kewan; Jiang, Deqi; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Xiaodan; Zhu, Ning; Li, Mingxing; Jia, Siyuan; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) can stimulate microglia to release a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and induce neurotoxicity. Nicotine has been reported to inhibit TNF-α, IL-1, and ROS production in microglia. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) plays an important role in neurotoxicity as well. Here, we investigated whether activating the microglial α7-nAChR has a neuroprotective role on neural stem cells (NSCs) and the function of mPTP in NSCs in this process. The expression of α7-nAChR in rat NSCs was detected by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR. The viability of microglia and NSCs was examined by MTT assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and morphological characteristics of NSCs was measured by JC-1 staining and transmission electron microscopy respectively. The distribution of cytochrome c in the subcellular regions of NSCs was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the expression levels of cyclophilin D and cleaved caspase-3 were assayed by western blot. The apoptotic rate of NSCs was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of α7-nAChR was detected in microglial cells, but no expression was found in NSCs. The viability of rat microglial cells and NSCs was not affected by reagents or coculture itself. Aβ1-42-mediated microglial activation impaired the morphology and the ΔΨm of mitochondria of NSCs as well as increased cell apoptosis. However, the damage was attenuated when the α7-nAChRs on microglial cells were activated or the mPTPs on NSCs were blocked. Blockade of mPTPs on NSCs and activation of α7-nAChRs on microglia exhibit neuroprotective roles in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity of NSCs. PMID:26875732

  14. The Potential Transformation of Our Species by Neural Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, E. Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Neural enhancement represents recovery of function that has been lost due to injury or disease pathology. Restoration of functional ability is the objective. For example, a neuroprosthetic to replace a forearm and hand lost to the ravages of war or industrial accident. However, the same basic constructs used for neural enhancement after injury could amplify abilities that are already in the natural normal range. That is, neural enhancement technologies to restore function and improve daily abilities for independent living could be used to improve so-called normal function to ultimate function. Approaching that functional level by use and integration of technology takes us toward the concept of a new species. This new subspecies—homo sapiens technologicus—is one that uses technology not just to assist but to change its own inherent biological function. The author uses examples from prosthetics and neuroprosthetics to address the issue of the limitations of constructs on the accepted range of human performance ability and aims to provide a cautionary view toward reflection on where our science may take the entire species. PMID:25575224

  15. The potential transformation of our species by neural enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul

    2015-01-01

    Neural enhancement represents recovery of function that has been lost due to injury or disease pathology. Restoration of functional ability is the objective. For example, a neuroprosthetic to replace a forearm and hand lost to the ravages of war or industrial accident. However, the same basic constructs used for neural enhancement after injury could amplify abilities that are already in the natural normal range. That is, neural enhancement technologies to restore function and improve daily abilities for independent living could be used to improve so-called normal function to ultimate function. Approaching that functional level by use and integration of technology takes us toward the concept of a new species. This new subspecies--homo sapiens technologicus--is one that uses technology not just to assist but to change its own inherent biological function. The author uses examples from prosthetics and neuroprosthetics to address the issue of the limitations of constructs on the accepted range of human performance ability and aims to provide a cautionary view toward reflection on where our science may take the entire species. PMID:25575224

  16. Enhanced memory performance thanks to neural network assortativity

    SciTech Connect

    Franciscis, S. de; Johnson, S.; Torres, J. J.

    2011-03-24

    The behaviour of many complex dynamical systems has been found to depend crucially on the structure of the underlying networks of interactions. An intriguing feature of empirical networks is their assortativity--i.e., the extent to which the degrees of neighbouring nodes are correlated. However, until very recently it was difficult to take this property into account analytically, most work being exclusively numerical. We get round this problem by considering ensembles of equally correlated graphs and apply this novel technique to the case of attractor neural networks. Assortativity turns out to be a key feature for memory performance in these systems - so much so that for sufficiently correlated topologies the critical temperature diverges. We predict that artificial and biological neural systems could significantly enhance their robustness to noise by developing positive correlations.

  17. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U.; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke. PMID:27073384

  18. Aqueous Fraction of Beta vulgaris Ameliorates Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice due to Enhanced Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion, Mediated by Acetylcholine and GLP-1, and Elevated Glucose Uptake via Increased Membrane Bound GLUT4 Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Ashraf Ul; Samad, Mehdi Bin; Ahmed, Arif; Jahan, Mohammad Rajib; Akhter, Farjana; Tasnim, Jinat; Hasan, S. M. Nageeb; Sayfe, Sania Sarker; Hannan, J. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was designed to investigate the probable mechanisms of anti-hyperglycemic activity of B. Vulgaris. Methodology/Principal Findings Aqueous fraction of B. Vulgaris extract was the only active fraction (50mg/kg). Plasma insulin level was found to be the highest at 30 mins after B. Vulgaris administration at a dose of 200mg/kg. B. Vulgaris treated mice were also assayed for plasma Acetylcholine, Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1), Gastric Inhibitory Peptide (GIP), Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide (PACAP), Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Pancreatic Polypeptides (PP), and Somatostatin, along with the corresponding insulin levels. Plasma Acetylcholine and GLP-1 significantly increased in B. Vulgaris treated animals and were further studied. Pharmacological enhancers, inhibitors, and antagonists of Acetylcholine and GLP-1 were also administered to the test animals, and corresponding insulin levels were measured. These studies confirmed the role of acetylcholine and GLP-1 in enhanced insulin secretion (p<0.05). Principal signaling molecules were quantified in isolated mice islets for the respective pathways to elucidate their activities. Elevated concentrations of Acetylcholine and GLP-1 in B. Vulgaris treated mice were found to be sufficient to activate the respective pathways for insulin secretion (p<0.05). The amount of membrane bound GLUT1 and GLUT4 transporters were quantified and the subsequent glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis were assayed. We showed that levels of membrane bound GLUT4 transporters, glucose-6-phosphate in skeletal myocytes, activity of glycogen synthase, and level of glycogen deposited in the skeletal muscles all increased (p<0.05). Conclusion Findings of the present study clearly prove the role of Acetylcholine and GLP-1 in the Insulin secreting activity of B. Vulgaris. Increased glucose uptake in the skeletal muscles and subsequent glycogen synthesis may also play a part in

  19. Neural regulation of MRNA for the alpha-subunit of acetylcholine receptors: Role of neuromuscular transmission. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, N.G.; Drachman, D.B.; Pestronk, A.; Shih, P.J.

    1989-12-31

    Levels of mRNA for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits are relatively low in innervated skeletal muscles. Following denervation they rise rapidly, leading to increased AChR synthesis. The mechanism by which motor nerves normally regulate these mRNA levels is not yet known. In order to determine the possible role of synaptic transmission in this process, the authors have compared the effect of blockade of cholinergic ACh transmission with that of surgical denervation. Blockade of quantal ACh transmission was produced by injection of type A botulinum toxin into the soleus muscles of rats.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate donepezil-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Ogata, Toru; Uchida, Ryuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Takishima, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Failure of myelin development and oligodendrocyte loss results in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that donepezil, an acetlycholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells without affecting proliferation or cell viability. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase, and MOG, in addition to transcription factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil. Furthermore, luciferase assays confirmed that both MAG and MBP promoters display increased activity upon donepezil-induced oligodendrocytes differentiation, suggesting that donepezil increases myelin gene expression mainly through enhanced transcription. We also found that the increase in the number of oligodendrocytes observed following donepezil treatment was significantly inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine, but not by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. Moreover, donepezil-induced myelin-related gene expression was suppressed by mecamylamine at both the mRNA and protein level. These results suggest that donepezil stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin-related gene expression via nAChRs in neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We show that donepezil, a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase and MOG in addition to transcripton factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil

  1. Underweight rats have enhanced dopamine release and blunted acetylcholine response in the nucleus accumbens while bingeing on sucrose.

    PubMed

    Avena, N M; Rada, P; Hoebel, B G

    2008-10-28

    The present study tested whether rats release more accumbens dopamine (DA) during a sugar binge when they are underweight vs. normal weight. Since acetylcholine (ACh) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) normally increases as a meal progresses and satiety ensues, we also tested whether ACh release is altered when an animal has lost weight. Rats were maintained on daily 8-h access to chow, with 10% sucrose solution available for the first 2 h. Microdialysis performed on day 21, at normal body weight, revealed an increase in extracellular DA to 122% of baseline in response to drinking sucrose. Extracellular ACh peaked at the end of the meal. Next, the rats were food and sucrose restricted so that by day 28 they were at 85% body weight. When retested, these animals released significantly more DA when drinking sucrose (179%), but ACh release failed to rise. A control group was tested in the same manner but given sugar only on days 1, 21 and 28. At normal body weight, control animals showed a non-significant rise in DA when drinking sucrose on day 21. On day 28, at 85% body weight, the controls showed a small increase (124%) in DA release; however, this was significantly lower than the 179% observed in the underweight rats with daily sugar access. These findings suggest that when an animal binges on sugar and then loses weight, the binge releases significantly more DA and less ACh than when animals are at a normal body weight. PMID:18790017

  2. UNDERWEIGHT RATS HAVE ENHANCED DOPAMINE RELEASE AND BLUNTED ACETYLCHOLINE RESPONSE IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS WHILE BINGEING ON SUCROSE

    PubMed Central

    AVENA, N. M.; RADA, P.; HOEBEL, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether rats release more accumbens dopamine (DA) during a sugar binge when they are underweight vs. normal weight. Since acetylcholine (ACh) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) normally increases as a meal progresses and satiety ensues, we also tested whether ACh release is altered when an animal has lost weight. Rats were maintained on daily 8-h access to chow, with 10% sucrose solution available for the first 2 h. Microdialysis performed on day 21, at normal body weight, revealed an increase in extracellular DA to 122% of baseline in response to drinking sucrose. Extracellular ACh peaked at the end of the meal. Next, the rats were food and sucrose restricted so that by day 28 they were at 85% body weight. When retested, these animals released significantly more DA when drinking sucrose (179%), but ACh release failed to rise. A control group was tested in the same manner but given sugar only on days 1, 21 and 28. At normal body weight, control animals showed a non-significant rise in DA when drinking sucrose on day 21. On day 28, at 85% body weight, the controls showed a small increase (124%) in DA release; however, this was significantly lower than the 179% observed in the underweight rats with daily sugar access. These findings suggest that when an animal binges on sugar and then loses weight, the binge releases significantly more DA and less ACh than when animals are at a normal body weight. PMID:18790017

  3. In vivo blockade of acetylcholinesterase increases intraovarian acetylcholine and enhances follicular development and fertility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Urra, Javier; Blohberger, Jan; Tiszavari, Michelle; Mayerhofer, Artur; Lara, Hernan E

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of ovarian follicles are regulated by systemic and local factors, which may include acetylcholine (ACh). Granulosa cells (GCs) of growing follicles and luteal cells produce ACh and in cultured GCs it exerts trophic actions via muscarinic receptors. However, such actions were not studied in vivo. After having established that rat ovarian GCs and luteal cells express the ACh-metabolizing enzyme ACh esterase (AChE), we examined the consequences of local application of an AChE inhibitor, huperzine A (HupA), by osmotic minipump delivery into the ovarian bursa of hemiovariectomized rats. Saline was used in the control group. Local delivery of HupA for 4 weeks increased ovarian ACh content. Estrus cyclicity was not changed indicating a locally restricted range of HupA action. The number of primordial and primary follicles was unaffected, but small secondary follicles significantly increased in the HupA group. Furthermore, a significant increase in the number of corpora lutea suggested increased ovulatory events. In support, as shown upon mating, HupA-treated females had significantly increased implantation sites and more pups. Thus the data are in support of a trophic role of ACh in follicular development and ovulation and point to an important role of ACh in female fertility. PMID:27440195

  4. In vivo blockade of acetylcholinesterase increases intraovarian acetylcholine and enhances follicular development and fertility in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blohberger, Jan; Tiszavari, Michelle; Mayerhofer, Artur; Lara, Hernan E.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of ovarian follicles are regulated by systemic and local factors, which may include acetylcholine (ACh). Granulosa cells (GCs) of growing follicles and luteal cells produce ACh and in cultured GCs it exerts trophic actions via muscarinic receptors. However, such actions were not studied in vivo. After having established that rat ovarian GCs and luteal cells express the ACh-metabolizing enzyme ACh esterase (AChE), we examined the consequences of local application of an AChE inhibitor, huperzine A (HupA), by osmotic minipump delivery into the ovarian bursa of hemiovariectomized rats. Saline was used in the control group. Local delivery of HupA for 4 weeks increased ovarian ACh content. Estrus cyclicity was not changed indicating a locally restricted range of HupA action. The number of primordial and primary follicles was unaffected, but small secondary follicles significantly increased in the HupA group. Furthermore, a significant increase in the number of corpora lutea suggested increased ovulatory events. In support, as shown upon mating, HupA-treated females had significantly increased implantation sites and more pups. Thus the data are in support of a trophic role of ACh in follicular development and ovulation and point to an important role of ACh in female fertility. PMID:27440195

  5. Acotiamide Hydrochloride, a Therapeutic Agent for Functional Dyspepsia, Enhances Acetylcholine-induced Contraction via Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Circular Muscle Strips of Guinea Pig Stomach.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Kawachi, M; Matsunaga, Y; Hori, Y; Ozaki, T; Nagahama, K; Hirayama, M; Kawabata, Y; Shiraishi, Y; Takei, M; Tanaka, T

    2016-04-01

    Acotiamide is a first-in-class prokinetic drug approved in Japan for the treatment of functional dyspepsia. Given that acotiamide enhances gastric motility in conscious dogs and rats, we assessed the in vitro effects of this drug on the contraction of guinea pig stomach strips and on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in stomach homogenate following fundus removal. We also investigated the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist mosapride, dopamine D2 receptor and AChE inhibitor itopride, and representative AChE inhibitor neostigmine. Acotiamide (0.3 and 1 μM) and itopride (1 and 3 μM) significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body strips induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS), but mosapride (1 and 10 μM) did not. Acotiamide and itopride significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body and antrum strips induced by acetylcholine (ACh), but not that induced by carbachol (CCh). Neostigmine also significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body strips induced by ACh, but not that by CCh. In contrast, mosapride failed to enhance contractions induced by either ACh or CCh in gastric antrum strips. Acotiamide exerted mixed inhibition of AChE, and the percentage inhibition of acotiamide (100 μM) against AChE activity was markedly reduced after the reaction mixture was dialyzed. In contrast, itopride exerted noncompetitive inhibition on AChE activity. These results indicate that acotiamide enhances ACh-dependent contraction in gastric strips of guinea pigs via the inhibition of AChE activity, and that it exerts mixed and reversible inhibition of AChE derived from guinea pig stomach. PMID:26418413

  6. High Glucose-enhanced Acetylcholine Stimulated CGMP Masks Impaired Vascular Reactivity in Tail Arteries from Short-Term Hyperglycemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamaty, Marwan; Guzmán, Cristina B.; Walsh , Mary F.; Bode, Ann M.; Levy, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Impaired vascular endothelium-dependent relaxation and augmented contractile responses have been reported in several models of long-term hyperglycemia. However, the effects of short-term ambient hyperglycemia are poorly understood. Since oxidative stress has been implicated as a contributor to impaired vascular function, we investigated the following: Aims: (1) the effects of high glucose exposure in vitro (7 – 10 days) on vascular relaxation to acetylcholine (Ach) and contractility to norepinephrine (NE) and KCl; (2) if NO-dependent cGMP generation is affected under these conditions; and (3) aortic redox status. Methods: Non-diabetic rat tail artery rings were incubated in normal (5mM) (control NG) or high (20mM) glucose buffer (control HG). Vascular responses to Ach, NE and KCl were compared to those of streptozotocin (SZ) diabetic animals in the same buffers (diabetic NG, diabetic HG). Ach stimulated cGMP levels were quantitated as an indirect assessment of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production and oxidative stress evaluated by measuring vascular glutathione and oxidized glutathione. Results: Rings from diabetic rats in NG showed impaired relaxation to Ach (P = 0.002) but relaxed normally, when maintained in HG. Similarly, contractile responses to NE were attenuated in diabetic rings in NG but similar to controls in HG. HG markedly augmented maximal contraction to KCl compared to control and diabetic vessels in NG (P < 0.0001). Diabetic vessels in a hyperosmolar, but normoglycemic, milieu respond like those in HG. in vitro, HG for 2 hours changed neither relaxation nor contractile responses to NE and KCl in control rings. Basal cGMP levels were lower in aortae from diabetic animals pre-incubated in NG than in HG/LG or in control rings in NG (P < 0.05). cGMP responses to Ach were exaggerated in diabetic vessels in HG (P = 0.035 vs. control NG, P = 0.043 vs. diabetic NG) but not different between control and diabetic rings in NG. Vessels from diabetic animals

  7. Blocking GABA-A receptors in the medial septum enhances hippocampal acetylcholine release and behavior in a rat model of diencephalic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Roland, Jessica J; Savage, Lisa M

    2009-05-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a form of diencephalic amnesia caused by thiamine deficiency, results in severe anterograde memory loss. Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD), an animal model of WKS, produces cholinergic abnormalities including decreased functional hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) release and poor spatial memory. Increasing hippocampal ACh levels has increased performance in PTD animals. Intraseptal bicuculline (GABA(A) antagonist) augments hippocampal ACh release in normal animals and we found it (0.50 microg/microl and 0.75 microg/microl) also increased in-vivo hippocampal ACh release in PTD animals. However, the 0.75 microg/microl dose produced a greater change in hippocampal ACh release in control animals. The 0.50 microg/microl dose of bicuculline was then selected to determine if it could enhance spontaneous alternation performance in PTD animals. This dose of bicuculline significantly increased hippocampal ACh levels above baseline in both PTD and control rats and resulted in complete behavioral recovery in PTD animals, without altering performance in control rats. This suggests that balancing ACh-GABA interactions in the septohippocampal circuit may be an effective therapeutic approach in certain amnestic syndromes. PMID:19463263

  8. Acetylcholine facilitates recovery of episodic memory after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Croxson, Paula L.; Browning, Philip G. F.; Gaffan, David; Baxter, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory depends on a network of interconnected brain structures including the inferior temporal cortex, hippocampus, fornix and mammillary bodies. We have previously shown that a moderate episodic memory impairment in monkeys with transection of the fornix is exacerbated by prior depletion of acetylcholine from inferotemporal cortex. This is despite the fact that depletion of acetylcholine from inferotemporal cortex on its own has no effect on episodic memory. Here we now show that this effect occurs because inferotemporal acetylcholine facilitates recovery of function following structural damage within the neural circuit for episodic memory. Episodic memory impairment caused by lesions of the mammillary bodies, like fornix transection, was exacerbated by prior removal of temporal cortical acetylcholine. However, removing temporal cortical acetylcholine after the lesion of the fornix or mammillary bodies did not increase the severity of the impairment. This lesion order effect suggests that acetylcholine within the inferior temporal cortex ordinarily facilitates functional recovery after structural lesions that impair episodic memory. In the absence of acetylcholine innervation to inferotemporal cortex, this recovery is impaired and the amnesia caused by the structural lesion is more severe. These results suggest that humans with loss of cortical acetylcholine function, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, may be less able to adapt to memory impairments caused by structural neuronal damage to areas in the network important for episodic memory. PMID:23035090

  9. Shared Neural Substrates of Emotionally Enhanced Perceptual and Mnemonic Vividness

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Rebecca M.; Schmitz, Taylor W.; Susskind, Josh; Anderson, Adam K.

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that emotionally salient events are remembered more vividly than mundane ones. Our recent research has demonstrated that such memory vividness (Mviv) is due in part to the subjective experience of emotional events as more perceptually vivid, an effect we call emotionally enhanced vividness (EEV). The present study built on previously reported research in which fMRI data were collected while participants rated relative levels of visual noise overlaid on emotionally salient and neutral images. Ratings of greater EEV were associated with greater activation in the amygdala and visual cortex. In the present study, we measured BOLD activation that predicted recognition Mviv for these same images 1 week later. Results showed that, after controlling for differences between scenes in low-level objective features, hippocampus activation uniquely predicted subsequent Mviv. In contrast, amygdala and visual cortex regions that were sensitive to EEV were also modulated by subsequent ratings of Mviv. These findings suggest shared neural substrates for the influence of emotional salience on perceptual and mnemonic vividness, with amygdala and visual cortex activation at encoding contributing to the experience of both perception and subsequent memory. PMID:23653601

  10. Low-dimensional recurrent neural network-based Kalman filter for speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Xia, Youshen; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a new recurrent neural network-based Kalman filter for speech enhancement, based on a noise-constrained least squares estimate. The parameters of speech signal modeled as autoregressive process are first estimated by using the proposed recurrent neural network and the speech signal is then recovered from Kalman filtering. The proposed recurrent neural network is globally asymptomatically stable to the noise-constrained estimate. Because the noise-constrained estimate has a robust performance against non-Gaussian noise, the proposed recurrent neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm can minimize the estimation error of Kalman filter parameters in non-Gaussian noise. Furthermore, having a low-dimensional model feature, the proposed neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm has a much faster speed than two existing recurrent neural networks-based speech enhancement algorithms. Simulation results show that the proposed recurrent neural network-based speech enhancement algorithm can produce a good performance with fast computation and noise reduction. PMID:25913233

  11. Nicotine enhances invasion and metastasis of human colorectal cancer cells through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor downstream p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Fei, Rushan; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Zhonglei; Qian, Jing; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine as a cigarette component is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer tumorigenesis. The downstream signaling pathways of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are believed to be responsible for the cellular effects. In the present study, we evaluated the effects and novel mechanisms for nicotine on the capacity for colorectal cancer cell invasion and metastasis. LOVO and SW620 colorectal cancer cells were stimulated with nicotine in vitro. A Transwell chamber model was applied to detect the capacity for tumor cell invasion. Assays for gelatin zymography and western blotting were applied to detect the activity and expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), respectively. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for the phosphorylation of relevant signal molecules and the application of pharmaceutical inhibitors. We showed that nicotine increased LOVO and SW620 colorectal cancer cell invasion along with enhanced activity and expression of MMP-1, -2 and -9. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of p38, ERK, Akt and PI3K p85 but had no effect on phosphorylation of JNK, or NF-κB. Of the pharmaceutical inhibitors of U0126 (ERK1/2 inhibitor), LY294002 (Akt activation inhibitor), SB239063 (p38 MAPK activation inhibitor) and hexamethonium (Hex) (nAchRs inhibitor), the cellular and molecular effects were reduced by the applications of SB239063 and Hex. We concluded that nicotine stimulates the invasion and metastasis of colon cancer cells in vitro via activation of the nAchRs and the p38 MAPK downstream signaling pathway. Therefore, p38 MAPK may have potential as a therapeutic target for smoking-related human colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:26530054

  12. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): blocking 5HT3 receptors enhances release of serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. 5HT3 receptor antagonism is one of these actions, and this leads to increased release of norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), and serotonin (5HT) within various brain circuits. PMID:26122791

  13. Enhanced immunohistochemical detection of neural infiltration in primary melanoma: is there a clinical value?

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Patrick; Tian, Jaiying; Zhong, Judy; Silva, Ines; Shapiro, Richard; Pavlick, Anna; Berman, Russell; Osman, Iman; Darvishian, Farbod

    2014-08-01

    Neural infiltration in primary melanoma is a histopathologic feature that has been associated with desmoplastic histopathologic subtype and local recurrence in the literature. We tested the hypothesis that improved detection and characterization of neural infiltration into peritumoral or intratumoral location and perineural or intraneural involvement could have a prognostic relevance. We studied 128 primary melanoma cases prospectively accrued and followed at New York University using immunohistochemical detection with antihuman neurofilament protein and routine histology with hematoxylin and eosin. Neural infiltration, defined as the presence of tumor cells involving or immediately surrounding nerve foci, was identified and characterized using both detection methods. Neural infiltration rate of detection was enhanced by immunohistochemistry for neurofilament in matched-pair design (47% by immunohistochemistry versus 25% by routine histology). Immunohistochemical detection of neural infiltration was significantly associated with ulceration (P = .021), desmoplastic and acral lentiginous histologic subtype (P = .008), and head/neck/hands/feet tumor location (P = .037). Routinely detected neural infiltration was significantly associated with local recurrence (P = .010). Immunohistochemistry detected more intratumoral neural infiltration cases compared with routine histology (30% versus 3%, respectively). Peritumoral and intratumoral nerve location had no impact on clinical outcomes. Using a multivariate model controlling for stage, neither routinely detected neural infiltration nor enhanced immunohistochemical characterization of neural infiltration was significantly associated with disease-free or overall survival. Our data demonstrate that routinely detected neural infiltration is associated with local recurrence in all histologic subtypes but that improved detection and characterization of neural infiltration with immunohistochemistry in primary melanoma does not

  14. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  15. Oligodendroglial and Pan-neural Crest Expression of Cre Recombinase Directed by Sox10 Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Zachary E.; Huynh, Jimmy L.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Gorkin, David U.; Salmasi, Amirali H.; Novak, Thomas; Purves, Todd; Miller, Ronald A.; Antonellis, Anthony; Gearhart, John P.; Pavan, William J.; McCallion, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a recently identified Sox10 distal enhancer directing Cre expression, we report S4F:Cre, a transgenic mouse line capable of inducing recombination in oligodendroglia and all examined neural crest derived tissues. Assayed using R26R:LacZ reporter mice expression was detected in neural crest derived tissues including the forming facial skeleton, dorsal root ganglia, sympathetic ganglia, enteric nervous system, aortae and melanoblasts, consistent with Sox10 expression. LacZ reporter expression was also detected in non-neural crest derived tissues including the oligodendrocytes and the ventral neural tube. This line provides appreciable differences in Cre expression pattern from other transgenic mouse lines that mark neural crest populations, including additional populations defined by the expression of other SoxE proteins. The S4F:Cre transgenic line will thus serve as a powerful tool for lineage tracing, gene function characterization and genome manipulation in these populations. PMID:19830815

  16. Neural Networks Based Approach to Enhance Space Hardware Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Thakoor, Anilkumar; Lu, Thomas; Franco, Lauro; Lin, Tsung Han; McClure, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of Neural Networks as a device modeling tool to increase the reliability analysis accuracy of circuits targeted for space applications. The paper tackles a number of case studies of relevance to the design of Flight hardware. The results show that the proposed technique generates more accurate models than the ones regularly used to model circuits.

  17. Heterogeneity of neural progenitor cells revealed by enhancers in the nestin gene

    PubMed Central

    Yaworsky, Paul J.; Kappen, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic embryos, we have identified two distinct CNS progenitor cell-specific enhancers, each requiring the cooperation of at least two independent regulatory sites, within the second intron of the rat nestin gene. One enhancer is active throughout the developing CNS while the other is specifically active in the ventral midbrain. These experiments demonstrate that neural progenitor cells in the midbrain constitute a unique subpopulation based upon their ability to activate the midbrain regulatory elements. Our finding of differential enhancer activity from a gene encoding a structural protein reveals a previously unrecognized diversity in neural progenitor cell populations. PMID:9917366

  18. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine. PMID:24592382

  19. GABAergic neural activity involved in salicylate-induced auditory cortex gain enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Lobarinas, E; Deng, A; Goodey, R; Stolzberg, D; Salvi, R J; Sun, W

    2011-08-25

    Although high doses of sodium salicylate impair cochlear function, it paradoxically enhances sound-evoked activity in the auditory cortex (AC) and augments acoustic startle reflex responses, neural and behavioral metrics associated with hyperexcitability and hyperacusis. To explore the neural mechanisms underlying salicylate (SS)-induced hyperexcitability and "increased central gain," we examined the effects of GABA receptor agonists and antagonists on SS-induced hyperexcitability in the AC and startle reflex responses. Consistent with our previous findings, local or systemic application of SS significantly increased the amplitude of sound-evoked AC neural activity, but generally reduced spontaneous activity in the AC. Systemic injection of SS also significantly increased the acoustic startle reflex. S-baclofen or R-baclofen, GABA-B agonists, which suppressed sound-evoked AC neural firing rate and local field potentials, also suppressed the SS-induced enhancement of the AC field potential and the acoustic startle reflex. Local application of vigabatrin, which enhances GABA concentration in the brain, suppressed the SS-induced enhancement of AC firing rate. Systemic injection of vigabatrin also reduced the SS-induced enhancement of acoustic startle reflex. Collectively, these results suggest that the sound-evoked behavioral and neural hyperactivity induced by SS may arise from a SS-induced suppression of GABAergic inhibition in the AC. PMID:21664433

  20. Diminished neural responses predict enhanced intrinsic motivation and sensitivity to external incentive.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Karen E; Ma, Wei Ji; Deci, Edward L; Ryan, Richard M; Chiu, Pearl H

    2015-06-01

    The duration and quality of human performance depend on both intrinsic motivation and external incentives. However, little is known about the neuroscientific basis of this interplay between internal and external motivators. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation, operationalized as the free-choice time spent on a task when this was not required, and tested the neural and behavioral effects of external reward on intrinsic motivation. We found that increased duration of free-choice time was predicted by generally diminished neural responses in regions associated with cognitive and affective regulation. By comparison, the possibility of additional reward improved task accuracy, and specifically increased neural and behavioral responses following errors. Those individuals with the smallest neural responses associated with intrinsic motivation exhibited the greatest error-related neural enhancement under the external contingency of possible reward. Together, these data suggest that human performance is guided by a "tonic" and "phasic" relationship between the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation (tonic) and the impact of external incentives (phasic). PMID:25348668

  1. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex. These changes include enhanced representation of the molecular features of familiar odors by mitral cells in the olfactory bulb, and synthetic coding of multiple coincident odorant features into odor objects by cortical neurons. In this paper, data are reviewed that show the critical role of acetylcholine (Ach) in olfactory system function and plasticity, and cholinergic modulation of olfactory perceptual learning at both the behavioral and cortical level. PMID:14747514

  2. Image resolution enhancement via image restoration using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuangteng; Lu, Yihong

    2011-04-01

    Image super-resolution aims to obtain a high-quality image at a resolution that is higher than that of the original coarse one. This paper presents a new neural network-based method for image super-resolution. In this technique, the super-resolution is considered as an inverse problem. An observation model that closely follows the physical image acquisition process is established to solve the problem. Based on this model, a cost function is created and minimized by a Hopfield neural network to produce high-resolution images from the corresponding low-resolution ones. Not like some other single frame super-resolution techniques, this technique takes into consideration point spread function blurring as well as additive noise and therefore generates high-resolution images with more preserved or restored image details. Experimental results demonstrate that the high-resolution images obtained by this technique have a very high quality in terms of PSNR and visually look more pleasant.

  3. Neural control of muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Markelonis, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation regulates the physiological and biochemical properties of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms that appear to be involved in this regulation include soluble, neurally-derived polypeptides, transmitter-evoked muscle activity and the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, itself. Despite extensive research, the interacting neural mechanisms that control such macromolecules as acetylcholinesterase, the acetylcholine receptor and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase remain unclear. It may be that more simplified in vitro model systems coupled with recent dramatic advances in the molecular biology of neurally-regulated proteins will begin to allow researchers to unravel the mechanisms controlling the expression and maintenance of these macromolecules.

  4. Musical Training during Early Childhood Enhances the Neural Encoding of Speech in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, Dana L.; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    For children, learning often occurs in the presence of background noise. As such, there is growing desire to improve a child's access to a target signal in noise. Given adult musicians' perceptual and neural speech-in-noise enhancements, we asked whether similar effects are present in musically-trained children. We assessed the perception and…

  5. Using neural networks to enhance the Higgs boson signal at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Kanev, Y.; Tayebnejad, M.; Griffin, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Neural networks are used to help distinguish the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}-jet-jet signal produced by the decay of a 400 GeV Higgs boson at a proton-proton collider energy of 15 TeV from the ``ordinary`` QCD Z + jets background. The ideal case where only one event at a time enters the detector (no pile-up) and the case of multiple interactions per beam crossing (pile-up) are examined. In both cases, when used in conjunction with the standard cuts, neural networks provide an additional signal to background enhancement.

  6. Neural time course of visually enhanced echo suppression.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher W; London, Sam; Miller, Lee M

    2012-10-01

    Auditory spatial perception plays a critical role in day-to-day communication. For instance, listeners utilize acoustic spatial information to segregate individual talkers into distinct auditory "streams" to improve speech intelligibility. However, spatial localization is an exceedingly difficult task in everyday listening environments with numerous distracting echoes from nearby surfaces, such as walls. Listeners' brains overcome this unique challenge by relying on acoustic timing and, quite surprisingly, visual spatial information to suppress short-latency (1-10 ms) echoes through a process known as "the precedence effect" or "echo suppression." In the present study, we employed electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate the neural time course of echo suppression both with and without the aid of coincident visual stimulation in human listeners. We find that echo suppression is a multistage process initialized during the auditory N1 (70-100 ms) and followed by space-specific suppression mechanisms from 150 to 250 ms. Additionally, we find a robust correlate of listeners' spatial perception (i.e., suppressing or not suppressing the echo) over central electrode sites from 300 to 500 ms. Contrary to our hypothesis, vision's powerful contribution to echo suppression occurs late in processing (250-400 ms), suggesting that vision contributes primarily during late sensory or decision making processes. Together, our findings support growing evidence that echo suppression is a slow, progressive mechanism modifiable by visual influences during late sensory and decision making stages. Furthermore, our findings suggest that audiovisual interactions are not limited to early, sensory-level modulations but extend well into late stages of cortical processing. PMID:22786953

  7. Tracing neural circuits in vivo with Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yusuke; Weber, Bruno; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Augath, Mark; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2006-05-01

    The application of MRI-visible paramagnetic tracers to reveal in vivo connectivity can provide important subject-specific information for multisite, multielectrode intracortical recordings in combined behavioral and physiology experiments. To establish the use of such tracers in the nonhuman primate, we recently compared the specificity of the anterograde tracer Mn2+ with that of wheat-germ-agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in experiments tracing the neuronal connections of the basal ganglia of the monkey. It was shown that Mn2+ and WGA-HRP yield the same projection patterns and that the former tracer crosses at least two synapses, for it could be found in thalamus following injections into the striatum. Here we provide evidence that Mn2+ reaches the cortex following striatum injections and, thus, is transferred even further than previously shown. In other words, used as a paramagnetic MRI tracer, Mn2+ can permit the visualization of neural networks covering at least four processing stages. Moreover, unilateral intravitreal injections show that Mn2+ is sufficiently synapse specific to permit visualization of the lamina of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Interestingly, the transfer rate of the substance reflected the well-known axonal size differences between the parvocellular and magnocellular layers of dLGN. After intravitreal injections, we were able to demonstrate transfer of Mn2+ into several subcortical and cortical areas, including the inferotemporal cortex. The specificity of the transsynaptic transfer of manganese that we report here indicates the value of this tracer for chronic studies of development and plasticity, as well as for studies of brain pathology. PMID:16677940

  8. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, Esam E.

    2010-01-01

    An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity) or decrease (negative cooperativity) in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine). Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  9. Noise reduction and image enhancement using a hardware implementation of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Robert; Williams, Erin; de Tremiolles, Ghislain; Tannhof, Pascal

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, we present a neural based solution developed for noise reduction and image enhancement using the ZISC, an IBM hardware processor which implements the Restricted Coulomb Energy algorithm and the K-Nearest Neighbor algorithm. Artificial neural networks present the advantages of processing time reduction in comparison with classical models, adaptability, and the weighted property of pattern learning. The goal of the developed application is image enhancement in order to restore old movies (noise reduction, focus correction, etc.), to improve digital television images, or to treat images which require adaptive processing (medical images, spatial images, special effects, etc.). Image results show a quantitative improvement over the noisy image as well as the efficiency of this system. Further enhancements are being examined to improve the output of the system.

  10. Repetition Priming and Repetition Suppression: A Case for Enhanced Efficiency Through Neural Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Chow, Carson C.; Martin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus repetition in identification tasks leads to improved behavioral performance ("repetition priming") but attenuated neural responses ("repetition suppression") throughout task-engaged cortical regions. While it's clear that this pervasive brain-behavior relationship reflects some form of improved processing efficiency, the exact form that it takes remains elusive. In this Discussion Paper, we review four different theoretical proposals that have the potential to link repetition suppression and priming, with a particular focus on a proposal that stimulus repetition affects improved efficiency through enhanced neural synchronization. We argue that despite exciting recent work on the role of neural synchronization in cognitive processes such as attention and perception, similar studies in the domain of learning and memory - and priming, in particular - have been lacking. We emphasize the need for new studies with adequate spatiotemporal resolution, formulate several novel predictions, and discuss our ongoing efforts to disentangle the current proposals. PMID:23144664

  11. Acetylcholine Acts through Nicotinic Receptors to Enhance the Firing Rate of a Subset of Hypocretin Neurons in the Mouse Hypothalamus through Distinct Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Mechanisms1,2

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Gao, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypocretin/orexin neurons regulate many behavioral functions, including addiction. Nicotine acts through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to alter firing rate of neurons throughout the brain, leading to addiction-related behaviors. While nAChRs are expressed in the hypothalamus and cholinergic fibers project to this structure, it is unclear how acetylcholine modulates the activity of hypocretin neurons. In this study, we stimulated hypocretin neurons in mouse brain slices with ACh in the presence of atropine to dissect presynaptic and postsynaptic modulation of these neurons through nAChRs. Approximately one-third of tested hypocretin neurons responded to pressure application of ACh (1 mM) with an increase in firing frequency. Stimulation of postsynaptic nAChRs with ACh or nicotine resulted in a highly variable inward current in approximately one-third of hypocretin neurons. In contrast, ACh or nicotine (1 µM) reliably decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs). Antagonism of nAChRs with mecamylamine also suppressed mEPSC frequency, suggesting that an endogenous, tonic activation of presynaptic nAChRs might be required for maintaining functional mEPSC frequency. Antagonism of heteromeric (α4β2) or homomeric (α7) nAChRs alone suppressed mEPSCs to a lesser extent. Finally, blocking internal calcium release reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, occluding the suppressive effect of presynaptic ACh. Taken together, these data provide a mechanism by which phasic ACh release enhances the firing of a subset of hypocretin neurons through postsynaptic nAChRs, but disrupts tonic, presynaptic nAChR-mediated glutamatergic inputs to the overall population of hypocretin neurons, potentially enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio during the response of the nAChR-positive subset of neurons. PMID:26322330

  12. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  13. PAC1R agonist maxadilan enhances hADSC viability and neural differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoling; Yu, Rongjie; Xu, Ying; Lian, Ruiling; Yu, Yankun; Cui, Zekai; Ji, Qingshan; Chen, Junhe; Li, Zhijie; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu

    2016-05-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a structurally endogenous peptide with many biological roles. However, little is known about its presence or effects in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). In this study, the expression of PACAP type I receptor (PAC1R) was first confirmed in hADSCs. Maxadilan, a specific agonist of PAC1R, could increase hADSC proliferation as determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 and cell cycle analysis and promote migration as shown in wound-healing assays. Maxadilan also showed anti-apoptotic activity in hADSCs against serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis based on Annexin V/propidium iodide analysis and mitochondrial membrane potential assays. The anti-apoptotic effects of maxadilan correlated with the down-regulation of Cleaved Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 as well as up-regulation of Bcl-2. The chemical neural differentiation potential could be enhanced by maxadilan as indicated through quantitative PCR, Western blot and cell morphology analysis. Moreover, cytokine neural redifferentiation of hADSCs treated with maxadilan acquired stronger neuron-like functions with higher voltage-dependent tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents, higher outward potassium currents and partial electrical impulses as determined using whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Maxadilan up-regulated the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway associated with dimer-dependent activity of PAC1R, promoting cell viability that was inhibited by XAV939, and it also activated the protein kinase A (PKA) signalling pathway associated with ligand-dependent activity of PAC1R, enhancing cell viability and neural differentiation potential that was inhibited by H-89. In summary, these results demonstrated that PAC1R is present in hADSCs, and maxadilan could enhance hADSC viability and neural differentiation potential in neural differentiation medium. PMID:26798992

  14. Crossmodal integration enhances neural representation of task-relevant features in audiovisual face perception.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Huang, Biao; Yu, Tianyou; Wu, Wei; Liu, Yongjian; Liang, Changhong; Sun, Pei

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that audiovisual integration improves identification performance and enhances neural activity in heteromodal brain areas, for example, the posterior superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus (pSTS/MTG). Furthermore, it has also been demonstrated that attention plays an important role in crossmodal integration. In this study, we considered crossmodal integration in audiovisual facial perception and explored its effect on the neural representation of features. The audiovisual stimuli in the experiment consisted of facial movie clips that could be classified into 2 gender categories (male vs. female) or 2 emotion categories (crying vs. laughing). The visual/auditory-only stimuli were created from these movie clips by removing the auditory/visual contents. The subjects needed to make a judgment about the gender/emotion category for each movie clip in the audiovisual, visual-only, or auditory-only stimulus condition as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals were recorded. The neural representation of the gender/emotion feature was assessed using the decoding accuracy and the brain pattern-related reproducibility indices, obtained by a multivariate pattern analysis method from the fMRI data. In comparison to the visual-only and auditory-only stimulus conditions, we found that audiovisual integration enhanced the neural representation of task-relevant features and that feature-selective attention might play a role of modulation in the audiovisual integration. PMID:23978654

  15. Mortality salience enhances racial in-group bias in empathic neural responses to others' suffering.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Luo, Siyang; Wu, Bing; Wu, Xinhuai; Han, Shihui

    2015-09-01

    Behavioral research suggests that mortality salience (MS) leads to increased in-group identification and in-group favoritism in prosocial behavior. What remains unknown is whether and how MS influences brain activity that mediates emotional resonance with in-group and out-group members and is associated with in-group favoritism in helping behavior. The current work investigated MS effects on empathic neural responses to racial in-group and out-group members' suffering. Experiments 1 and 2 respectively recorded event related potentials (ERPs) and blood oxygen level dependent signals to pain/neutral expressions of Asian and Caucasian faces from Chinese adults who had been primed with MS or negative affect (NA). Experiment 1 found that an early frontal/central activity (P2) was more strongly modulated by pain vs. neutral expressions of Asian than Caucasian faces, but this effect was not affected by MS vs. NA priming. However, MS relative to NA priming enhanced racial in-group bias in long-latency neural response to pain expressions over the central/parietal regions (P3). Experiment 2 found that MS vs. NA priming increased racial in-group bias in empathic neural responses to pain expression in the anterior and mid-cingulate cortex. Our findings indicate that reminding mortality enhances brain activity that differentiates between racial in-group and out-group members' emotional states and suggest a neural basis of in-group favoritism under mortality threat. PMID:26074201

  16. Musical training during early childhood enhances the neural encoding of speech in noise.

    PubMed

    Strait, Dana L; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2012-12-01

    For children, learning often occurs in the presence of background noise. As such, there is growing desire to improve a child's access to a target signal in noise. Given adult musicians' perceptual and neural speech-in-noise enhancements, we asked whether similar effects are present in musically-trained children. We assessed the perception and subcortical processing of speech in noise and related cognitive abilities in musician and nonmusician children that were matched for a variety of overarching factors. Outcomes reveal that musicians' advantages for processing speech in noise are present during pivotal developmental years. Supported by correlations between auditory working memory and attention and auditory brainstem response properties, we propose that musicians' perceptual and neural enhancements are driven in a top-down manner by strengthened cognitive abilities with training. Our results may be considered by professionals involved in the remediation of language-based learning deficits, which are often characterized by poor speech perception in noise. PMID:23102977

  17. Musical training during early childhood enhances the neural encoding of speech in noise

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Dana L.; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    For children, learning often occurs in the presence of background noise. As such, there is growing desire to improve a child’s access to a target signal in noise. Given adult musicians’ perceptual and neural speech-in-noise enhancements, we asked whether similar effects are present in musically-trained children. We assessed the perception and subcortical processing of speech in noise and related cognitive abilities in musician and nonmusician children that were matched for a variety of overarching factors. Outcomes reveal that musicians’ advantages for processing speech in noise are present during pivotal developmental years. Supported by correlations between auditory working memory and attention and auditory brainstem response properties, we propose that musicians’ perceptual and neural enhancements are driven in a top-down manner by strengthened cognitive abilities with training. Our results may be considered by professionals involved in the remediation of language-based learning deficits, which are often characterized by poor speech perception in noise. PMID:23102977

  18. Dimethyloxalylglycine may be enhance the capacity of neural-like cells in treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi Moravej, Fahimeh; Vahabian, Mehrangiz; Soleimani Asl, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Although using differentiated stem cells is the best proposed option for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD), an efficient differentiation and cell therapy require enhanced cell survival and homing and decreased apoptosis. It seems that hypoxia preconditioning via Dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) may increase the capacity of MSC to induce neural like stem cells (NSCs). Furthermore, it can likely improve the viability of NSCs when transplanted into the brain of AD rats. PMID:27005959

  19. Design and expression of human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor extracellular domain mutants with enhanced solubility and ligand-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Zouridakis, Marios; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Eliopoulos, Elias; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2009-02-01

    In order to facilitate structural studies of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), we designed several mutants, since the wild-type-ECD forms large oligomers and microaggregates, and expressed them in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mutant design was based on a 3D model of human alpha7-nAChR-ECD, constructed using as templates the X-ray crystal structure of the homologous acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) and the electron microscopy structure of the Torpedo alpha-nAChR-ECD. At least one mutant, mut10, carrying six single-point mutations (Phe3Tyr, Val69Thr, Cys116Ser, Ile165Thr, Val177Thr, Phe187Tyr) and the replacement of its Cys-loop with the corresponding and more hydrophilic AChBP Cys-loop, was expressed with a 4-fold higher expression yield (1.2 mg/L) than the wild-type alpha7-ECD, existing exclusively as a soluble oligomeric, probably pentameric, form, at concentrations up to at least 10 mg/mL, as judged by gel filtration and dynamic light scattering. This mutant displayed a significantly improved (125)I-alpha-bungarotoxin-binding affinity (K(d)=24 nM) compared to the wild-type-ECD (K(d)=70 nM), the binding being inhibited by unlabelled alpha-bungarotoxin, d-tubocurarine or nicotine (K(i) of 21.5 nM, 127 microM and 17.5 mM, respectively). Circular dichroism studies of mut10 revealed (a) a similar secondary structure composition ( approximately 5% alpha-helix, approximately 45% beta-sheet) to that of the AChBP, Torpedo alpha-nAChR-ECD, and mouse alpha1-nAChR-ECD, (b) a well-defined tertiary structure and (c) binding of small cholinergic ligands at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed well-assembled, probably pentameric, particles of mut10. Finally, since deglycosylation did not alter its solubility or ligand-binding properties, mut10, in either its glycosylated or deglycosylated form, is a promising alpha7-ECD mutant for structural studies, useful for the rational drug design to

  20. Early Life Stress, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Alcohol Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Joan Y; Bartlett, Selena E

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a major driving force in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). It influences how much one consumes, craving intensity and whether an abstinent individual will return to harmful alcohol consumption. We are most vulnerable to the effects of stress during early development, and exposure to multiple traumatic early life events dramatically increases the risk for AUDs. However, not everyone exposed to early life stress will develop an AUD. The mechanisms determining whether an individual's brain adapts and becomes resilient to the effects of stress or succumbs and is unable to cope with stress remain elusive. Emerging evidence suggests that neuroplastic changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following early life stress underlie the development of AUDs. This review discusses the impact of early life stress on NAc structure and function, how these changes affect cholinergic signaling within the mesolimbic reward pathway and the role nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play in this process. Understanding the neural pathways and mechanism determining stress resilience or susceptibility will improve our ability to identify individuals susceptible to developing AUDs, formulate cognitive interventions to prevent AUDs in susceptible individuals and to elucidate and enhance potential therapeutic targets, such as the nAChRs, for those struggling to overcome an AUD. PMID:26136145

  1. Early Life Stress, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Holgate, Joan Y.; Bartlett, Selena E.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a major driving force in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). It influences how much one consumes, craving intensity and whether an abstinent individual will return to harmful alcohol consumption. We are most vulnerable to the effects of stress during early development, and exposure to multiple traumatic early life events dramatically increases the risk for AUDs. However, not everyone exposed to early life stress will develop an AUD. The mechanisms determining whether an individual’s brain adapts and becomes resilient to the effects of stress or succumbs and is unable to cope with stress remain elusive. Emerging evidence suggests that neuroplastic changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following early life stress underlie the development of AUDs. This review discusses the impact of early life stress on NAc structure and function, how these changes affect cholinergic signaling within the mesolimbic reward pathway and the role nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play in this process. Understanding the neural pathways and mechanism determining stress resilience or susceptibility will improve our ability to identify individuals susceptible to developing AUDs, formulate cognitive interventions to prevent AUDs in susceptible individuals and to elucidate and enhance potential therapeutic targets, such as the nAChRs, for those struggling to overcome an AUD. PMID:26136145

  2. Presynaptic Type III Neuregulin 1 Is Required for Sustained Enhancement of Hippocampal Transmission by Nicotine and for Axonal Targeting of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chongbo; Du, Chuang; Hancock, Melissa; Mertz, Marjolijn; Talmage, David A.; Role, Lorna W.

    2009-01-01

    Both the neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7*nAChRs) genes have been linked to schizophrenia and associated sensory–motor gating deficits. The prominence of nicotine addiction in schizophrenic patients is reflected in the normalization of gating deficits by nicotine self-administration. To assess the role of presynaptic type III Nrg1 at hippocampal–accumbens synapses, an important relay in sensory–motor gating, we developed a specialized preparation of chimeric circuits in vitro. Synaptic relays from Nrg1tm1Lwr heterozygote ventral hippocampal slices to wild-type (WT) nucleus accumbens neurons (1) lack a sustained, α7*nAChRs-mediated phase of synaptic potentiation seen in comparable WT/WT circuits and (2) are deficient in targeting α7*nAChRs to presynaptic sites. Thus, selective alteration of the level of presynaptic type III Nrg1 dramatically affects the modulation of glutamatergic transmission at ventral hippocampal to nucleus accumbens synapses. PMID:18784291

  3. Chronic (3-Weeks) Treatment of Estrogen (17β-Estradiol) Enhances Working and Reference Memory in Ovariectomized Rats: Role of Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Uzum, Gulay; Bahcekapili, Nesrin; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Ziylan, Yusuf Ziya

    2016-06-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in the effects of estrogen on cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to examine 17β-estradiol treatment on working and reference memory in ovariectomized rats. We also examined the changes in the acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the brain areas associated with learning and memory. The study was performed on Sprague-Dawley type 3-month-old female rats. The rats were divided into four groups as control, ovariectomy (OVX), and OVX and estrogen treatment (10 µg/day i.p. 17β-estradiol) groups for 3 (OVX + E3) and 21 days OVX + E21). The rats were trained on eight arm radial maze task with eight arms baited to assess spatial memory, in addition four arms baited to assess both working and reference memory performances. The electron microscope images of the ACh vesicles in the frontal cortex, temporal cortex and hippocampus areas of the brain which are important regions for learning and memory were screened. Results showed that long term 17β-estradiol treatment has positive effects on both reference memory and working memory and that ACh vesicles increased in the examined brain areas, especially in hippocampus. Our results suggest that 3 weeks 17β-estradiol treatment may have an ameliorative effect on the memory through the central cholinergic system. PMID:26879199

  4. Sensing acetylcholine and anticholinesterase compounds.

    PubMed

    Schena, Alberto; Johnsson, Kai

    2014-01-27

    Acetylcholine is a key neurotransmitter, and anticholinesterase agents are essential compounds used as medical drugs, pesticides, and chemical warfare agents. A semisynthetic fluorescence-based probe for the direct, real-time detection of acetylcholine and anticholinesterase compounds is introduced. The probe possesses good sensitivity, tunable detection range, and can be selectively targeted to cell surfaces, thereby making it an attractive tool for applications in analytical chemistry and quantitative biology. PMID:24339043

  5. Successful antidepressant chronotherapeutics enhance fronto-limbic neural responses and connectivity in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Vai, Benedetta; Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Dallaspezia, Sara; Bulgarelli, Chiara; Locatelli, Clara; Bollettini, Irene; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    The identification of antidepressant response predictors in bipolar disorder (BD) may provide new potential enhancements in treatment selection. Repeated total sleep deprivation combined with light therapy (TSD+LT) can acutely reverse depressive symptoms and has been proposed as a model antidepressant treatment. This study aims at investigating the effect of TSD+LT on effective connectivity and neural response in cortico-limbic circuitries during implicit processing of fearful and angry faces in patients with BD. fMRI and Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) were combined to study the effect of chronotherapeutics on neural responses in healthy controls (HC, n = 35) and BD patients either responder (RBD, n = 26) or non responder (nRBD, n = 11) to 3 consecutive TSD+LT sessions. Twenty-four DCMs exploring connectivity between anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), Amygdala (Amy), fusiform gyrus and visual cortex were constructed. After treatment, patients significantly increased their neural responses in DLPFC, ACC and insula. nRBD showed lower baseline and endpoint neural responses than RBD. The increased activity in ACC and in medial prefrontal cortex, associated with antidepressant treatment, was positively associated with the improvement of depressive symptomatology. Only RBD patients increased intrinsic connectivity from DLPFC to ACC and reduced the modulatory effect of the task on Amy-DLPFC connection. A successful antidepressant treatment was associated with an increased functional activity and connectivity within cortico-limbic networks, suggesting the possible role of these measures in providing possible biomarkers for treatment efficacy. PMID:26195295

  6. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, E.; Coruzzi, G.; Bertaccini, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with ({sup 3}H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors.

  7. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances neural stem cell proliferation and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Hasti Atashi; Rasouli, Javad; Ciric, Bogoljub; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2015-04-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) has recently been found to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although its effect was attributed to an anti-inflammatory mechanism, it is not clear whether this treatment can also directly act on neural cells to promote CNS recovery. The present study investigates the effect of various concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 on neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and their differentiation to oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells. We have, for the first time, shown that NSCs constitutively express vitamin D receptor (VDR), which can be upregulated by 1,25(OH)2D3. This vitamin significantly enhanced proliferation of NSCs, and enhanced their differentiation into neurons and oligodendrocytes, but not astrocytes. NSCs treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 showed increased expression of NT-3, BDNF, GDNF and CNTF, important neurotrophic factors for neural cell survival and differentiation. Overall, we demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 has a direct effect on NSC proliferation, survival, and neuron/oligodendrocyte differentiation, thus representing a novel mechanism underlying its remyelinating and neuroprotective effect in MS/EAE therapy. PMID:25681066

  8. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  9. Enzyme-linked DNA dendrimer nanosensors for acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ryan; Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Ruckh, Timothy T.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently difficult to measure small dynamics of molecules in the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution while connecting them to the bigger picture of brain function. A step towards understanding the underlying neural networks of the brain is the ability to sense discrete changes of acetylcholine within a synapse. Here we show an efficient method for generating acetylcholine-detecting nanosensors based on DNA dendrimer scaffolds that incorporate butyrylcholinesterase and fluorescein in a nanoscale arrangement. These nanosensors are selective for acetylcholine and reversibly respond to levels of acetylcholine in the neurophysiological range. This DNA dendrimer architecture has the potential to overcome current obstacles to sensing in the synaptic environment, including the nanoscale size constraints of the synapse and the ability to quantify the spatio-temporal fluctuations of neurotransmitter release. By combining the control of nanosensor architecture with the strategic placement of fluorescent reporters and enzymes, this novel nanosensor platform can facilitate the development of new selective imaging tools for neuroscience. PMID:26442999

  10. Enzyme-linked DNA dendrimer nanosensors for acetylcholine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Ryan; Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Ruckh, Timothy T.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-10-01

    It is currently difficult to measure small dynamics of molecules in the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution while connecting them to the bigger picture of brain function. A step towards understanding the underlying neural networks of the brain is the ability to sense discrete changes of acetylcholine within a synapse. Here we show an efficient method for generating acetylcholine-detecting nanosensors based on DNA dendrimer scaffolds that incorporate butyrylcholinesterase and fluorescein in a nanoscale arrangement. These nanosensors are selective for acetylcholine and reversibly respond to levels of acetylcholine in the neurophysiological range. This DNA dendrimer architecture has the potential to overcome current obstacles to sensing in the synaptic environment, including the nanoscale size constraints of the synapse and the ability to quantify the spatio-temporal fluctuations of neurotransmitter release. By combining the control of nanosensor architecture with the strategic placement of fluorescent reporters and enzymes, this novel nanosensor platform can facilitate the development of new selective imaging tools for neuroscience.

  11. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  12. Using Artificial Neural Networks Approach for the Color Enhance of High Power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Wu, Guo-Yang; Yang, Chi-Hao; Chen, Peng-Ying; Lai, Mei-Jyun; Huang, Kuo-Ting

    2012-10-01

    High power light-emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) always are applied for energy-saving to replace the traditional light sources. HP-LEDs lighting has been regarded in the next generation lighting. In this study, the RGY colors enhance of whit LED lighting was researched and modulated by artificial neural network (ANN). An ANN model was used to investigate the correlated color temperature (CCT) and luminous flux (Lux) for the white LED enhanced with different power of single RYG LEDs. The starting color temperature of the white LED will be set at 7500K (D75 white light standard), then changed the voltage of the single LED of the red, green or yellow, respectively, to find the best tuning function for the color temperature and luminous efficiency. These results exhibited that changing the voltage of red LED had the broader color temperature from 7500 K to 1500 K than the range of green and yellow LEDs from 7500K to 8200K and 7500K to 4700K, respectively. Then, these experimental results were used as input data for the training model. After the learning model was completed, an analysis was used to obtain the internal representation of the color information by the responses of the individual chips of the three hidden units in the middle layer. Identification rate of data would be achieved to 100% by the neural network pattern-recognition tool. Anyway, the correlation coefficient could reach to 99% by the ANN fitting tool for the color enhancement.

  13. Prior perceptual processing enhances the effect of emotional arousal on the neural correlates of memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Dew, Ilana T Z; Ritchey, Maureen; LaBar, Kevin S; Cabeza, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    A fundamental idea in memory research is that items are more likely to be remembered if encoded with a semantic, rather than perceptual, processing strategy. Interestingly, this effect has been shown to reverse for emotionally arousing materials, such that perceptual processing enhances memory for emotional information or events. The current fMRI study investigated the neural mechanisms of this effect by testing how neural activations during emotional memory retrieval are influenced by the prior encoding strategy. Participants incidentally encoded emotional and neutral pictures under instructions to attend to either semantic or perceptual properties of each picture. Recognition memory was tested 2 days later. fMRI analyses yielded three main findings. First, right amygdalar activity associated with emotional memory strength was enhanced by prior perceptual processing. Second, prior perceptual processing of emotional pictures produced a stronger effect on recollection- than familiarity-related activations in the right amygdala and left hippocampus. Finally, prior perceptual processing enhanced amygdalar connectivity with regions strongly associated with retrieval success, including hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, visual cortex, and ventral parietal cortex. Taken together, the results specify how encoding orientations yield alterations in brain systems that retrieve emotional memories. PMID:24380867

  14. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing. PMID:27114512

  15. Musical intervention enhances infants’ neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, T. Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants’ neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants’ neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants’ neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants’ ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing. PMID:27114512

  16. Sea clutter reduction and target enhancement by neural networks in a marine radar system.

    PubMed

    Vicen-Bueno, Raúl; Carrasco-Álvarez, Rubén; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Nieto-Borge, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The presence of sea clutter in marine radar signals is sometimes not desired. So, efficient radar signal processing techniques are needed to reduce it. In this way, nonlinear signal processing techniques based on neural networks (NNs) are used in the proposed clutter reduction system. The developed experiments show promising results characterized by different subjective (visual analysis of the processed radar images) and objective (clutter reduction, target enhancement and signal-to-clutter ratio improvement) criteria. Moreover, a deep study of the NN structure is done, where the low computational cost and the high processing speed of the proposed NN structure are emphasized. PMID:22573993

  17. Enhancement of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Spiking Neural Systems with Noise.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko

    2016-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely recognized to support adaptable information processing in the brain. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity, one subtype of plasticity, can lead to synchronous spike propagation with temporal spiking coding information. Recently, it was reported that in a noisy environment, like the actual brain, the spike-timing-dependent plasticity may be made efficient by the effect of stochastic resonance. In the stochastic resonance, the presence of noise helps a nonlinear system in amplifying a weak (under barrier) signal. However, previous studies have ignored the full variety of spiking patterns and many relevant factors in neural dynamics. Thus, in order to prove the physiological possibility for the enhancement of spike-timing-dependent plasticity by stochastic resonance, it is necessary to demonstrate that this stochastic resonance arises in realistic cortical neural systems. In this study, we evaluate this stochastic resonance phenomenon in the realistic cortical neural system described by the Izhikevich neuron model and compare the characteristics of typical spiking patterns of regular spiking, intrinsically bursting and chattering experimentally observed in the cortex. PMID:26678248

  18. Transient Stability Enhancement of Power Systems by Lyapunov-Based Recurrent Neural Networks UPFC Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wei-Neng

    A Lyapunov-based recurrent neural networks unified power flow controller (UPFC) is developed for improving transient stability of power systems. First, a simple UPFC dynamical model, composed of a controllable shunt susceptance on the shunt side and an ideal complex transformer on the series side, is utilized to analyze UPFC dynamical characteristics. Secondly, we study the control configuration of the UPFC with two major blocks: the primary control, and the supplementary control. The primary control is implemented by standard PI techniques when the power system is operated in a normal condition. The supplementary control will be effective only when the power system is subjected by large disturbances. We propose a new Lyapunov-based UPFC controller of the classical single-machine-infinite-bus system for damping enhancement. In order to consider more complicated detailed generator models, we also propose a Lyapunov-based adaptive recurrent neural network controller to deal with such model uncertainties. This controller can be treated as neural network approximations of Lyapunov control actions. In addition, this controller also provides online learning ability to adjust the corresponding weights with the back propagation algorithm built in the hidden layer. The proposed control scheme has been tested on two simple power systems. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is very effective for suppressing power swing even under severe system conditions.

  19. Synthesis of poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog for promoting neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dongming; Ma, Lie; Gao, Changyou

    2014-10-01

    The modification of biodegradable polyesters with bioactive molecules has become an important strategy for controlling neuron adhesion and neurite outgrowth in nerve regeneration. In this study we report a biodegradable poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog, which a neurotransmitter for the enhancement of neuron adhesion and outgrowth. The acetylcholine-functionalized poly(ester-carbonate) (Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)) was prepared by copolymerizing l-lactide (LA) and 5-methyl-5-chloroethoxycarbonyl trimethylene carbonate (ClTMC), followed by quaternization with trimethylamine. The acetylcholine analog content could be modulated by changing the molar feeding fraction of ClTMC. The incorporation of the acetylcholine analog improved the hydrophilicity of the films, but the acetylcholine analog content did not significantly influence the surface morphology of the acetylcholine-functionalized films. The results of PC12 cell culture showed that the acetylcholine analog promoted cell viability and neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. The longest length of neurite and the percentage of cells bearing neurites were obtained on the Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)-10 film. All the results indicate that the integration of the acetylcholine analog at an appropriate fraction could be an effective strategy for optimizing the existing biodegradable polyesters for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:24998182

  20. Polyester with Pendent Acetylcholine-Mimicking Functionalities Promotes Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaofei; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sun, Lijie; You, Zhengwei; Wang, Yadong

    2016-04-20

    Successful regeneration of nerves can benefit from biomaterials that provide a supportive biochemical and mechanical environment while also degrading with controlled inflammation and minimal scar formation. Herein, we report a neuroactive polymer functionalized by covalent attachment of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (Ach). The polymer was readily synthesized in two steps from poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD), which previously demonstrated biocompatibility and biodegradation in vivo. Distinct from prior acetylcholine-biomimetic polymers, PSeD-Ach contains both quaternary ammonium and free acetyl moieties, closely resembling native acetylcholine structure. The polymer structure was confirmed via (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Hydrophilicity, charge, and thermal properties of PSeD-Ach were determined by tensiometer, zetasizer, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. PC12 cells exhibited the greatest proliferation and neurite outgrowth on PSeD-Ach and laminin substrates, with no significant difference between these groups. PSeD-Ach yielded much longer neurite outgrowth than the control polymer containing ammonium but no the acetyl group, confirming the importance of the entire acetylcholine-like moiety. Furthermore, PSeD-Ach supports adhesion of primary rat dorsal root ganglions and subsequent neurite sprouting and extension. The sprouting rate is comparable to the best conditions from previous report. Our findings are significant in that they were obtained with acetylcholine-like functionalities in 100% repeating units, a condition shown to yield significant toxicity in prior publications. Moreover, PSeD-Ach exhibited favorable mechanical and degradation properties for nerve tissue engineering application. Humidified PSeD-Ach had an elastic modulus of 76.9 kPa, close to native neural tissue, and could well recover from cyclic dynamic compression. PSeD-Ach showed a gradual in

  1. Differential effects of subtype-specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on early and late hippocampal LTP.

    PubMed

    Kroker, Katja S; Rast, Georg; Rosenbrock, Holger

    2011-12-01

    Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in several neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety. Currently, approaches selectively targeting the activation of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are in clinical development for treatment of memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease patients. These are α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists which are believed to enhance cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. In order to gain a better insight into the mechanistic role of these two nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in learning and memory, we investigated the effects of the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist TC-1827 and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular experimental model of memory formation. Generally, LTP is distinguished in an early and a late form, the former being protein-synthesis independent and the latter being protein-synthesis dependent. TC-1827 was found to increase early LTP in a bell-shaped dose dependent manner, but did not affect late LTP. In contrast, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 showed enhancing effects on both early and late LTP in a bell-shaped manner. Furthermore, SSR180711 not only increased early LTP, but also transformed it into late LTP, which was not observed with the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. Therefore, based on these findings α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (partial) agonists appear to exhibit stronger efficacy on memory improvement than α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. PMID:21968142

  2. STAT3 modulation to enhance motor neuron differentiation in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Rajalaxmi; Singal, Vinamrata; Benes, Richard; Gao, Junling; Chan, Hoi; Chen, Haijun; Yu, Yongjia; Zhou, Jia; Wu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis damages spinal motor neurons and forms a glial scar, which prevents neural regeneration. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a critical role in astrogliogenesis and scar formation, and thus a fine modulation of STAT3 signaling may help to control the excessive gliogenic environment and enhance neural repair. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of STAT3 inhibition on human neural stem cells (hNSCs). In vitro hNSCs primed with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) exhibited a lower level of phosphorylated STAT3 than cells primed by epidermal growth factor (EGF), which correlated with a higher number of motor neurons differentiated from FGF2-primed hNSCs. Treatment with STAT3 inhibitors, Stattic and Niclosamide, enhanced motor neuron differentiation only in FGF2-primed hNSCs, as shown by increased homeobox gene Hb9 mRNA levels as well as HB9+ and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)+ co-labeled cells. The increased motor neuron differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. Interestingly, Stattic and Niclosamide did not affect the level of STAT3 phosphorylation; rather, they perturbed the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3. In summary, we demonstrate that FGF2 is required for motor neuron differentiation from hNSCs and that inhibition of STAT3 further increases motor neuron differentiation at the expense of astrogliogenesis. Our study thus suggests a potential benefit of targeting the STAT3 pathway for neurotrauma or neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24945434

  3. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    PubMed Central

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning as an alternate model for behavioral facilitation. We examined the neural basis of RP during mathematical problem solving in the context of these two models of learning. Brain imaging and behavioral data were acquired from 39 adults during novel and repeated presentation of three-operand mathematical equations. Despite widespread decreases in activation during repeat, compared with novel trials, there was no direct relation between behavioral facilitation and the degree of repetition suppression in any brain region. Rather, RT improvements were directly correlated with repetition enhancement in the hippocampus and the postero-medial cortex [posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and retro-splenial cortex; Brodmann’s areas (BAs) 23, 7, and 30, respectively], regions known to support memory formation and retrieval, and in the SMA (BA 6) and the dorsal midcingulate (“motor cingulate”) cortex (BA 24d), regions known to be important for motor learning. Furthermore, improvements in RT were also correlated with increased functional connectivity of the hippocampus with both the SMA and the dorsal midcingulate cortex. Our findings provide novel support for the hypothesis that repetition enhancement and associated stimulus-response learning may facilitate behavioral performance during problem solving. PMID:19366289

  4. Laminin enhances the growth of human neural stem cells in defined culture media

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Peter E; Lathia, Justin D; Caldwell, Maeve A; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Background Human neural stem cells (hNSC) have the potential to provide novel cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. In order to realise this goal, protocols need to be developed that allow for large quantities of hNSC to be cultured efficiently. As such, it is important to identify factors which enhance the growth of hNSC. In vivo, stem cells reside in distinct microenvironments or niches that are responsible for the maintenance of stem cell populations. A common feature of niches is the presence of the extracellular matrix molecule, laminin. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of exogenous laminin on hNSC growth. Results To measure hNSC growth, we established culture conditions using B27-supplemented medium that enable neurospheres to grow from human neural cells plated at clonal densities. Limiting dilution assays confirmed that neurospheres were derived from single cells at these densities. Laminin was found to increase hNSC numbers as measured by this neurosphere formation. The effect of laminin was to augment the proliferation/survival of the hNSC, rather than promoting the undifferentiated state. In agreement, apoptosis was reduced in dissociated neurospheres by laminin in an integrin β1-dependent manner. Conclusion The addition of laminin to the culture medium enhances the growth of hNSC, and may therefore aid their large-scale production. PMID:18651950

  5. Neural coordination can be enhanced by occasional interruption of normal firing patterns: a self-optimizing spiking neural network model.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Alexander; Froese, Tom; Ikegami, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The state space of a conventional Hopfield network typically exhibits many different attractors of which only a small subset satisfies constraints between neurons in a globally optimal fashion. It has recently been demonstrated that combining Hebbian learning with occasional alterations of normal neural states avoids this problem by means of self-organized enlargement of the best basins of attraction. However, so far it is not clear to what extent this process of self-optimization is also operative in real brains. Here we demonstrate that it can be transferred to more biologically plausible neural networks by implementing a self-optimizing spiking neural network model. In addition, by using this spiking neural network to emulate a Hopfield network with Hebbian learning, we attempt to make a connection between rate-based and temporal coding based neural systems. Although further work is required to make this model more realistic, it already suggests that the efficacy of the self-optimizing process is independent from the simplifying assumptions of a conventional Hopfield network. We also discuss natural and cultural processes that could be responsible for occasional alteration of neural firing patterns in actual brains. PMID:25257715

  6. Progranulin enhances neural progenitor cell proliferation through glycogen synthase kinase 3β phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nedachi, T; Kawai, T; Matsuwaki, T; Yamanouchi, K; Nishihara, M

    2011-06-30

    Progranulin (PGRN) is an estrogen-inducible growth factor thought to affect multiple processes in the CNS, including brain sexual differentiation, adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and development of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the precise physiological functions of PGRN in individual nerve cells are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to enhance the understanding of PGRN function in the CNS by investigating the effects of PGRN on neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We found that significant amounts of endogenous PGRN were secreted from isolated NPCs in cultures. To assess the bioactivities of endogenous and exogenous PGRN, we studied NPCs derived from wild-type mice (WT-NPCs) and PGRN-deficient mice (KO-NPCs). We found that proliferation of KO-NPCs was significantly enhanced by PGRN treatment; however, PGRN treatment apparently did not affect proliferation of WT-NPCs perhaps because of the high levels of endogenous PGRN expression. NPC death and asymmetric cellular division of KO-NPCs and WT-NPCs, which results in production of neural stem cells, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes, were not affected by PGRN treatment. We also investigated the signaling mechanism(s) that mediate PGRN-induced NPC proliferation and found that phosphorylation of serine 9 (S9) of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3β), which was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, was induced by PGRN treatment. In addition, a GSK3β-specific inhibitor enhanced NPC proliferation. Taken together, our observations indicate that PGRN enhanced NPC proliferation, at least in part, via inducing GSK3β phosphorylation. PMID:21540081

  7. An enhanced two-step-ahead recurrent neural network for prediction of inflow in reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Chang, L.; Chang, F.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate prediction of the inflow in a reservoir is crucial to optimizing the management of water resources. In our last study, an algorithm for two-step-ahead forecasting based on a real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) neural network has been devised and successfully applied to flow forecasting. Whereas, this algorithm still can be enhanced on account of time lag phenomenon during synaptic weight updating process. The main purpose of this study was to derive an enhanced two-step-ahead RTRL algorithm. To evaluate the properties of the enhanced two-step-ahead RTRL algorithm, its predictive ability was firstly compared with the original two-step-ahead RTRL algorithm on several synthetic time-series. Then, the enhanced two-step-ahead RTRL network was investigated by using the rainfall-runoff data of the Shihmen Reservoir in Taiwan. All the results show that the enhanced RTRL network has much better performance on time series than the original RTRL network where the time-shift problem has been significantly reduced, especially in the recession limb of two-step-ahead stream flow forecast cases.

  8. α4α6β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation on Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons Is Sufficient to Stimulate a Depolarizing Conductance and Enhance Surface AMPA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Staci E.; Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a serious threat to public health in the United States and abroad, and development of new therapeutic approaches is a major priority. Nicotine activates and/or desensitizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the brain. nAChRs in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons are crucial for the rewarding and reinforcing properties of nicotine in rodents, suggesting that they may be key mediators of nicotine’s action in humans. However, it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are sufficient to activate these neurons. To test the hypothesis that nAChRs containing α6 subunits are sufficient to activate VTA DA neurons, we studied mice expressing hypersensitive, gain-of-function α6 nAChRs (α6L9′S mice). In voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices from adult mice, 100 nM nicotine was sufficient to elicit inward currents in VTA DA neurons via α6β2* nAChRs. In addition, we found that low concentrations of nicotine could act selectively through α6β2* nAChRs to enhance the function of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (AMPA) receptors on the surface of these cells. In contrast, α6β2* activation did not enhance N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor function. Finally, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function was not similarly enhanced in brain slices from α6L9′S mice lacking α4 nAChR subunits, suggesting that α4α6β2* nAChRs are important for enhancing AMPAR function in VTA DA neurons. Together, these data suggest that activation of α4α6β2* nAChRs in VTA DA neurons is sufficient to support the initiation of cellular changes that play a role in addiction to nicotine. α4α6β2* nAChRs may be a promising target for future smoking cessation pharmacotherapy. PMID:23788655

  9. Enhanced emotion regulation capacity and its neural substrates in those exposed to moderate childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Susanne; Walsh, Nicholas D; Stretton, Jason; Dunn, Valerie J; Goodyer, Ian M; Dalgleish, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Individuals exposed to childhood adversities (CA) present with emotion regulation (ER) difficulties in later life, which have been identified as risk and maintenance factors for psychopathologies. However, it is unclear if CA negatively impacts on ER capacity per se or whether observed regulation difficulties are a function of the challenging circumstances in which ER is being deployed. In this longitudinal study, we aimed to clarify this association by investigating the behavioral and neural effects of exposure to common moderate CA (mCA) on a laboratory measure of ER capacity in late adolescence/young adulthood. Our population-derived samples of adolescents/young adults (N = 53) were administered a film-based ER-task during functional magnetic resonance imaging that allowed evaluation of ER across mCA-exposure. mCA-exposure was associated with enhanced ER capacity over both positive and negative affect. At the neural level, the better ER of negative material in those exposed to mCA was associated with reduced recruitment of ER-related brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex and temporal gyrus. In addition mCA-exposure was associated with a greater down-regulation of the amygdala during ER of negative material. The implications of these findings for our understanding of the effects of mCA on the emergence of resilience in adolescence are discussed. PMID:26341903

  10. Immersive audiomotor game play enhances neural and perceptual salience of weak signals in noise

    PubMed Central

    Whitton, Jonathon P.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Polley, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    All sensory systems face the fundamental challenge of encoding weak signals in noisy backgrounds. Although discrimination abilities can improve with practice, these benefits rarely generalize to untrained stimulus dimensions. Inspired by recent findings that action video game training can impart a broader spectrum of benefits than traditional perceptual learning paradigms, we trained adult humans and mice in an immersive audio game that challenged them to forage for hidden auditory targets in a 2D soundscape. Both species learned to modulate their angular search vectors and target approach velocities based on real-time changes in the level of a weak tone embedded in broadband noise. In humans, mastery of this tone in noise task generalized to an improved ability to comprehend spoken sentences in speech babble noise. Neural plasticity in the auditory cortex of trained mice supported improved decoding of low-intensity sounds at the training frequency and an enhanced resistance to interference from background masking noise. These findings highlight the potential to improve the neural and perceptual salience of degraded sensory stimuli through immersive computerized games. PMID:24927596

  11. Enhanced emotion regulation capacity and its neural substrates in those exposed to moderate childhood adversity

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Susanne; Walsh, Nicholas D.; Stretton, Jason; Dunn, Valerie J.; Goodyer, Ian M.; Dalgleish, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Individuals exposed to childhood adversities (CA) present with emotion regulation (ER) difficulties in later life, which have been identified as risk and maintenance factors for psychopathologies. However, it is unclear if CA negatively impacts on ER capacity per se or whether observed regulation difficulties are a function of the challenging circumstances in which ER is being deployed. In this longitudinal study, we aimed to clarify this association by investigating the behavioral and neural effects of exposure to common moderate CA (mCA) on a laboratory measure of ER capacity in late adolescence/young adulthood. Our population-derived samples of adolescents/young adults (N = 53) were administered a film-based ER-task during functional magnetic resonance imaging that allowed evaluation of ER across mCA-exposure. mCA-exposure was associated with enhanced ER capacity over both positive and negative affect. At the neural level, the better ER of negative material in those exposed to mCA was associated with reduced recruitment of ER-related brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex and temporal gyrus. In addition mCA-exposure was associated with a greater down-regulation of the amygdala during ER of negative material. The implications of these findings for our understanding of the effects of mCA on the emergence of resilience in adolescence are discussed. PMID:26341903

  12. Tuning to the significant: neural and genetic processes underlying affective enhancement of visual perception and memory.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Jelena; Anderson, Adam K; Todd, Rebecca M

    2014-02-01

    Emotionally arousing events reach awareness more easily and evoke greater visual cortex activation than more mundane events. Recent studies have shown that they are also perceived more vividly and that emotionally enhanced perceptual vividness predicts memory vividness. We propose that affect-biased attention (ABA) - selective attention to emotionally salient events - is an endogenous attentional system tuned by an individual's history of reward and punishment. We present the Biased Attention via Norepinephrine (BANE) model, which unifies genetic, neuromodulatory, neural and behavioural evidence to account for ABA. We review evidence supporting BANE's proposal that a key mechanism of ABA is locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) activity, which interacts with activity in hubs of affective salience networks to modulate visual cortex activation and heighten the subjective vividness of emotionally salient stimuli. We further review literature on biased competition and look at initial evidence for its potential as a neural mechanism behind ABA. We also review evidence supporting the role of the LC-NE system as a driving force of ABA. Finally, we review individual differences in ABA and memory including differences in sensitivity to stimulus category and valence. We focus on differences arising from a variant of the ADRA2b gene, which codes for the alpha2b adrenoreceptor as a way of investigating influences of NE availability on ABA in humans. PMID:24269973

  13. Immersive audiomotor game play enhances neural and perceptual salience of weak signals in noise.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Jonathon P; Hancock, Kenneth E; Polley, Daniel B

    2014-06-24

    All sensory systems face the fundamental challenge of encoding weak signals in noisy backgrounds. Although discrimination abilities can improve with practice, these benefits rarely generalize to untrained stimulus dimensions. Inspired by recent findings that action video game training can impart a broader spectrum of benefits than traditional perceptual learning paradigms, we trained adult humans and mice in an immersive audio game that challenged them to forage for hidden auditory targets in a 2D soundscape. Both species learned to modulate their angular search vectors and target approach velocities based on real-time changes in the level of a weak tone embedded in broadband noise. In humans, mastery of this tone in noise task generalized to an improved ability to comprehend spoken sentences in speech babble noise. Neural plasticity in the auditory cortex of trained mice supported improved decoding of low-intensity sounds at the training frequency and an enhanced resistance to interference from background masking noise. These findings highlight the potential to improve the neural and perceptual salience of degraded sensory stimuli through immersive computerized games. PMID:24927596

  14. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs. PMID:19580981

  15. Simvastatin Enhances Spatial Memory and Long-Term Potentiation in Hippocampal CA1 via Upregulation of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Wang, Conghui; Sha, Sha; Zhou, Libin; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Simvastatin (SV) has been reported to improve cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that chronic administration of SV (20 mg/kg) for 30 days in adult mice (SV mice) enhanced spatial cognitive performance as assessed by Morris water maze and Y-maze. To explore mechanisms underlying SV-enhanced spatial cognition, we further examined synaptic properties and long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal CA1, hippocampal α7nAChR expression, and Akt and ERK2 phosphorylation. In comparison with controls, the SV administration caused increase in presynaptic glutamate release and amplitude of NMDAr-dependent LTP (LTP-augmentation), and decrease in threshold of NMDAr-independent LTP induction (LTP-facilitation). The supplement of isoprenoid farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) by applying farnesol (FOH) could abolish the spatial cognitive potentiation, increased glutamate release, and LTP-augmentation/facilitation in SV mice. Expression of α7nAChR, but not α4β2nAChR, was increased in hippocampal pyramidal cells of SV mice with the reduction of transcription factor AP-2α, which were abolished by FOH. Levels of Akt and ERK2 phosphorylation in SV mice were elevated, which were suppressed by FOH or α7nAChR antagonist methyl-lycaconitine (MLA). In hippocampal slices obtained from SV mice, acute perfusion of MLA blocked the increased glutamate release, whereas FOH, PI3K inhibitor LY294002, or MEK inhibitor U0126 could not. In the slices of SV mice, the perfusion of MLA or U0126, but not FOH, abolished the LTP-augmentation and LTP-facilitation. By contrast, LY294002 prevented the LTP-facilitation but failed to affect the LTP-augmentation. The findings indicate that the administration of SV through reducing FPP increases α7nAChR expression and α7nAChR-related Akt and ERK2 phosphorylation, leading to LTP enhancement and spatial cognitive potentiation. PMID:26198568

  16. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  17. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  18. Pharmacology of some acetylcholine homologues

    PubMed Central

    Barrass, B. C.; Brimblecombe, R. W.; Rich, P.; Taylor, Joan V.

    1970-01-01

    1. The acetates of several long chain (3 to 12 methylene groups) analogues of choline have been prepared and their pharmacological properties studied. 2. None of the compounds had a high level of activity at the post-ganglionic parasympathetic acetylcholine receptors. The lower members of the series showed weak agonist activity and the homologues with 8 to 10 methylene groups had very weak anticholinergic activity. 3. All the compounds had a depolarizing action at the acetylcholine receptors of the neuromuscular junction and of sympathetic ganglia. At the neuromuscular junction there were two peaks of stimulant activity, one with the hexamethylene and one with the dodecamethylene homologue, whereas at the ganglion there was only one peak, with the hexamethylene homologue. 4. The ganglion-stimulant activity of the higher members of the series was blocked by pretreatment with the anticholinesterase drug dyflos, whereas the activity of lower members was either unaffected by such treatment or slightly potentiated. 5. The results are discussed in terms of possible spatial arrangements of acetylcholine receptor units in the neuromuscular junction and the ganglion. PMID:5420144

  19. Metformin Acts on Two Different Molecular Pathways to Enhance Adult Neural Precursor Proliferation/Self-Renewal and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fatt, Michael; Hsu, Karolynn; He, Ling; Wondisford, Fredric; Miller, Freda D.; Kaplan, David R.; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recruitment of endogenous adult neural stem cells for brain repair is a promising regenerative therapeutic strategy. This strategy involves stimulation of multiple stages of adult neural stem cell development, including proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. Currently, there is a lack of a single therapeutic approach that can act on these multiple stages of adult neural stem cell development to enhance neural regeneration. Here we show that metformin, an FDA-approved diabetes drug, promotes proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation of adult neural precursors (NPCs). Specifically, we show that metformin enhances adult NPC proliferation and self-renewal dependent upon the p53 family member and transcription factor TAp73, while it promotes neuronal differentiation of these cells by activating the AMPK-aPKC-CBP pathway. Thus, metformin represents an optimal candidate neuro-regenerative agent that is capable of not only expanding the adult NPC population but also subsequently driving them toward neuronal differentiation by activating two distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26677765

  20. Speech dereverberation for enhancement and recognition using dynamic features constrained deep neural networks and feature adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiong; Zhao, Shengkui; Ha Nguyen, Duc Hoang; Zhong, Xionghu; Jones, Douglas L.; Chng, Eng Siong; Li, Haizhou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates deep neural networks (DNN) based on nonlinear feature mapping and statistical linear feature adaptation approaches for reducing reverberation in speech signals. In the nonlinear feature mapping approach, DNN is trained from parallel clean/distorted speech corpus to map reverberant and noisy speech coefficients (such as log magnitude spectrum) to the underlying clean speech coefficients. The constraint imposed by dynamic features (i.e., the time derivatives of the speech coefficients) are used to enhance the smoothness of predicted coefficient trajectories in two ways. One is to obtain the enhanced speech coefficients with a least square estimation from the coefficients and dynamic features predicted by DNN. The other is to incorporate the constraint of dynamic features directly into the DNN training process using a sequential cost function. In the linear feature adaptation approach, a sparse linear transform, called cross transform, is used to transform multiple frames of speech coefficients to a new feature space. The transform is estimated to maximize the likelihood of the transformed coefficients given a model of clean speech coefficients. Unlike the DNN approach, no parallel corpus is used and no assumption on distortion types is made. The two approaches are evaluated on the REVERB Challenge 2014 tasks. Both speech enhancement and automatic speech recognition (ASR) results show that the DNN-based mappings significantly reduce the reverberation in speech and improve both speech quality and ASR performance. For the speech enhancement task, the proposed dynamic feature constraint help to improve cepstral distance, frequency-weighted segmental signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and log likelihood ratio metrics while moderately degrades the speech-to-reverberation modulation energy ratio. In addition, the cross transform feature adaptation improves the ASR performance significantly for clean-condition trained acoustic models.

  1. A new paradigm of electrical stimulation to enhance sensory neural function.

    PubMed

    Breen, Paul P; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; McIntosh, Caroline; Dinneen, Sean F; Quinlan, Leo R; Serrador, Jorge M

    2014-08-01

    The ability to improve peripheral neural transmission would have significant therapeutic potential in medicine. A technology of this kind could be used to restore and/or enhance sensory function in individuals with depressed sensory function, such as older adults or patients with peripheral neuropathies. The goal of this study was to investigate if a new paradigm of subsensory electrical noise stimulation enhances somatosensory function. Vibration (50Hz) was applied with a Neurothesiometer to the plantar aspect of the foot in the presence or absence of subsensory electrical noise (1/f type). The noise was applied at a proximal site, on a defined region of the tibial nerve path above the ankle. Vibration perception thresholds (VPT) of younger adults were measured in control and experimental conditions, in the absence or presence of noise respectively. An improvement of ∼16% in VPT was found in the presence of noise. These are the first data to demonstrate that modulation of axonal transmission with externally applied electrical noise improves perception of tactile stimuli in humans. PMID:24894033

  2. Musicians' Enhanced Neural Differentiation of Speech Sounds Arises Early in Life: Developmental Evidence from Ages 3 to 30

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Dana L.; O'Connell, Samantha; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The perception and neural representation of acoustically similar speech sounds underlie language development. Music training hones the perception of minute acoustic differences that distinguish sounds; this training may generalize to speech processing given that adult musicians have enhanced neural differentiation of similar speech syllables compared with nonmusicians. Here, we asked whether this neural advantage in musicians is present early in life by assessing musically trained and untrained children as young as age 3. We assessed auditory brainstem responses to the speech syllables /ba/ and /ga/ as well as auditory and visual cognitive abilities in musicians and nonmusicians across 3 developmental time-points: preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Cross-phase analyses objectively measured the degree to which subcortical responses differed to these speech syllables in musicians and nonmusicians for each age group. Results reveal that musicians exhibit enhanced neural differentiation of stop consonants early in life and with as little as a few years of training. Furthermore, the extent of subcortical stop consonant distinction correlates with auditory-specific cognitive abilities (i.e., auditory working memory and attention). Results are interpreted according to a corticofugal framework for auditory learning in which subcortical processing enhancements are engendered by strengthened cognitive control over auditory function in musicians. PMID:23599166

  3. Musicians' enhanced neural differentiation of speech sounds arises early in life: developmental evidence from ages 3 to 30.

    PubMed

    Strait, Dana L; O'Connell, Samantha; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Kraus, Nina

    2014-09-01

    The perception and neural representation of acoustically similar speech sounds underlie language development. Music training hones the perception of minute acoustic differences that distinguish sounds; this training may generalize to speech processing given that adult musicians have enhanced neural differentiation of similar speech syllables compared with nonmusicians. Here, we asked whether this neural advantage in musicians is present early in life by assessing musically trained and untrained children as young as age 3. We assessed auditory brainstem responses to the speech syllables /ba/ and /ga/ as well as auditory and visual cognitive abilities in musicians and nonmusicians across 3 developmental time-points: preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults. Cross-phase analyses objectively measured the degree to which subcortical responses differed to these speech syllables in musicians and nonmusicians for each age group. Results reveal that musicians exhibit enhanced neural differentiation of stop consonants early in life and with as little as a few years of training. Furthermore, the extent of subcortical stop consonant distinction correlates with auditory-specific cognitive abilities (i.e., auditory working memory and attention). Results are interpreted according to a corticofugal framework for auditory learning in which subcortical processing enhancements are engendered by strengthened cognitive control over auditory function in musicians. PMID:23599166

  4. The neural mechanisms underlying the aging-related enhancement of positive affects: electrophysiological evidences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianxin; Yang, Jiemin; Cai, AYan; Ding, XinSheng; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Hong; Yuan, JiaJin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that old adults, relative to young adults, showed improvement of emotional stability and increased experiences of positive affects. Methods: In order to better understand the neural underpinnings behind the aging-related enhancement of positive affects, it is necessary to investigate whether old and young adults differ in the threshold of eliciting positive or negative emotional reactions. However, no studies have examined emotional reaction differences between old and young adults by manipulating the intensity of emotional stimuli to date. To clarify this issue, the present study examined the impact of aging on the brain’s susceptibility to affective pictures of varying emotional intensities. We recorded event-related potentials (ERP) for highly negative (HN), mildly negative (MN) and neutral pictures in the negative experimental block; and for highly positive (HP), mildly positive (MP) and neutral pictures in the positive experimental block, when young and old adults were required to count the number of pictures, irrespective of the emotionality of the pictures. Results: Event-related potentials results showed that LPP (late positive potentials) amplitudes were larger for HN and MN stimuli compared to neutral stimuli in young adults, but not in old adults. By contrast, old adults displayed larger LPP amplitudes for HP and MP relative to neutral stimuli, while these effects were absent for young adults. In addition, old adults reported more frequent perception of positive stimuli and less frequent perception of negative stimuli than young adults. The post-experiment stimulus assessment showed more positive ratings of Neutral and MP stimuli, and reduced arousal ratings of HN stimuli in old compared to young adults. Conclusion: These results suggest that old adults are more resistant to the impact of negative stimuli, while they are equipped with enhanced attentional bias for positive stimuli. The implications of these results

  5. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M.; DeSimone, John A.; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. PMID:26039516

  6. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, Christopher J.; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M.; Davis, Jason A.; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system. PMID:26980066

  7. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M; Davis, Jason A; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system. PMID:26980066

  8. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  9. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA. PMID:27380048

  10. Enhanced proliferation of PC12 neural cells on untreated, nanotextured glass coverslips.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhymin; Atmaramani, Rahul; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Santaneel; Iqbal, Samir M

    2016-10-14

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system is a significant health problem. There is no effective treatment available partly because of the complexity of the system. Implementation of multifunctional micro- and nano-device based combinatorial therapeutics can provide biocompatible and tunable approaches to perform on-demand release of specific drugs. This can help the damaged cells to improve neuronal survival, regeneration of axons, and their reconnection to appropriate targets. Nano-topological features induced rapid cell growth is especially important towards the design of effective platforms to facilitate damaged neural circuit reconstruction. In this study, for the first time, feasibility of neuron-like PC12 cell growth on untreated and easy to prepare nanotextured surfaces has been carried out. The PC12 neuron-like cells were cultured on micro reactive ion etched  nanotextured glass coverslips. The effect of nanotextured topology as physical cue for the growth of PC12 cells was observed exclusively, eliminating the possible influence(s) of the enhanced concentration of coated materials on the surface. The cell density was observed to increase by almost 200% on nanotextured coverslips compared to plain coverslips. The morphology study indicated that PC12 cell attachment and growth on the nanotextured substrates did not launch any apoptotic machinery of the cell. Less than 5% cells deformed and depicted condensed nuclei with apoptotic bodies on nanotextured surfaces which is typical for the normal cell handling and culture. Enhanced PC12 cell proliferation by such novel and easy to prepare substrates is not only attractive for neurite outgrowth and guidance, but may be used to increase the affinity of similar cancerous cells (ex: B35 neuroblastoma) and rapid proliferation thereafter-towards the development of combinatorial theranostics to diagnose and treat aggressive cancers like neuroblastoma. PMID:27587351

  11. Enhanced Neural Responses to Imagined Primary Rewards Predict Reduced Monetary Temporal Discounting.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Shabnam; Hare, Todd A

    2015-09-23

    The pervasive tendency to discount the value of future rewards varies considerably across individuals and has important implications for health and well-being. Here, we used fMRI with human participants to examine whether an individual's neural representation of an imagined primary reward predicts the degree to which the value of delayed monetary payments is discounted. Because future rewards can never be experienced at the time of choice, imagining or simulating the benefits of a future reward may play a critical role in decisions between alternatives with either immediate or delayed benefits. We found that enhanced ventromedial prefrontal cortex response during imagined primary reward receipt was correlated with reduced discounting in a separate monetary intertemporal choice task. Furthermore, activity in enhanced ventromedial prefrontal cortex during reward imagination predicted temporal discounting behavior both between- and within-individual decision makers with 62% and 73% mean balanced accuracy, respectively. These results suggest that the quality of reward imagination may impact the degree to which future outcomes are discounted. Significance statement: We report a novel test of the hypothesis that an important factor influencing the discount rate for future rewards is the quality with which they are imagined or estimated in the present. Previous work has shown that temporal discounting is linked to individual characteristics ranging from general intelligence to the propensity for addiction. We demonstrate that individual differences in a neurobiological measure of primary reward imagination are significantly correlated with discounting rates for future monetary payments. Moreover, our neurobiological measure of imagination can be used to accurately predict choice behavior both between and within individuals. These results suggest that improving reward imagination may be a useful therapeutic target for individuals whose high discount rates promote

  12. Neuromodulation by acetylcholine: examples from schizophrenia and depression.

    PubMed

    Higley, Michael J; Picciotto, Marina R

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of acetylcholine to psychiatric illnesses remains an area of active research. For example, increased understanding of mechanisms underlying cholinergic modulation of cortical function has provided insight into attentional dysfunction in schizophrenia. Acetylcholine normally enhances cortical sensitivity to external stimuli and decreases corticocortical communication, increasing focused attention; however, increases in ACh signaling can lead to symptoms related to anxiety and depression. For example, while stress-induced ACh release can result in adaptive responses to environmental stimuli, chronic elevations in cholinergic signaling may produce maladaptive behaviors. Here, we review several innovations in human imaging, molecular genetics and physiological control of circuits that have begun to identify mechanisms linking altered cholinergic neuromodulation to schizophrenia and depression. PMID:24983212

  13. The Speckle Noise Reduction and the Boundary Enhancement on Medical Ultrasound Images using the Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunkyung; Miyazaki, Ryota; Nishimura, Toshihiro; Tamaki, Yasuhiro

    The purpose is to remove the speckle noise and to emphasize the boundary of a tumor by filtering based on the intensity difference in the medical ultrasound images. The proposed method is evaluated using numerical phantom simulating ultrasound B-mode images, and the effect is confirmed by applying to medical ultrasound images. Therefore, some important features such as tissue boundaries and small tumors may be overlooked. A CNN (cellular neural networks) for the speckle reduction and the edge enhancement are proposed in this paper. A CNN which is a kind of recurrent neural network can deal with images by the weight of neurons called a cell. It could be obtained more detail images recognition compared with the previous studies. A determination template parameters of the CNN for ultrasound image processing is discussed. The experimental results show effectiveness of applying the proposed method to boundary enhancement and the speckle reduction of medical ultrasound image.

  14. Using Neural Net Technology To Enhance the Efficiency of a Computer Adaptive Testing Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nelson, C.; Henriksen, Larry W.

    The potential for computer adaptive testing (CAT) has been well documented. In order to improve the efficiency of this process, it may be possible to utilize a neural network, or more specifically, a back propagation neural network. The paper asserts that in order to accomplish this end, it must be shown that grouping examinees by ability as…

  15. Spaced Learning Enhances Subsequent Recognition Memory by Reducing Neural Repetition Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Poldrack, Russell; Dong, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Spaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half…

  16. The selectivity of noise and coupling for coherence biresonance and array-enhanced coherence biresonance in coupled neural systems.

    PubMed

    Shi, JianCheng; Luo, Min; Dong, Tao

    2009-11-01

    The selectivity of noise and coupling for coherence biresonance (CBR) and array-enhanced coherence biresonance (AECBR) in coupled neural systems has been investigated. It is shown that, depending on the coupling strength and noise intensity, various coherence behaviors and phenomena are exhibited, including CBR, coherence resonance without tuning, AECBR and undamped signal transmission. There exist optimal coupling and noise regions for the occurrence of CBR and AECBR in the transmission of noise-induced oscillations (NIOs). PMID:19615426

  17. Optogenetic Stimulation of Neural Grafts Enhances Neurotransmission and Downregulates the Inflammatory Response in Experimental Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Daadi, Marcel M; Klausner, Jill Q; Bajar, Bryce; Goshen, Inbal; Lee-Messer, Christopher; Lee, Soo Yeun; Winge, Mårten C G; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Lo, Maisie; Sun, Guohua; Deisseroth, Karl; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) from multiple sources ameliorates motor deficits after stroke. However, it is currently unknown to what extent the electrophysiological activity of grafted NSC progeny participates in the improvement of motor deficits and whether excitatory phenotypes of the grafted cells are beneficial or deleterious to sensorimotor performances. To address this question, we used optogenetic tools to drive the excitatory outputs of the grafted NSCs and assess the impact on local circuitry and sensorimotor performance. We genetically engineered NSCs to express the Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), a light-gated cation channel that evokes neuronal depolarization and initiation of action potentials with precise temporal control to light stimulation. To test the function of these cells in a stroke model, rats were subjected to an ischemic stroke and grafted with ChR2-NSCs. The grafted NSCs identified with a human-specific nuclear marker survived in the peri-infarct tissue and coexpressed the ChR2 transgene with the neuronal markers TuJ1 and NeuN. Gene expression analysis in stimulated versus vehicle-treated animals showed a differential upregulation of transcripts involved in neurotransmission, neuronal differentiation, regeneration, axonal guidance, and synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, genes involved in the inflammatory response were significantly downregulated. Behavioral analysis demonstrated that chronic optogenetic stimulation of the ChR2-NSCs enhanced forelimb use on the stroke-affected side and motor activity in an open field test. Together these data suggest that excitatory stimulation of grafted NSCs elicits beneficial effects in experimental stroke model through cell replacement and non-cell replacement, anti-inflammatory/neurotrophic effects. PMID:26132738

  18. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and cancer

    PubMed Central

    DANG, NINGNING; MENG, XIANGUANG; SONG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine, the primary addictive constituent of cigarettes, is believed to contribute to cancer promotion and progression through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are membrane ligand-gated cation channels. nAChRs activation can be triggered by the neurotransmitter Ach, or certain other biological compounds, such as nicotine. In recent years, genome-wide association studies have indicated that allelic variation in the α5-α3-β4 nAChR cluster on chromosome 15q24-15q25.1 is associated with lung cancer risk. The role of nAChRs in other types of cancer has also been reported. The present review highlights the role of nAChRs in types of human cancer. PMID:27123240

  19. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-01-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  20. Galantamine-induced amyloid-{beta} clearance mediated via stimulation of microglial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Saeki, Mana; Terada, Maki; Kagitani, Sachiko; Kitamura, Risa; Fujikawa, Yasuhiro; Maelicke, Alfred; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shimohama, Shun

    2010-12-17

    Reduction of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) has been proposed as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease (AD), and microglial Aβ phagocytosis is noted as an Aβ clearance system in brains. Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for symptomatic treatment of AD. Galantamine also acts as an allosterically potentiating ligand (APL) for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). APL-binding site is located close to but distinct from that for acetylcholine on nAChRs, and FK1 antibody specifically binds to the APL-binding site without interfering with the acetylcholine-binding site. We found that in human AD brain, microglia accumulated on Aβ deposits and expressed α7 nAChRs including the APL-binding site recognized with FK1 antibody. Treatment of rat microglia with galantamine significantly enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis, and acetylcholine competitive antagonists as well as FK1 antibody inhibited the enhancement. Thus, the galantamine-enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis required the combined actions of an acetylcholine competitive agonist and the APL for nAChRs. Indeed, depletion of choline, an acetylcholine-competitive α7 nAChR agonist, from the culture medium impeded the enhancement. Similarly, Ca(2+) depletion or inhibition of the calmodulin-dependent pathways for the actin reorganization abolished the enhancement. These results suggest that galantamine sensitizes microglial α7 nAChRs to choline and induces Ca(2+) influx into microglia. The Ca(2+)-induced intracellular signaling cascades may then stimulate Aβ phagocytosis through the actin reorganization. We further demonstrated that galantamine treatment facilitated Aβ clearance in brains of rodent AD models. In conclusion, we propose a further advantage of galantamine in clinical AD treatment and microglial nAChRs as a new therapeutic target. PMID:20947502

  1. The Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus in Trace Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Raybuck, J. D.; Gould, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Acute nicotine enhances multiple types of learning including trace fear conditioning but the underlying neural substrates of these effects are not well understood. Trace fear conditioning critically involves the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, which both express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Therefore, nicotine could act in either or both areas to enhance trace fear conditioning. To identify the underlying neural areas and nAChR subtypes, we examined the effects of infusion of nicotine, or nicotinic antagonists dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHβE: high-affinity nAChRs) or methyllycaconitine (MLA: low-affinity nAChRs) into the dorsal hippocampus, ventral hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) on trace and contextual fear conditioning. We found that the effects of nicotine on trace and contextual fear conditioning vary by brain region and nAChR subtype. The dorsal hippocampus was involved in the effects of nicotine on both trace and contextual fear conditioning but each task was sensitive to different doses of nicotine. Additionally, dorsal hippocampal infusion of the antagonist DHβE produced deficits in trace but not contextual fear conditioning. Nicotine infusion into the ventral hippocampus produced deficits in both trace and contextual fear conditioning. In the mPFC, nicotine enhanced trace but not contextual fear conditioning. Interestingly, infusion of the antagonists MLA or DHβE in the mPFC also enhanced trace fear conditioning. These findings suggest that nicotine acts on different substrates to enhance trace versus contextual fear conditioning, and that nicotine-induced desensitization of nAChRs in the mPFC may contribute to the effects of nicotine on trace fear conditioning. PMID:20727979

  2. Fuzzy wavelet plus a quantum neural network as a design base for power system stability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ganjefar, Soheil; Tofighi, Morteza; Karami, Hamidreza

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we introduce an indirect adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural controller (IAFWNC) as a power system stabilizer to damp inter-area modes of oscillations in a multi-machine power system. Quantum computing is an efficient method for improving the computational efficiency of neural networks, so we developed an identifier based on a quantum neural network (QNN) to train the IAFWNC in the proposed scheme. All of the controller parameters are tuned online based on the Lyapunov stability theory to guarantee the closed-loop stability. A two-machine, two-area power system equipped with a static synchronous series compensator as a series flexible ac transmission system was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller. The simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the proposed IAFWNC scheme can achieve favorable control performance. PMID:26363960

  3. Accumbens dopamine-acetylcholine balance in approach and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Hoebel, Bartley G; Avena, Nicole M; Rada, Pedro

    2007-12-01

    Understanding systems for approach and avoidance is basic for behavioral neuroscience. Research on the neural organization and functions of the dorsal striatum in movement disorders, such as Huntington's and Parkinson's Disease, can inform the study of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in motivational disorders, such as addiction and depression. We propose opposing roles for dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) in the NAc in the control of GABA output systems for approach and avoidance. Contrary to DA, which fosters approach, ACh release is a correlate or cause of meal satiation, conditioned taste aversion and aversive brain stimulation. ACh may also counteract excessive DA-mediated approach behavior as revealed during withdrawal from drugs of abuse or sugar when the animal enters an ACh-mediated state of anxiety and behavioral depression. This review summarizes evidence that ACh is important in the inhibition of behavior when extracellular DA is high and the generation of an anxious or depressed state when DA is relatively low. PMID:18023617

  4. Gestational naltrexone ameliorates fetal ethanol exposures enhancing effect on the postnatal behavioral and neural response to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Youngentob, Steven L; Kent, Paul F; Youngentob, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    The association between gestational exposure to ethanol and adolescent ethanol abuse is well established. Recent animal studies support the role of fetal ethanol experience-induced chemosensory plasticity as contributing to this observation. Previously, we established that fetal ethanol exposure, delivered through a dam’s diet throughout gestation, tuned the neural response of the peripheral olfactory system of early postnatal rats to the odor of ethanol. This occurred in conjunction with a loss of responsiveness to other odorants. The instinctive behavioral response to the odor of ethanol was also enhanced. Importantly, there was a significant contributory link between the altered response to the odor of ethanol and increased ethanol avidity when assessed in the same animals. Here, we tested whether the neural and behavioral olfactory plasticity, and their relationship to enhanced ethanol intake, is a result of the mere exposure to ethanol or whether it requires the animal to associate ethanol’s reinforcing properties with its odor attributes. In this later respect, the opioid system is important in the mediation (or modulation) of the reinforcing aspects of ethanol. To block endogenous opiates during prenatal life, pregnant rats received daily intraperitoneal administration of the opiate antagonist naltrexone from gestational day 6–21 jointly with ethanol delivered via diet. Relative to control progeny, we found that gestational exposure to naltrexone ameliorated the enhanced postnatal behavioral response to the odor of ethanol and postnatal drug avidity. Our findings support the proposition that in utero ethanol-induced olfactory plasticity (and its relationship to postnatal intake) requires, at least in part, the associative pairing between ethanol’s odor quality and its reinforcing aspects. We also found suggestive evidence that fetal naltrexone ameliorated the untoward effects of gestational ethanol exposure on the neural response to non

  5. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning…

  6. Evidence for Neural Computations of Temporal Coherence in an Auditory Scene and Their Enhancement during Active Listening.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, James A; Shamma, Shihab A; Lalor, Edmund C

    2015-05-01

    The human brain has evolved to operate effectively in highly complex acoustic environments, segregating multiple sound sources into perceptually distinct auditory objects. A recent theory seeks to explain this ability by arguing that stream segregation occurs primarily due to the temporal coherence of the neural populations that encode the various features of an individual acoustic source. This theory has received support from both psychoacoustic and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that use stimuli which model complex acoustic environments. Termed stochastic figure-ground (SFG) stimuli, they are composed of a "figure" and background that overlap in spectrotemporal space, such that the only way to segregate the figure is by computing the coherence of its frequency components over time. Here, we extend these psychoacoustic and fMRI findings by using the greater temporal resolution of electroencephalography to investigate the neural computation of temporal coherence. We present subjects with modified SFG stimuli wherein the temporal coherence of the figure is modulated stochastically over time, which allows us to use linear regression methods to extract a signature of the neural processing of this temporal coherence. We do this under both active and passive listening conditions. Our findings show an early effect of coherence during passive listening, lasting from ∼115 to 185 ms post-stimulus. When subjects are actively listening to the stimuli, these responses are larger and last longer, up to ∼265 ms. These findings provide evidence for early and preattentive neural computations of temporal coherence that are enhanced by active analysis of an auditory scene. PMID:25948273

  7. Self-Powered Electrical Stimulation for Enhancing Neural Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Graphene-Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Hybrid Microfibers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Zhang, Xiaodi; Yu, Xin; Wang, Shu; Qiu, Jichuan; Tang, Wei; Li, Linlin; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-24

    Engineered conductive scaffolds toward neural regeneration should have the ability to regulate mesenchymal stems cell (MSC) differentiation into neural lineage through an electrical stimulation-assisted culture process. In this work, a self-powered electrical stimulation-assisted neural differentiation system for MSCs was realized by combining a high effective triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) to supply pulsed electric simulation signals and a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid microfiber (80 μm in diameter) as a scaffold. The conductive PEDOT endows the rGO-PEDOT hybrid microfiber with an enhanced electrical conductivity and maintains a good cytocompatibility. MSCs cultured on this highly conductive rGO-PEDOT hybrid microfiber possess enhanced proliferation ability and good neural differentiation tendency. Importantly, by inducing electric pulses generated by the TENG as the electrical stimulation signal, which are triggered by human walking steps, neural differentiation of MSCs is dramatically improved. This study illustrates the customizability of the rGO-PEDOT hybrid microfiber for neural tissue engineering scaffolding applications, underlines the potential of a self-powered TENG electrical stimulation system for accelerating MSC differentiation into neural cells without bio/chemical cues, and suggests the TENG's practical use as a wearable stimulation system to assist nerve regeneration for a walking person. PMID:27144593

  8. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  9. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields enhance the proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells cultured from ischemic brains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yannan; Dai, Yiqin; Zhu, Ximin; Xu, Haochen; Cai, Ping; Xia, Ruohong; Mao, Lizhen; Zhao, Bing-Qiao; Fan, Wenying

    2015-10-21

    In the mammalian brain, neurogenesis persists throughout the embryonic period and adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the granular zone (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Newborn neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the two regions play a critical role in structural and functional plasticity and neural regeneration after brain injury. Previous studies have reported that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) could promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis, and cardiac stem cells' differentiation, which indicates that ELF-EMF might be an effective tool for regenerative therapy. The present studies were carried out to examine the effects of ELF-EMF on hippocampal NPCs cultured from embryonic and adult ischemic brains. We found that exposure to ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 0.4 mT) significantly enhanced the proliferation capability both in embryonic NPCs and in ischemic NPCs. Neuronal differentiation was also enhanced after 7 days of cumulative ELF-EMF exposure, whereas glial differentiation was not influenced markedly. The expression of phosphorylated Akt increased during the proliferation process when ischemic NPCs were exposed to ELF-EMF. However, blockage of the Akt pathway abolished the ELF-EMF-induced proliferation of ischemic NPCs. These data show that ELF-EMF promotes neurogenesis of ischemic NPCs and suggest that this effect may occur through the Akt pathway.Video abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/WNR/A347. PMID:26339991

  10. Effects of extracellular acetylcholine on muscarinic receptor binding assessed by [125I]dexetimide and a simple probe.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Roa, P M; Wagner, H N; Villemagne, V L; London, E D; Lever, J R

    1998-10-01

    New pharmacologic approaches to enhance brain cholinergic function focus on increasing intrasynaptic acetylcholine. We examined the usefulness of a simple probe and [125I]dexetimide to evaluate in vivo the effects of extracellular acetylcholine on muscarinic receptor binding in the mouse brain. After radiotracer injection continuous time/activity curves were generated over 330 min. [125I]Dexetimide reached a plateau at 90 min post-injection. To increase extracellular acetylcholine, the anticholinesterase physostigmine was administered at 120 min, producing a reversible decrease in [125I]dexetimide specific binding (23%) for 30 min. These findings demonstrate that dynamic changes in extracellular acetylcholine can be evaluated by displacement of [125I]dexetimide binding in vivo using a simple probe system. PMID:9822886

  11. A neural network approach for enhancing information extraction from multispectral image data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Shao, G.; Zhu, H.; Liu, S.

    2005-01-01

    A back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) was applied to classify multispectral remote sensing imagery data. The classification procedure included four steps: (i) noisy training that adds minor random variations to the sampling data to make the data more representative and to reduce the training sample size; (ii) iterative or multi-tier classification that reclassifies the unclassified pixels by making a subset of training samples from the original training set, which means the neural model can focus on fewer classes; (iii) spectral channel selection based on neural network weights that can distinguish the relative importance of each channel in the classification process to simplify the ANN model; and (iv) voting rules that adjust the accuracy of classification and produce outputs of different confidence levels. The Purdue Forest, located west of Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, was chosen as the test site. The 1992 Landsat thematic mapper imagery was used as the input data. High-quality airborne photographs of the same Lime period were used for the ground truth. A total of 11 land use and land cover classes were defined, including water, broadleaved forest, coniferous forest, young forest, urban and road, and six types of cropland-grassland. The experiment, indicated that the back-propagation neural network application was satisfactory in distinguishing different land cover types at US Geological Survey levels II-III. The single-tier classification reached an overall accuracy of 85%. and the multi-tier classification an overall accuracy of 95%. For the whole test, region, the final output of this study reached an overall accuracy of 87%. ?? 2005 CASI.

  12. Neural mechanisms of reactivation-induced updating that enhance and distort memory

    PubMed Central

    St. Jacques, Peggy L.; Olm, Christopher; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    We remember a considerable number of personal experiences because we are frequently reminded of them, a process known as memory reactivation. Although memory reactivation helps to stabilize and update memories, reactivation may also introduce distortions if novel information becomes incorporated with memory. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating reactivation-induced updating in memory for events experienced during a museum tour. During scanning, participants were shown target photographs to reactivate memories from the museum tour followed by a novel lure photograph from an alternate tour. Later, participants were presented with target and lure photographs and asked to determine whether the photographs showed a stop they visited during the tour. We used a subsequent memory analysis to examine neural recruitment during reactivation that was associated with later true and false memories. We predicted that the quality of reactivation, as determined by online ratings of subjective recollection, would increase subsequent true memories but also facilitate incorporation of the lure photograph, thereby increasing subsequent false memories. The fMRI results revealed that the quality of reactivation modulated subsequent true and false memories via recruitment of left posterior parahippocampal, bilateral retrosplenial, and bilateral posterior inferior parietal cortices. However, the timing of neural recruitment and the way in which memories were reactivated contributed to differences in whether memory reactivation led to distortions or not. These data reveal the neural mechanisms recruited during memory reactivation that modify how memories will be subsequently retrieved, supporting the flexible and dynamic aspects of memory. PMID:24191059

  13. Bioactive DNA-Peptide Nanotubes Enhance the Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the construction of DNA nanotubes covalently functionalized with the cell adhesion peptide RGDS as a bioactive substrate for neural stem cell differentiation. Alteration of the Watson–Crick base pairing program that builds the nanostructures allowed us to probe independently the effect of nanotube architecture and peptide bioactivity on stem cell differentiation. We found that both factors instruct synergistically the preferential differentiation of the cells into neurons rather than astrocytes. PMID:25546084

  14. Enhanced growth of neural networks on conductive cellulose-derived nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Kalogeropoulos, Theodoros; Thunberg, Johannes; Johannesson, Sara; Hägg, Daniel; Enoksson, Peter; Gatenholm, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The problem of recovery from neurodegeneration needs new effective solutions. Tissue engineering is viewed as a prospective approach for solving this problem since it can help to develop healthy neural tissue using supportive scaffolds. This study presents effective and sustainable tissue engineering methods for creating biomaterials from cellulose that can be used either as scaffolds for the growth of neural tissue in vitro or as drug screening models. To reach this goal, nanofibrous electrospun cellulose mats were made conductive via two different procedures: carbonization and addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting scaffolds were much more conductive than untreated cellulose material and were used to support growth and differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The cells were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy methods over a period of 15 days at different time points. The results showed that the cellulose-derived conductive scaffolds can provide support for good cell attachment, growth and differentiation. The formation of a neural network occurred within 10 days of differentiation, which is a promising length of time for SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26478282

  15. Effects of acetylcholine on neuronal properties in entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heys, James G.; Schultheiss, Nathan W.; Shay, Christopher F.; Tsuno, Yusuke; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) receives prominent cholinergic innervation from the medial septum and the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (MSDB). To understand how cholinergic neurotransmission can modulate behavior, research has been directed toward identification of the specific cellular mechanisms in EC that can be modulated through cholinergic activity. This review focuses on intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in EC that may underlie functions such as working memory, spatial processing, and episodic memory. In particular, the study of stellate cells (SCs) in medial entorhinal has resulted in discovery of correlations between physiological properties of these neurons and properties of the unique spatial representation that is demonstrated through unit recordings of neurons in medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) from awake-behaving animals. A separate line of investigation has demonstrated persistent firing behavior among neurons in EC that is enhanced by cholinergic activity and could underlie working memory. There is also evidence that acetylcholine plays a role in modulation of synaptic transmission that could also enhance mnemonic function in EC. Finally, the local circuits of EC demonstrate a variety of interneuron physiology, which is also subject to cholinergic modulation. Together these effects alter the dynamics of EC to underlie the functional role of acetylcholine in memory. PMID:22837741

  16. Metabolism of acetylcholine in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to examine the possible role of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase in the maintenance of membrane phospholipid content and membrane fluidity, experiments were performed to monitor the activity of the enzyme and follow the fate of one of its hydrolytic products, choline. Intact human erythrocytes were incubated with acetylcholine (choline methyl-{sup 14}C). The incubation resulted in the hydrolysis of acetylcholine to acetate and choline; the reaction was catalyzed by membrane acetylcholinesterase. The studies demonstrate the further metabolism of choline. Experiments were carried out to determine rate of hydrolysis of acetylcholine, uptake of choline, identification of intracellular metabolites of choline, and identification of radiolabeled membrane components. Erythrocytes at a 25% hematocrit were incubated in an isoosmotic bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4, containing glucose, adenosine, streptomycin and penicillin with 0.3 {mu}Ci of acetylcholine (choline methyl-{sup 14}C), for 24 hours. Aliquots of the erythrocyte suspension were taken throughout for analysis. Erythrocytes were washed free of excess substrate, lysed, and the hemolysate was extracted for choline and its metabolites. Blank samples containing incubation buffer and radiolabeled acetylcholine only, and erythrocyte hemolysate extracts were analyzed for choline content, the difference between blank samples and hemolysate extracts was the amount of choline originating from acetylcholine and attributable to acetylcholinesterase activity. The conversion of choline to {sup 14}C-betaine is noted after several minutes of incubation; at 30 minutes, more than 80% of {sup 14}C-choline is taken up and after several hours, detectable levels of radiolabeled S-adenosylmethionine were present in the hemolysate extract.

  17. Performance enhancement at the cost of potential brain plasticity: neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Kimberly R.; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement is perhaps one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in neuroscience today. Currently, the main classes of drugs used as potential cognitive enhancers include psychostimulants (methylphenidate (MPH), amphetamine), but wakefulness-promoting agents (modafinil) and glutamate activators (ampakine) are also frequently used. Pharmacologically, substances that enhance the components of the memory/learning circuits—dopamine, glutamate (neuronal excitation), and/or norepinephrine—stand to improve brain function in healthy individuals beyond their baseline functioning. In particular, non-medical use of prescription stimulants such as MPH and illicit use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement have seen a recent rise among teens and young adults in schools and college campuses. However, this enhancement likely comes with a neuronal, as well as ethical, cost. Altering glutamate function via the use of psychostimulants may impair behavioral flexibility, leading to the development and/or potentiation of addictive behaviors. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine do not display linear effects; instead, their modulation of cognitive and neuronal function maps on an inverted-U curve. Healthy individuals run the risk of pushing themselves beyond optimal levels into hyperdopaminergic and hypernoradrenergic states, thus vitiating the very behaviors they are striving to improve. Finally, recent studies have begun to highlight potential damaging effects of stimulant exposure in healthy juveniles. This review explains how the main classes of cognitive enhancing drugs affect the learning and memory circuits, and highlights the potential risks and concerns in healthy individuals, particularly juveniles and adolescents. We emphasize the performance enhancement at the potential cost of brain plasticity that is associated with the neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain. PMID:24860437

  18. No Evidence That Gratitude Enhances Neural Performance Monitoring or Conflict-Driven Control

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Blair; He, Frank F. H.; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that gratitude can benefit self-regulation by reducing impulsivity during economic decision making. We tested if comparable benefits of gratitude are observed for neural performance monitoring and conflict-driven self-control. In a pre-post design, 61 participants were randomly assigned to either a gratitude or happiness condition, and then performed a pre-induction flanker task. Subsequently, participants recalled an autobiographical event where they had felt grateful or happy, followed by a post-induction flanker task. Despite closely following existing protocols, participants in the gratitude condition did not report elevated gratefulness compared to the happy group. In regard to self-control, we found no association between gratitude—operationalized by experimental condition or as a continuous predictor—and any control metric, including flanker interference, post-error adjustments, or neural monitoring (the error-related negativity, ERN). Thus, while gratitude might increase economic patience, such benefits may not generalize to conflict-driven control processes. PMID:26633830

  19. Short-term Music Training Enhances Complex, Distributed Neural Communication during Music and Linguistic Tasks.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sarah M; Moreno, Sylvain; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-10-01

    Musical training is frequently associated with benefits to linguistic abilities, and recent focus has been placed on possible benefits of bilingualism to lifelong executive functions; however, the neural mechanisms for such effects are unclear. The aim of this study was to gain better understanding of the whole-brain functional effects of music and second-language training that could support such previously observed cognitive transfer effects. We conducted a 28-day longitudinal study of monolingual English-speaking 4- to 6-year-old children randomly selected to receive daily music or French language training, excluding weekends. Children completed passive EEG music note and French vowel auditory oddball detection tasks before and after training. Brain signal complexity was measured on source waveforms at multiple temporal scales as an index of neural information processing and network communication load. Comparing pretraining with posttraining, musical training was associated with increased EEG complexity at coarse temporal scales during the music and French vowel tasks in widely distributed cortical regions. Conversely, very minimal decreases in complexity at fine scales and trends toward coarse-scale increases were displayed after French training during the tasks. Spectral analysis failed to distinguish between training types and found overall theta (3.5-7.5 Hz) power increases after all training forms, with spatially fewer decreases in power at higher frequencies (>10 Hz). These findings demonstrate that musical training increased diversity of brain network states to support domain-specific music skill acquisition and music-to-language transfer effects. PMID:27243611

  20. The Synapse Project: Engagement in mentally challenging activities enhances neural efficiency

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ian M.; Haber, Sara; Bischof, Gérard N.; Park, Denise C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Correlational and limited experimental evidence suggests that an engaged lifestyle is associated with the maintenance of cognitive vitality in old age. However, the mechanisms underlying these engagement effects are poorly understood. We hypothesized that mental effort underlies engagement effects and used fMRI to examine the impact of high-challenge activities (digital photography and quilting) compared with low-challenge activities (socializing or performing low-challenge cognitive tasks) on neural function at pretest, posttest, and one year after the engagement program. Methods: In the scanner, participants performed a semantic-classification task with two levels of difficulty to assess the modulation of brain activity in response to task demands. Results: The High-Challenge group, but not the Low-Challenge group, showed increased modulation of brain activity in medial frontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortex—regions associated with attention and semantic processing—some of which were maintained a year later. This increased modulation stemmed from decreases in brain activity during the easy condition for the High-Challenge group and was associated with time committed to the program, age, and cognition. Conclusions: Sustained engagement in cognitively demanding activities facilitated cognition by increasing neural efficiency. Mentally-challenging activities may be neuroprotective and an important element to maintaining a healthy brain into late adulthood. PMID:26484698

  1. The positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide, enhances memory processes and stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Wnorowski, Artur; Budzynska, Barbara; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Biala, Grazyna; Arias, Hugo R

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide (PAM-2), a positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), improves memory processes, passive avoidance tests were conducted in male mice after acute and chronic treatments. To determine the neuronal mechanisms underlying the promnesic activity elicited by PAM-2, the effect of this ligand on α7 nAChR up-regulation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was assessed in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The results indicate that: (1) PAM-2 improves memory acquisition/consolidation after acute treatment (Day 2) and memory consolidation after chronic treatment (Day 22). Although no effect was observed on α7 nAChR up-regulation, the chronic, but not acute, PAM-2 treatment increases ERK1/2 kinase phosphorylation, (2) the promnesic activity of PAM-2 was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, a selective α7-antagonist, confirming the role of α7 nAChRs, (3) a synergistic (acute) effect was observed between inactive doses of PAM-2 (0.1mg/kg) and DMXBA (0.3mg/kg), a selective α7-agonist, and (4) PAM-2 reversed the memory impairment elicited by scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist. The results demonstrate that PAM-2 presents promnesic activity mediated by α7 nAChRs, and is able to trigger ERK1/2 phosphorylation only after chronic treatment. PMID:26778787

  2. Extracellular matrix-regulated neural differentiation of human multipotent marrow progenitor cells enhances functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Win-Ping; Yang, Chi-Chiang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Chen, Chun-Wei D.; Chen, Wei-Hong; Yang, Charn-Bing; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Lai, Wen-Fu T.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Recent advanced studies have demonstrated that cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) could trigger various types of neural differentiation. However, the efficacy of differentiation and in vivo transplantation has not yet thoroughly been investigated. PURPOSE To highlight the current understanding of the effects of ECM on neural differentiation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs), regarding state-of-art cure for the animal with acute spinal cord injury (SCI), and explore future treatments aimed at neural repair. STUDY DESIGN A selective overview of the literature pertaining to the neural differentiation of the MSCs and experimental animals aimed at improved repair of SCI. METHODS Extracellular matrix proteins, tenascin-cytotactin (TN-C), tenascin-restrictin (TN-R), and chondroitin sulfate (CS), with the cytokines, nerve growth factor (NGF)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/retinoic acid (RA) (NBR), were incorporated to induce transdifferentiation of human MPCs. Cells were treated with NBR for 7 days, and then TN-C, TN-R, or CS was added for 2 days. The medium was changed every 2 days. Twenty-four animals were randomly assigned to four groups with six animals in each group: one experimental and three controls. Animals received two (bilateral) injections of vehicle, MPCs, NBR-induced MPCs, or NBR/TN-C-induced MPCs into the lesion sites after SCI. Functional assessment was measured using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating score. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) post hoc tests. RESULTS Results showed that MPCs with the transdifferentiation of human MPCs to neurons were associated with increased messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of neuronal markers including nestin, microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, βIII tubulin, and NGF. Greater amounts of neuronal morphology appeared in cultures incorporated with TN-C and TN

  3. Mechanism underlying H2O2-induced inhibition of acetylcholine-induced contraction in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Michihiro; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Itoh, Takeo

    2007-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the inhibition by H2O2 of acetylcholine-induced contraction was investigated in epithelium-denuded strips of rabbit trachea. Acetylcholine (10 microM) generated a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and force. Although the acetylcholine-induced tonic contraction was around 9 times the high K+ (80 mM)-induced one, the two stimulants induced similar [Ca2+]i increases (around 0.2 microM), indicating that acetylcholine generates tonic contraction via increases in both [Ca2+]i and myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. H2O2 (30 microM) (a) enhanced the acetylcholine-induced tonic (not phasic) increase in [Ca2+]i but attenuated both phases of the acetylcholine-induced contraction and (b) enhanced the high K+-induced increase in [Ca2+]i but did not modify the high K+-induced contraction. In beta-escin-skinned strips, application of acetylcholine in the presence of GTP enhanced the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ so that its amplitude became similar to that induced by 1 microM Ca2+. H2O2 (30 microM) attenuated the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ (alone or in the presence of acetylcholine) but not those induced by higher concentrations of Ca2+ alone (0.5 microM and 1 microM). These results indicate that H2O2 acts directly on contractile proteins in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle to inhibit the contraction induced by low concentrations of Ca2+ (<0.5 microM). An action of H2O2 that increases [Ca2+]i (and thereby masks this reactive-oxygen-induced inhibition of myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity) is apparent in the presence of high K+ but not of acetylcholine. Thus, in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle H2O2 downregulates myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity more potently during acetylcholine-induced contraction than during high-K+-induced contraction, leading to an effective inhibition of the former contraction. PMID:17188263

  4. Programming Hippocampal Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells into Oligodendrocytes Enhances Remyelination in the Adult Brain after Injury.

    PubMed

    Braun, Simon M G; Pilz, Gregor-Alexander; Machado, Raquel A C; Moss, Jonathan; Becher, Burkhard; Toni, Nicolas; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2015-06-23

    Demyelinating diseases are characterized by a loss of oligodendrocytes leading to axonal degeneration and impaired brain function. Current strategies used for the treatment of demyelinating disease such as multiple sclerosis largely rely on modulation of the immune system. Only limited treatment options are available for treating the later stages of the disease, and these treatments require regenerative therapies to ameliorate the consequences of oligodendrocyte loss and axonal impairment. Directed differentiation of adult hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) into oligodendrocytes may represent an endogenous source of glial cells for cell-replacement strategies aiming to treat demyelinating disease. Here, we show that Ascl1-mediated conversion of hippocampal NSPCs into mature oligodendrocytes enhances remyelination in a diphtheria-toxin (DT)-inducible, genetic model for demyelination. These findings highlight the potential of targeting hippocampal NSPCs for the treatment of demyelinated lesions in the adult brain. PMID:26074082

  5. Enhancer Analysis Unveils Genetic Interactions between TLX and SOX2 in Neural Stem Cells and In Vivo Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammed M.; Smith, Derek K.; Niu, Wenze; Fang, Sanhua; Iqbal, Nida; Sun, Guoqiang; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Summary The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a master regulator of postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and neurogenesis; however, it remains unclear how TLX expression is precisely regulated in these tissue-specific stem cells. Here, we show that a highly conserved cis-element within the Tlx locus functions to drive gene expression in NSCs. We demonstrate that the transcription factors SOX2 and MYT1 specifically interact with this genomic element to directly regulate Tlx enhancer activity in vivo. Knockdown experiments further reveal that SOX2 dominantly controls endogenous expression of TLX, whereas MYT1 only plays a modulatory role. Importantly, TLX is essential for SOX2-mediated in vivo reprogramming of astrocytes and itself is also sufficient to induce neurogenesis in the adult striatum. Together, these findings unveil functional genetic interactions among transcription factors that are critical to NSCs and in vivo cell reprogramming. PMID:26607952

  6. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:26828681

  7. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  8. An EEMD-ICA Approach to Enhancing Artifact Rejection for Noisy Multivariate Neural Data.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke; Chen, Dan; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Wang, Lizhe; Liu, Xianzeng; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    As neural data are generally noisy, artifact rejection is crucial for data preprocessing. It has long been a grand research challenge for an approach which is able: 1) to remove the artifacts and 2) to avoid loss or disruption of the structural information at the same time, thus the risk of introducing bias to data interpretation may be minimized. In this study, an approach (namely EEMD-ICA) was proposed to first decompose multivariate neural data that are possibly noisy into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD). Independent component analysis (ICA) was then applied to the IMFs to separate the artifactual components. The approach was tested against the classical ICA and the automatic wavelet ICA (AWICA) methods, which were dominant methods for artifact rejection. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in handling neural data possibly with intensive noises, experiments on artifact removal were performed using semi-simulated data mixed with a variety of noises. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach continuously outperforms the counterparts in terms of both normalized mean square error (NMSE) and Structure SIMilarity (SSIM). The superiority becomes even greater with the decrease of SNR in all cases, e.g., SSIM of the EEMD-ICA can almost double that of AWICA and triple that of ICA. To further examine the potentials of the approach in sophisticated applications, the approach together with the counterparts were used to preprocess a real-life epileptic EEG with absence seizure. Experiments were carried out with the focus on characterizing the dynamics of the data after artifact rejection, i.e., distinguishing seizure-free, pre-seizure and seizure states. Using multi-scale permutation entropy to extract feature and linear discriminant analysis for classification, the EEMD-ICA performed the best for classifying the states (87.4%, about 4.1% and 8.7% higher than that of AWICA and ICA

  9. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. PMID:24508663

  10. Increased extracellular dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels contribute to enhanced subthalamic nucleus neural activity during exhausting exercise.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Liu, X; Qiao, D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the mechanism underlying the enhanced subthalamic nucleus (STN) neural activity during exhausting exercise from the perspective of monoamine neurotransmitters and changes of their corresponding receptors. Rats were randomly divided into microdialysis and immunohistochemistry study groups. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of the STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe before, during and 90 min after one bout of exhausting exercise. Dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were subsequently detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For immunohistochemistry study, the expression of DRD2 and HT2C receptors in the STN, before, immediately after and 90 min after exhaustion was detected through immunohistochemistry technique. Microdialysis study results showed that the extracellular DA and 5-HT neurotransmitters increased significantly throughout the procedure of exhausting exercise and the recovery period (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry study results showed that the expression levels of DRD2 and HT2C in the rat STN immediately after exhausting exercise and at the time point of 90 min after exhaustion were both higher than those of the rest condition, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Our results suggest that the increased extracellular DA and 5-HT in the STN might be one important factor leading to the enhanced STN neural activity and the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise. This study may essentially offer useful evidence for better understanding of the mechanism of the central type of exercise-induced fatigue. PMID:26424920

  11. Suppression of IGF-I signals in neural stem cells enhances neurogenesis and olfactory function during aging.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Zayna; Aïd, Saba; Berry, Hugues; Holzenberger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Downregulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathways prolongs lifespan in various species, including mammals. Still, the cellular mechanisms by which IGF signaling controls the aging trajectory of individual organs are largely unknown. Here, we asked whether suppression of IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) in adult stem cells preserves long-term cell replacement, and whether this may prevent age-related functional decline in a regenerating tissue. Using neurogenesis as a paradigm, we showed that conditional knockout of IGF-1R specifically in adult neural stem cells (NSC) maintained youthful characteristics of olfactory bulb neurogenesis within an aging brain. We found that blocking IGF-I signaling in neural precursors increased cumulative neuroblast production and enhanced neuronal integration into the olfactory bulb. This in turn resulted in neuro-anatomical changes that improved olfactory function. Interestingly, mutants also displayed long-term alterations in energy metabolism, possibly related to IGF-1R deletion in NSCs throughout lifespan. We explored Akt and ERK signaling cascades and revealed differential regulation downstream of IGF-1R, with Akt phosphorylation preferentially decreased in IGF-1R(-/-) NSCs within the niche, and ERK pathway downregulated in differentiated neurons of the OB. These challenging experimental results were sustained by data from mathematical modeling, predicting that diminished stimulation of growth is indeed optimal for tissue aging. Thus, inhibiting growth and longevity gene IGF-1R in adult NSCs induced a gain-of-function phenotype during aging, marked by optimized management of cell renewal, and enhanced olfactory sensory function. PMID:26219530

  12. Suppression of IGF-I signals in neural stem cells enhances neurogenesis and olfactory function during aging

    PubMed Central

    Chaker, Zayna; Aïd, Saba; Berry, Hugues; Holzenberger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathways prolongs lifespan in various species, including mammals. Still, the cellular mechanisms by which IGF signaling controls the aging trajectory of individual organs are largely unknown. Here, we asked whether suppression of IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) in adult stem cells preserves long-term cell replacement, and whether this may prevent age-related functional decline in a regenerating tissue. Using neurogenesis as a paradigm, we showed that conditional knockout of IGF-1R specifically in adult neural stem cells (NSC) maintained youthful characteristics of olfactory bulb neurogenesis within an aging brain. We found that blocking IGF-I signaling in neural precursors increased cumulative neuroblast production and enhanced neuronal integration into the olfactory bulb. This in turn resulted in neuro-anatomical changes that improved olfactory function. Interestingly, mutants also displayed long-term alterations in energy metabolism, possibly related to IGF-1R deletion in NSCs throughout lifespan. We explored Akt and ERK signaling cascades and revealed differential regulation downstream of IGF-1R, with Akt phosphorylation preferentially decreased in IGF-1R−/− NSCs within the niche, and ERK pathway downregulated in differentiated neurons of the OB. These challenging experimental results were sustained by data from mathematical modeling, predicting that diminished stimulation of growth is indeed optimal for tissue aging. Thus, inhibiting growth and longevity gene IGF-1R in adult NSCs induced a gain-of-function phenotype during aging, marked by optimized management of cell renewal, and enhanced olfactory sensory function. PMID:26219530

  13. Retinoid supplementation of differentiating human neural progenitors and embryonic stem cells leads to enhanced neurogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Christie, Victoria B; Maltman, Daniel J; Henderson, Andrew P; Whiting, Andrew; Marder, Todd B; Lako, Majlinda; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2010-11-30

    Retinoids are important molecules involved in the development and homeostasis of the nervous system. As such, various retinoid derivatives are often found in culture media and supplement formulations to support the growth and maintenance of neural cells. However, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and its associated derivatives are light sensitive and are highly susceptible to isomerisation. This can lead to variability in retinoid concentrations and the nature of the retinoid species present in culture solutions which in turn can influence biological activity and introduce inconsistency. We have previously described the development of the synthetic retinoid derivative, EC23, as a chemically and light stable alternative that does not degrade and has biological activity similar to ATRA. In this study we demonstrate that the addition of exogenous retinoid can significantly enhance neuronal differentiation of both human neuroprogenitor and human embryonic stem cells. In the former, both ATRA and EC23 induced increased maturation and stabilisation of the axonal cytoskeleton. However, EC23 was particularly potent at lower nanomolar concentrations resulting in significantly greater neurogenesis than ATRA. In ES cells enhanced motor neuron marker expression was also detected in response to both retinoids when incorporated into an established protocol for neuronal differentiation. We propose that synthetic retinoid EC23 represents a valuable addition to the formulation of new and existing culture supplements to enhance neuronal differentiation whilst enabling improved consistency. PMID:20817032

  14. Variations in prestimulus neural activity predict the emotion-enhanced memory effect.

    PubMed

    Yick, Yee Ying; Buratto, Luciano G; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Here, we report evidence that electrophysiological neural activity preceding the onset of emotional pictures can predict whether they will be remembered or forgotten 24 h later, whereas the same effect was not observed for neutral pictures. In contrast to previous research, we observed this effect using a paradigm in which participants could not predict the emotional or the neutral content of the pictures before their onset. These effects were obtained alongside significant behavioural effects of superior recognition memory for emotional compared with neutral items. These findings suggest that the preferential encoding of emotional events in memory is determined by fluctuations in the availability of processing resources just before event onset. This explanation argues in favour of mediational models of emotional memory, which contend that emotional information is preferentially encoded because it mobilizes a greater amount of processing resources than neutral information. PMID:27295027

  15. Hybrid optical fiber sensor and artificial neural network system for bioethanol quality control and productivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusken, Edmilton; Salgado, Ricardo M.; Rossell, Carlos E. V.; Ohishi, Takaaki; Suzuki, Carlos K.

    2008-04-01

    Bioethanol is produced by bio-chemical process that converts sugar or biomass feedstock into ethanol. After bio-chemical process, the solution is distilled under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature, in order to obtain an ethanol-water solution. However, the ethanol concentration analysis is generally performed off-line and, sometimes, a re-distillation process becomes necessary. In this research, an optical apparatus based on Fresnel reflection has been used in combination with artificial neural networks for determination of bioethanol concentration in hydro-alcoholic solution at any temperature. The volumetric concentration and temperature effect was investigated. This intelligent system can effectively detect and update in real-time the correction of distillation parameters to reduce losses of bioethanol and also to improve the quality in a production plant.

  16. Endogenous Repair Signaling after Brain Injury and Complementary Bioengineering Approaches to Enhance Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Caroline P; Roussas, Adam; Dutta, Dipankar; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 5.3 million Americans annually. Despite the many long-term deficits associated with TBI, there currently are no clinically available therapies that directly address the underlying pathologies contributing to these deficits. Preclinical studies have investigated various therapeutic approaches for TBI: two such approaches are stem cell transplantation and delivery of bioactive factors to mitigate the biochemical insult affiliated with TBI. However, success with either of these approaches has been limited largely due to the complexity of the injury microenvironment. As such, this review outlines the many factors of the injury microenvironment that mediate endogenous neural regeneration after TBI and the corresponding bioengineering approaches that harness these inherent signaling mechanisms to further amplify regenerative efforts. PMID:25983552

  17. Kinetics of unliganded acetylcholine receptor channel gating.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B

    1986-01-01

    Open- and closed-state lifetimes of unliganded acetylcholine receptor channel activity were analyzed by the method of likelihood maximazation. For both open times and closed times, the best-fitting density is most often a sum of two exponentials. These multiple open states cannot depend on the number of receptor binding sites occupied since they are observed in the absence of ligand. The rate of spontaneous opening and the faster decay constant of closing increased as the membrane was hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence of the rate of spontaneous opening is stronger than that for curare-liganded channels. Evidence that the acetylcholine receptor channel can open spontaneously in the absence of ligand has been presented previously (Sanchez et al, 1983; Brehm et al, 1984; Jackson, 1984). To add to this evidence, alpha-bungarotoxin was added to the patch electrode, causing the frequency of openings to decay with time. The rate constant determined from this decay is similar to rate constants reported for the binding of iodinated alpha-bungarotoxin to the acetylcholine receptor. The frequency of unliganded channel opening has been estimated as 2 X 10(-3) s-1 per receptor. A comparison of carbamylcholine-liganded and spontaneous gating transition rates suggests that ligand binding increases the rate of opening by a factor of 1.4 X 10(7). Carbamylcholine binding increases the mean open time by a factor of 5. Thus, a cholinergic agonist activates the acetylcholine receptor by destabilizing the closed state. The liganded and unliganded channel gating rates were used to analyze the energetics of ligand activation of the acetylcholine receptor channel, and to relate the open channel dissociation constant to the closed channel dissociation constant. PMID:2421793

  18. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, Amy L.; Gutzwiller, Lisa M.; Gauck, Mackenzie K.; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A.; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability. PMID

  19. Rhomboid Enhancer Activity Defines a Subset of Drosophila Neural Precursors Required for Proper Feeding, Growth and Viability.

    PubMed

    Gresser, Amy L; Gutzwiller, Lisa M; Gauck, Mackenzie K; Hartenstein, Volker; Cook, Tiffany A; Gebelein, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Organismal growth regulation requires the interaction of multiple metabolic, hormonal and neuronal pathways. While the molecular basis for many of these are well characterized, less is known about the developmental origins of growth regulatory structures and the mechanisms governing control of feeding and satiety. For these reasons, new tools and approaches are needed to link the specification and maturation of discrete cell populations with their subsequent regulatory roles. In this study, we characterize a rhomboid enhancer element that selectively labels four Drosophila embryonic neural precursors. These precursors give rise to the hypopharyngeal sensory organ of the peripheral nervous system and a subset of neurons in the deutocerebral region of the embryonic central nervous system. Post embryogenesis, the rhomboid enhancer is active in a subset of cells within the larval pharyngeal epithelium. Enhancer-targeted toxin expression alters the morphology of the sense organ and results in impaired larval growth, developmental delay, defective anterior spiracle eversion and lethality. Limiting the duration of toxin expression reveals differences in the critical periods for these effects. Embryonic expression causes developmental defects and partially penetrant pre-pupal lethality. Survivors of embryonic expression, however, ultimately become viable adults. In contrast, post-embryonic toxin expression results in fully penetrant lethality. To better define the larval growth defect, we used a variety of assays to demonstrate that toxin-targeted larvae are capable of locating, ingesting and clearing food and they exhibit normal food search behaviors. Strikingly, however, following food exposure these larvae show a rapid decrease in consumption suggesting a satiety-like phenomenon that correlates with the period of impaired larval growth. Together, these data suggest a critical role for these enhancer-defined lineages in regulating feeding, growth and viability. PMID

  20. Enhancement of cognitive and neural functions through complex reasoning training: evidence from normal and clinical populations.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sandra B; Mudar, Raksha A

    2014-01-01

    Public awareness of cognitive health is fairly recent compared to physical health. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training offers promise in augmenting cognitive brain performance in normal and clinical populations. Targeting higher-order cognitive functions, such as reasoning in particular, may promote generalized cognitive changes necessary for supporting the complexities of daily life. This data-driven perspective highlights cognitive and brain changes measured in randomized clinical trials that trained gist reasoning strategies in populations ranging from teenagers to healthy older adults, individuals with brain injury to those at-risk for Alzheimer's disease. The evidence presented across studies support the potential for Gist reasoning training to strengthen cognitive performance in trained and untrained domains and to engage more efficient communication across widespread neural networks that support higher-order cognition. The meaningful benefits of Gist training provide compelling motivation to examine optimal dose for sustained benefits as well as to explore additive benefits of meditation, physical exercise, and/or improved sleep in future studies. PMID:24808834

  1. Enhancement of cognitive and neural functions through complex reasoning training: evidence from normal and clinical populations

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sandra B.; Mudar, Raksha A.

    2014-01-01

    Public awareness of cognitive health is fairly recent compared to physical health. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training offers promise in augmenting cognitive brain performance in normal and clinical populations. Targeting higher-order cognitive functions, such as reasoning in particular, may promote generalized cognitive changes necessary for supporting the complexities of daily life. This data-driven perspective highlights cognitive and brain changes measured in randomized clinical trials that trained gist reasoning strategies in populations ranging from teenagers to healthy older adults, individuals with brain injury to those at-risk for Alzheimer's disease. The evidence presented across studies support the potential for Gist reasoning training to strengthen cognitive performance in trained and untrained domains and to engage more efficient communication across widespread neural networks that support higher-order cognition. The meaningful benefits of Gist training provide compelling motivation to examine optimal dose for sustained benefits as well as to explore additive benefits of meditation, physical exercise, and/or improved sleep in future studies. PMID:24808834

  2. Centered Kernel Alignment Enhancing Neural Network Pretraining for MRI-Based Dementia Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Peña, David; Collazos-Huertas, Diego; Castellanos-Dominguez, German

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a growing problem that affects elderly people worldwide. More accurate evaluation of dementia diagnosis can help during the medical examination. Several methods for computer-aided dementia diagnosis have been proposed using resonance imaging scans to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (NC). Nonetheless, the computer-aided diagnosis is especially challenging because of the heterogeneous and intermediate nature of MCI. We address the automated dementia diagnosis by introducing a novel supervised pretraining approach that takes advantage of the artificial neural network (ANN) for complex classification tasks. The proposal initializes an ANN based on linear projections to achieve more discriminating spaces. Such projections are estimated by maximizing the centered kernel alignment criterion that assesses the affinity between the resonance imaging data kernel matrix and the label target matrix. As a result, the performed linear embedding allows accounting for features that contribute the most to the MCI class discrimination. We compare the supervised pretraining approach to two unsupervised initialization methods (autoencoders and Principal Component Analysis) and against the best four performing classification methods of the 2014 CADDementia challenge. As a result, our proposal outperforms all the baselines (7% of classification accuracy and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve) at the time it reduces the class biasing. PMID:27148392

  3. Broadband neural encoding in the cricket cereal sensory system enhanced by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Jacob E.; Miller, John P.

    1996-03-01

    SENSORY systems are often required to detect a small amplitude signal embedded in broadband background noise. Traditionally, ambient noise is regarded as detrimental to encoding accuracy. Recently, however, a phenomenon known as stochastic resonance has been described in which, for systems with a nonlinear threshold, increasing the input noise level can actually improve the output signal-to-noise ratio over a limited range of signal and noise strengths. Previous theoretical and experimental studies of stochastic resonance in physical1-7and biological6-10 systems have dealt exclusively with single-frequency sine stimuli embedded in a broadband noise background. In the past year it has been shown in a theoretical and modelling study that stochastic resonance can be observed with broadband signals11,12. Here we demonstrate that broadband stochastic resonance is manifest in the peripheral layers of neural processing in a simple sensory system, and that it plays a role over a wide range of biologically relevant stimulus parameters. Further, we quantify the functional significance of the phenomenon within the context of signal processing, using information theory.

  4. GDNF Enhances Therapeutic Efficiency of Neural Stem Cells-Based Therapy in Chronic Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Deng, Li; Wang, Yun; Yin, Ling; Yang, Chaoxian; Du, Jie; Yuan, Qionglan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in the CNS. The current immunomodulating drugs for MS do not effectively prevent the progressive neurological decline. Neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation has been proven to promote repair and functional recovery of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model for MS, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has also been found to have capability of promoting axonal regeneration and remyelination of regenerating axons. In the present study, to assess whether GDNF would enhance therapeutic effect of NSCs for EAE, GDNF gene-modified NSCs (GDNF/NSCs) and native NSCs were transplanted into each lateral ventricle of rats at 10 days and rats were sacrificed at 60 days after EAE immunization. We found that NSCs significantly reduced the clinical signs, and GDNF gene-modification further promoted functional recovery. GDNF/NSCs more profoundly suppressed brain inflammation and improved density of myelin compared with NSCs. The survival of GDNF/NSCs was significantly higher than that of transplanted NSCs. Transplanted GDNF/NSCs, in contrast to NSCs, differentiated into more neurons and oligodendrocytes. Moreover, the mRNA expression of oligodendrocyte lineage cells in rats with GDNF/NSCs was significantly increased compared to rats with NSCs. These results suggest that GDNF enhances therapeutic efficiency of NSCs-based therapy for EAE. PMID:27212951

  5. Chondroitinase and growth factors enhance activation and oligodendrocyte differentiation of endogenous neural precursor cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Schut, Desiree; Wang, Jian; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    The adult spinal cord harbours a population of multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the ability to replace oligodendrocytes. However, despite this capacity, proliferation and endogenous remyelination is severely limited after spinal cord injury (SCI). In the post-traumatic microenvironment following SCI, endogenous spinal NPCs mainly differentiate into astrocytes which could contribute to astrogliosis that exacerbate the outcomes of SCI. These findings emphasize a key role for the post-SCI niche in modulating the behaviour of spinal NPCs after SCI. We recently reported that chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar restrict the outcomes of NPC transplantation in SCI by reducing the survival, migration and integration of engrafted NPCs within the injured spinal cord. These inhibitory effects were attenuated by administration of chondroitinase (ChABC) prior to NPC transplantation. Here, in a rat model of compressive SCI, we show that perturbing CSPGs by ChABC in combination with sustained infusion of growth factors (EGF, bFGF and PDGF-AA) optimize the activation and oligodendroglial differentiation of spinal NPCs after injury. Four days following SCI, we intrathecally delivered ChABC and/or GFs for seven days. We performed BrdU incorporation to label proliferating cells during the treatment period after SCI. This strategy increased the proliferation of spinal NPCs, reduced the generation of new astrocytes and promoted their differentiation along an oligodendroglial lineage, a prerequisite for remyelination. Furthermore, ChABC and GF treatments enhanced the response of non-neural cells by increasing the generation of new vascular endothelial cells and decreasing the number of proliferating macrophages/microglia after SCI. In conclusions, our data strongly suggest that optimization of the behaviour of endogenous spinal NPCs after SCI is critical not only to promote endogenous oligodendrocyte replacement, but also to reverse the otherwise

  6. Role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in Alzheimer's disease pathology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Sylvia; Maskos, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the major form of senile dementia, characterized by neuronal loss, extracellular deposits, and neurofibrillary tangles. It is accompanied by a loss of cholinergic tone, and acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the brain, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD. Current medication is restricted to enhancing cholinergic signalling for symptomatic treatment of AD patients. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor family (nAChR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family (mAChR) are the target of ACh in the brain. Both families of receptors are affected in AD. It was demonstrated that amyloid beta (Aβ) interacts with nAChRs. Here we discuss how Aβ activates or inhibits nAChRs, and how this interaction contributes to AD pathology. We will discuss the potential role of nAChRs as therapeutic targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25514383

  7. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signaling Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Preventing Mitochondrial DNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ben; Kwan, Kevin; Levine, Yaakov A; Olofsson, Peder S; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Joshi, Sonia; Wang, Haichao; Andersson, Ulf; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Tracey, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of cellular and environmental stress. Cellular stress is associated with changes in immunity and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a key component of innate immunity. Here we show that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR)-signaling inhibits inflammasome activation and prevents release of mitochondrial DNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Cholinergic receptor agonists or vagus nerve stimulation significantly inhibits inflammasome activation, whereas genetic deletion of α7 nAchR significantly enhances inflammasome activation. Acetylcholine accumulates in macrophage cytoplasm after adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulation in an α7 nAchR-independent manner. Acetylcholine significantly attenuated calcium or hydrogen oxide–induced mitochondrial damage and mitochondrial DNA release. Together, these findings reveal a novel neurotransmitter-mediated signaling pathway: acetylcholine translocates into the cytoplasm of immune cells during inflammation and inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation by preventing mitochondrial DNA release. PMID:24849809

  8. Attention Enhances Synaptic Efficacy and Signal-to-Noise in Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Farran; Mangun, George R.; Usrey, W. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Attention is a critical component of perception. However, the mechanisms by which attention modulates neuronal communication to guide behavior are poorly understood. To elucidate the synaptic mechanisms of attention, we developed a sensitive assay of attentional modulation of neuronal communication. In alert monkeys performing a visual spatial attention task, we probed thalamocortical communication by electrically stimulating neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus while simultaneously recording shock-evoked responses from monosynaptically connected neurons in primary visual cortex. We found that attention enhances neuronal communication by (1) increasing the efficacy of presynaptic input in driving postsynaptic responses, (2) increasing synchronous responses among ensembles of postsynaptic neurons receiving independent input, and (3) decreasing redundant signals between postsynaptic neurons receiving common input. These results demonstrate that attention finely tunes neuronal communication at the synaptic level by selectively altering synaptic weights, enabling enhanced detection of salient events in the noisy sensory milieu. PMID:23803766

  9. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  10. Vital staining of nerve structures with fluorescent dyes and optical determination of acetylcholine in the somatic muscle of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Volkov, M E

    2012-11-01

    Experiments with fluorescent dyes showed that high concentrations of K(+) ions in the medium depolarize the membrane and enhance exo-endocytosis in nerve structures, which is accompanied by an increase in acetylcholine concentration in the somatic muscle of earthworm. In the presence of BAPTA and without Ca(2+) exo-endocytosis is sharply decelerated, the level of acetylcholine in the muscle decreases, but remains relatively high. PMID:23330101

  11. External imaging of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.; Reba, R.C.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Hill, T.; Holman, B.L.; Budinger, T.; Conklin, J.J.; Eng, R.; Grissom, M.P.

    1984-01-20

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  12. External Imaging of Cerebral Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelman, William C.; Reba, Richard C.; Rzeszotarski, Waclaw J.; Gibson, Raymond E.; Hill, Thomas; Holman, B. Leonard; Budinger, Thomas; Conklin, James J.; Eng, Robert; Grissom, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  13. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  14. Relaxation measurements on the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, R E; Lester, H A

    1975-01-01

    In Electrophorus electroplaques, the agonist-induced postsynaptic conductance depends on membrane potential. During steady exposure to agonists, after a voltage step the conductance relaxes on a millisecond time scale, exponentially approaching a new equilibrium value. The relaxation rate constant k is an instantaneous function of voltage, insensitive to the past or present conductance. Two components sum to form k. A concentration-sensitive component increases linearly with agonist concentration and decreases during desensitization or exposure to curare. Thus this component reflects the average frequency at which acetylcholine receptors are opening. The voltage-sensitive component, obtained by extrapolating k to zero agonist concentration, increases at more positive potentials. For acetylcholine, the voltage-sensitive component equals the rate constant for the exponential decay of postsynaptic currents; it thus seems to be the closing rate for active receptors. The voltage-sensitive component has the relative amplitudes acetylcholine less than carbamoylcholine less than decamethonium, and for each agonist equals the closing rate determined from "noise" measurements at neuromuscular junctions. The kinetic data explain several aspects of the steady-state conductance induced by agonists, but shed no light on apparent cooperative effects. PMID:1059136

  15. The gating isomerization of neuromuscular acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptor-channels are allosteric proteins that isomerize (‘gate’) between conformations that have a low vs. high affinity for the transmitter and conductance for ions. In order to comprehend the mechanism by which the affinity and conductance changes are linked it is of value to know the magnitude, timing and distribution of energy flowing through the system. Knowing both the di- and unliganded gating equilibrium constants (E2 and E0) is a foundation for understanding the AChR gating mechanism and for engineering both the ligand and the protein to operate in predictable ways. In adult mouse neuromuscular receptors activated by acetylcholine, E2= 28 and E0≈ 6.5 × 10−7. At each (equivalent) transmitter binding site acetylcholine provides ∼5.2 kcal mol−1 to motivate the isomerization. The partial agonist choline provides ∼3.3 kcal mol−1. The relative time of a residue's gating energy change is revealed by the slope of its rate–equilibrium constant relationship. A map of this parameter suggests that energy propagates as a conformational cascade between the transmitter binding sites and the gate region. Although gating energy changes are widespread throughout the protein, some residues are particularly sensitive to perturbations. Several specific proposals for the structural events that comprise the gating conformational cascade are discussed. PMID:19933754

  16. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-28

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. PMID:26750302

  17. [Sites of synthesis of acetylcholine receptors in denervated muscles].

    PubMed

    Giacobini Robecchi, M G; Garelli, M; Filogamo, G

    1980-09-01

    Muscle fibres binding with 125I alpha-bungarotoxine from Bungarus Multicinctus, after treatment with saponine, shows (in electron microscope autoradiography) intracellular binding sites identifying sites of acetylcholine receptor synthesis. In innervated muscle, the acetylcholine receptor is located only at the neuromuscular junction. In denervated muscle the receptor is distributed along the whole sarcolemma; in this situation the acetylcholine receptor is synthesized "ex novo" in the membrane system over the whole length of the muscle fibre. PMID:7214035

  18. Accumbens dopamine-acetylcholine balance in approach and avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Hoebel, Bartley G.; Avena, Nicole M.; Rada, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Summary Understanding systems for approach and avoidance is basic for behavioral neuroscience. Research on the neural organization and functions of the dorsal striatum in movement disorders, such as Huntington's and Parkinson's Disease, can inform the study of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in motivational disorders, such as addiction and depression. We propose opposing roles for dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) in the NAc in the control of GABA output systems for approach and avoidance. Contrary to DA, which fosters approach, ACh release is a correlate or cause of meal satiation, conditioned taste aversion and aversive brain stimulation. ACh may also counteract excessive DA-mediated approach behavior as revealed during withdrawal from drugs of abuse or sugar, when the animal enters an ACh-mediated state of anxiety and behavioral depression. This review summarizes evidence that ACh is important in the inhibition of behavior when extracellular DA is high and the generation of an anxious or depressed state when DA is relatively low. PMID:18023617

  19. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  20. Endocrine responses to intra-aortic infusions of acetylcholine in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C T; Edwards, A V; Bloom, S R

    1991-01-01

    1. Adrenal responses to intra-aortic infusions of acetylcholine (4.5 nmol min-1 kg-1 for 10 min) have been investigated in conscious, functionally hypophysectomized, 3- to 6-week-old calves, in the presence and absence of exogenous ACTH (2 ng min-1 kg-1, I.V.). 2. Acetylcholine produced a substantial fall in adrenal vascular resistance, which was significantly reduced in the presence of exogenous ACTH, while producing minimal changes in aortic blood pressure and heart rate. 3. There was also a significant rise in right adrenal cortisol output which was sufficient to produce a measurable rise in plasma cortisol concentration. The effect could be accounted for by the increase in adrenal ACTH presentation. It was abolished by pre-treatment with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1). A small but significant rise in aldosterone output during acetylcholine infusions was also abolished in the presence of ACTH. 4. Both adrenaline and noradrenaline were released during intra-aortic acetylcholine infusions and these responses were substantially reduced, but not abolished, by pre-treatment with atropine. 5. Acetylcholine also stimulated the release of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and [Met5]enkephalins from the gland. The output of CRF was enhanced and that of free [Met5]enkephalin was significantly reduced in the presence of exogenous ACTH. All these responses were largely, but not completely, suppressed by atropine. 6. Acetylcholine also promoted the release of the pancreatic hormones glucagon, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). The amounts of pancreatic glucagon and insulin that were released were highly dependent on the concentration of glucose in the circulating plasma and all these responses were abolished by atropine. 7. It is concluded that acetylcholine is capable of stimulating the release of a wide variety of agonists from the adrenal gland when infused intra-aortically at a dose of 4.5 nmol min-1 kg-1. The increase in cortisol output appears to be secondary to an

  1. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  2. Promotion of Cell Migration by Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Is Enhanced by PSA in a Polysialyltransferase-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  3. Neural Correlates of Enhanced Visual Short-Term Memory for Angry Faces: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Margaret C.; Wolf, Claudia; Johnston, Stephen J.; Raymond, Jane E.; Linden, David E. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Fluid and effective social communication requires that both face identity and emotional expression information are encoded and maintained in visual short-term memory (VSTM) to enable a coherent, ongoing picture of the world and its players. This appears to be of particular evolutionary importance when confronted with potentially threatening displays of emotion - previous research has shown better VSTM for angry versus happy or neutral face identities. Methodology/Principal Findings Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, here we investigated the neural correlates of this angry face benefit in VSTM. Participants were shown between one and four to-be-remembered angry, happy, or neutral faces, and after a short retention delay they stated whether a single probe face had been present or not in the previous display. All faces in any one display expressed the same emotion, and the task required memory for face identity. We find enhanced VSTM for angry face identities and describe the right hemisphere brain network underpinning this effect, which involves the globus pallidus, superior temporal sulcus, and frontal lobe. Increased activity in the globus pallidus was significantly correlated with the angry benefit in VSTM. Areas modulated by emotion were distinct from those modulated by memory load. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide evidence for a key role of the basal ganglia as an interface between emotion and cognition, supported by a frontal, temporal, and occipital network. PMID:18958158

  4. Promotion of cell migration by neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is enhanced by PSA in a polysialyltransferase-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Wang, Xin; He, Fa

    2015-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule 140 (NCAM-140) is a glycoprotein and always highly polysialylated in cancer. Functions of polysialic acid (PSA) that binds to N-glycan termini on NCAM remain unclear. ldlD-14 cells, a CHO cell mutant deficient in UDP-Gal 4-epimerase, are useful for structural and functional studies of Gal-containing glycoproteins because their abnormal glycosylation can be converted to normal status by exogenous addition of galactose (Gal). We cloned the genes for NCAM-140 and for polysialyltransferases STX and PST (responsible for PSA synthesis) from normal murine mammary gland epithelial (NMuMG) cells and transfected them into ldlD-14 and human breast cancer cells MCF-7. The effect of PSA on NCAM-mediated cell proliferation, motility, migration and adhesion was studied. We found that NCAM-140 significantly promoted cell proliferation, motility and migration, while polysialylation of NCAM-140 catalyzed by STX, but not by PST, enhanced NCAM-mediated cell migration, but not cell proliferation or motility. In addition, PSA catalyzed by different polysialyltransferases affected the adhesion of NCAM to different extracellular matrix (ECM) components. PMID:25885924

  5. Enhancing glass ionomer cement features by using the HA/YSZ nanocomposite: a feed forward neural network modelling.

    PubMed

    Rajabzadeh, Ghadir; Salehi, Sahar; Nemati, Ali; Tavakoli, Razeih; Solati Hashjin, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    Despite brilliant properties of glass ionomer cement (GIC), its weak mechanical property poses an obstacle for its use in medical applications. The present research aims to formulate hydroxyapatite/yttria-stabilized zirconia (HA/YSZ) in the composition of GIC to enhance mechanical properties and to improve fluoride release of GIC. HA/YSZ was synthesized via a sol-gel method and characterized by applying X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. The synthesized nanocomposite was mixed with GIC at a fixed composition of 5wt%. The effect of different weight percentages of YSZ:HA on GIC was investigated by measuring the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, microhardness and fluoride release. The results showed that, after 1 and 7 days of setting, the 20wt% nanohydroxyapatite/80wt% stabilized zirconia cement exhibited higher compressive strength (1857-245MPa), higher diametral tensile strength (11-14MPa) and greater microhardness (104-106MPa) as compared with the pure GIC (65-88MPa in compressive strength, 5-9.5MPa in diametral tensile strength and 70-89MPa in microhardness). The reinforced cement, also, exhibited higher fluoride release compared with pure GIC. The artificial neural network (ANN) was trained for modeling the system. Results obtained by ANN have proved to be completely in accordance with expectations. PMID:24140732

  6. Neural Progenitor Cell Transplantation Promotes Neuroprotection, Enhances Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Improves Cognitive Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Meghan O.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) may be a potential treatment strategy for traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to their intrinsic advantages, including the secretion of neurotrophins. Neurotrophins are critical for neuronal survival and repair, but their clinical use is limited. In this study, we hypothesized that pericontusional transplantation of NPCs genetically modified to secrete a synthetic, human multineurotrophin (MNTS1) would overcome some of the limitations of traditional neurotrophin therapy. MNTS1 is a multifunctional neurotrophin that binds all three tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors, recapitulating the prosurvival activity of 3 endogenous mature neurotrophins. NPCs obtained from rat fetuses at E15 were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing MNTS1 and GFP constructs (MNTS1-NPCs) or fluorescent constructs alone (control GFP-NPCs). Adult rats received fluid percussion-induced TBI or sham surgery. Animals were transplanted 1 week later with control GFP-NPCs, MNTS1-NPCs, or injected with saline (vehicle). At five weeks, animals were evaluated for hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Six weeks post surgery, we observed significant survival and neuronal differentiation of MNTS1-NPCs and injury-activated tropism towards contused regions. NPCs displayed processes that extended into several remote structures, including the hippocampus and contralateral cortex. Both GFP- and MNTS1-NPCs conferred significant preservation of pericontusional host tissues and enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. NPC transplantation improved spatial memory capacity on the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Transplant recipients exhibited escape latencies approximately half that of injured vehicle controls. While we observed greater transplant survival and neuronal differentiation of MNTS1-NPCs, our collective findings suggest that MNTS1 may be superfluous in terms of preserving the cytoarchitecture and rescuing behavioral deficits given the lack of significant

  7. Synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonist and phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor in releasing acetylcholine in pig gastric circular muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Romain A; Van Colen, Inge; Pauwelyn, Vicky; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2016-06-15

    5-HT4 receptor agonists have a gastroprokinetic effect by facilitating acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerves innervating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in the signal transduction pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on the cholinergic neurons towards the circular muscle layer in pig stomach was investigated by analysis of acetylcholine release. Circular muscle strips were prepared from pig proximal stomach and tritium outflow, induced by electrical field stimulation, was studied as a marker for acetylcholine release after incubation with [(3)H]-choline. The PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast concentration-dependently (0.1-1µM) enhanced the facilitating effect of a submaximally effective concentration of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride (0.01µM) on electrically induced acetylcholine release. Roflumilast (0.3µM) enhanced acetylcholine release per se but in the combined presence of roflumilast and prucalopride, acetylcholine release was enhanced more than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The 5-HT4 receptor agonist velusetrag concentration-dependently (0.01-0.1µM) enhanced acetylcholine release; the effect of the minimally effective concentration (0.01µM) was significantly enhanced by 1µM of the PDE4-inhibitor rolipram, again to a level higher than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonists and PDE4-inhibitors demonstrates that the intracellular pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on cholinergic neurons towards pig gastric circular muscle is controlled by PDE4. Combining a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with a PDE4-inhibitor might thus enhance its gastroprokinetic effect. PMID:27060014

  8. Role of acetylcholine receptors in proliferation and differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Resende, R.R.; Alves, A.S.; Britto, L.R.G; Ulrich, H.

    2008-04-15

    Coordinated proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells is the base for production of appropriate numbers of neurons and glia during neuronal development in order to establish normal brain functions. We have used murine embryonal carcinoma P19 cells as an in vitro model for early differentiation to study participation of nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine (mAChR) receptors in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and their differentiation to neurons. We have previously shown that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) already expressed in embryonic cells mediate elevations in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) via calcium influx through nAChR channels whereas intracellular stores contribute to nAChR- and mAChR-mediated calcium fluxes in differentiated cells [Resende et al., Cell Calcium 43 (2008) 107-121]. In the present study, we have demonstrated that nicotine provoked inhibition of proliferation in embryonic cells as determined by BrdU labeling. However, in neural progenitor cells nicotine stimulated proliferation which was reversed in the presence of inhibitors of calcium mobilization from intracellular stores, indicating that liberation of intracellular calcium contributed to this proliferation induction. Muscarine induced proliferation stimulation in progenitor cells by activation of G{alpha}{sub q/11}-coupled M{sub 1}, M{sub 3} and M{sub 5} receptors and intracellular calcium stores, whereas G{alpha}{sub i/o}-protein coupled M{sub 2} receptor activity mediated neuronal differentiation.

  9. Neural traces of stress: cortisol related sustained enhancement of amygdala-hippocampal functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vaisvaser, Sharon; Lin, Tamar; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Greenman, Yona; Stern, Naftali; Fruchter, Eyal; Wald, Ilan; Pine, Daniel S.; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Bar-Haim, Yair; Hendler, Talma

    2013-01-01

    Stressful experiences modulate neuro-circuitry function, and the temporal trajectory of these alterations, elapsing from early disturbances to late recovery, heavily influences resilience and vulnerability to stress. Such effects of stress may depend on processes that are engaged during resting-state, through active recollection of past experiences and anticipation of future events, all known to involve the default mode network (DMN). By inducing social stress and acquiring resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before stress, immediately following it, and 2 h later, we expanded the time-window for examining the trajectory of the stress response. Throughout the study repeated cortisol samplings and self-reports of stress levels were obtained from 51 healthy young males. Post-stress alterations were investigated by whole brain resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of two central hubs of the DMN: the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and hippocampus. Results indicate a ’recovery’ pattern of DMN connectivity, in which all alterations, ascribed to the intervening stress, returned to pre-stress levels. The only exception to this pattern was a stress-induced rise in amygdala-hippocampal connectivity, which was sustained for as long as 2 h following stress induction. Furthermore, this sustained enhancement of limbic connectivity was inversely correlated to individual stress-induced cortisol responsiveness (AUCi) and characterized only the group lacking such increased cortisol (i.e., non-responders). Our observations provide evidence of a prolonged post-stress response profile, characterized by both the comprehensive balance of most DMN functional connections and the distinct time and cortisol dependent ascent of intra-limbic connectivity. These novel insights into neuro-endocrine relations are another milestone in the ongoing search for individual markers in stress-related psychopathologies. PMID:23847492

  10. Synaptic modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in spinal ventral horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Mine, N; Taniguchi, W; Nishio, N; Izumi, N; Miyazaki, N; Yamada, H; Nakatsuka, T; Yoshida, M

    2015-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are distributed widely in the central nervous system and play important roles in higher brain functions, including learning, memory, and recognition. However, functions of the cholinergic system in spinal motoneurons remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the actions of presynaptic and postsynaptic nAChRs in spinal ventral horn neurons by performing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings on lumbar slices from male rats. The application of nicotine or acetylcholine generated slow inward currents and increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Slow inward currents by acetylcholine or nicotine were not inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or glutamate receptor antagonists. In the presence of TTX, the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were also increased by acetylcholine or nicotine. A selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE), significantly decreased nicotine-induced inward currents without affecting the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. In addition, a selective α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, methyllycaconitine, did not affect either nicotine-induced inward currents or the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. These results suggest that α4β2 AChRs are localized at postsynaptic sites in the spinal ventral horn, non-α4β2 and non-α7 nAChRs are located presynaptically, and nAChRs enhance excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal ventral horn. PMID:25613686

  11. Inhibition of the acetylcholine receptor by histrionicotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Anwyl, R.; Narahashi, T.

    1980-01-01

    1 The action of C5-decahydrohistrionicotoxin (C5-HTX) has been investigated on the extrajunctional acetylcholine (ACh) receptors of denervated rat muscle. 2 C5-HTX causes both a rapid and slow reduction in amplitude of iontophoretic ACh potentials evoked at all frequencies from the extrajunctional receptors. 3 C5-HTX also causes a time-dependent inhibition of the iontophoretic potentials evoked at frequencies greater than 0.02 Hz. This inhibition was observed either alone or superimposed upon desensitization, and may be caused by a similar mechanism to desensitization. PMID:7378635

  12. Acetylcholine determination of microdialysates of fetal neocortex grafts that induce recovery of learning.

    PubMed

    Miranda, M I; Bermúdez-Rattoni, F

    1998-03-01

    The microdialysis technique for acetylcholine (ACh) first became possible when sensitive and specific assays for ACh (pmol/sample range) were developed [G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, P. de Boer, J.B. de Vries, A.S. Horn, Determination of basal acetylcholine release in freely moving rats by transstriatal dialysis coupled to on-line HPLC analysis: pharmacological aspects, Life Sci. 43 (1988) 1161-1168; G. Damsma, B.H.C. Westerink, A. Imperato, H. Rollema, J.B. de Vries, A. S. Horn, Automated brain dialysis of acetylcholine in freely moving rats: detection of basal acetylcholine, Life Sci. 41 (1987) 873-876; P.E. Potter, J.L. Meek, N.H. Neff, Acetylcholine and choline in neural tissue measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, J. Neurochem. 41 (1983) 188-194; B.H.C. Westerink, G. Damsma, Determination of acetylcholine in microdialysates by HPLC and electrochemical detection, Neurosci. Protocols 20 (1993) 1-9.]. In the present protocol, the microdialysis technique was used to correlate ACh release with the recovery of the ability to acquire a conditioning taste aversion (CTA), by fetal brain grafts in insular cortex (IC) lesioned rats [M.I. Miranda, A.M. Lopez-Colome, F. Bermúdez Rattoni, Recovery of conditional taste aversion induced by fetal neocortex grafts. In vivo correlation of acetylcholine levels, Brain Res. 759 (1997) 141-148]. Three groups of IC lesioned rats showing disrupted CTA received cell suspension grafts of fetal tissue dissected from either the IC or occipital cortex (OC) of 16-day-old rat fetuses. One of the groups of IC-grafted animals was tested after 15 days post-graft; the other groups, IC- and OC-grafted animals, were tested after a recovery time of 45 days, as well as the groups of lesioned and unoperated animals used as control. After the CTA test, guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted into the IC of all groups. Two days later, microdialysis was performed to determine the extracellular levels of ACh inside the graft. The

  13. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  14. Self-incompatibility involved in the level of acetylcholine and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Takafumi; Akita, Isamu; Yoshino, Natsuko

    2007-11-01

    Elongation of pollen tubes in pistils after self-pollination of Lilium longiflorum cv. Hinomoto exhibiting strong gametophytic self-incompatibility was promoted by cAMP and also promoted by some metabolic modulators, namely, activators (forskolin and cholera toxin) of adenylate cyclase and inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and pertussis) of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. Moreover, the elongation was promoted by acetylcholine (ACh) and other choline derivatives, such as acetylthiocholine, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine and chlorocholinechloride [CCC; (2-chloroethyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride]. A potent inhibitor (neostigmine) of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as acetylcholine also promoted the elongation. cAMP enhanced choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and suppressed AChE activity in the pistils, suggesting that the results are closely correlated with self-incompatibility in L. longiflorum. In short, it came to light that cAMP modulates ChAT (acetylcholine-forming enzyme) and AChE (acetylchoine-decomposing enzyme) activities to enhance the level of ACh in the pistils of L. logiflorum after self-incompatible pollination. These results indicate that the self-incompatibility on self-pollination is caused by low levels of ACh and/or cAMP. PMID:19704589

  15. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  16. Spontaneous openings of the acetylcholine receptor channel.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B

    1984-01-01

    Patch clamp recordings from embryonic mouse muscle cells in culture revealed spontaneous openings of the acetylcholine receptor channel in the absence of exogenously applied cholinergic agent. The conductance of the spontaneous channel currents was, within experimental error, identical with the conductance of suberyldicholine-activated channel currents. The comparison of channel conductance was made with sodium and with cesium, each at two concentrations, with the same result. Treatment of the cells with alpha-bungarotoxin blocked the spontaneous channel currents. To determine whether the spontaneous openings were caused by an endogenous agent with cholinergic activity a reactive disulfide bond near the receptor binding site was reduced with dithiothreitol and alkylated with N-ethylmaleimide. This chemical modification reduced the effectiveness with which suberyldicholine and curare activated channel currents but did not reduce the frequency of spontaneous openings. These experiments indicate that the acetylcholine receptor briefly and infrequently fluctuates into an active state in the absence of agonist. Agonist activation of the receptor presumably accelerates this spontaneously occurring process. PMID:6328531

  17. Measurement of Acetylcholine from Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jamie K.; Brown, Kathleen C.; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor for the development of lung cancer. It is estimated that smoking is associated with 80–90% of lung cancer cases throughout the world (see References 1 and 2). The addictive component of cigarette smoke is nicotine. Our published data shows that nicotine promotes the production of acetylcholine (ACh) in human bronchioalveolar carcinoma cells (BACs) (Lau et al., 2013). ACh functions as a growth factor in human BACs. The following protocol is based on a published protocol by (Song et al., 2003), with some modifications (Lau et al., 2013; Song et al., 2008; Song et al., 2003; Sekhon et al., 2003). An important point to remember is that fetal bovine serum (FBS) contains a high amount of acetylcholine (ACh). Therefore, cells must be cultured in serum-free medium to measure ACh in the culture supernatant. Two aliquots of the culture supernatant are used for analysis. This protocol measures the total choline in the cell supernatent under two conditions: 1) After treatment with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which converts the ACh to choline (also called the total choline sample) and 2) after measuring the amount of free choline in the sample. The concentration of ACh in the sample calculated by subtracting the free choline from the total choline.

  18. Evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, T; Illing, R B; Starke, K

    1987-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase staining and studies on the uptake of [3H]choline into the subsequent efflux of tritium from collicular slices were carried out in order to provide evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus. Acetylcholinesterase staining was dense and homogeneous in superficial layers whereas the staining was arranged in patches with slightly higher density caudally than rostrally in the intermediate layers. The accumulation of tritium in slices incubated with [3H]choline depended on time, temperature and concentration, and was inhibited by hemicholinium-3. Accumulation was slightly higher in caudal than in rostral slices. Electrical stimulation enhanced tritium outflow from slices preincubated with [3H]choline. Tetrodotoxin and a low calcium medium inhibited the evoked overflow whereas hemicholinium-3 caused an enhancement. Oxotremorine decreased the evoked overflow; atropine prevented this effect. The opioids [D-Ala2, MePhe4, Glycol5]enkephalin, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and ethylketocyclazocine caused an inhibition. The effects of the latter two agonists were antagonized by naloxone. The GABAB-receptor-agonist (-)-baclofen decreased the evoked overflow at lower concentrations than GABA, whereas the GABAA-receptor-agonist muscimol was ineffective. Serotonin produced an inhibition which was prevented by metitepin, alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor as well as dopamine-receptor ligands caused no change. It is concluded that in the rabbit superior colliculus the pattern of acetylcholinesterase staining is comparable, but not identical to the distribution in other species. The accumulation of [3H]choline, as well as the tetrodotoxin-sensitive and calcium-dependent overflow of tritium upon electrical stimulation (reflecting presumably release of [3H]acetylcholine) indicate that acetylcholine has a neurotransmitter function in this tissue. The release of [3H]acetylcholine was modulated by various transmitter substances and

  19. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Effects of nicotine, methamphetamine and cocaine on extracellular levels of acetylcholine in the interpeduncular nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rifat J; Taraschenko, Olga D; Glick, Stanley D

    2008-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cholinergic habenulo-interpeduncular pathway and the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway may jointly mediate the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. However, the effects of addictive drug on the functioning of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway have not been well-characterized. Thus, several drugs of abuse (i.e., nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine) have been shown to alter the morphology of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, causing selective degeneration of the cholinergic neurons in this area. On the other hand, morphine was shown to alter the neurochemistry of the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, inducing biphasic changes in acetylcholine release in the interpeduncular nucleus. In order to determine the effects of cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine on cholinergic neurotransmission in the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, levels of acetylcholine were assessed during microdialysis in freely moving rats. Nicotine (0.1 and 0.4 mg/kg s.c.) produced a dose-dependent decrease in extracellular levels of acetylcholine, while methamphetamine (1 and 4 mg/kg i.p.) produced an increase in acetylcholine release in the interpeduncular nucleus. Cocaine (5 and 20 mg/kg i.p.) produced a biphasic effect on extracellular acetylcholine release, i.e., a low dose enhanced the release of acetylcholine and a high dose decreased its release. These results suggest that the habenulo-intepeduncular pathway may be a common target for drugs of abuse and, by modulating the mesolimbic pathway, may mediate unique aspects of the rewarding effects of different drugs. PMID:18583043

  1. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. PMID:17349863

  2. Neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention are enhanced by computerized training: Electrophysiological evidence from language-impaired and typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Courtney; Fanning, Jessica; Coch, Donna; Sanders, Lisa; Neville, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Recent proposals suggest that some interventions designed to improve language skills might also target or train selective attention. The present study examined whether six weeks of high-intensity (100 min/day) training with a computerized intervention program designed to improve language skills would also influence neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention previously shown to be deficient in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Twenty children received computerized training, including 8 children diagnosed with SLI and 12 children with typically developing language. An additional 13 children with typically developing language received no specialized training (NoTx control group) but were tested and retested after a comparable time period to control for maturational and test-retest effects. Before and after training (or a comparable delay period for the NoTx control group), children completed standardized language assessments and an event-related brain potential (ERP) measure of selective auditory attention. Relative to the NoTx control group, children receiving training showed increases in standardized measures of receptive language. In addition, children receiving training showed larger increases in the effects of attention on neural processing following training relative to the NoTx control group. The enhanced effect of attention on neural processing represented a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.8), and was specific to changes in signal enhancement of attended stimuli. These findings indicate that the neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention, previously shown to be deficient in children with SLI, can be remediated through training and can accompany improvements on standardized measures of language. Section Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience PMID:18353284

  3. Topographical studies of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. [Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemas, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    All four subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in membrane vesicles isolated from Torpedo californica have been labeled with the photoactivated hydrophobic probe, (/sup 3/H)adamantanediazirine, which selectively labels regions of integral membrane proteins in contact with the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer. All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor in membrane vesicles isolated from Torpedo californica have been labeled with (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl diazoacetate. As this probe incorporates into lipid bilayers analogously to cholesterol, this result indicates that acetylcholine receptor interacts with cholesterol. Since the photogenerated carbene is situated near the lipid-water interface, this probe has potential as a topographic tool for mapping membrane protein structure. The labeling studies with both (/sup 3/H)adamantanediazirine and (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl diazoacetate support the concept that the acetylcholine receptor is a pseudosymmetric complex of homologous subunits, all of which interact with and span the membrane. The synthesis of the fluorine-containing agonists for the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, fluoroacetylcholine bromide and p-fluorophenyltrimethylammonium iodide, are described. It is demonstrated that both are agonists using a cation flux assay with acetylcholine receptor enriched membrane vesicles. The affinity cleavage reagent, p-thiocyanophenyltrimethylammonium iodide, specifically cleaves a peptide bond of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in membrane vesicles isolated from Torpedo californica. It is demonstrated that this reagent is an agonist using a cation flux assay. The cleavage is blocked by stoichiometric quantities of ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin.

  4. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Frank R.; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  5. Allosteric interactions of quaternary strychnine and brucine derivatives with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gharagozloo, P; Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1999-02-11

    The affinity and allosteric properties of 22 quaternary derivatives of strychnine and brucine at the m1-m4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors have been analyzed and compared. The subtype selectivity, in terms of affinity, was in general m2 > m4 > m1 > m3. The highest affinities were found for N-benzyl, N-2-naphthylmethyl, and N-4-biphenylylmethyl strychnine (13, 14, and 18, respectively). All the strychnine and brucine derivatives were positively cooperative with the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine, at m2 receptors and, in the case of the strychnine analogues, were positively cooperative with N-methylscopolamine at least at one other subtype. The strychnine analogues were negatively cooperative with the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at all subtypes whereas brucine and five of the six derivatives examined were positively cooperative with acetylcholine at one or more subtypes (m1-m5) and exhibited different patterns of subtype selectivity. The ability to generate subtype-selective allosteric enhancers of acetylcholine binding and function may be of use in the development of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:9986715

  6. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  7. Cardiac acetylcholine concentration in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, A.; Yasuda, H.; Shimono, H.; Takechi, S.; Maruyama, Y.

    1988-01-01

    We measured cardiac acetylcholine (ACh) in mice using four different methods. The mice in the in vivo irradiation group received microwave irradiation and then the hearts were removed. The animals in the in vitro irradiation group were decapitated and only the hearts were irradiated. The animals in the non-frozen group were decapitated and ACh was measured soon after the removal of the heart. The animals in the frozen group were decapitated and the hearts were frozen. There were significant differences in ACh concentrations between the in vivo irradiation group and the other groups. We also measured the ACh concentrations in both atria and ventricles after the mice were irradiated while alive. The atrial ACh concentration 1.70 +/- 0.70 nmol/g (mean +/- SD) was significantly higher than the ventricle concentration 1.07 +/- 0.30. We concluded the microwave irradiation of animals was suitable method of sacrifice for the measurement of cardiac ACh.

  8. [Desensitization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor].

    PubMed

    Quiñonez, M; Rojas, L

    1994-01-01

    In biological membranes, ionic channels act speeding up ion movements. Each ionic channel is excited by a specific stimulus (i.e. electric, mechanical, chemical, etc.). Chemically activated ionic channels (CAIC), such as the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), suffer desensitization when the receptor site is still occupied by the agonist molecule. The desensitized CAIC is a non functional channel state regarded as a particular case of receptors rundown. CAIC desensitization only involve reduced activity and not their membrane elimination. Desensitization is important to control synaptic transmission and the development of the nervous system. In this review we discuss results related to its production, modulation and some aspects associated to models that consider it. Finally, an approach combining molecular biology and electrophysiology techniques to understand desensitization and its importance in biological systems is presented. PMID:8525756

  9. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lebbe, Eline K. M.; Peigneur, Steve; Wijesekara, Isuru; Tytgat, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV), potassium- (KV), and calcium- (CaV) channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action of several conotoxins has been the subject of investigation, while for many others this remains unknown. This review aims to give an overview of the knowledge we have today on the molecular pharmacology of conotoxins specifically interacting with nAChRs along with the structure–function relationship data. PMID:24857959

  10. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are prototypical Family A G protein coupled-receptors. The five mAChR subtypes are widespread throughout the periphery and the central nervous system and, accordingly, are widely involved in a variety of both physiological and pathophysiological processes. There currently remains an unmet need for better therapeutic agents that can selectively target a given mAChR subtype to the relative exclusion of others. The main reason for the lack of such selective mAChR ligands is the high sequence homology within the acetylcholine-binding site (orthosteric site) across all mAChRs. However, the mAChRs possess at least one, and likely two, extracellular allosteric binding sites that can recognize small molecule allosteric modulators to regulate the binding and function of orthosteric ligands. Extensive studies of prototypical mAChR modulators, such as gallamine and alcuronium, have provided strong pharmacological evidence, and associated structure-activity relationships (SAR), for a “common” allosteric site on all five mAChRs. These studies are also supported by mutagenesis experiments implicating the second extracellular loop and the interface between the third extracellular loop and the top of transmembrane domain 7 as contributing to the common allosteric site. Other studies are also delineating the pharmacology of a second allosteric site, recognized by compounds such as staurosporine. In addition, allosteric agonists, such as McN-A-343, AC-42 and N-desmethylclozapine, have also been identified. Current challenges to the field include the ability to effectively detect and validate allosteric mechanisms, and to quantify allosteric effects on binding affinity and signaling efficacy to inform allosteric modulator SAR. PMID:19305798

  11. [Probable mechanism of recognition of cholinergic ligands by acetylcholine receptors].

    PubMed

    Demushkin, V P; Kotelevtsev, Iu V; Pliashkevich, Iu G; Khramtsov, N V

    1982-01-01

    Dryding's models were used for the conformational analysis of compounds affecting muscarin-specific acetylcholine receptor and nicotin-specific acetylcholine receptor. Ammonium group and ether oxygen (3.6 A apart from the ammonium group) specifically oriented to each other were shown to be necessary structural elements to reveal muscarin-type cholinergic activity. Ammonium group along with carbonyl oxygen or its substituent (5 A distance) are the necessary structural units providing nicotin-type cholinergic activity. The presence of two hydrophobic substituents (one in the ammonium area and the other neighbouring the second active grouping) is the additional factor. The developed principles were justified by the use of a series of synthetic samples. The compounds were obtained likely favouring affinitive modification of acetylcholine receptor (dissociation constants of acetylcholine receptor complexes equalling to 10(-4)--10(-7) M-1). PMID:7070378

  12. New Insights on Plant Cell Elongation: A Role for Acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Fornaciari, Silvia; Barozzi, Fabrizio; Piro, Gabriella; Arru, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response. PMID:24642879

  13. New insights on plant cell elongation: a role for acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Fornaciari, Silvia; Barozzi, Fabrizio; Piro, Gabriella; Arru, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response. PMID:24642879

  14. Enhanced viability and neural differential potential in poor post-thaw hADSCs by agarose multi-well dishes and spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoling; Li, Shanyi; Ji, Qingshan; Lian, Ruiling; Chen, Jiansu

    2015-10-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) are potential adult stem cells source for cell therapy. But hADSCs with multi-passage or cryopreservation often revealed poor growth performance. The aim of our work was to improve the activity of poor post-thaw hADSCs by simple and effective means. We describe here a simple method based on commercially available silicone micro-wells for creating hADSCs spheroids to improve viability and neural differentiation potential on poor post-thaw hADSCs. The isolated hADSCs positively expresse d CD29, CD44, CD105, and negatively expressed CD34, CD45, HLA-DR by flow cytometry. Meanwhile, they had adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. The post-thaw and post-spheroid hADSCs from poor growth status hADSCs showed a marked increase in cell proliferation by CKK-8 analysis, cell cycle analysis and Ki67/P27 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. They also displayed an increase viability of anti-apoptosis by annexin v and propidium iodide assays and mitochondrial membrane potential assays. After 3 days of neural induction, the neural differentiation potential of post-thaw and post-spheroid hADSCs could be enhanced by qPCR analysis and western blotting analysis. These results suggested that the spheroid formation could improve the viability and neural differentiation potential of bad growth status hADSCs, which is conducive to ADSCs research and cell therapy. PMID:26054839

  15. Microtubule disrupting chemotherapeutics result in enhanced proteasome-mediated degradation and disappearance of tubulin in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Lyn M.; Sackett, Dan L.; Poruchynsky, Marianne S.; Fojo, Tito

    2010-01-01

    We sought to examine the effects of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) on neural cells to better understand the problem of neurotoxicity, their principal side effect, and to possibly develop a model of clinical toxicity. Studies showed that microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDAs) not only disassembled microtubules in neural HCN2 cells but also led to rapid disappearance of tubulin and that this was specific for MDAs. Tubulin levels fell to 20% as early as 8 hours after adding vincristine and to 1–30% (mean, 9.8 ± 7.6%; median of 7%) after 100 nM VCR for 24 hours. This disappearance was reversible. An increase in both glu-terminated and acetylated tubulin, markers of stable tubulin, preceded re-accumulation of soluble tubulin, suggesting a priority for stabilizing tubulin first as microtubules, prior to replenishing the soluble pool. Similar results were demonstrated with other MDAs. Furthermore, microtubule reassembly did not arise from a central focus but instead appeared to involve dispersed nucleation, as evidenced by the appearance of small stable microtubule stubs throughout the cytoplasm. In contrast, experiments with four non-neural “normal” cell lines and four cancer cell lines resulted in microtubule de-stabilization but only modest tubulin degradation. Evidence for proteasome-mediated degradation was obtained by demonstrating that adding a proteasome inhibitor prior to vincristine prevented tubulin disappearance. In summary, MDAs lead to rapid disappearance of tubulin in neural but not other normal cells or cancer cells. These results underscore the fine control that occurs in neural cells and may further our understanding of neurotoxicity following MDAs. PMID:20587529

  16. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock-down mice show sexual dimorphism on memory.

    PubMed

    Capettini, Suellem B; Moraes, Márcio F D; Prado, Vânia F; Prado, Marco A M; Pereira, Grace S

    2011-04-25

    The key neural substrates involved in memory and cognitive tasks have been reported to receive important modulation from ovarian hormones. In fact, neurochemical systems associated with cognitive functions, such as the cholinergic system, are, at least in part, under modulation of estrogens. Here we show that vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) mutant mice, which express lower levels of the VAChT (VAChT KD) and reduced acetylcholine release, present sexual dimorphism on memory. We evaluate short- and long-term object recognition memories (STM and LTM) in both sexes. We have showed previously, and confirm here, that VAChT KDHET male mice present deficits in both STM and LTM object recognition memories in comparison with WT. In contrast, VAChT KDHET female mice present deficit in LTM, but not in STM. To test if the female hormones levels could be a determinant factor on sexual dimorphism observed, we submitted female mice to ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-surgery. After 1 week (1 w), we evaluate STM. Female hormone deprivation promotes STM impairment in VAChT KDHET, but not in WT female mice. Our results strongly suggest that the sexual dimorphism observed in VAChT KDHET mice on STM is due to modulation of cholinergic system by ovarian hormones. PMID:21329745

  17. Methodologic aspects of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Hansen, K; Nedergaard, O A

    1999-08-01

    The acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit isolated thoracic aorta precontracted by phenylephrine was studied. Phenylephrine caused a steady contraction that was maintained for 6 h. In the presence of calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and ascorbic acid the contraction decreased with time. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine abolished the inhibitory effect of EDTA and ascorbic acid. Acetylcholine evoked a rapid concentration-dependent relaxation that recovered spontaneously and slowly, but fully, with time. Relaxation evoked by equieffective concentrations of carbachol and acetylcholine had the same time course. Cumulative addition of acetylcholine (10(-7)-3 x 10(-5) M) caused a marked relaxation that was reverted slightly at high concentrations. The relaxation was the same with rings derived from the upper, middle, and lower part of the thoracic aorta. Two consecutive concentration-response curves for acetylcholine obtained at a 2-h interval demonstrated a slight development of tachyphylaxis. The relaxation was inversely related to precontractile tension evoked by phenylephrine when expressed as a percentage, but independent when expressed as g tension. Storage of aorta in cold salt solution for 24 h did not alter the relaxation. EDTA and ascorbic acid did not alter the relaxation. It is concluded that (1) EDTA and ascorbic acid can not be used with impunity to stabilize catecholamines used as preconstriction agents; (2) the reversal of the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation is not due to hydrolysis of acetylcholine; (3) the relaxation is uniform in all segments of thoracic aorta; (4) cold storage of aorta does not alter the relaxation; and (5) acetylcholine releases the same amount of relaxing factor, irrespective of the precontractile tension. PMID:10691020

  18. Bolus injection of acetylcholine terminates atrial fibrillation in rats.

    PubMed

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Goldberg, Yuri; Ovsyshcher, I Eli

    2008-01-28

    It is well established that a tonic increase in the availability of the atrial muscarinic K(+) channels, either by enhanced vagal tone or by steady infusion of a low-dose of cholinergic or adenosine receptor agonists, promotes the genesis of atrial fibrillation. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that bolus administration of a muscarinic receptor agonist would destabilize and terminate atrial arrhythmia by uniformly and transiently activating K(+) channels throughout the atria, and that if the agonist was rapidly hydrolysable, it would dissipate before the more tonic, pro-arrhythmic effects could take hold. The episodes of untreated atrial fibrillation, induced in anesthetized rats by programmed electrical stimulation via trans-esophageal bipolar catheter, lasted on average 8.6+/-2.2 min (n=32). Intravenous injection of a model hydrolysable muscarinic agonist, acetylcholine (0.2 mg/kg body weight), converted atrial fibrillation into sinus rhythm within 8.4+/-1.9 s (n=10, P<0.05). The termination of an atrial fibrillation episode was always accompanied by transient bradycardia; the sinus rhythm gradually accelerated and reached pre-atrial fibrillation values within 10-20 s of injection. In conclusion, our evidence indicates that bolus administration of rapidly hydrolysable muscarinic agonist could be an effective way to pharmacologically terminate atrial fibrillation and restore sinus rhythm. PMID:18078927

  19. Increased expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Clare; Pette, Dirk; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2003-01-10

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation has been used as a model for investigating responses of skeletal muscle fibres to enhanced neuromuscular activity under conditions of maximum activation. Fast-to-slow isoform shifting of markers of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the contractile apparatus demonstrated successful fibre transitions prior to studying the effect of chronic electro-stimulation on the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Comparative immunoblotting revealed that the alpha- and delta-subunits of the receptor were increased in 10-78 day stimulated specimens, while an associated component of the surface utrophin-glycoprotein complex, beta-dystroglycan, was not drastically changed in stimulated fast skeletal muscle. Previous studies have shown that electro-stimulation induces degeneration of fast glycolytic fibres, trans-differentiation leading to fast-to-slow fibre transitions and activation of muscle precursor cells. In analogy, our results indicate a molecular modification of the central functional unit of the post-synaptic muscle surface within existing neuromuscular junctions and/or during remodelling of nerve-muscle contacts. PMID:12504123

  20. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Monica S; De Jaeger, Xavier; Raulic, Sanda; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X; Schmid, Susanne; Menon, Ravi S; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-11-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN) and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease. PMID:22087075

  1. Bridging the divide between sensory integration and binding theory: Using a binding-like neural synchronization mechanism to model sensory enhancements during multisensory interactions.

    PubMed

    Billock, Vincent A; Tsou, Brian H

    2014-07-01

    Neural information combination problems are ubiquitous in cognitive neuroscience. Two important disciplines, although conceptually similar, take radically different approaches to these problems. Sensory binding theory is largely grounded in synchronization of neurons responding to different aspects of a stimulus, resulting in a coherent percept. Sensory integration focuses more on the influences of the senses on each other and is largely grounded in the study of neurons that respond to more than one sense. It would be desirable to bridge these disciplines, so that insights gleaned from either could be harnessed by the other. To link these two fields, we used a binding-like oscillatory synchronization mechanism to simulate neurons in rattlesnake that are driven by one sense but modulated by another. Mutual excitatory coupling produces synchronized trains of action potentials with enhanced firing rates. The same neural synchronization mechanism models the behavior of a population of cells in cat visual cortex that are modulated by auditory activation. The coupling strength of the synchronizing neurons is crucial to the outcome; a criterion of strong coupling (kept weak enough to avoid seriously distorting action potential amplitude) results in intensity-dependent sensory enhancement-the principle of inverse effectiveness-a key property of sensory integration. PMID:24456391

  2. Ionophoretically applied acetylcholine and vagal stimulation in the arrested sinus venosus of the toad, Bufo marinus.

    PubMed Central

    Bramich, N J; Brock, J A; Edwards, F R; Hirst, G D

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine (ACh), applied by ionophoresis, on the isolated arrested sinus venosus of the toad, Bufo marinus, were examined. 2. At each position where ACh was applied across the surface of sinus venosus preparations, a hyperpolarization was produced. These responses were abolished by hyoscine, indicating that muscarinic cholinoceptors are widely distributed over the surface of these muscle cells. 3. Vagal stimulation produced hyperpolarizations which were mimicked, to some extent, by ionophoretically applied ACh. 4. The responses to ionophoretically applied ACh were abolished by adding barium ions to the perfusion fluid, whereas responses to vagal stimulation persisted. 5. The responses to ionophoretically applied ACh were consistently slower than those to vagal stimulation. It is argued that the pathways activated by neural and applied ACh have different kinetics of activation. PMID:7965847

  3. Subtype-selective positive cooperative interactions between brucine analogs and acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors: functional studies.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J; Farries, T; Gharagozloo, P; Kobayashi, S; Lazareno, S; Sugimoto, M

    1999-04-01

    In radioligand binding studies, it has been reported that brucine, N-chloromethyl brucine, and brucine N-oxide increased the affinity of acetylcholine for M1, M3, and M4 muscarinic receptors, respectively, in a manner consistent with the predictions of the ternary complex allosteric model. We now demonstrate an equivalent ability of these three allosteric agents to modulate the actions of acetylcholine in functional studies in membranes and in whole cells. The enhancing actions of brucine and brucine N-oxide on acetylcholine (ACh) potency at M1 and M4 receptors respectively have been confirmed in guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate, GTPase, cAMP, and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization assays of function. In general, neither the basal nor the maximally stimulated response to ACh is affected. The subtype-selective allosteric effects of N-chloromethyl brucine on M2 and M3 receptors were shown to be qualitatively and quantitatively the same in guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate functional assays, in terms of both its affinity and cooperativity with ACh, as those found in binding assays. Neutral cooperativity of N-chloromethyl brucine with ACh on M4 receptor function was also observed, thereby demonstrating its "absolute subtype selectivity": a lack of action at any concentration at M4 receptors and an action at M2 and M3 receptors. The enhancing action of N-chloromethyl brucine on neurogenically released ACh binding at M3 receptors was also detected in whole tissue as an increased contraction of the isolated guinea pig ileum to submaximal electrical stimulation. In conclusion, these functional studies confirm that brucine analogs are allosteric enhancers of ACh affinity at certain muscarinic receptor subtypes. PMID:10101037

  4. Modal gating of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vij, Ridhima

    Many ion channels exhibit multiple patterns of kinetic activity in single-channel currents. This behavior is rare in WT mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), where A2C↔A2O gating events are well-described by single exponentials. Also, single-channel open probability (PO) is essentially homogeneous at a given agonist concentration in the WT receptors. Here I report that perturbations of almost all the residues in loop C (alpha188-alpha199, at the agonist binding site) generate heterogeneity in PO ('modes'). Such unsettled activity was apparent with an alanine substitution at all positions in loop C (except alphaY190 and alphaY198) and with different side chain substitutions at alphaP197 for both adult- and fetal-type AChRs. I used single channel electrophysiology along with site-directed mutagenesis to study modal gating in AChRs consequent to mutations/deletions in loop C. The multiple patterns of kinetic activity arose from the difference in agonist affinity rather than in intrinsic AChR gating. Out of the four different agonists used to study the modal behavior, acetylcholine (ACh) showed a higher degree of kinetic heterogeneity compared to others. The time constant for switching between modes was long (~mins), suggesting that they arise from alternative, stable protein conformations. By studying AChRs having only 1 functional binding site, I attempted to find the source of the affinity difference, which was traced mainly to the alphadelta agonist site. Affinity at the neurotransmitter binding site is mainly determined by a core of five aromatic residues (alphaY93, alphaW149, alphaY190, alphaY198 and deltaW57). Phenylalanine substitutions at all aromatic residues except alphaY93 resulted in elimination of modes. Modes were also eliminated by alanine mutation at deltaW57 on the complementary side but not at other aromatics. Also, by substituting four gamma subunit residues into the delta subunit on the complementary beta sheet, I found that

  5. Cardiac acetylcholine concentration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, A.; Yasuda, H.; Takechi, S.; Matsuo, H.; Maruyama, Y. Gunma Univ., Maebashi )

    1990-01-01

    Varying values for the acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat heart have been reported. The possibility that the method of sampling may influence prompted a comparison of heart levels of ACh obtained by two different procedures for sacrificing animals. One method was by microwave irradiation in vivo and the other being in vitro on the irradiated heart removed after decapitation. There were significant differences found in cardiac ACh concentration between the in vivo irradiated group and the decapitation groups. In decapitated animals, the cardiac ACh concentration became increasingly lower on standing. We also measured the ACh concentration of right atrium, left atrium, right ventricle and left ventricle. They were 4.62 {plus minus} 1.57 nmol/g (mean {plus minus} SD), 2.58 {plus minus} 1.01, 2.76 {plus minus} 1.00 and 2.12 {plus minus} 0.70, respectively. We conclude the microwave irradiation in vivo is a more appropriate method for determining the cardiac ACh concentration.

  6. Cholinesterase activity and exposure time to acetylcholine as factors influencing the muscarinic inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline overflow from guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Fuder, H.; Muscholl, E.; Wolf, K.

    1985-01-01

    Guinea-pig isolated atria were incubated and loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline. The release of 3H and of [3H]-noradrenaline was induced by field stimulation (6-9 trains of 150 pulses at 5 Hz). The stimulation-evoked overflows of 3H and of [3H]-noradrenaline were determined. In the absence of an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, acetylcholine (12 min preincubation before nerve stimulation, up to 10 microM) failed to inhibit the evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow. In the presence of atropine, an increase by acetylcholine of evoked release was observed in the same atria. In contrast, the selective muscarinic agonist methacholine significantly decreased the evoked overflow. The inhibition was antagonized by atropine. Methacholine did not enhance release in the presence of atropine. When present for only 2 min, acetylcholine 10 microM inhibited the evoked overflow and no facilitation of release was observed in the presence of atropine. In the presence of physostigmine, acetylcholine (12 min preincubation, 1 and 10 microM) inhibited evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow, but the overflow was increased by acetylcholine 10 microM in the presence of atropine. In the presence of cocaine, corticosterone, phentolamine, propranolol and hexamethonium together, acetylcholine 1 microM inhibited the evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow. The inhibition was significantly enhanced in the presence of physostigmine. It decreased with preincubation time of the agonist, despite the presence of physostigmine and constant replacement by new drug. Neither inhibition nor facilitation of evoked release was observed in the presence of atropine. It is concluded that a muscarinic inhibition by acetylcholine (upon prolonged exposure time) may be masked by a concomitant facilitation of release and/or desensitization of the muscarinic inhibitory mechanism. Furthermore, degradation by acetylcholinesterase contributes in part to the ineffectiveness of acetylcholine as a presynaptic inhibitor. When a

  7. The mechanism of acetylcholine receptor in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis and the role of HSP90 molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongbo; Chen, Siqia; Liao, Juan; Chen, Xiaopu; Xu, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As an autoimmune disease, myasthenia gravis is caused by the dysfunction of neural transmission. Acetylcholine is known to exert its function after entering into synaptic cleft through binding onto postsynaptic membrane. The role of acetylcholine in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis, however, remains unknown. A total of 38 myasthenia gravis patients and 27 healthy controls were included in this study for the detection of the expression of MuSK using immunofluorescent method. Expression of both MuSK and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by Western blot, followed by the correlation analysis between heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and IL-6 which were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In myasthenia gravis patients, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine at the postsynaptic membrane. Such accumulation of MuSK, however, did not occur in normal people. Meanwhile we also observed elevated expression of IL-6 in myasthenia gravis patients (p<0.05). ELISA assay showed higher expression of HSP90 in patients. Further signaling pathway screening revealed the activation of IL-6-mediated pathways including STAT3 and SPH2. In conclusion, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine in myasthenia gravis patients, with elevated expression. HSP90 in disease people can activate IL-6 mediated signaling pathways. PMID:27186300

  8. A supervised 'lesion-enhancement' filter by use of a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji

    2009-09-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has been an active area of study in medical image analysis. A filter for the enhancement of lesions plays an important role for improving the sensitivity and specificity in CAD schemes. The filter enhances objects similar to a model employed in the filter; e.g. a blob-enhancement filter based on the Hessian matrix enhances sphere-like objects. Actual lesions, however, often differ from a simple model; e.g. a lung nodule is generally modeled as a solid sphere, but there are nodules of various shapes and with internal inhomogeneities such as a nodule with spiculations and ground-glass opacity. Thus, conventional filters often fail to enhance actual lesions. Our purpose in this study was to develop a supervised filter for the enhancement of actual lesions (as opposed to a lesion model) by use of a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) in a CAD scheme for detection of lung nodules in CT. The MTANN filter was trained with actual nodules in CT images to enhance actual patterns of nodules. By use of the MTANN filter, the sensitivity and specificity of our CAD scheme were improved substantially. With a database of 69 lung cancers, nodule candidate detection by the MTANN filter achieved a 97% sensitivity with 6.7 false positives (FPs) per section, whereas nodule candidate detection by a difference-image technique achieved a 96% sensitivity with 19.3 FPs per section. Classification-MTANNs were applied for further reduction of the FPs. The classification-MTANNs removed 60% of the FPs with a loss of one true positive; thus, it achieved a 96% sensitivity with 2.7 FPs per section. Overall, with our CAD scheme based on the MTANN filter and classification-MTANNs, an 84% sensitivity with 0.5 FPs per section was achieved. First presented at the Seventh International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications, San Diego, CA, USA, 11-13 December 2008.

  9. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    PubMed

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. PMID:26572235

  10. FN-DFE: Fuzzy-Neural Data Fusion Engine for Enhanced State-Awareness of Resilient Hybrid Energy System

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrej Linda; Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2014-11-01

    Resiliency and improved state-awareness of modern critical infrastructures, such as energy production and industrial systems, is becoming increasingly important. As control systems become increasingly complex, the number of inputs and outputs increase. Therefore, in order to maintain sufficient levels of state-awareness, a robust system state monitoring must be implemented that correctly identifies system behavior even when one or more sensors are faulty. Furthermore, as intelligent cyber adversaries become more capable, incorrect values may be fed to the operators. To address these needs, this paper proposes a Fuzzy-Neural Data Fusion Engine (FN-DFE) for resilient state-awareness of control systems. The designed FN-DFE is composed of a three-layered system consisting of: 1) traditional threshold based alarms, 2) anomalous behavior detector using self-organizing fuzzy logic system, and 3) artificial neural network based system modeling and prediction. The improved control system state-awareness is achieved via fusing input data from multiple sources and combining them into robust anomaly indicators. In addition, the neural network based signal predictions are used to augment the resiliency of the system and provide coherent state-awareness despite temporary unavailability of sensory data. The proposed system was integrated and tested with a model of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) hybrid energy system facility know as HYTEST. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed FN-DFE provides timely plant performance monitoring and anomaly detection capabilities. It was shown that the system is capable of identifying intrusive behavior significantly earlier than conventional threshold based alarm systems.

  11. Intracoronary Acetylcholine Provocation Testing for Assessment of Coronary Vasomotor Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ong, Peter; Athanasiadis, Anastasios; Sechtem, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Intracoronary acetylcholine provocation testing (ACH-test) is an established method for assessment of epicardial coronary artery spasm in the catheterization laboratory which was introduced more than 30 years ago. Due to the short half-life of acetylcholine it can only be applied directly into the coronary arteries. Several studies have demonstrated the safety and clinical usefulness of this test. However, acetylcholine testing is only rarely applied in the U.S. or Europe. Nevertheless, it has been shown that 62% of Caucasian patients with stable angina and unobstructed coronary arteries on coronary angiography suffer from coronary vasomotor disorders that can be diagnosed with acetylcholine testing. In recent years it has been appreciated that the ACH-test not only assesses the presence of epicardial spasm but that it can also be useful for the detection of coronary microvascular spam. In such cases no epicardial spasm is seen after injection of acetylcholine but ischemic ECG shifts are present together with a reproduction of the patient's symptoms during the test. This article describes the experience with the ACH-test and its implementation in daily clinical routine. PMID:27583694

  12. The role of acetylcholine in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark J; Adinoff, Bryon

    2008-07-01

    Central nervous system cholinergic neurons arise from several discrete sources, project to multiple brain regions, and exert specific effects on reward, learning, and memory. These processes are critical for the development and persistence of addictive disorders. Although other neurotransmitters, including dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin, have been the primary focus of drug research to date, a growing preclinical literature reveals a critical role of acetylcholine (ACh) in the experience and progression of drug use. This review will present and integrate the findings regarding the role of ACh in drug dependence, with a primary focus on cocaine and the muscarinic ACh system. Mesostriatal ACh appears to mediate reinforcement through its effect on reward, satiation, and aversion, and chronic cocaine administration produces neuroadaptive changes in the striatum. ACh is further involved in the acquisition of conditional associations that underlie cocaine self-administration and context-dependent sensitization, the acquisition of associations in conditioned learning, and drug procurement through its effects on arousal and attention. Long-term cocaine use may induce neuronal alterations in the brain that affect the ACh system and impair executive function, possibly contributing to the disruptions in decision making that characterize this population. These primarily preclinical studies suggest that ACh exerts a myriad of effects on the addictive process and that persistent changes to the ACh system following chronic drug use may exacerbate the risk of relapse during recovery. Ultimately, ACh modulation may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment interventions in cocaine-addicted subjects. However, the complicated neurocircuitry of the cholinergic system, the multiple ACh receptor subtypes, the confluence of excitatory and inhibitory ACh inputs, and the unique properties of the striatal cholinergic interneurons suggest that a precise target of cholinergic

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis. PMID:26711579

  14. ROLE OF ACETYLCHOLINE IN RHYTHMIC SPONTANEOUS CONTRACTIONS OF RAT'S DUODENAL SMOOTH MUSCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study is to reexamine the role of endogenous acetylcholine in spontaneous contractions of smooth muscle whose contractions are associated with cell metabolism. The study does not attempt to define the role of endogenous acetylcholine.

  15. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  16. Cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum. II. Acetylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, R.; De Tejada, S.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. )

    1988-03-01

    Physiological and histochemical evidence indicates that cholinergic nerves may participate in mediating penile erection. Acetylcholine synthesis and release was studied in isolated human corporal tissue. Human corpus cavernosum incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline accumulated ({sup 3}H)choline and synthesized ({sup 3}H)acethylcholine in an concentration-dependent manner. ({sup 3}H)Acetylcholine accumulation by the tissue was inhibited by hemicholinium-3, a specific antagonist of the high-affinity choline transport in cholinergic nerves. Transmural electrical field stimulation caused release of ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine which was significantly diminished by inhibiting neurotransmission with calcium-free physiological salt solution or tetrodotoxin. These observations provide biochemical and physiological evidence for the existence of cholinergic innervation in human corpus cavernosum.

  17. Self-consistent signal-to-noise analysis of the statistical behavior of analog neural networks and enhancement of the storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiino, Masatoshi; Fukai, Tomoki

    1993-08-01

    Based on the self-consistent signal-to-noise analysis (SCSNA) capable of dealing with analog neural networks with a wide class of transfer functions, enhancement of the storage capacity of associative memory and the related statistical properties of neural networks are studied for random memory patterns. Two types of transfer functions with the threshold parameter θ are considered, which are derived from the sigmoidal one to represent the output of three-state neurons. Neural networks having a monotonically increasing transfer function FM, FM(u)=sgnu (||u||>θ), FM(u)=0 (||u||<=θ), are shown to make it impossible for the spin-glass state to coexist with retrieval states in a certain parameter region of θ and α (loading rate of memory patterns), implying the reduction of the number of spurious states. The behavior of the storage capacity with changing θ is qualitatively the same as that of the Ising spin neural networks with varying temperature. On the other hand, the nonmonotonic transfer function FNM, FNM(u)=sgnu (||u||<θ), FNM(u)=0 (||u||>=θ) gives rise to remarkable features in several respects. First, it yields a large enhancement of the storage capacity compared with the Amit-Gutfreund-Sompolinsky (AGS) value: with decreasing θ from θ=∞, the storage capacity αc of such a network is increased from the AGS value (~=0.14) to attain its maximum value of ~=0.42 at θ~=0.7 and afterwards is decreased to vanish at θ=0. Whereas for θ>~1 the storage capacity αc coincides with the value αc~ determined by the SCSNA as the upper bound of α ensuring the existence of retrieval solutions, for θ<~1 the αc is shown to differ from the αc~ with the result that the retrieval solutions claimed by the SCSNA are unstable for αc<α<αc~. Second, in the case of θ<1 the network can exhibit a new type of phase which appears as a result of a phase transition with respect to the non-Gaussian distribution of the local fields of neurons: the standard type of retrieval

  18. Synthesis on accumulation of putative neurotransmitters by cultured neural crest cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, G.D.; Sietz, P.D.; Rafford, C.E.

    1982-07-01

    The events mediating the differentiation of embryonic neural crest cells into several types of neurons are incompletely understood. In order to probe one aspect of this differentiation, we have examined the capacity of cultured quail trunk neural crest cells to synthesize, from radioactive precursors, and store several putative neurotransmitter compounds. These neural crest cultures develop the capacity to synthesize and accumulate acetylcholine and the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine. In contrast, detectable but relatively little synthesis and accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine gamma-aminobutyric acid, or octopamine from the appropriate radiolabeled precursors were observed. The capacity for synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines is very low or absent at 2 days in vitro. Between 3 and 7 days in vitro, there is a marked rise in both catecholamine and acetylcholine accumulation in the cultures. These findings suggest that, under the particular conditions used in these experiments, the development of neurotransmitter biosynthesis in trunk neural crest cells ijs restricted and resembles, at least partially, the pattern observed in vivo. The development of this capacity to synthesize and store radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines from the appropriate radioactive precursors coincides closely with the development of the activities of the synthetic enzymes choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase reported by others.

  19. Effects of lisdexamfetamine alone and in combination with s-citalopram on acetylcholine and histamine efflux in the rat pre-frontal cortex and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Heins, Mariette S; Folgering, Joost H A

    2015-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by poor attention, impulse control and hyperactivity. A significant proportion of ADHD patients are also co-morbid for other psychiatric problems including mood disorders and these patients may be managed with a combination of psychostimulants and anti-depressants. While it is generally accepted that enhanced catecholamine signalling via the action of psychostimulants is likely responsible for the cognitive improvement in ADHD, other neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and histamine may be involved. In the present study, we have examined the effect of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX), an amphetamine pro-drug that is approved for the treatment of ADHD on acetylcholine and histamine efflux in pre-frontal cortex and hippocampus alone and in combination with the anti-depressant s-citalopram. LDX increased cortical acetylcholine efflux, an effect that was not significantly altered by co-administration of s-citalopram. Cortical and hippocampal histamine were markedly increased by LDX, an effect that was attenuated in the hippocampus but not in pre-frontal cortex when co-administered with s-citalopram. Taken together, these results suggest that efflux of acetylcholine and histamine may be involved in the therapeutic effects of LDX and are differentially influenced by the co-administration of s-citalopram. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by poor attention, impulse control and hyperactivity. Some ADHD patients are also co-morbid for mood disorders and may be managed with psychostimulants (e.g. lisdexamfetamine, LDX) and anti-depressants (e.g. s-citalopram). LDX increased the efflux of acetylcholine and histamine, neurotransmitters involved in cognitive function, which were differentially influenced when co-administered with s-citalopram. Acetylcholine and histamine may be involved in the therapeutic effects of LDX and are differentially

  20. Enhanced antibiotic production by Streptomyces sindenensis using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, C K M; Khan, Mahvish; Praveen, Vandana; Khan, Saif; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic production with Streptomyces sindenensis MTCC 8122 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions by artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex (NMDS). Feed forward back-propagation ANN was trained to establish the mathematical relationship among the medium components and length of incubation period for achieving maximum antibiotic yield. The optimization strategy involved growing the culture with varying concentrations of various medium components for different incubation periods. Under non-optimized condition, antibiotic production was found to be 95 microgram/ml, which nearly doubled (176 microgram/ml) with the ANN-GA optimization. ANN-NMDS optimization was found to be more efficacious, and maximum antibiotic production (197 microgram/ml) was obtained by cultivating the cells with (g/l) fructose 2.7602, MgSO4 1.2369, (NH4)2PO4 0.2742, DL-threonine 3.069%, and soyabean meal 1.952%, for 9.8531 days of incubation, which was roughly 12% higher than the yield obtained by ANN coupled with GA under the same conditions. PMID:22580313

  1. β-chemokine production by neural and glial progenitor cells is enhanced by HIV-1 Tat: Effects on microglial migration

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Vo, Phu; Fitting, Sylvia; Block, Michelle L.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 neuropathology results from collective effects of viral proteins and inflammatory mediators on several cell types. Significant damage is mediated indirectly through inflammatory conditions promulgated by glial cells, including microglia that are productively infected by HIV-1, and astroglia. Neural and glial progenitors exist in both developing and adult brains. To determine whether progenitors are targets of HIV-1, a multi-plex assay was performed to assess chemokine/cytokine expression after treatment with viral proteins Tat or gp120. In the initial screen, ten analytes were basally released by murine striatal progenitors. The beta-chemokines CCL5/RANTES, CCL3/MIP-1α, and CCL4/MIP-1β were increased by 12 h exposure to HIV-1 Tat. Secreted factors from Tat-treated progenitors were chemoattractive towards microglia, an effect blocked by 2D7 anti-CCR5 antibody pretreatment. Tat and opiates have interactive effects on astroglial chemokine secretion, but this interaction did not occur in progenitors. gp120 did not affect chemokine/cytokine release, although both CCR5 and CXCR4, which serve as gp120 co-receptors, were detected in progenitors. We postulate that chemokine production by progenitors may be a normal, adaptive process that encourages immune inspection of newly generated cells. Pathogens such as HIV might usurp this function to create a maladaptive state, especially during development or regeneration, when progenitors are numerous. PMID:20403075

  2. Beyond Neural Cubism: Promoting a Multidimensional View of Brain Disorders by Enhancing the Integration of Neurology and Psychiatry in Education

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Joseph J.; Williams, Nolan R.; George, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Cubism was an influential early 20th century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stem from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders. PMID:25340364

  3. Neural structures involved in visual search guidance by reward-enhanced contextual cueing of the target location.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Stefan; Eštočinová, Jana; Sommer, Susanne; Chelazzi, Leonardo; Zinke, Wolf

    2016-01-01

    Spatial contextual cueing reflects an incidental form of learning that occurs when spatial distractor configurations are repeated in visual search displays. Recently, it was reported that the efficiency of contextual cueing can be modulated by reward. We replicated this behavioral finding and investigated its neural basis with fMRI. Reward value was associated with repeated displays in a learning session. The effect of reward value on context-guided visual search was assessed in a subsequent fMRI session without reward. Structures known to support explicit reward valuation, such as ventral frontomedial cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, were modulated by incidental reward learning. Contextual cueing, leading to more efficient search, went along with decreased activation in the visual search network. Retrosplenial cortex played a special role in that it showed both a main effect of reward and a reward×configuration interaction and may thereby be a central structure for the reward modulation of context-guided visual search. PMID:26427645

  4. β-adrenoceptor pathway enhances mitochondrial function in human neural stem cells via rotary cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Lin, Heng; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Yen, Chia-Hui; Huang, Rong-Nan; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-06-15

    The structure and function of the human nervous system are altered in space when compared with their state on earth. To investigate directly the influence of simulated microgravity conditions which may be beneficial for cultivation and proliferation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs), the rotary cell culture system (RCCS) developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was used. RCCS allows the creation of a unique microgravity environment of low shear force, high-mass transfer and enables three-dimensional (3D) cell culture of dissimilar cell types. The results show that simulated microgravity using an RCCS would induce β-adrenoceptor, upregulate cAMP formation and activate both PKA and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) pathways. The expression of intracellular mitochondrial genes, including PGC1α (PPAR coactivator 1α), nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF1 and NRF2) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), regulated by CREB, were all significantly increased at 72 h after the onset of microgravity. Accordingly and importantly, the ATP level and amount of mitochondrial mass were also increased. These results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity using an RCCS would induce cellular proliferation in hNSCs via an increased mitochondrial function. In addition, the RCCS bioreactor would support hNSCs growth, which may have the potential for cell replacement therapy in neurological disorders. PMID:22524992

  5. Enhancement of noradrenergic neural transmission: an effective therapy of myasthenia gravis: a report on 52 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Pardey-Maldonado, B; John, E; Jimenez, V; Orozco, B; Baez, S; Lechin, M E

    2000-01-01

    Neurochemical, neuroautonomic and neuropharmacological assessments carried out on all our myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that they presented a neural sympathetic deficit plus excessive adrenal-sympathetic activity. These abnormalities were registered during the basal (supine-resting) state, as well as after several stress tests (orthostasis, exercise, oral glucose and buspirone). In addition, MG patients showed increased levels of free-serotonin (f5HT) in the plasma, supposedly associated with the increased platelet aggregability which we found in all MG patients. As the above trio of neurochemical disorders (low noradrenergic-activity + high adrenergic-activity + increased f-5HT plasma levels) is known to favor Th-1 immunosuppression + Th-2 predominance, we outlined a neuropharmacological strategy for reverting the above neurochemical disorder. This treatment provoked sudden (acute), and late sustained improvements. Acute effects have been attributed to the increase of alpha-1 activity at the spinal motoneuron level. Late improvements always paralleled a significant normalization of immunological disorders. Complete normalization was registered only in non-thymectomized MG patients. PMID:11508327

  6. Glutamatergic synapse formation is promoted by α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Adrian F; Wang, Xulong; Gounko, Natalia V; Massey, Kerri A; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Zhaoping; Berg, Darwin K

    2012-05-30

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory transmitter in adult brain, acting through synapses on dendritic spines and shafts. Early in development, however, when glutamatergic synapses are only beginning to form, nicotinic cholinergic excitation is already widespread; it is mediated by acetylcholine activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that generate waves of activity across brain regions. A major class of nAChRs contributing at this time is a species containing α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs). These receptors are highly permeable to calcium, influence a variety of calcium-dependent events, and are diversely distributed throughout the developing CNS. Here we show that α7-nAChRs unexpectedly promote formation of glutamatergic synapses during development. The dependence on α7-nAChRs becomes clear when comparing wild-type (WT) mice with mice constitutively lacking the α7-nAChR gene. Ultrastructural analysis, immunostaining, and patch-clamp recording all reveal synaptic deficits when α7-nAChR input is absent. Similarly, nicotinic activation of α7-nAChRs in WT organotypic culture, as well as cell culture, increases the number of glutamatergic synapses. RNA interference demonstrates that the α7-nAChRs must be expressed in the neuron being innervated for normal innervation to occur. Moreover, the deficits persist throughout the developmental period of major de novo synapse formation and are still fully apparent in the adult. GABAergic synapses, in contrast, are undiminished in number under such conditions. As a result, mice lacking α7-nAChRs have an altered balance in the excitatory/inhibitory input they receive. This ratio represents a fundamental feature of neural networks and shows for the first time that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic signaling plays a key role in network construction. PMID:22649244

  7. Activation of portal-hepatic osmoreceptors in rats: role of calcium, acetylcholine and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Stoppini, L; Baertschi, A J

    1984-11-01

    Osmoreceptors are sensory organs of paramount importance in water and electrolyte balance, yet the mechanisms for their activation are virtually unknown. Peripheral osmoreceptors have been localised in the hepatic portal vein area of rats. We thus superfused the portal adventitia with 0.2 ml of 4% NaCl before and after various pharmacological pretreatments (0.4 ml of 1 mM solutions) of the portal area, while monitoring the neural activity of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. Portal superfusion with verapamil, to reduce Ca-influx, reversibly inhibited the response to osmotic stimuli by up to 50% (P less than 0.0005). Such inhibition (58%; P less than 0.0005) was also seen with portal superfusion by atropine. Atropine did not affect hypothalamo-neurohypophysial responses to stimulation of portal bradykinin receptors with 0.2 ml 1 muM bradykinin, and portal superfusion with acetylcholine activated the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. The results thus support the hypothesis of a cholinergic neurotransmission linking portal osmoreceptive structures and afferent nerve endings. Diamide, which inhibits water efflux in frog skin, also reversibly inhibited responses to osmotic stimuli by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Pretreatments with trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and cordycepin, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, diminished responses to osmotic stimuli by 30-45% (P less than 0.005), while cAMP and theophilline potentiated them by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Responses to bradykinin superfusion were reduced 20-30% (P less than 0.05) by both cordycepin and cAMP. The results suggest that portal osmoreceptors release acetylcholine to excite afferent nerves when exposed to an osmotic gradient. The mechanism of this release may be mediated by an efflux of water and an increase of intracellular calcium activity and cAMP. PMID:6150955

  8. Changes in Acetylcholine Extracellular Levels during Cognitive Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepeu, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the changes in neurotransmitter extracellular levels in discrete brain areas is considered a tool for identifying the neuronal systems involved in specific behavioral responses or cognitive processes. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the first neurotransmitter whose diffusion from the central nervous system was investigated and whose extracellular…

  9. CAP modulates acetylcholine release at the myoneural junction

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Potian, Joseph G.; Baskaran, Padmamalini; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are non-selective cation channel proteins that are expressed throughout the body. Previous studies demonstrated the expression of TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), capsaicin (CAP) receptor, in sensory neurons. Recently, we reported TRPV1 expression in mouse motor nerve terminals [MNTs; (Thyagarajan et al., 2009)], where we observed that CAP protected MNTs from botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A). Phrenic nerve diaphragm nerve muscle preparations (NMP) isolated from isoflurane anesthetized adult mice were analyzed for twitch tension, spontaneous (mEPCs) and nerve stimulus evoked (EPCs) acetylcholine release. When acutely applied to isolated NMP, CAP produced a concentration-dependent decline of twitch tension and produced a significant decline in the amplitude of EPCs and quantal content without any effect on the mEPCs. The suppression of nerve stimulus evoked acetylcholine release by CAP was antagonized by capsazepine (CPZ), a TRPV1 antagonist. CAP did not suppress phrenic nerve stimulus evoked acetylcholine release in TRPV1 knockout mice. Also, CAP treatment, in vitro, interfered with the localization of adapter protein 2 in cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. Wortmannin, (WMN; non-selective phosphoinositol kinase inhibitor), mimicked the effects of CAP by inhibiting the acetylcholine exocytosis. Our data suggest that TRPV1 proteins expressed at the MNT are coupled to the exo-endocytic mechanisms to regulate neuromuscular functions. PMID:25446918

  10. Neural Stem Cell-based Cell Carriers Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of an Oncolytic Adenovirus in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Atique U; Thaci, Bart; Alexiades, Nikita G; Han, Yu; Qian, Shuo; Liu, Feifei; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya Y; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of oncolytic adenoviruses as anticancer agents is significantly hampered by the inability of the currently available viral vectors to effectively target micrometastatic tumor burden. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to function as cell carriers for targeted delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus because of their inherent tumor-tropic migratory ability. We have previously reported that in vivo delivery of CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, can enhance the survival of animals with experimental glioma. In this study, we show that intratumoral delivery of NSCs loaded with the CRAD-S-pk7 in an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioma is able to not only inhibit tumor growth but more importantly to increase median survival by ~50% versus animals treated with CRAd-S-pk7 alone (P = 0.0007). We also report that oncolytic virus infection upregulates different chemoattractant receptors and significantly enhances migratory capacity of NSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data further suggest that NSC-based carriers have the potential to improve the clinical efficacy of antiglioma virotherapy by not only protecting therapeutic virus from the host immune system, but also amplifying the therapeutic payload selectively at tumor sites. PMID:21629227

  11. Neural stem cell-based cell carriers enhance therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic adenovirus in an orthotopic mouse model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atique U; Thaci, Bart; Alexiades, Nikita G; Han, Yu; Qian, Shuo; Liu, Feifei; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Ulasov, Ilya Y; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-09-01

    The potential utility of oncolytic adenoviruses as anticancer agents is significantly hampered by the inability of the currently available viral vectors to effectively target micrometastatic tumor burden. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the ability to function as cell carriers for targeted delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus because of their inherent tumor-tropic migratory ability. We have previously reported that in vivo delivery of CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, can enhance the survival of animals with experimental glioma. In this study, we show that intratumoral delivery of NSCs loaded with the CRAD-S-pk7 in an orthotopic xenograft model of human glioma is able to not only inhibit tumor growth but more importantly to increase median survival by ~50% versus animals treated with CRAd-S-pk7 alone (P = 0.0007). We also report that oncolytic virus infection upregulates different chemoattractant receptors and significantly enhances migratory capacity of NSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Our data further suggest that NSC-based carriers have the potential to improve the clinical efficacy of antiglioma virotherapy by not only protecting therapeutic virus from the host immune system, but also amplifying the therapeutic payload selectively at tumor sites. PMID:21629227

  12. Protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms: facilitation of acetylcholine release and interactions with prejunctional blocking toxins.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Karlsson, E

    1982-09-01

    1 Five polypeptides, which were isolated from elapid snake venoms and which are structurally related to protease inhibitors, were tested for action on isolated biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations of the chick. 2 Dendrotoxin from the Eastern green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) and toxins K and I from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) increased to indirect stimulation without affecting responses to exogenous acetylcholine, carbachol of KCl. 3 The two other protease inhibitor homologues, HHV-II from Ringhals cobra (Hemachatus haemachatus) and NNV-II from Cape cobra (Naja nivea) did not increase responses to nerve stimulation. Trypsin inhibitor from bovine pancreas also had no facilitatory effects on neuromuscular transmission. 4 The facilitatory toxins from mamba venoms interacted with the prejunctional blocking toxins, beta-bungarotoxin, crotoxin and notexin, but not with taipoxin. The blocking effects of beta-bungarotoxin were reduced by pretreatment with the mamba toxins, whereas the blocking actions of crotoxin and notexin were enhanced. 5 The results indicate that protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms form a new class of neurotoxin, which acts to increase the release of acetylcholine in response to motor nerve stimulation. 6 From the interaction studies it is concluded that the facilitatory toxins bind to motor nerve terminals at sites related to those occupied by the prejunctional blocking toxins. However, differences in interactions with individual toxins suggest that there must be several related binding sites on the nerve terminals. PMID:6751453

  13. Responses of coronary arteries of cardiac transplant patients to acetylcholine.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, R D; Nabel, E G; Selwyn, A P; Ludmer, P L; Mudge, G H; Kirshenbaum, J M; Schoen, F J; Alexander, R W; Ganz, P

    1988-01-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis is a major cause of graft failure after heart transplantation. Graft atherosclerosis is typically diffuse and difficult to detect even with coronary arteriography. Recently, acetylcholine was shown to dilate blood vessels by releasing a vasorelaxant substance from the endothelium (endothelium-derived relaxing factor). We have demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction induced by acetylcholine both early and late in the course of coronary atherosclerosis in patients, suggesting an association of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that coronary arteries of heart transplant patients can show endothelial dysfunction before or in the early stages of angiographically evident coronary atherosclerosis. Acetylcholine was infused into the left anterior descending artery of 13 heart transplant patients at 12 (n = 9) and 24 (n = 4) mo after transplantation. Vascular responses were evaluated by quantitative angiography. Among patients with angiographically smooth coronary arteries, relatively few (6/25) arterial segments had preserved vasodilator responses, while the majority failed to dilate (10/25) or paradoxically constricted (9/25). Angiographically irregular coronary arteries were present in three patients, in whom 8/10 segments showed marked paradoxical constriction and the remaining 2/10 failed to dilate. Only 1 of 13 patients retained appropriate dilation to acetylcholine in all segments. Nitroglycerin, which acts directly on vascular smooth muscle, dilated nearly all segments. No clinical features of the patients, including myocardial rejection appeared to correlate with the impaired functional response of vessels. Thus impaired response to acetylcholine is a common early finding in heart transplant patients and emphasizes the potential importance of endothelial dysfunction in the development of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:3121675

  14. Cellular prion protein promotes post-ischemic neuronal survival, angioneurogenesis and enhances neural progenitor cell homing via proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Doeppner, T R; Kaltwasser, B; Schlechter, J; Jaschke, J; Kilic, E; Bähr, M; Hermann, D M; Weise, J

    2015-01-01

    Although cellular prion protein (PrPc) has been suggested to have physiological roles in neurogenesis and angiogenesis, the pathophysiological relevance of both processes remain unknown. To elucidate the role of PrPc in post-ischemic brain remodeling, we herein exposed PrPc wild type (WT), PrPc knockout (PrP−/−) and PrPc overexpressing (PrP+/+) mice to focal cerebral ischemia followed by up to 28 days reperfusion. Improved neurological recovery and sustained neuroprotection lasting over the observation period of 4 weeks were observed in ischemic PrP+/+ mice compared with WT mice. This observation was associated with increased neurogenesis and angiogenesis, whereas increased neurological deficits and brain injury were noted in ischemic PrP−/− mice. Proteasome activity and oxidative stress were increased in ischemic brain tissue of PrP−/− mice. Pharmacological proteasome inhibition reversed the exacerbation of brain injury induced by PrP−/−, indicating that proteasome inhibition mediates the neuroprotective effects of PrPc. Notably, reduced proteasome activity and oxidative stress in ischemic brain tissue of PrP+/+ mice were associated with an increased abundance of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and PACAP-38, which are known stimulants of neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration and trafficking. To elucidate effects of PrPc on intracerebral NPC homing, we intravenously infused GFP+ NPCs in ischemic WT, PrP−/− and PrP+/+ mice, showing that brain accumulation of GFP+ NPCs was greatly reduced in PrP−/− mice, but increased in PrP+/+ animals. Our results suggest that PrPc induces post-ischemic long-term neuroprotection, neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the ischemic brain by inhibiting proteasome activity. PMID:26673668

  15. Neural enhancement and pre-emptive perception: the genesis of attention and the attentional maintenance of the cortical salience map.

    PubMed

    Gee, Angela L; Ipata, Anna E; Gottlieb, Jacqueline; Bisley, James W; Goldberg, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    One of the stable hypotheses in systems neuroscience is the relationship between attention and the enhancement of visual responses when an animal attends to the stimulus in its receptive field (Goldberg and Wurtz, 1972 Journal of Neurophysiology 35 560-574). This was first discovered in the superior colliculus of the monkey: neurons in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus responded more intensely to the onset of a stimulus during blocks of trials in which the monkey had to make a saccade to it than they did during blocks of trials in which the monkey had to continue fixating a central point and not respond to the stimulus. This enhancement has been found in many brain regions, including prefrontal cortex (Boch and Goldberg, 1987 Investigative Ophthalmology 28 Supplement, 124), V4 (Moran and Desimone, 1985 Science 229 782-784), and lateral intraparietal area (Colby et al, 1996 Journal of Neurophysiology 76 2841-2852; Colby and Goldberg, 1999 Annual Review of Neuroscience 22 319-349), and even V1 (Lamme et al, 2000 Vision Research 40 1507-1521). In these studies the assumption has been that the monkey attended to the stimulus because the stimulus evoked an enhanced response. In the experiments described here we show that for abruptly appearing stimuli, attention is not related to the initial response evoked by the stimulus, but by the activity present on the salience map in the parietal cortex when the stimulus appears. Attention to the stimulus may subsequently, by a top down signal, sustain the map, but stimuli can as easily be suppressed by top down features as they can be enhanced. PMID:18491716

  16. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs. PMID:27485575

  17. Calcium-dependent effect of the thymic polypeptide thymopoietin on the desensitization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Revah, F.; Mulle, C.; Pinset, C.; Audhya, T.; Goldstein, G.; Changeux, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of the thymic polypeptide thymopoietin (Tpo) on the properties of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) were investigated by patch clamp techniques on mouse C/sub 2/ myotubes and by biochemical assays on AcChoR-rich membrane fragments purified from the Torpedo marmorata electric organ. At high concentrations (> 100 nM), Tpo inhibits the binding of cholinergic agonists to the AcChoR in a Ca/sup 2 +/-insensitive manner. At lower concentrations (2 nM), Tpo applied on C/sub 2/ myotubes simultaneously with nondesensitizing concentrations of acetylcholine results in the appearance of long closed times separating groups of openings. This effect depends on the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the external medium. Outside-out recordings, performed with various concentrations of EGTA in the intracellular medium, suggest that Ca/sup 2 +/ acts on the cytoplasmic face of the membrane after entry through acetylcholine-activated channels. Parallel studies with T. marmorata AcChoR-rich membranes show that in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ Tpo causes a decrease in the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the noncompetitive blocker (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine, enhances, at low concentrations, the binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine, and also alters the binding kinetics of the fluorescent agonist 6-(5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonamido)-n-hexanoic acid ..beta..-(N-trimethylammonium bromide) ethyl ester to the AcChoR. It was concluded that, in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, Tpo displaces the conformational equilibrium of the AcChoR towards a high-affinity desensitized state and increases the transition rate towards the same state.

  18. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs.

  19. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shulepko, M A; Shenkarev, Z O; Bychkov, M L; Paramonov, A S; Chugunov, A O; Kulbatskii, D S; Arvaniti, M; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T; Arseniev, A S; Efremov, R G; Thomsen, M S; Dolezal, V; Bertrand, D; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-01-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a 'three-finger' fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the 'classical' orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs. PMID:27485575

  20. Sustaining high acetylcholine levels in the frontal cortex, but not retrosplenial cortex, recovers spatial memory performance in a rodent model of diencephalic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Savage, Lisa M

    2012-04-01

    Although the thalamus and/or mammillary bodies are the primary sites of neuropathology in cases of diencephalic amnesia such as Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), there is also functional deactivation of certain cortical regions that contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter that modulates neural processing within the cortex and between the thalamus and cortex. In the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of WKS, there are significant reductions in cholinergic innervation and behaviorally stimulated ACh efflux in the frontal (FC) and retrosplenial (RSC) cortices. In the present study, ACh released levels were site-specifically amplified with physostigmine (0.5 μg, 1.0 μg) in the FC and the RSC, which was confirmed with in vivo microdialysis. Although physostigmine sustained high ACh levels in both cortical regions, the effects on spatial memory, assessed by spontaneous alternation, were different as a function of region (FC, RSC) and treatment (PTD, pair-fed [PF]). Higher ACh levels in the FC recovered the rate of alternation in PTD rats as well as reduced arm-reentry perseverative errors. However, higher ACh levels within the FC of PF rats exacerbated arm-reentry perseverative errors without significantly affecting alternation rates. Maintaining high ACh levels in the RSC had no procognitive effects in PTD rats, but rather impaired alternation behavior in PF rats. These results demonstrate that diverse cortical regions respond differently to intensified ACh levels-and the effects are dependent on thalamic pathology. Thus, pharmacotherapeutics aimed at enhancing cognitive functions must account for the unique features of cortical ACh stimulation and the connective circuitry with the thalamus. PMID:22448856

  1. Sustaining high acetylcholine levels in the frontal cortex, but not retrosplenial cortex, recovers spatial memory performance in a rodent model of diencephalic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the thalamus and/or mammillary bodies are the primary sites of neuropathology in cases of diencephalic amnesia such as Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), there is also functional deactivation of certain cortical regions that contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter that modulates neural processing within the cortex and between the thalamus and cortex. In the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of WKS there are significant reductions in cholinergic innervation and behaviorally-stimulated ACh efflux in the frontal (FC) and retrosplenial (RSC) cortices. In the present study, ACh released levels were site-specifically amplified with physostigmine (0.5 μg, 1.0 μg) in the FC and the RSC, which was confirmed with in vivo microdialysis. Although physostigmine sustained high ACh levels in both cortical regions, the effects on spatial memory, assessed by spontaneous alternation, were different as a function of region (FC, RSC) and treatment (PTD, pair-fed [PF]). Higher ACh levels in the FC recovered the rate of alternation in PTD rats as well as reduced arm-re-entry preservative errors. However, higher ACh levels within the FC of PF rats exacerbated arm-re-entry preservative errors without significantly affecting alternation rates. Maintaining high ACh levels in the RSC had no procognitive effects in PTD rats, but rather impaired alternation behavior in PF rats. These results demonstrate that diverse cortical regions respond differently to intensified ACh levels—and the effects are dependent on thalamic pathology. Thus, pharmacotherapeutics aimed at enhancing cognitive functions must account for the unique features of cortical ACh stimulation and the connective circuitry with the thalamus. PMID:22448856

  2. Phenytoin enhances the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor receptor in the subventricular zone and promotes the proliferation of neural precursor cells and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Campos-Ordonez, Tania; Luquin, Sonia; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin is a widely used antiepileptic drug that induces cell proliferation in several tissues, such as heart, bone, skin, oral mucosa and neural precursors. Some of these effects are mediated via fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). These receptors are strongly expressed in the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), the main neurogenic niche in the adult brain. The aim of this study was to determine the cell lineage and cell fate of V-SVZ neural progenitors expanded by phenytoin, as well as the effects of this drug on EGFR/FGFR phosphorylation. Male BALB/C mice received 10 mg/kg phenytoin by oral cannula for 30 days. We analysed the proliferation of V-SVZ neural progenitors by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our findings indicate that phenytoin enhanced twofold the phosphorylation of EGFR and FGFR in the V-SVZ, increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)+/Sox2+ and BrdU+/doublecortin+ cells in the V-SVZ, and expanded the population of Olig2-expressing cells around the lateral ventricles. After phenytoin removal, a large number of BrdU+/Receptor interacting protein (RIP)+ cells were observed in the olfactory bulb. In conclusion, phenytoin enhanced the phosphorylation of FGFR and EGFR, and promoted the expression of neural precursor markers in the V-SVZ. In parallel, the number of oligodendrocytes increased significantly after phenytoin removal. PMID:26370587

  3. Physical studies of the interactions of acetylcholine chloride with membrane constituents.

    PubMed

    Hauser, H; Phillips, M C; Marchbanks, R M

    1970-11-01

    The binding of acetylcholine to pure lipids, and lipids, proteins and lipoproteins extracted from synaptic membranes, was investigated by monolayer and n.m.r. techniques. No specific binding of acetylcholine could be detected at the concentration used, although its muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists [atropine and (+)-tubocurarine respectively] could be shown to interact with the membrane components. It is concluded that the binding of the nicotinic and muscarinic antagonists of acetylcholine is not necessarily indicative of the existence of a specific acetylcholine receptor. Measurements of the displacement of (45)Ca(2+) from monolayers of phosphatidylserine by acetylcholine and the variation of electrophoretic mobility of phosphatidylserine particles with concentration of acetylcholine indicated that in these systems acetylcholine was acting as a counterion at the negatively charged lipid interface. But studies of the salting-in and salting-out of negatively charged lipid aggregates showed that acetylcholine and other quaternary ammonium compounds did not here behave simply as counterions. Electrostrictively hydrated cations such as Na(+) and K(+) were found to salt out, whereas hydrophobically hydrated cations such as acetylcholine salted in such aggregates. The possible role of the hydration of acetylcholine in synaptic transmission is discussed. PMID:4321895

  4. After daily bingeing on a sucrose solution, food deprivation induces anxiety and accumbens dopamine/acetylcholine imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Avena, Nicole M.; Bocarsly, Miriam E.; Rada, Pedro; Kim, Agnes; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2015-01-01

    Bingeing on sugar may activate neural pathways in a manner similar to taking drugs of abuse, resulting in related signs of dependence. The present experiments test whether rats that have been bingeing on sucrose and then fasted demonstrate signs of opiate-like withdrawal. Rats were maintained on 12-h deprivation followed by 12-h access to a 10% sucrose solution and chow for 28 days, then fasted for 36 h. These animals spent less time on the exposed arm of an elevated plus-maze compared with a similarly deprived ad libitum chow group, suggesting anxiety. Microdialysis revealed a concomitant increase in extracellular acetylcholine and decrease in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results did not appear to be due to hypoglycemia. The findings suggest that a diet of bingeing on sucrose and chow followed by fasting creates a state that involves anxiety and altered accumbens dopamine and acetylcholine balance. This is similar to the effects of naloxone, suggesting opiate-like withdrawal. This may be a factor in some eating disorders. PMID:18325546

  5. After daily bingeing on a sucrose solution, food deprivation induces anxiety and accumbens dopamine/acetylcholine imbalance.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Rada, Pedro; Kim, Agnes; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2008-06-01

    Bingeing on sugar may activate neural pathways in a manner similar to taking drugs of abuse, resulting in related signs of dependence. The present experiments test whether rats that have been bingeing on sucrose and then fasted demonstrate signs of opiate-like withdrawal. Rats were maintained on 12-h deprivation followed by 12-h access to a 10% sucrose solution and chow for 28 days, then fasted for 36 h. These animals spent less time on the exposed arm of an elevated plus-maze compared with a similarly deprived ad libitum chow group, suggesting anxiety. Microdialysis revealed a concomitant increase in extracellular acetylcholine and decrease in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell. These results did not appear to be due to hypoglycemia. The findings suggest that a diet of bingeing on sucrose and chow followed by fasting creates a state that involves anxiety and altered accumbens dopamine and acetylcholine balance. This is similar to the effects of naloxone, suggesting opiate-like withdrawal. This may be a factor in some eating disorders. PMID:18325546

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonism enhances proliferation and migration of engrafted neural progenitor cells in a model of viral-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Caroline A; Grist, Jonathan J; Rosen, Hugh; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    The oral drug FTY720 affects sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling on targeted cells that bear the S1P receptors S1P1, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5. We examined the effect of FTY720 treatment on the biology of mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) after transplantation in a viral model of demyelination. Intracerebral infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in an acute encephalomyelitis, followed by demyelination similar in pathology to the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. We have previously reported that intraspinal transplantation of mouse NPCs into JHMV-infected animals resulted in selective colonization of demyelinated lesions, preferential differentiation into oligodendroglia accompanied by axonal preservation, and increased remyelination. Cultured NPCs expressed transcripts for S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5. FTY720 treatment of cultured NPCs resulted in increased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and migration after exposure to the chemokine CXCL12. Administration of FTY720 to JHMV-infected mice resulted in enhanced migration and increased proliferation of transplanted NPCs after spinal cord engraftment. FTY720 treatment did not improve clinical disease, diminish neuroinflammation or the severity of demyelination, nor increase remyelination. These findings argue that FTY720 treatment selectively increases NPC proliferation and migration but does not either improve clinical outcome or enhance remyelination after transplantation into animals in which immune-mediated demyelination is initiated by the viral infection of the central nervous system. PMID:26435414

  7. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H+ Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1). PMID:23506877

  8. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  9. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:22270644

  10. Mechanisms of Barbiturate Inhibition of Acetylcholine Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dilger, James P.; Boguslavsky, Rebecca; Barann, Martin; Katz, Tamir; Vidal, Ana Maria

    1997-01-01

    We used patch clamp techniques to study the inhibitory effects of pentobarbital and barbital on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels from BC3H-1 cells. Single channel recording from outside-out patches reveals that both drugs cause acetylcholine-activated channel events to occur in bursts. The mean duration of gaps within bursts is 2 ms for 0.1 mM pentobarbital and 0.05 ms for 1 mM barbital. In addition, 1 mM barbital reduces the apparent single channel current by 15%. Both barbiturates decrease the duration of openings within a burst but have only a small effect on the burst duration. Macroscopic currents were activated by rapid perfusion of 300 μM acetylcholine to outside-out patches. The concentration dependence of peak current inhibition was fit with a Hill function; for pentobarbital, Ki = 32 μM, n = 1.09; for barbital, Ki = 1900 μM, n = 1.24. Inhibition is voltage independent. The kinetics of inhibition by pentobarbital are at least 30 times faster than inhibition by barbital (3 ms vs. <0.1 ms at the Ki). Pentobarbital binds ≥10-fold more tightly to open channels than to closed channels; we could not determine whether the binding of barbital is state dependent. Experiments performed with both barbiturates reveal that they do not compete for a single binding site on the acetylcholine receptor channel protein, but the binding of one barbiturate destabilizes the binding of the other. These results support a kinetic model in which barbiturates bind to both open and closed states of the AChR and block the flow of ions through the channel. An additional, lower-affinity binding site for pentobarbital may explain the effects seen at >100 μM pentobarbital. PMID:9089445

  11. Mechanisms of barbiturate inhibition of acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Dilger, J P; Boguslavsky, R; Barann, M; Katz, T; Vidal, A M

    1997-03-01

    We used patch clamp techniques to study the inhibitory effects of pentobarbital and barbital on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels from BC3H-1 cells. Single channel recording from outside-out patches reveals that both drugs cause acetylcholine-activated channel events to occur in bursts. The mean duration of gaps within bursts in 2 ms for 0.1 mM pentobarbital and 0.05 ms for 1 mM barbital. In addition, 1 mM barbital reduces the apparent single channel current by 15%. Both barbiturates decrease the duration of openings within a burst but have only a small effect on the burst duration. Macroscopic currents were activated by rapid perfusion of 300 microM acetylcholine to outside-out patches. The concentration dependence of peak current inhibition was fit with a Hill function; for pentobarbital, Ki = 32 microM, n = 1.09; for barbital, Ki = 1900 microM, n = 1.24. Inhibition is voltage independent. The kinetics of inhibition by pentobarbital are at least 30 times faster than inhibition by barbital (3 ms vs. < 0.1 ms at the Ki). Pentobarbital binds > or = 10-fold more tightly to open channels than to closed channels; we could not determine whether the binding of barbital is state dependent. Experiments performed with both barbiturates reveal that they do not compete for a single binding site on the acetylcholine receptor channel protein, but the binding of one barbiturate destabilizes the binding of the other. These results support a kinetic model in which barbiturates bind to both open and closed states of the AChR and block the flow of ions through the channel. An additional, lower-affinity binding site for pentobarbital may explain the effects seen at > 100 microM pentobarbital. PMID:9089445

  12. The coumarin scopoletin potentiates acetylcholine release from synaptosomes, amplifies hippocampal long-term potentiation and ameliorates anticholinergic- and age-impaired memory

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, A.; Lieb, A.; Vo, N.P.; Rollinger, J.M.; Stuppner, H.; Prast, H.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study the simple, naturally derived coumarin scopoletin (SCT) was identified as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach. In this study the potential of SCT as procholinergic and cognition-enhancing therapeutic was investigated in a more detailed way, using different experimental approaches like measuring newly synthesized acetylcholine (ACh) in synaptosomes, long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments in hippocampal slices, and behavior studies. SCT enhanced the K+-stimulated release of ACh from rat frontal cortex synaptosomes, showing a bell-shaped dose effect curve (Emax: 4 μM). This effect was blocked by the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists mecamylamine (MEC) and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHE). The nAChR agonist (and AChE inhibitor) galantamine induced a similar increase in ACh release (Emax: 1 μM). SCT potentiated LTP in hippocampal slices of rat brain. The high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-induced, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dependent LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at CA3-CA1 synapses was greatly enhanced by pre-HFS application of SCT (4 μM for 4 min). This effect was mimicked by nicotine (2 μM) and abolished by MEC, suggesting an effect on nAChRs. SCT did not restore the total inhibition of LTP by NMDA receptor antagonist d, l-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). SCT (2 μg, i.c.v.) increased T-maze alternation and ameliorated novel object recognition of mice with scopolamine-induced cholinergic deficit. It also reduced age-associated deficits in object memory of 15–18-month-old mice (2 mg/kg sc). Our findings suggest that SCT possesses memory-improving properties, which are based on its direct nAChR agonistic activity. Therefore, SCT might be able to rescue impaired cholinergic functions by enhancing nAChR-mediated release of neurotransmitters and promoting neural plasticity in hippocampus. PMID:21945033

  13. Effect of oxotremorine, physostigmine, and scopolamine on brain acetylcholine synthesis: a study using HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, N.; Beley, A. )

    1990-11-01

    The synthesis rate of brain acetylcholine (ACh) was estimated in mice following i.v. administration of ({sup 3}H)choline (Ch). The measurements were performed 1 min after the tracer injection, using the ({sup 3}H)ACh/({sup 3}H)Ch specific radioactivity ratio as an index of ACh synthesis rate. Endogenous and labeled Ch and ACh were quantified using HPLC methodology. Oxotremorine and physostigmine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the steady state concentration of brain ACh by + 130% and 84%, respectively and of Ch by + 60% (oxotremorine); they decreased ACh synthesis by 62 and 55%, respectively. By contrast, scopolamine (0.7 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the cerebral content of Ch by - 26% and of ACh by - 23% without enhancing the synthesis of ACh. The results show the utility of HPLC methodology in the investigation of ACh turnover.

  14. Feeling happy enhances early spatial encoding of peripheral information automatically: electrophysiological time-course and neural sources.

    PubMed

    Vanlessen, Naomi; Rossi, Valentina; De Raedt, Rudi; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has shown that positive mood may broaden attention, although it remains unclear whether this effect has a perceptual or a postperceptual locus. In this study, we addressed this question using high-density event-related potential methods. We randomly assigned participants to a positive or a neutral mood condition. Then they performed a demanding oddball task at fixation (primary task ensuring fixation) and a localization task of peripheral stimuli shown at three positions in the upper visual field (secondary task) concurrently. While positive mood did not influence behavioral performance for the primary task, it did facilitate stimulus localization on the secondary task. At the electrophysiological level, we found that the amplitude of the C1 component (reflecting an early retinotopic encoding of the stimulus in V1) was enhanced in the positive, as compared with the neutral, mood group. Importantly, this effect appeared to be largely automatic, because it occurred regardless of the task relevance of the peripheral stimulus and prior to top-down gain control effects seen at the level of the subsequent P1 component. This early effect was also observed irrespective of a change of the target-related P300 component (primary task) by positive mood. These results suggest that positive mood can automatically boost the spatial encoding of peripheral stimuli early on following stimulus onset. This effect can eventually underlie the broadening of spatial attention, which has been associated with this specific mood state. PMID:24570275

  15. Native Experience with a Tone Language Enhances Pitch Discrimination and the Timing of Neural Responses to Pitch Change

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Ryan J.; Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Stanley, Emily M.; Narayana, Shalini; Wicha, Nicole Y. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Native tone language experience has been linked with alterations in the production and perception of pitch in language, as well as with the brain response to linguistic and non-linguistic tones. Here we use two experiments to address whether these changes apply to the discrimination of simple pitch changes and pitch intervals. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from native Mandarin speakers and a control group during a same/different task with pairs of pure tones differing only in pitch height, and with pure tone pairs differing only in interval distance. Behaviorally, Mandarin speakers were more accurate than controls at detecting both pitch and interval changes, showing a sensitivity to small pitch changes and interval distances that was absent in the control group. Converging evidence from ERPs obtained during the same tasks revealed an earlier response to change relative to no-change trials in Mandarin speakers, as well as earlier differentiation of trials by change direction relative to controls. These findings illustrate the cross-domain influence of language experience on the perception of pitch, suggesting that the native use of tonal pitch contours in language leads to a general enhancement in the acuity of pitch representations. PMID:21886629

  16. Neuronal specificity of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promoter develops during morphogenesis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Matter-Sadzinski, L; Hernandez, M C; Roztocil, T; Ballivet, M; Matter, J M

    1992-01-01

    A transient transfection assay has been developed to analyse promoter activity in neuronal cells freshly dissociated from the chick central nervous system. The assay enabled us to identify cis-acting regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking region of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene. In differentiated retina, regulatory elements direct reporter gene expression to a small subset of neurons which has been identified as ganglion cells, i.e. to the population of neurons in which alpha 7 transcripts were localized by in situ hybridization. However, these promoter elements exhibit ubiquitous activity in undifferentiated neural cells and in mesodermal stem cells. Our study supports the idea that alpha 7 regulatory elements acquire their neuronal specificity in the course of embryogenesis. Images PMID:1425587

  17. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  18. Branched nanotrees with immobilized acetylcholine esterase for nanobiosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risveden, Klas; Dick, Kimberly A.; Bhand, Sunil; Rydberg, Patrik; Samuelson, Lars; Danielsson, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on SiNx-covered wafers. Two different reactors are shown: one with simple, one-dimensional nanorods and one with branched nanorod structures (nanotrees). Significantly higher enzymatic activity is found for the nanotree reactors than for the nanorod reactors, most likely due to the increased gold surface area and thereby higher enzyme binding capacity. A theoretical calculation is included to show how the enzyme kinetics and hence the sensitivity can be influenced and increased by the control of electrical fields in relation to the active sites of enzymes in an electronic biosensor. The possible effects of electrical fields employed in the RISFET on the function of acetylcholine esterase is investigated using quantum chemical methods, which show that the small electric field strengths used are unlikely to affect enzyme kinetics. Acetylcholine esterase activity is determined using choline oxidase and peroxidase by measuring the amount of choline formed using the chemiluminescent luminol reaction.

  19. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection: Evaluation in Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Frank R; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe; Peters, Eva M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  20. Comparison of (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding in mouse brain: regional distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sershen, H.; Reith, M.E.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.

    1985-06-01

    In a continuing study of nicotine binding sites, the authors determined the relative amount of nicotine binding and acetylcholine binding in various brain regions of C57/BL and of DBA mice. Although midbrain showed the highest and cerebellum the lowest binding for both (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine, the ratio of nicotine to acetylcholine binding showed a three-fold regional variation. Acetylcholine inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nicotine binding indicated that a portion of nicotine binding was not inhibited by acetylcholine. These results indicate important differences between the binding of (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine and that of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine.

  1. The role of acetylcholine in the regulation of ion transport by rat colon mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Browning, J. G.; Hardcastle, Jacqueline; Hardcastle, P. T.; Sanford, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine increases the potential difference across rat proximal colon both in vivo and in vitro. 2. There is a sigmoid relationship between the change in potential difference and the logarithm of the dose of acetylcholine. The dose—response curve is shifted to the left by neostigmine and to the right by atropine, suggesting that the action of acetylcholine is mediated by a muscarinic type of receptor. 3. The dose-response curve for acetylcholine in vivo is not altered by the ganglion-blocking agents hexamethonium and pentolinium, suggesting a direct effect of this transmitter on the colon. 4. Acetylcholine causes an increase in potential difference, a small decrease in resistance and hence a rise in the current generated by both normal and stripped everted sacs of rat colon. 5. In the absence of sodium, the calculated current change produced by acetylcholine is reduced, and the removal of chloride has a similar inhibitory effect. The absence of bicarbonate does not significantly affect the response. 6. Acetylcholine virtually abolished net sodium movement and induced net chloride secretion and these changes accounted for the increased short-circuit current. 7. Acetylcholine had no effect on oxygen consumption by rings of colon. 8. Tracts staining for acetylcholinesterase were observed running from the submucous plexus towards the mucosal epithelium. 9. This study shows that acetylcholine can influence ion movement by rat colonic mucosa and suggests that the autonomic nervous system might be involved in the regulation of transport mechanisms in this tissue. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:592212

  2. Effects of cooling on the response of the snail bursting neuron to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Nedeljković, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija

    2005-06-01

    The Br-type neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature change on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. Acetylcholine induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyzed the effects of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced inward current. The amplitude of acetylcholine-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling, and the speed of the decay of acetylcholine response was decreased. PMID:16154950

  3. Nicotine evokes kinetic tremor by activating the inferior olive via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Naofumi; Iha, Higor A; Shimizu, Saki; Tokudome, Kentaro; Mukai, Takahiro; Kinboshi, Masato; Serikawa, Tadao; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of movement disorders (e.g., tremor) and epilepsy. Here, we performed behavioral and immunohistochemical studies using mice and rats to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced tremor. Treatments of animals with nicotine (0.5-2mg/kg, i.p.) elicited kinetic tremor, which was completely suppressed by the nACh receptor antagonist mecamylamine (MEC). The specific α7 nACh receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) also inhibited nicotine-induced tremor, whereas the α4β2 nACh antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) or the peripheral α3β4 nACh antagonist hexamethonium showed no effects. Mapping analysis of Fos protein expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that a tremorgenic dose (1mg/kg) of nicotine region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the piriform cortex (PirC), medial habenula, solitary nucleus and inferior olive (IO) among 44 brain regions examined. In addition, similarly to the tremor responses, nicotine-induced Fos expression in the PirC and IO was selectively antagonized by MLA, but not by DHβE. Furthermore, an electrical lesioning of the IO, but not the PirC, significantly suppressed the induction of nicotine tremor. The present results suggest that nicotine elicits kinetic tremor in rodents by activating the IO neurons via α7 nACh receptors. PMID:27506652

  4. Biomimetic polymer brushes containing tethered acetylcholine analogs for protein and hippocampal neuronal cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaoli; Yu, Panpan; Geller, Herbert M; Ober, Christopher K

    2013-02-11

    This paper describes a method to control neuronal cell adhesion and differentiation with both chemical and topographic cues by using a spatially defined polymer brush pattern. First, biomimetic methacrylate polymer brushes containing tethered neurotransmitter acetylcholine functionalities in the form of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate or free hydroxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) units were prepared using the "grown from" method through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization reactions. The surface properties of the resulting brushes were thoroughly characterized with various techniques and hippocampal neuronal cell culture on the brush surfaces exhibit cell viability and differentiation comparable to, or even better than, those on commonly used poly-l-lysine coated glass coverslips. The polymer brushes were then patterned via UV photolithography techniques to provide specially designed surface features with different sizes (varying from 2 to 200 μm) and orientations (horizontal and vertical). Protein absorption experiments and hippocampal neuronal cell culture tests on the brush patterns showed that both protein and neurons can adhere to the patterns and therefore be guided by such patterns. These results also demonstrate that, because of their unique chemical composition and well-defined nature, the developed polymer brushes may find many potential applications in cell-material interactions studies and neural tissue engineering. PMID:23336729

  5. Recycling of Acetylcholine Receptors at Ectopic Postsynaptic Clusters Induced by Exogenous Agrin in Living Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Hans Rudolf; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    During the development of the neuromuscular junction, motor axons induce the clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and increase their metabolic stability in the muscle membrane. Here, we asked whether the synaptic organizer agrin might regulate the metabolic stability and density of AChRs by promoting the recycling of internalized AChRs, which would otherwise be destined for degradation, into synaptic sites. We show that at nerve-free AChR clusters induced by agrin in extrasynaptic membrane, internalized AChRs are driven back into the ectopic synaptic clusters where they intermingle with pre-existing and new receptors. The extent of AChR recycling depended on the strength of the agrin stimulus, but not on the development of junctional folds, another hallmark of mature postsynaptic membranes. In chronically denervated muscles, in which both AChR stability and recycling are significantly decreased by muscle inactivity, agrin maintained the amount of recycled AChRs at agrin-induced clusters at a level similar to that at denervated original endplates. In contrast, AChRs did not recycle at agrin-induced clusters in C2C12 or primary myotubes. Thus, in muscles in vivo, but not in cultured myotubes, neural agrin promotes the recycling of AChRs and thereby increases their metabolic stability. PMID:25093969

  6. The effects of postnatal alcohol exposure and galantamine on the context pre-exposure facilitation effect and acetylcholine efflux using in vivo microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Amy E; Fadel, Jim R; Kelly, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are characterized by damage to multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, which is involved in learning and memory. The acetylcholine neurotransmitter system provides major input to the hippocampus and is a possible target of developmental alcohol exposure. Alcohol (3.0 g/kg/day) was administered via intubation to male rat pups (postnatal day [PD] 2-10; ethanol-treated [ET]). Controls received a sham intubation (IC) or no treatment (NC). Acetylcholine efflux was measured using in vivo microdialysis (PD 32-35). ET animals were not different at baseline, but had decreased K(+)/Ca(2+)-induced acetylcholine efflux compared to NC animals and an enhanced acetylcholine response to galantamine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; 2.0 mg/kg) compared to both control groups. A separate cohort of animals was tested in the context pre-exposure facilitation effect task (CPFE; PD 30-32) following postnatal alcohol exposure and administration of galantamine (2.0 mg/kg; PD 11-30). Neither chronic galantamine nor postnatal alcohol exposure influenced performance in the CPFE task. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that neither alcohol exposure nor behavioral testing significantly altered the density of vesicular acetylcholine transporter or alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the ventral hippocampus (CA1). In the medial septum, the average number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT+) cells was increased in ET animals that displayed the context-shock association; there were no changes in IC and NC animals that learned the context-shock association or in any animals that were in the control task that entailed no learning. Taken together, these results indicate that the hippocampal acetylcholine system is significantly disrupted under conditions of pharmacological manipulations (e.g., galantamine) in alcohol-exposed animals. Furthermore, ChAT was up‑regulated in ET animals that learned the CPFE, which may account for their ability

  7. Formate supplementation enhances folate-dependent nucleotide biosynthesis and prevents spina bifida in a mouse model of folic acid-resistant neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Sudiwala, Sonia; De Castro, Sandra C P; Leung, Kit-Yi; Brosnan, John T; Brosnan, Margaret E; Mills, Kevin; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2016-07-01

    The curly tail mouse provides a model for neural tube defects (spina bifida and exencephaly) that are resistant to prevention by folic acid. The major ct gene, responsible for spina bifida, corresponds to a hypomorphic allele of grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) but the frequency of NTDs is strongly influenced by modifiers in the genetic background. Moreover, exencephaly in the curly tail strain is not prevented by reinstatement of Grhl3 expression. In the current study we found that expression of Mthfd1L, encoding a key component of mitochondrial folate one-carbon metabolism (FOCM), is significantly reduced in ct/ct embryos compared to a partially congenic wild-type strain. This expression change is not attributable to regulation by Grhl3 or the genetic background at the Mthfd1L locus. Mitochondrial FOCM provides one-carbon units as formate for FOCM reactions in the cytosol. We found that maternal supplementation with formate prevented NTDs in curly tail embryos and also resulted in increased litter size. Analysis of the folate profile of neurulation-stage embryos showed that formate supplementation resulted in an increased proportion of formyl-THF and THF but a reduction in proportion of 5-methyl THF. In contrast, THF decreased and 5-methyl THF was relatively more abundant in the liver of supplemented dams than in controls. In embryos cultured through the period of spinal neurulation, incorporation of labelled thymidine and adenine into genomic DNA was suppressed by supplemental formate, suggesting that de novo folate-dependent biosynthesis of nucleotides (thymidylate and purines) was enhanced. We hypothesise that reduced Mthfd1L expression may contribute to susceptibility to NTDs in the curly tail strain and that formate acts as a one-carbon donor to prevent NTDs. PMID:26924399

  8. Functional characterisation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α subunit from the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus☆

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Kristin; Jones, Andrew K.; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B.; Woods, Debra J.; Bowman, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases have a major impact on human and animal health worldwide. Current control strategies rely heavily on the use of chemical acaricides, most of which target the CNS and with increasing resistance, new drugs are urgently needed. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets of highly successful insecticides. We isolated a full-length nAChR α subunit from a normalised cDNA library from the synganglion (brain) of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Phylogenetic analysis has shown this R. sanguineus nAChR to be most similar to the insect α1 nAChR group and has been named Rsanα1. Rsanα1 is distributed in multiple tick tissues and is present across all life-stages. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Rsanα1 failed to function as a homomer, with and without the addition of either Caenorhabditis elegans resistance-to-cholinesterase (RIC)-3 or X. laevis RIC-3. When co-expressed with chicken β2 nAChR, Rsanα1 evoked concentration-dependent, inward currents in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and showed sensitivity to nicotine (100 μM) and choline (100 μM). Rsanα1/β2 was insensitive to both imidacloprid (100 μM) and spinosad (100 μM). The unreliable expression of Rsanα1 in vitro suggests that additional subunits or chaperone proteins may be required for more robust expression. This study enhances our understanding of nAChRs in arachnids and may provide a basis for further studies on the interaction of compounds with the tick nAChR as part of a discovery process for novel acaricides. PMID:24291321

  9. Pulmonary Inflammation Is Regulated by the Levels of the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Adenir; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Costa, Soraia K. P.; Alonso-Vale, Maria Isabel C.; Caperuto, Luciana C.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.; Prado, Marco Antônio M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Prado, Vânia F.; Prado, Carla M.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays a crucial role in physiological responses of both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moreover, ACh was described as an anti-inflammatory mediator involved in the suppression of exacerbated innate response and cytokine release in various organs. However, the specific contributions of endogenous release ACh for inflammatory responses in the lung are not well understood. To address this question we have used mice with reduced levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), a protein required for ACh storage in secretory vesicles. VAChT deficiency induced airway inflammation with enhanced TNF-α and IL-4 content, but not IL-6, IL-13 and IL-10 quantified by ELISA. Mice with decreased levels of VAChT presented increased collagen and elastic fibers deposition in airway walls which was consistent with an increase in inflammatory cells positive to MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in the lung. In vivo lung function evaluation showed airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in mutant mice. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (p65-NF-kB) in lung of VAChT-deficient mice were higher than in wild-type mice, whereas a decreased expression of janus-kinase 2 (JAK2) was observed in the lung of mutant animals. Our findings show the first evidence that cholinergic deficiency impaired lung function and produce local inflammation. Our data supports the notion that cholinergic system modulates airway inflammation by modulation of JAK2 and NF-kB pathway. We proposed that intact cholinergic pathway is necessary to maintain the lung homeostasis. PMID:25816137

  10. Critical metabolic roles of β-cell M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Azua, Inigo Ruiz; Gautam, Dinesh; Jain, Shalini; Guettier, Jean-Marc; Wess, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs; M1–M5) regulate the activity of an extraordinarily large number of important physiological processes. We and others previously demonstrated that pancreatic β-cells are endowed with M3 mAChRs which are linked to G proteins of the Gq family. The activation of these receptors by ACh or other muscarinic agonists leads to the augmentation of glucose-induced insulin release via multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, in humans, ACh acting on human β-cell mAChRs is released from adjacent α-cells which express both choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAChT), indicative of the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in human pancreatic islets. In order to shed light on the physiological roles of β-cell M3 receptors, we recently generated and analyzed various mutant mouse models. Specifically, we carried out studies with mice which overexpressed M3 receptors or mutant M3 receptors in pancreatic β-cells or which selectively lacked M3 receptors or M3-receptor-associated proteins in pancreatic β-cells. Our findings indicate that β-cell M3 receptors play a key role in maintaining proper insulin release and whole body glucose homeostasis and that strategies aimed at enhancing signaling through β-cell M3 receptors may prove useful to improve β-cell function for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:22525375

  11. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  12. Neuromuscular block after intra-arterially injected acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, P.; Tonali, P.; Gambi, D.

    1973-01-01

    It has been suggested that the effect of ACTH in myasthenia gravis may be ascribed to an action involving neuromuscular transmission which favours repolarization processes, with a tendency towards hyperpolarization of the membranes of muscle fibres and motor nerve endings. A similar mechanism has been postulated for the action of ACTH in epilepsy (Klein, 1970). A direct or indirect action on nerve membrane would interfere with depolarization. There is evidence of raised concentration of intracellular potassium and increased outflow of sodium ions which would cause hyperpolarization of the membrane. This paper studies the effect of ACTH on the late block of neuromuscular transmission caused by acetylcholine (ACTH). Images PMID:4350704

  13. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  14. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  15. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. PMID:25445036

  16. Influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic brain receptors.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, M; Fixmann, A; Holschbach, M; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1998-11-01

    The distribution of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain in vivo has been successfully characterized using radiolabeled tracers and emission tomography. The effect of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft on receptor binding of these tracers has not yet been investigated. The present study examined the influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic cholinergic receptors of porcine brain synaptosomes in vitro. 4-Iododexetimide is a subtype-unspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist with high affinity. Acetylcholine competed with 4-[125I]iododexetimide in a dose-dependent manner. A concentration of 500 microM acetylcholine inhibited 50% of total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding to synaptosomes when both substances were given simultaneously. An 800 microM acetylcholine solution reduced total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding by about 35%, when acetylcholine was given 60 min after incubation of synaptosomes with 4-[125I]iododexetimide. Variations in the synaptic acetylcholine concentration might influence muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging in vivo using 4-[123I]iododexetimide. Conversely, 4-[123I]iododexetimide might be an appropriate molecule to investigate alterations of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft in vivo using single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:9863566

  17. Identification of subunits of acetylcholine receptor that interact with a cholesterol photoaffinity probe

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemas, D.S.; Raftery, M.A.

    1987-03-10

    All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor in membrane vesicles isolated from Torpedo californica have been labeled with (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl diazoacetate. As this probe incorporates into lipid bilayers analogously to cholesterol, this result indicates that acetylcholine receptor interacts with cholesterol. This investigation also demonstrates that this probe is a useful reagent for studying the interaction of cholesterol with membrane proteins.

  18. Acetylcholine and acetylcarnitine transport in peritoneum: Role of the SLC22A4 (OCTN1) transporter.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Di Silvestre, Sara; Belviso, Stefania; Pandolfi, Assunta; Arduini, Arduino; Bonomini, Mario; Indiveri, Cesare

    2016-04-01

    A suitable experimental tool based on proteoliposomes for assaying Organic Cation Transporter Novel member 1 (OCTN1) of peritoneum was pointed out. OCTN1, recently acknowledged as acetylcholine transporter, was immunodetected in rat peritoneum. Transport was assayed following flux of radiolabelled TEA, acetylcholine or acetylcarnitine in proteoliposomes reconstituted with peritoneum extract. OCTN1 mediated, besides TEA, also acetylcholine and a slower acetylcarnitine transport. External sodium inhibited acetylcholine uptake but not its release from proteoliposomes. Differently, sodium did not affect acetylcarnitine uptake. These results suggested that physiologically, acetylcholine should be released while acetylcarnitine was taken up by peritoneum cells. Transport was impaired by OCTN1 inhibitors, butyrobetaine, spermine, and choline. Biotin was also found as acetylcholine transport inhibitor. Anti-OCTN1 antibody specifically inhibited acetylcholine transport confirming the involvement of OCTN1. The transporter was also immunodetected in human mesothelial primary cells. Extract from these cells was reconstituted in proteoliposomes. Transport features very similar to those found with rat peritoneum were observed. Validation of the proteoliposome model for peritoneal transport study was then achieved assaying transport in intact mesothelial cells. TEA, butyrobetaine and Na(+) inhibited acetylcholine transport in intact cells while efflux was Na(+) insensitive. Therefore transport features in intact cells overlapped those found in proteoliposomes. PMID:26724204

  19. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  20. Morphogenic role for acetylcholinesterase in axonal outgrowth during neural development.

    PubMed Central

    Bigbee, J W; Sharma, K V; Gupta, J J; Dupree, J L

    1999-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses and neuromuscular junctions. However, results from our laboratory and others indicate that AChE has an extrasynaptic, noncholinergic role during neural development. This article is a review of our findings demonstrating the morphogenic role of AChE, using a neuronal cell culture model. We also discuss how these data suggest that AChE has a cell adhesive function during neural development. These results could have additional significance as AChE is the target enzyme of agricultural organophosphate and carbamate pesticides as well as the commonly used household organophosphate chlorpyrifos (Dursban). Prenatal exposure to these agents could have adverse effects on neural development by interfering with the morphogenic function of AChE. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10229710

  1. Designer Self-Assemble Peptides Maximize the Therapeutic Benefits of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Alzheimer's Disease via Enhancing Neuron Differentiation and Paracrine Action.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guo-hong; Shao, Shui-jin; Yang, Jia-jun; Liu, Jian-ren; Guo, Hai-dong

    2016-03-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the presence of extracellular amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the form of amyloid plaques and neuronal loss. Neural stem cell (NSC) is being scrutinized as a promising cell replacement therapy for various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the unfavorable niche at the site of degenerative disease is hostile to the survival and differentiation of transplanted cells. Here, we undertook in vitro and in vivo works to examine whether a designer self-assemble peptide (DSP), which contains one functional domain Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) derived from laminin, promotes the survival and neuronal differentiation of NSC and behavioral improvement. We found that DSP could undergo spontaneous assembly into well-ordered nanofibers, and it not only facilitated the cell viability in normal culture condition, but also decreased the number of apoptotic cells induced by Aβ in vitro. NSC seeded in DSP showed much more neuronal differentiation than that seeded in self-assemble peptide (SP) or alone. In the AD model, NSC transplantation in DSP-treated AD rats demonstrated much more obvious cognitive rescue with restoration of learning/memory function compared with NSC transplantation in SP, NSC alone, or DSP alone treated ones. Interestingly, DSP enhanced the survival and neuronal differentiation of transplanted NSC. Apoptosis levels in the CA1 region and Aβ level in the hippocampus were significantly decreased in the group of NSC transplantation in DSP. Moreover, synaptic function, indicated by the expression of pre-synaptic protein synapsin-1, was restored and the secretion of anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic factors were increased, such as IL-10, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), while the expression of pro-inflammatory factors were decreased, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data firstly unveiled that the biomaterial DSP can

  2. Functional expression of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Jiang, Ji-Hong; Li, Shi-Tong

    2016-09-01

    The functional expression of recombinant α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells has presented a challenge. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 3 (RIC‑3) has been confirmed to act as a molecular chaperone of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The primary objectives of the present study were to investigate whether the co‑expression of human (h)RIC‑3 with human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in HEK 293 cells facilitates functional expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Subsequent to transfection, western blotting and polymerase chain reaction were used to test the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and RIC-3. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was expressed alone or co‑expressed with hRIC‑3 in the HEK 293 cells. Drug‑containing solution was then applied to the cells via a gravity‑driven perfusion system. Calcium influx in the cells was analyzed using calcium imaging. Nicotine did not induce calcium influx in the HEK 293 cells expressing human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor only. However, in the cells co‑expressing human RIC‑3 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, nicotine induced calcium influx via the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration‑dependent manner (concentration required to elicit 50% of the maximal effect=29.21 µM). Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that the co‑expression of RIC‑3 in HEK 293 cells facilitated the functional expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. PMID:27430244

  3. Purification of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; De Backer, J P; Guillet, J C; Vanderheyden, P; Vauquelin, G; Strosberg, A D

    1983-01-01

    Calf forebrain homogenates contain 2.8 pM muscarinic acetylcholine receptors per mg of protein. [3H]Antagonist saturation binding experiments under equilibrium conditions revealed a single class of sites with equilibrium dissociation constants of 0.82 nM for [3H]dexetimide and 0.095 nM for [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. Displacement binding studies with agonists revealed the presence of low and high affinity sites. Here we describe the solubilization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with digitonin and their purification by affinity chromatography using an affinity gel which consisted of dexetimide coupled to Affi-Gel 10 (i.e., carboxy N-hydroxysuccinimide esters linked via a 1 nm spacer arm to agarose beads). Purified proteins were obtained by specific elution with muscarinic drugs, i.e., the antagonist atropine and the irreversible ligand propylbenzilylcholine mustard. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioiodinated purified preparations revealed a major 70-K protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6605245

  4. END-PLATE ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR: STRUCTURE, MECHANISM, PHARMACOLOGY, AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The synapse is a localized neurohumoral contact between a neuron and an effector cell and may be considered the quantum of fast intercellular communication. Analogously, the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor may be considered the quantum of fast chemical to electrical transduction. Our understanding of postsynaptic receptors began to develop about a hundred years ago with the demonstration that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve released acetylcholine and slowed the heart beat. During the past 50 years, advances in understanding postsynaptic receptors increased at a rapid pace, owing largely to studies of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the motor endplate. The endplate AChR belongs to a large superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors, called Cys-loop receptors, and has served as an exemplar receptor for probing fundamental structures and mechanisms that underlie fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent studies provide an increasingly detailed picture of the structure of the AChR and the symphony of molecular motions that underpin its remarkably fast and efficient chemoelectrical transduction. PMID:22811427

  5. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulation by general anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Flood, P; Role, L W

    1998-11-23

    1. General anesthetics have been shown to inhibit synaptic transmission in multiple areas of the central and peripheral nervous systems. 2. The mechanism of inhibition is not well understood. 3. It has become clear that general anesthetics modulate the function of members of the ligand gated ion channel superfamily, including receptors for GABA(A), glycine (Harrison et al., Mol. Pharmacol. 44(3), 1993, 628-632) and 5HT3 (Zhou and Lovinger, J. Pharmacol. Exp. Therap. 278(2), 1996, 732-740). 4. Studies of the activity of general anesthetics on recombinant neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have added this receptor family to those potently inhibited by general anesthetics (Flood et al., Anesthesiology 86(4), 1997, 859-865; Violet et al., Anesthesiology 86(4), 1997, 866-874). 5. Studies of neuronal nicotinic receptors in native neurons suggest that the inhibition of these receptors by general anesthetics at low clinical concentrations may be biologically significant (Nicoll, Science 199(4327), 1978, 451-452). 6. Recent work on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system suggests that their primary role may be to modulate synaptic transmission (Role and Berg, Neuron 16(6), 1996, 1077-1085). 7. Thus, inhibition of nicotinic modulation in the central nervous system may result in inhibition of synaptic transmission and some of the behavioral consequences of general anesthesia. PMID:10049135

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nociception

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Emiliano; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Husson, Steven J.; Steuer-Costa, Wagner; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R.; Treinin, Millet

    2014-01-01

    Polymodal nociceptors sense and integrate information on injurious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Chemical signals either activate nociceptors or modulate their responses to other stimuli. One chemical known to activate or modulate responses of nociceptors is acetylcholine (ACh). Across evolution nociceptors express subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family, a family of ACh-gated ion channels. The roles of ACh and nAChRs in nociceptor function are, however, poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans polymodal nociceptors, PVD, express nAChR subunits on their sensory arbor. Here we show that mutations reducing ACh synthesis and mutations in nAChR subunits lead to defects in PVD function and morphology. A likely cause for these defects is a reduction in cytosolic calcium measured in ACh and nAChR mutants. Indeed, overexpression of a calcium pump in PVD mimics defects in PVD function and morphology found in nAChR mutants. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a central role for nAChRs and ACh in nociceptor function and suggest that calcium permeating via nAChRs facilitates activity of several signaling pathways within this neuron. PMID:24518198

  7. Allosteric interactions of staurosporine and other indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine and acetylcholine at muscarinic receptor subtypes: identification of a second allosteric site.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-07-01

    We have studied the interactions of five indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine (NMS) and unlabeled acetylcholine at M(1)-M(4) muscarinic receptors, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium radioligand binding studies. The results are consistent with an allosteric model in which the primary and allosteric ligands bind simultaneously to the receptor and modify each other's affinities. The compounds were generally most active at M(1) receptors. [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by staurosporine, KT5720, and KT5823 at M(1) and M(2) receptors, and by K-252a at M(1) receptors. Gö 7874 reduced [(3)H]NMS affinity by up to threefold for all subtypes. A range of cooperative effects with acetylcholine was seen, and, at the M(1) receptor, KT5720 had a log affinity of 6.4 and enhanced acetylcholine affinity by 40%. The compounds inhibited the dissociation of [(3)H]NMS to different extents across the receptor subtypes, with the largest effects at M(1) receptors. In equilibrium binding studies the inhibitory potency of gallamine at M(1) receptors was not affected by KT5720, indicating that these agents bind to two distinct allosteric sites and have neutral cooperativity with each other. In contrast, gallamine and staurosporine had a negatively cooperative or competitive interaction at M(1) receptors. Similarly, the potency and relative effectiveness of KT5720 for inhibiting [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(1) receptors were not affected by gallamine or brucine, but were affected in a complex manner by staurosporine. These results demonstrate that there are at least two distinct allosteric sites on the M(1) receptor, both of which can support positive cooperativity with acetylcholine. PMID:10860942

  8. Cholinergic enhancement of functional networks in older adults with MCI

    PubMed Central

    Pa, Judy; Berry, Anne S.; Compagnone, Mariana; Boccanfuso, Jacqueline; Greenhouse, Ian; Rubens, Michael T.; Johnson, Julene K.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The importance of the cholinergic system for cognitive function has been well-documented in animal and human studies. The objective of this study was to elucidate the cognitive and functional connectivity changes associated with enhanced acetylcholine (ACh) levels. We hypothesized older adults with mild memory deficits would show behavioral and functional network enhancements with an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor treatment (donepezil) when compared to a placebo control group. Methods We conducted a 3-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of donepezil in twenty-seven older adults with mild memory deficits. Participants completed a delayed recognition memory task. FMRI scans were collected at baseline prior to treatment and at 3-month follow-up while on a 10 mg daily dose of donepezil or placebo. Results Donepezil treatment significantly enhanced the response time for face and scene memory probes when compared to the placebo group. A group-by-visit interaction was identified for the functional network connectivity of the left fusiform face area (FFA) with the hippocampus and inferior frontal junction, such that the treatment group showed increased connectivity over time when compared to the placebo group. Additionally, the enhanced functional network connectivity of the FFA and hippocampus significantly predicted memory response time at 3-month follow-up in the treatment group. Interpretation These findings suggest that increased cholinergic transmission improves goal-directed neural processing and cognitive ability and may serve to facilitate communication across functionally-connected attention and memory networks. Longitudinal fMRI is a useful method for elucidating the neural changes associated with pharmacological modulation and is a potential tool for monitoring intervention efficacy in clinical trials. PMID:23447373

  9. The effects of postnatal alcohol exposure and galantamine on the context pre-exposure facilitation effect and acetylcholine efflux using in vivo microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Amy E.; Fadel, Jim R.; Kelly, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) affect 2–5% of children. FASD have been shown to cause damage to multiple brain regions, but damage to the hippocampus specifically may explain deficits in learning and memory that are hallmark symptoms of FASD. The acetylcholine neurotransmitter system is a major input to the hippocampus and is a possible target of developmental alcohol exposure. Alcohol (3.0 g/kg/day) was administered via intragastric intubation to developing male rat pups (postnatal day [PD] 2–10; ethanol-treated [ET]), with controls receiving a sham intubation (IC) or no treatment (NC). In Experiment 1, in vivo microdialysis was used to measure acetylcholine efflux in adolescents (PD 32–35). During microdialysis, the effects of a high K+/Ca2+ aCSF solution (PD 32–33) and an acute galantamine (acetylcholinesterase [AChE] inhibitor) injection (2.0 mg/kg; PD 34–35) on acetylcholine efflux were measured. Alcohol-exposed animals did not differ in acetylcholine efflux at baseline. However, alcohol-exposed animals had a decrease in K+/Ca2+-induced acetylcholine efflux compared to non-treated controls, and an enhanced acetylcholine response to galantamine compared to both control groups. Experiment 2 tested whether chronic administration of galantamine (2.0 mg/kg; PD 11–30) could attenuate alcohol-induced learning deficits in the context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE; PD 30–32). Neither chronic galantamine nor postnatal alcohol exposure influenced performance in the CPFE task. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; medial septum), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAChT; ventral CA1), and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR; ventral CA1) following microdialysis (Exp. 1) or chronic galantamine and behavioral testing (Exp. 2). Neither alcohol exposure nor behavioral testing significantly altered the density of vAChT or α7 nAChRs in the ventral CA1 region of the

  10. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan

    2009-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  11. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan; Standaert, David G; Pisani, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  12. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) enhances MAP2 + and HUC/D + neurons and influences neurite extension during differentiation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (L1F), a member of the Interleukin 6 cytokine family, has a role in differentiation of Human Neural Progenitor (hNP) cells in vitro. hNP cells, derived from Human Embryonic Stem (hES) cells, have an unlimited capacity for self-renewal in monolayer cultu...

  13. Nanoengineered Polystyrene Surfaces with Nanopore Array Pattern Alters Cytoskeleton Organization and Enhances Induction of Neural Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ae Ryang; Kim, Richard Y; Kim, Hyung Woo; Shrestha, Kshitiz Raj; Jeon, Seung Hwan; Cha, Kyoung Je; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Dong Sung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-07-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) can differentiate into various cell types depending on chemical and topographical cues. One topographical cue recently noted to be successful in inducing differentiation is the nanoengineered polystyrene surface containing nanopore array-patterned substrate (NP substrate), which is designed to mimic the nanoscale topographical features of the extracellular matrix. In this study, efficacies of NP and flat substrates in inducing neural differentiation of hADSCs were examined by comparing their substrate-cell adhesion rates, filopodia growth, nuclei elongation, and expression of neural-specific markers. The polystyrene nano Petri dishes containing NP substrates were fabricated by a nano injection molding process using a nickel electroformed nano-mold insert (Diameter: 200 nm. Depth of pore: 500 nm. Center-to-center distance: 500 nm). Cytoskeleton and filopodia structures were observed by scanning electron microscopy and F-actin staining, while cell adhesion was tested by vinculin staining after 24 and 48 h of seeding. Expression of neural specific markers was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results showed that NP substrates lead to greater substrate-cell adhesion, filopodia growth, nuclei elongation, and expression of neural specific markers compared to flat substrates. These results not only show the advantages of NP substrates, but they also suggest that further study into cell-substrate interactions may yield great benefits for biomaterial engineering. PMID:25919423

  14. Acetylcholine promotes the emergence and elongation of lateral roots of Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kou-ichi; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2011-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) was grown on four layers of paper towel moistened with distilled water with and without acetylcholine (ACh) for five days in the dark after sowing. ACh at 1 nM promoted the growth (emergence and elongation) of lateral roots of radish plants, but had no effect on the stems and main roots. Moreover, ACh enhanced the dry weight of roots [main (primary) + lateral roots]. Neostigmine, an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) also promoted the emergence and elongation of lateral roots, and atropine, a competitive inhibitor of ACh receptor, suppressed the emergence and elongation. ACh suppressed the activity of AChE and increased the amount of proteins and pyridine nucleotides (NAD and NADH) in the roots of the seedlings. It also increased the activities of NAD-forming enzymes [NAD synthetase and ATP-nicotinamide mononucleotide (ATP-NMN) adenyltransferase], and enhanced the amount of DNA in the roots of the seedlings. The relationship between ACh and the emergence and growth of lateral roots was discussed from a biochemical viewpoint. PMID:21900743

  15. Co-release of acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid by a retinal neuron

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, D.M.; Masland, R.H.

    1989-05-01

    Rabbit retinas were vitally stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), a fluorescent compound that selectively accumulates within the cholinergic amacrine cells. The retinas were then incubated in vitro in the presence of radioactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and autoradiographed. The cells that accumulated DAPI were found to accumulate GABA, confirming immunohistochemical evidence that the cholinergic amacrine cells contain GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K+ caused them to release acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. This indicates that the cholinergic amacrine cells can secrete acetylcholine and GABA. Retinas were double-labeled with (14C)GABA and (3H)acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of (14C)GABA was found to be independent of extracellular Ca2+. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from (14C)glutamate behaved the same way as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments the simultaneously measured release of (3H)acetylcholine was strongly Ca2+-dependent, indicating that the releases of acetylcholine and GABA are controlled by different mechanisms. Synaptic vesicles immunologically isolated from double-labeled retinas contained much (3H)acetylcholine and little or no (14C)GABA. These results suggest that the cholinergic amacrine cells release acetylcholine primarily by vesicle exocytosis and release GABA primarily by means of a carrier.

  16. Specific Stimulated Uptake of Acetylcholine by Torpedo Electric Organ Synaptic Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Stanley M.; Koenigsberger, Robert

    1980-10-01

    The specificity of acetylcholine uptake by synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica was studied. In the absence of cofactors, [3H]acetylcholine was taken up identically to [14C]choline in the same solution (passive uptake), and the equilibrium concentration achieved inside the vesicles was equal to the concentration outside. In the presence of MgATP, [3H]acetylcholine and [14C]choline in the same solution were taken up identically, except only about half as much of each was taken up (suppressed uptake). [3H]Acetylcholine uptake was stimulated by MgATP and HCO3 about 4-fold relative to suppressed uptake, for a net concentrative uptake of about 2:1 (stimulated uptake). Uptake of [14C]choline in the same solution remained at the suppressed level. [3H]Acetylcholine taken up under stimulated conditions migrated with vesicles containing [14C]mannitol on analytical glycerol density gradients during centrifugation. Vesicles were treated with nine protein modification reagents under mild conditions. Two reagents had no effect on, dithiothreitol potentiated, and six reagents strongly inhibited subsequent stimulated uptake of [3H]acetylcholine. The results indicate that uptake of acetylcholine is conditionally specific for the transported substrate, is carried out by the synaptic vesicles rather than a contaminant of the preparation, and requires a functional protein system containing a critical sulfhydryl group.

  17. Relation between the content of acetyl-coenzyme A and acetylcholine in brain slices.

    PubMed Central

    Rícný, J; Tucek, S

    1980-01-01

    Slices of rat caudate nuclei were incubated in vitro in media containing, among other constituents, three different concentrations of glucose (0.5, 2 and 10 mM), 0.2 mM-choline, paraoxon as an inhibitor of cholinesterase, and 5 mM- or 30 mM-K+. After 30 and 60 min of incubation, the concentrations of acetyl-CoA, acetylcholine and choline in the tissue and of acetylcholine in the incubation medium were measured. The content of acetyl-CoA in the sliced varied in direct relation to the concentration of glucose in the incubation medium. The content of acetylcholine in the slices and, in experiments with high K+, also the amount of acetylcholine released into the incubation medium varied in direct relation to the concentration of glucose in the incubation medium and to the concentration of acetyl-CoA in the slices; the relation between the concentrations of acetyl-CoA and of acetylcholine in the slices was linear. It was concluded that the availability of acetyl-CoA had a decisive influence on both the rate of synthesis of acetylcholine and its steady-state concentration. The observations accord with the view that, at the ultimate level, the synthesis of acetylcholine is controlled by the Law of Mass Action. PMID:7470027

  18. Bladder outlet obstruction causes up-regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in bladder-projecting pelvic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Choong-Ku; Park, Kwang-Hwa; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2015-03-30

    Pelvic ganglion (PG) neurons relay sympathetic and parasympathetic signals to the lower urinary tract, comprising the urinary bladder and bladder outlet, and are thus essential for both storage and voiding reflexes. Autonomic transmission is mediated by activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in PG neurons. Previously, bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia, was found to increase soma sizes of bladder-projecting PG neurons. To date, however, it remains unknown whether these morphological changes are accompanied by functional plasticity in PG neurons. In the present study, we investigated whether BOO alters acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) transcript expression and current density in bladder PG neurons. Partial ligation of the rat urethra for six weeks induced detrusor overactivity (DO), as observed during cystometrical measurement. In rats exhibiting DO, membrane capacitance of parasympathetic bladder PG neurons was selectively increased. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that BOO enhanced the expression of the transcripts encoding the nAChR α3 and β4 subunits in PG neurons. Notably, BOO significantly increased ACh-evoked current density in parasympathetic bladder PG neurons, whereas no changes were observed in sympathetic bladder and parasympathetic penile PG neurons. In addition, other ligand-gated ionic currents were immune to BOO in bladder PG neurons. Taken together, these data suggest that BOO causes upregulation of nAChR in parasympathetic bladder PG neurons, which in turn may potentiate ganglionic transmission and contribute to the development of DO. PMID:25625357

  19. Modulation of the effect of acetylcholine on insulin release by the membrane potential of B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hermans, M.P.; Schmeer, W.; Henquin, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Mouse islets were used to test the hypothesis that the B cell membrane must be depolarized for acetylcholine to increase insulin release. The resting membrane potential of B cells (at 3 mM glucose) was slightly decreased (5 mV) by acetylcholine, but no electrical activity appeared. This depolarization was accompanied by a Ca-independent acceleration of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 45/Ca efflux but no insulin release. When the B cell membrane was depolarized by a stimulatory concentration of glucose (10 mM), acetylcholine potentiated electrical activity, accelerated /sup 86/Rb and /sup 45/Ca efflux, and increased insulin release. This latter effect, but not the acceleration of /sup 45/Ca efflux, was totally dependent on extracellular Ca. If glucose-induced depolarization of the B cell membrane was prevented by diazoxide, acetylcholine lost all effects but those produced at low glucose. In contrast, when the B cell membrane was depolarized by leucine or tolbutamide (at 3 mM glucose), acetylcholine triggered a further depolarization with appearance of electrical activity, accelerated /sup 86/Rb and /sup 45/Ca efflux, and stimulated insulin release. Acetylcholine produced similar effects (except for electrical activity) in the presence of high K or arginine which, unlike the above test agents, depolarize the B cell membrane by a mechanism other than a decrease in K+ permeability. Omission of extracellular Ca abolished the releasing effect of acetylcholine under all conditions but only partially decreased the stimulation of /sup 45/Ca efflux. The results show thus that acetylcholine stimulation of insulin release does not result from mobilization of cellular Ca but requires that the B cell membrane be sufficiently depolarized to reach the threshold potential where Ca channels are activated. This may explain why acetylcholine alone does not initiate release but becomes active in the presence of a variety of agents.

  20. Gastrointestinal hypomotility with loss of enteric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: active immunization model in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Fryer, James P.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Xiao, Yingxian; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID) is a limited form of dysautonomia. The only proven effector to date is IgG specific for ganglionic nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors containing α3 subunits (α3*-nAChR). Rabbits immunized with recombinant α3-polypeptide produce α3*-nAChR autoantibodies, and profound AGID ensues. Human and rabbit α3*-nAChR-specific-IgGs induce transient hypomotility when injected into mice. Here we describe success and problems encountered inducing gastrointestinal hypomotility in mice by active immunization. Methods We repeatedly injected young adult mice of seven different strains susceptible to autoimmunity (spontaneous diabetes or neural antigen immunization-induced myasthenia gravis or encephalomyelitis) with: i) α3-polypeptide, intradermally, or ii) live α3*-nAChR-expressing xenogeneic cells, intraperitoneally. We measured serum α3*-nAChR-IgG twice monthly, and terminally assessed blue dye gastrointestinal transit, total small intestinal α3*-nAChR content (radiochemically) and myenteric plexus neuron numbers (immunohistochemically, ileal-jejunal whole-mount preparations). Key Results Standard cutaneous inoculation with α3-polypeptide was minimally immunogenic, regardless of dose. Intraperitoneally-injected live cells were potently immunogenic. Self-reactive α3*-nAChR-IgG was induced only by rodent immunogen; small intestinal transit slowing and enteric α3*-nAChR loss required high serum levels. Ganglionic neurons were not lost. Conclusions & Inferences AGID is inducible in mice by active immunization. Accompanying enteric α3*-nAChR reduction without neuronal death is consistent with an IgG-mediated rather than T cell-mediated pathogenesis, as is improvement of symptoms in patients receiving antibody-depleting therapies. PMID:23072523

  1. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Michalski, Dominik; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Morten S

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal gyrus from AD patients and found significantly increased PSCA levels (approximately 70%). In contrast, no changes in Lypd6 levels were detected. In concordance with our findings in AD patients, PSCA levels were increased in the frontal cortex of triple transgenic mice with an AD-like pathology harboring human transgenes that cause both age-dependent β-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display β-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting that PSCA-nAChR interactions may be involved in the cognitive dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:25680266

  2. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors contribute to learning-induced metaplasticity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Benjamin; Klein, Eva M; Striepens, Nadine; Mihov, Yoan; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Reul, Juergen; Goossens, Liesbet; Schruers, Koen; Kendrick, Keith M; Hurlemann, René

    2013-07-01

    Hippocampal learning is thought to induce metaplasticity, which can facilitate subsequent learning. Administered at single low doses, the N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptor antagonist memantine predominantly blocks α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs). Placebo-controlled administration of a single low dose of memantine in a pharmaco-fMRI experiment may thus help characterize the role of α7 nAChRs in hippocampal metaplasticity. We hypothesized that if α7 nAChRs contribute to learning-induced metaplasticity in the hippocampus, blockade of these receptors with low-dose memantine would selectively interfere with a facilitation of subsequent learning without impairing hippocampal learning per se. To specifically test this hypothesis, we devised a randomized controlled trial in which healthy volunteers were administered a 20-mg single oral dose of memantine or placebo and scanned on three subsequent runs of a hippocampal learning task. Our results indicate no discrepancies in behavioral learning between low-dose memantine- and placebo-treated participants in the first and second run of this task. In the third run, however, only the placebo-treated group showed facilitated behavioral learning, an effect paralleled by decreased neural responses in the hippocampal cornu ammonis region. Our findings suggest that blockade of α7 nAChRs selectively interfered with a learning-induced facilitation of subsequent learning while leaving unimpaired hippocampal learning per se. Taken together, our results provide support for a relevant contribution of α7 nAChRs to learning-associated metaplasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:23469888

  3. Immunological relationship between acetylcholine receptor and thymus: a possible significance in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Aharonov, A; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Abramsky, O; Fuchs, S

    1975-01-01

    A defined immunological cross-reaction was observed between acetylcholine receptor fraction from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, and two calf thymus fractions. The cross-reaction was demonstrated on the cellular level by means of the lymphocyte transformation technique, and on the humoral level, by means of the microcomplement fixation assay. In the human disease myasthenia gravis both acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction and the thymus are affected, probably by an autoimmune mechanism. The immunological cross-reaction between acetylcholine receptor and thymic components may explain the association between endplate and thymus disorders in myasthenia gravis. PMID:1055418

  4. Mef2c-F10N enhancer driven β-galactosidase (LacZ) and Cre recombinase mice facilitate analyses of gene function and lineage fate in neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Kazushi; Sandell, Lisa L; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E; Yuen, Kobe C; Watt, Kristin E Noack; Black, Brian L; Durnin, Michael; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-06-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) comprise a multipotent, migratory stem cell and progenitor population that gives rise to numerous cell and tissue types within a developing embryo, including craniofacial bone and cartilage, neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, and melanocytes within the skin. Here we describe two novel stable transgenic mouse lines suitable for lineage tracing and analysis of gene function in NCC. Firstly, using the F10N enhancer of the Mef2c gene (Mef2c-F10N) linked to LacZ, we generated transgenic mice (Mef2c-F10N-LacZ) that express LacZ in the majority, if not all migrating NCC that delaminate from the neural tube. Mef2c-F10N-LacZ then continues to be expressed primarily in neurogenic, gliogenic and melanocytic NCC and their derivatives, but not in ectomesenchymal derivatives. Secondly, we used the same Mef2c-F10N enhancer together with Cre recombinase to generate transgenic mice (Mef2c-F10N-Cre) that can be used to indelibly label, or alter gene function in, migrating NCC and their derivatives. At early stages of development, Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre label NCC in a pattern similar to Wnt1-Cre mice, with the exception that Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre specifically label NCC that have delaminated from the neural plate, while premigratory NCC are not labeled. Thus, our Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre transgenic mice provide new resources for tracing migratory NCC and analyzing gene function in migrating and differentiating NCC independently of NCC formation. PMID:25794678

  5. Mef2c-F10N enhancer driven β-galactosidase (LacZ) and Cre recombinase mice facilitate analyses of gene function and lineage fate in neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Kazushi; Sandell, Lisa L.; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E.; Yuen, Kobe C.; Noack Watt, Kristin E.; Black, Brian L.; Durnin, Michael; Trainor, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) comprise a multipotent, migratory stem cell and progenitor population that gives rise to numerous cell and tissue types within a developing embryo, including craniofacial bone and cartilage, neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, and melanocytes within the skin. Here we describe two novel stable transgenic mouse lines suitable for lineage tracing and analysis of gene function in NCC. Firstly, using the F10N enhancer of the Mef2c gene (Mef2c-F10N) linked to LacZ, we generated transgenic mice (Mef2c-F10N-LacZ) that express LacZ in the majority, if not all migrating NCC that delaminate from the neural tube. Mef2c-F10N-LacZ then continues to be expressed primarily in neurogenic, gliogenic and melanocytic NCC and their derivatives, but not in ectomesenchymal derivatives. Secondly, we used the same Mef2c-F10N enhancer together with Cre recombinase to generate transgenic mice (Mef2c-F10N-Cre) that can be used to indelibly label, or alter gene function in, migrating NCC and their derivatives. At early stages of development, Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre label NCC in a pattern similar to Wnt1-Cre mice, with the exception that Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre specifically label NCC that have delaminated from the neural plate, while premigratory NCC are not labeled. Thus, our Mef2c-F10N-LacZ and Mef2c-F10N-Cre transgenic mice provide new resources for tracing migratory NCC and analyzing gene function in migrating and differentiating NCC independently of NCC formation. PMID:25794678

  6. Structure and superorganization of acetylcholine receptor–rapsyn complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Benoît; Unwin, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The scaffolding protein at the neuromuscular junction, rapsyn, enables clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in high concentration and is critical for muscle function. Patients with insufficient receptor clustering suffer from muscle weakness. However, the detailed organization of the receptor–rapsyn network is poorly understood: it is unclear whether rapsyn first forms a wide meshwork to which receptors can subsequently dock or whether it only forms short bridges linking receptors together to make a large cluster. Furthermore, the number of rapsyn-binding sites per receptor (a heteropentamer) has been controversial. Here, we show by cryoelectron tomography and subtomogram averaging of Torpedo postsynaptic membrane that receptors are connected by up to three rapsyn bridges, the minimum number required to form a 2D network. Half of the receptors belong to rapsyn-connected groups comprising between two and fourteen receptors. Our results provide a structural basis for explaining the stability and low diffusion of receptors within clusters. PMID:23754381

  7. A novel mechanism for acetylcholine to generate diacylglycerol in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Z.; Drewes, L.R. )

    1990-03-05

    The classical scheme involving inositol phospholipid breakdown by phospholipase C as the sole source of diacylglycerol (DAG) has recently been challenged by evidence that phosphatidylcholine (PC) is an alternative source. In synaptic membranes of canine cerebral cortex, cholinergic agonists caused rapid accumulation of ({sup 3}H)phosphatidic acid (PA) from ({sup 3}H)PC within 15 s, whereas (3H)DAG formation showed a transient lag period before becoming elevated and then exceeding the amount of ({sup 3}H)PA. Additional evidence shows that DAG is produced from PC by the action of phospholipase D to yield PA, which is further dephosphorylated to DAG by PA phosphatase. Our results indicate that this muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-regulated PC phospholipase D-PA phosphatase pathway may be a novel mechanism in cell signal transduction processes for activation of protein kinase C in brain.

  8. Frizzled-9 impairs acetylcholine receptor clustering in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Evelyn C.; Pinto, Cristina; Hanna, Patricia; Ojeda, Jorge; Pérez, Viviana; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Zamorano, Pedro; Albistur, Miguel; Sandoval, Daniel; Henríquez, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence indicates that Wnt pathways play crucial and diverse roles to assemble the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a peripheral synapse characterized by the clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on postsynaptic densities. The molecular determinants of Wnt effects at the NMJ are still to be fully elucidated. We report here that the Wnt receptor Frizzled-9 (Fzd9) is expressed in developing skeletal muscles during NMJ synaptogenesis. In cultured myotubes, gain- and loss-of-function experiments revealed that Fzd9-mediated signaling impairs the AChR-clustering activity of agrin, an organizer of postsynaptic differentiation. Overexpression of Fzd9 induced the cytosolic accumulation of β-catenin, a key regulator of Wnt signaling. Consistently, Fzd9 and β-catenin localize in the postsynaptic domain of embryonic NMJs in vivo. Our findings represent the first evidence pointing to a crucial role of a Fzd-mediated, β-catenin-dependent signaling on the assembly of the vertebrate NMJ. PMID:24860427

  9. Cholinergic modulation of dopamine pathways through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    de Kloet, Sybren F; Mansvelder, Huibert D; De Vries, Taco J

    2015-10-15

    Nicotine addiction is highly prevalent in current society and is often comorbid with other diseases. In the central nervous system, nicotine acts as an agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and its effects depend on location and receptor composition. Although nicotinic receptors are found in most brain regions, many studies on addiction have focused on the mesolimbic system and its reported behavioral correlates such as reward processing and reinforcement learning. Profound modulatory cholinergic input from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmentum to dopaminergic midbrain nuclei as well as local cholinergic interneuron projections to dopamine neuron axons in the striatum may play a major role in the effects of nicotine. Moreover, an indirect mesocorticolimbic feedback loop involving the medial prefrontal cortex may be involved in behavioral characteristics of nicotine addiction. Therefore, this review will highlight current understanding of the effects of nicotine on the function of mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine projections in the mesocorticolimbic circuit. PMID:26208783

  10. Recent developments in the synthesis of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Breining, Scott R

    2004-01-01

    The extraordinary pharmacology of nicotine and epibatidine have indicated the potential for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands to serve as a new therapeutic class for a host of CNS disorders. Many such ligands are natural products, or analogs thereof, which represent a significant challenge to the synthetic chemist. Synthesis of such molecules often serves as a showcase to demonstrate the potential of newly developed methodology. This synthetic challenge coupled with the promise of pharmacological activity in compounds possessing the nicotinic pharmacophore has stimulated a great deal of synthetic activity over the last five years. The present report provides an overview of novel synthetic methodology occurring during this period directed toward the synthesis of compounds with presumed affinity for the neuronal nAChR. Syntheses chosen for review here represent the major efforts toward molecules such as epibatidine analogs, anatoxin-a, nicotine and related alkaloids, conformationally constrained nicotine derivatives, cytisine and methyllycaconitine (MLA). PMID:14965298

  11. Neural network technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A.

    1991-01-01

    A whole new arena of computer technologies is now beginning to form. Still in its infancy, neural network technology is a biologically inspired methodology which draws on nature's own cognitive processes. The Software Technology Branch has provided a software tool, Neural Execution and Training System (NETS), to industry, government, and academia to facilitate and expedite the use of this technology. NETS is written in the C programming language and can be executed on a variety of machines. Once a network has been debugged, NETS can produce a C source code which implements the network. This code can then be incorporated into other software systems. Described here are various software projects currently under development with NETS and the anticipated future enhancements to NETS and the technology.

  12. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed. PMID:18512214

  13. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  14. Physiological characterization of human muscle acetylcholine receptors from ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Eleonora; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conti, Luca; Deflorio, Cristina; Frasca, Vittorio; Manteca, Alessia; Pichiorri, Floriana; Roseti, Cristina; Torchia, Gregorio; Limatola, Cristina; Grassi, Francesca; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to muscle paralysis. Research in transgenic mice suggests that the muscle actively contributes to the disease onset, but such studies are difficult to pursue in humans and in vitro models would represent a good starting point. In this work we show that tiny amounts of muscle from ALS or from control denervated muscle, obtained by needle biopsy, are amenable to functional characterization by two different technical approaches: “microtransplantation” of muscle membranes into Xenopus oocytes and culture of myogenic satellite cells. Acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents and unitary events were characterized in oocytes and multinucleated myotubes. We found that ALS acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) retain their native physiological characteristics, being activated by ACh and nicotine and blocked by α-bungarotoxin (α-BuTX), d-tubocurarine (dTC), and galantamine. The reversal potential of ACh-evoked currents and the unitary channel behavior were also typical of normal muscle AChRs. Interestingly, in oocytes injected with muscle membranes derived from ALS patients, the AChRs showed a significant decrease in ACh affinity, compared with denervated controls. Finally, riluzole, the only drug currently used against ALS, reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the ACh-evoked currents, indicating that its action remains to be fully characterized. The two methods described here will be important tools for elucidating the role of muscle in ALS pathogenesis and for developing drugs to counter the effects of this disease. PMID:22128328

  15. Inhibitory Learning is Modulated by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Heidi C.; Putney, Rachel B.; Bucci, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has established that stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can facilitate learning and memory. However, most studies have focused on learning to emit a particular behavior, while little is known about the effects of nicotine on learning to withhold a behavioral response. The present study consisted of a dose response analysis of the effects of nicotine on negative occasion setting, a form of learned inhibition. In this paradigm, rats received one type of training trial in which presentation of a tone by itself was followed immediately by food reward. During the other type of trials, the tone was preceded by presentation of a light and no food was delivered after the tone. Rats gradually learned to approach the cup in anticipation of receiving food reward during presentations of the tone alone, but withheld that behavior when the tone was preceded by the light. Nicotine (0.35mg/kg) facilitated negative occasion setting by reducing the number of sessions needed to learn the discrimination between trial types and by reducing the rate of responding on non-reinforced trials. Nicotine also increased the orienting response to the light, suggesting that nicotine may have affected the ability to withhold food cup behavior on non-reinforced trials by increasing attention to the light. In contrast to the effects of nicotine, rats treated with mecamylamine (0.125, 0.5, or 2 mg/kg) needed more training sessions to discriminate between reinforced and non-reinforced trials compared to saline-treated rats. The findings indicate that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may be active during negative occasion setting and that nicotine can potentiate learned inhibition. PMID:25445487

  16. Morphine Increases Acetylcholine Release in the Trigeminal Nuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenghong; Bowman, Heather R.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The trigeminal nuclear complex (V) contains cholinergic neurons and includes the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (PSTN) which receives sensory input from the face and jaw, and the trigeminal motor nucleus (MoV) which innervates the muscles of mastication. Pain associated with pathologies of V is often managed with opioids but no studies have characterized the effect of opioids on acetylcholine (ACh) release in PSTN and MoV. Opioids can increase or decrease ACh release in brainstem nuclei. Therefore, the present experiments tested the 2-tailed hypothesis that microdialysis delivery of opioids to the PSTN and MoV significantly alters ACh release. Design: Using a within-subjects design and isoflurane-anesthetized Wistar rats (n = 53), ACh release in PSTN during microdialysis with Ringer's solution (control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis delivery of the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin, muscarinic agonist bethanechol, opioid agonist morphine, mu opioid agonist DAMGO, antagonists for mu (naloxone) and kappa (nor-binaltorphimine; nor-BNI) opioid receptors, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline. Measurements and Results: Tetrodotoxin decreased ACh, confirming action potential-dependent ACh release. Bethanechol and morphine caused a concentration-dependent increase in PSTN ACh release. The morphine-induced increase in ACh release was blocked by nor-BNI but not by naloxone. Bicuculline delivered to the PSTN also increased ACh release. ACh release in the MoV was increased by morphine, and this increase was not blocked by naloxone or nor-BNI. Conclusions: These data comprise the first direct measures of ACh release in PSTN and MoV and suggest synaptic disinhibition as one possible mechanism by which morphine increases ACh release in the trigeminal nuclei. Citation: Zhu Z; Bowman HR; Baghdoyan HA; Lydic R. Morphine increases acetylcholine release in the trigeminal nuclear complex. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1629–1637. PMID:19090318

  17. Electroencephalographic coherence and cortical acetylcholine during ketamine-induced unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Pal, D.; Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, V. S.; Silverstein, B. H.; Mashour, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited understanding of cortical neurochemistry and cortical connectivity during ketamine anaesthesia. We conducted a systematic study to investigate the effects of ketamine on cortical acetylcholine (ACh) and electroencephalographic coherence. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (n=11) were implanted with electrodes to record electroencephalogram (EEG) from frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices, and with a microdialysis guide cannula for simultaneous measurement of ACh concentrations in prefrontal cortex before, during, and after ketamine anaesthesia. Coherence and power spectral density computed from the EEG, and ACh concentrations, were compared between conscious and unconscious states. Loss of righting reflex was used as a surrogate for unconsciousness. Results Ketamine-induced unconsciousness was associated with a global reduction of power (P=0.02) in higher gamma bandwidths (>65 Hz), a global reduction of coherence (P≤0.01) across a broad frequency range (0.5–250 Hz), and a significant increase in ACh concentrations (P=0.01) in the prefrontal cortex. Compared with the unconscious state, recovery of righting reflex was marked by a further increase in ACh concentrations (P=0.0007), global increases in power in theta (4–10 Hz; P=0.03) and low gamma frequencies (25–55 Hz; P=0.0001), and increase in power (P≤0.01) and coherence (P≤0.002) in higher gamma frequencies (65–250 Hz). Acetylcholine concentrations, coherence, and spectral properties returned to baseline levels after a prolonged recovery period. Conclusions Ketamine-induced unconsciousness is characterized by suppression of high-frequency gamma activity and a breakdown of cortical coherence, despite increased cholinergic tone in the cortex. PMID:25951831

  18. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  19. Neural repair in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  20. Electronic neural networks for global optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Moopenn, A. W.; Eberhardt, S.

    1990-01-01

    An electronic neural network with feedback architecture, implemented in analog custom VLSI is described. Its application to problems of global optimization for dynamic assignment is discussed. The convergence properties of the neural network hardware are compared with computer simulation results. The neural network's ability to provide optimal or near optimal solutions within only a few neuron time constants, a speed enhancement of several orders of magnitude over conventional search methods, is demonstrated. The effect of noise on the circuit dynamics and the convergence behavior of the neural network hardware is also examined.

  1. Roles for N-terminal Extracellular Domains of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) β3 Subunits in Enhanced Functional Expression of Mouse α6β2β3- and α6β4β3-nAChRs*

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Li, Ming D.; Lukas, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional heterologous expression of naturally expressed mouse α6*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (mα6*-nAChRs; where “*” indicates the presence of additional subunits) has been difficult. Here we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT), gain-of-function, chimeric, or gain-of-function chimeric nAChR subunits, sometimes as hybrid nAChRs containing both human (h) and mouse (m) subunits, in Xenopus oocytes. Hybrid mα6mβ4hβ3- (∼5–8-fold) or WT mα6mβ4mβ3-nAChRs (∼2-fold) yielded higher function than mα6mβ4-nAChRs. Function was not detected when mα6 and mβ2 subunits were expressed together or in the additional presence of hβ3 or mβ3 subunits. However, function emerged upon expression of mα6mβ2mβ3V9′S-nAChRs containing β3 subunits having gain-of-function V9′S (valine to serine at the 9′-position) mutations in transmembrane domain II and was further elevated 9-fold when hβ3V9′S subunits were substituted for mβ3V9′S subunits. Studies involving WT or gain-of-function chimeric mouse/human β3 subunits narrowed the search for domains that influence functional expression of mα6*-nAChRs. Using hβ3 subunits as templates for site-directed mutagenesis studies, substitution with mβ3 subunit residues in extracellular N-terminal domain loops “C” (Glu221 and Phe223), “E” (Ser144 and Ser148), and “β2-β3” (Gln94 and Glu101) increased function of mα6mβ2*- (∼2–3-fold) or mα6mβ4* (∼2–4-fold)-nAChRs. EC50 values for nicotine acting at mα6mβ4*-nAChR were unaffected by β3 subunit residue substitutions in loop C or E. Thus, amino acid residues located in primary (loop C) or complementary (loops β2-β3 and E) interfaces of β3 subunits are some of the molecular impediments for functional expression of mα6mβ2β3- or mα6mβ4β3-nAChRs. PMID:25028511

  2. Differential Effects of Quercetin and Quercetin Glycosides on Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Mediated Ion Currents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-07-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid usually found in fruits and vegetables. Aside from its antioxidative effects, quercetin, like other flavonoids, has a various neuropharmacological actions. Quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (Rham1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (Rutin), and quercetin- 3-(2(G)-rhamnosylrutinoside (Rham2) are mono-, di-, and tri-glycosylated forms of quercetin, respectively. In a previous study, we showed that quercetin can enhance α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR)-mediated ion currents. However, the role of the carbohydrates attached to quercetin in the regulation of α7 nAChR channel activity has not been determined. In the present study, we investigated the effects of quercetin glycosides on the acetylcholine induced peak inward current (IACh) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the α7 nAChR. IACh was measured with a two-electrode voltage clamp technique. In oocytes injected with α7 nAChR copy RNA, quercetin enhanced IACh, whereas quercetin glycosides inhibited IACh. Quercetin glycosides mediated an inhibition of IACh, which increased when they were pre-applied and the inhibitory effects were concentration dependent. The order of IACh inhibition by quercetin glycosides was Rutin≥Rham1>Rham2. Quercetin glycosides-mediated IACh enhancement was not affected by ACh concentration and appeared voltage-independent. Furthermore, quercetin-mediated IACh inhibition can be attenuated when quercetin is co-applied with Rham1 and Rutin, indicating that quercetin glycosides could interfere with quercetin-mediated α7 nAChR regulation and that the number of carbohydrates in the quercetin glycoside plays a key role in the interruption of quercetin action. These results show that quercetin and quercetin glycosides regulate the α7 nAChR in a differential manner. PMID:27098860

  3. Differential Effects of Quercetin and Quercetin Glycosides on Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Mediated Ion Currents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid usually found in fruits and vegetables. Aside from its antioxidative effects, quercetin, like other flavonoids, has a various neuropharmacological actions. Quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (Rham1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (Rutin), and quercetin-3-(2(G)-rhamnosylrutinoside (Rham2) are mono-, di-, and tri-glycosylated forms of quercetin, respectively. In a previous study, we showed that quercetin can enhance α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR)-mediated ion currents. However, the role of the carbohydrates attached to quercetin in the regulation of α7 nAChR channel activity has not been determined. In the present study, we investigated the effects of quercetin glycosides on the acetylcholine induced peak inward current (IACh) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the α7 nAChR. IACh was measured with a two-electrode voltage clamp technique. In oocytes injected with α7 nAChR copy RNA, quercetin enhanced IACh, whereas quercetin glycosides inhibited IACh. Quercetin glycosides mediated an inhibition of IACh, which increased when they were pre-applied and the inhibitory effects were concentration dependent. The order of IACh inhibition by quercetin glycosides was Rutin≥Rham1>Rham2. Quercetin glycosides-mediated IACh enhancement was not affected by ACh concentration and appeared voltage-independent. Furthermore, quercetin-mediated IACh inhibition can be attenuated when quercetin is co-applied with Rham1 and Rutin, indicating that quercetin glycosides could interfere with quercetin-mediated α7 nAChR regulation and that the number of carbohydrates in the quercetin glycoside plays a key role in the interruption of quercetin action. These results show that quercetin and quercetin glycosides regulate the α7 nAChR in a differential manner. PMID:27098860

  4. Scopolamine Enhances Generalization between Odor Representations in Rat Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a critical, modulatory role in plasticity in many sensory systems. In the rat olfactory system, both behavioral and physiological data indicate that ACh may be required for normal odor memory and synaptic plasticity. Based on these data, neural network models have hypothesized that ACh muscarinic receptors reduce interference between learned cortical representations of odors within the piriform cortex. In this study, odor receptive fields of rat anterior piriform cortex (aPCX) single-units for alkane odors were mapped before and after either a systemic injection of the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) or aPCX surface application of 500 μM scopolamine (or saline/ACSF controls). Cross-habituation between alkanes differing by two to four carbons was then examined following a 50-sec habituating stimulus. The results demonstrate that neither aPCX spontaneous activity nor odor-evoked activity (receptive field) was affected by scopolamine, but that cross-habituation in aPCX neurons was enhanced significantly by either systemic or cortical scopolamine. These results indicate that scopolamine selectively enhances generalization between odor representations in aPCX in a simple memory task. Given that ACh primarily affects intracortical association fibers in the aPCX, the results support a role for the association system in odor memory and discrimination and indicate an important ACh modulatory control over this basic sensory process. PMID:11584075

  5. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  6. Notexin preferentially inhibits the release of newly synthesized acetylcholine from rat brain synaptosomal fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, C.B.; Jenden, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effects of the snake venom neurotoxin, notexin, on acetylcholine turnover in rat brain P2 fractions using a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for acetylcholine and choline. In contrast to earlier reports, we found a stimulation of the uptake and acetylation of labeled choline by toxin-treated P2 fractions. More significantly, notexin inhibited the release of this newly synthesized transmitter. These effects were found to be dependent on the dose of the toxin and the time of exposure of the P2 fraction to notexin. Longer exposure to notexin or experiments involving resuspension of notexin-treated P2 fractions appeared to result in considerable lysis of the transmitter-containing particles. Thus, notexin may alter acetylcholine compartmentation in the nerve ending and thereby affect acetylcholine synthesis.

  7. Retinal co-mediator acetylcholine evokes muscarinic inhibition of recurrent excitation in frog tectum column.

    PubMed

    Baginskas, Armantas; Kuras, Antanas

    2016-08-26

    Acetylcholine receptors contribute to the control of neuronal and neuronal network activity from insects to humans. We have investigated the action of acetylcholine receptors in the optic tectum of Rana temporaria (common frog). Our previous studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine activates presynaptic nicotinic receptors, when released into the frog optic tectum as a co-mediator during firing of a single retinal ganglion cell, and causes: a) potentiation of retinotectal synaptic transmission, and b) facilitation of transition of the tectum column to a higher level of activity. In the present study we have shown that endogenous acetylcholine also activates muscarinic receptors, leading to a delayed inhibition of recurrent excitatory synaptic transmission in the tectum column. The delay of muscarinic inhibition was evaluated to be of ∼80ms, with an extent of inhibition of ∼2 times. The inhibition of the recurrent excitation determines transition of the tectum column back to its resting state, giving a functional sense for the inhibition. PMID:27394688

  8. A family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channel subunits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Putrenko, Igor; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Dent, Joseph A

    2005-02-25

    The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a surprisingly large and diverse superfamily of genes encoding Cys loop ligand-gated ion channels. Here we report the first cloning, expression, and pharmacological characterization of members of a family of anion-selective acetylcholine receptor subunits. Two subunits, ACC-1 and ACC-2, form homomeric channels for which acetylcholine and arecoline, but not nicotine, are efficient agonists. These channels are blocked by d-tubocurarine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin. We provide evidence that two additional subunits, ACC-3 and ACC-4, interact with ACC-1 and ACC-2. The acetylcholine-binding domain of these channels appears to have diverged substantially from the acetylcholine-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. PMID:15579462

  9. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  10. Acetylcholine test in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Enrico; Destro, Gianni; Oliva, Massimo; Zardini, Piero

    1994-02-01

    Angina pectoris with normal coronary artery on the coronary angiography is an intriguing issue. Intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine has recently been used to test the integrity of endothelial cells. We studied 16 patients with this syndrome. A relationship has been found between the acetylcholine test and the exercise stress test in normotensive patients. The presence of hypertension makes the evaluation of the test more unpredictable, probably because of the damage on the endothelial cells related to systemic hypertension.

  11. Satellite image analysis using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    The tremendous backlog of unanalyzed satellite data necessitates the development of improved methods for data cataloging and analysis. Ford Aerospace has developed an image analysis system, SIANN (Satellite Image Analysis using Neural Networks) that integrates the technologies necessary to satisfy NASA's science data analysis requirements for the next generation of satellites. SIANN will enable scientists to train a neural network to recognize image data containing scenes of interest and then rapidly search data archives for all such images. The approach combines conventional image processing technology with recent advances in neural networks to provide improved classification capabilities. SIANN allows users to proceed through a four step process of image classification: filtering and enhancement, creation of neural network training data via application of feature extraction algorithms, configuring and training a neural network model, and classification of images by application of the trained neural network. A prototype experimentation testbed was completed and applied to climatological data.

  12. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  13. Effects of selected muscarinic cholinergic antagonists on [3H]acetylcholine release from rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pohorecki, R; Head, R; Domino, E F

    1988-01-01

    A number of cholinergic muscarinic (M) agonists and antagonists were studied for their ability to enhance tritiated acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release from electrically field-stimulated rat hippocampal slices. A Ca++-free medium and carbachol, but not nicotine, inhibited [3H]ACh release. Atropine, methylatropine and dexetimide produced concentration-dependent increases in [3H]ACh release to a maximum of about 50% above control. Aprophen and benactyzine produced a maximal response 25 to 35% above control. The selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine had the least effect on [3H]ACh release. Of the nonspecific M1-M2 antagonists studied, benactyzine produced the least amount of [3H]ACh release. The order of potency of the M antagonists in promoting a 15% increase in [3H]ACh release was aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than methylatropine greater than dexetimide greater than pirenzepine greater than atropine. However, the order of promoting maximal release of [3H]ACh was atropine greater than dexetimide greater than methylatropine greater than aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than pirenzepine. PMID:3335998

  14. Antigenic role of single residues within the main immunogenic region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Papadouli, I; Potamianos, S; Hadjidakis, I; Bairaktari, E; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos, C; Cung, M T; Marraud, M; Tzartos, S J

    1990-01-01

    The target of most of the autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in myasthenic sera is the main immunogenic region (MIR) on the extracellular side of the AChR alpha-subunit. Binding of anti-MIR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been recently localized between residues alpha 67 and alpha 76 of Torpedo californica electric organ (WNPADYGGIK) and human muscle (WNPDDYGGVK) AChR. In order to evaluate the contribution of each residue to the antigenicity of the MIR, we synthesized peptides corresponding to residues alpha 67-76 from Torpedo and human AChRs, together with 13 peptide analogues. Nine of these analogues had one residue of the Torpedo decapeptide replaced by L-alanine, three had a structure which was intermediate between those of the Torpedo and human alpha 67-76 decapeptides, and one had D-alanine in position 73. Binding studies employing six anti-MIR mAbs and all 15 peptides revealed that some residues (Asn68 and Asp71) are indispensable for binding by all mAbs tested, whereas others are important only for binding by some mAbs. Antibody binding was mainly restricted to residues alpha 68-74, the most critical sequence being alpha 68-71. Fish electric organ and human MIR form two distinct groups of strongly overlapping epitopes. Some peptide analogues enhanced mAb binding compared with Torpedo and human peptides, suggesting that the construction of a very antigenic MIR is feasible. PMID:1695844

  15. Rab11a and myosin Vb regulate recycling of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Volpicelli, Laura A; Lah, James J; Fang, Guofu; Goldenring, James R; Levey, Allan I

    2002-11-15

    Agonist-induced internalization followed by subsequent return to the cell surface regulates G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activity. Because the cellular responsiveness to ligand depends on the balance between receptor degradation and recycling, it is crucial to identify the molecules involved in GPCR recovery to the cell surface. In this study, we identify mechanisms involved in the recycling of the M4 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. M4 is highly expressed in the CNS, plays a role in locomotor activity, and is a novel therapeutic target for neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Previous studies show that, after cholinergic stimulation, M4 internalizes from the cell surface to endosomes in cell culture and the rat brain. Here, we show that, after activation, M4 traffics to transferrin receptor- and Rab11a-positive perinuclear endosomes. Expression of the constitutively GDP-bound, inactive mutant Rab11aS25N inhibits M4 trafficking to recycling endosomes. Expression of the C-terminal tail of myosin Vb, a Rab11a effector, enhances M4 accumulation in perinuclear endosomes. Both Rab11aS25N and the myosin Vb tail impair M4 recycling. The results demonstrate that GPCR recycling is mediated through a discrete pathway using both Rab11a and myosin Vb. PMID:12427833

  16. Catharanthine alkaloids are noncompetitive antagonists of muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2010-09-01

    We compared the interaction of several catharanthine alkaloids including, ibogaine, vincristine, and vinblastine, with that for the noncompetitive antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) at muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states. The results established that catharanthine alkaloids: (a) inhibit, in a noncompetitive manner, (+/-)-epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in TE671-halpha1beta1gammadelta cells with similar potencies (IC(50)=17-25microM), (b) inhibit [(3)H]TCP binding to the desensitized Torpedo AChR with higher affinity compared to the resting AChR, and (c) enhance [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, suggesting desensitizing properties. Interestingly, PCP inhibits [(3)H]ibogaine binding to the AChR in a steric fashion. This is corroborated by additional docking experiments indicating that the amino groups of neutral ibogaine form hydrogen bonds with the serine ring (position 6'), a location shared with PCP. Since protonated ibogaine forms a salt bridge with one of the acidic residues at the outer ring (position 20'), this ligand could be first attracted to the entrance of the channel by electrostatic interactions. Our data indicate that the catharanthine moiety is a minimum structural requirement for AChR inhibition including, ion channel blocking and desensitization, and that ibogaine and PCP bind to overlapping sites in the desensitized AChR ion channel. PMID:20493225

  17. Interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Rosenberg, Avraham; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Glick, Stanley D; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-01

    The interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) was compared with that for ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP). The results established that 18-MC: (a) is more potent than ibogaine and PCP inhibiting (+/-)-epibatidine-induced AChR Ca(2+) influx. The potency of 18-MC is increased after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, (b) binds to a single site in the Torpedo AChR with high affinity and inhibits [(3)H]TCP binding to desensitized AChRs in a steric fashion, suggesting the existence of overlapping sites. This is supported by our docking results indicating that 18-MC interacts with a domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine (position 13') rings, and (c) inhibits [(3)H]TCP, [(3)H]ibogaine, and [(3)H]18-MC binding to desensitized AChRs with higher affinity compared to resting AChRs. This can be partially attributed to a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized AChR compared to that from the resting AChR. The enthalpic contribution is more important than the entropic contribution when 18-MC binds to the desensitized AChR compared to that for the resting AChR, and vice versa. Ibogaine analogs inhibit the AChR by interacting with a luminal domain that is shared with PCP, and by inducing desensitization. PMID:20303928

  18. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  19. Sub-anesthetic concentrations of (R,S)-ketamine metabolites inhibit acetylcholine-evoked currents in α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moaddel, Ruin; Abdrakhmanova, Galia; Kozak, Joanna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Toll, Lawrence; Jimenez, Lucita; Rosenberg, Avraham; Tran, Thao; Xiao, Yingxian; Zarate, Carlos A.; Wainer, Irving W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the (R,S)-ketamine metabolites (R,S)-norketamine, (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)- hydroxynorketamine on the activity of α7 and α3β4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated using patch-clamp techniques. The data indicated that (R,S)-dehydronorketamine inhibited acetylcholine-evoked currents in α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, IC50 = 55 ± 6 nM, and that (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine, (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine and (R,S)-norketamine also inhibited α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function at concentrations ≤1μM, while (R,S)-ketamine was inactive at these concentrations. The inhibitory effect of (R,S)-dehydronorketamine was voltage-independent and the compound did not competitively displace selective α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-epibatidine indicating that (R,S)-dehydronorketamine is a negative allosteric modulator of the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. (R,S)-Ketamine and (R,S)-norketamine inhibited (S)-nicotine-induced whole-cell currents in cells expressing α3β4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, IC50 3.1 and 9.1μM, respectively, while (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine were weak inhibitors, IC50 >100μM. The binding affinities of (R,S)-dehydronorketamine, (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine at the NMDA receptor were also determined using rat brain membranes and the selective NMDA receptor antagonist [3H]-MK-801. The calculated Ki values were 38.95 μM for (S)-dehydronorketamine, 21.19 μM for (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and > 100 μM for (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine. The results suggest that the inhibitory activity of ketamine metabolites at the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor may contribute to the clinical effect of the drug. PMID:23183107

  20. The neural basis of non-verbal communication—enhanced processing of perceived give-me gestures in 9-month-old girls

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Marta; Kaduk, Katharina; Elsner, Claudia; Juvrud, Joshua; Gustaf Gredebäck

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the neural basis of non-verbal communication. Event-related potentials were recorded while 29 nine-month-old infants were presented with a give-me gesture (experimental condition) and the same hand shape but rotated 90°, resulting in a non-communicative hand configuration (control condition). We found different responses in amplitude between the two conditions, captured in the P400 ERP component. Moreover, the size of this effect was modulated by participants’ sex, with girls generally demonstrating a larger relative difference between the two conditions than boys. PMID:25705196

  1. The neural basis of non-verbal communication-enhanced processing of perceived give-me gestures in 9-month-old girls.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Marta; Kaduk, Katharina; Elsner, Claudia; Juvrud, Joshua; Gustaf Gredebäck

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the neural basis of non-verbal communication. Event-related potentials were recorded while 29 nine-month-old infants were presented with a give-me gesture (experimental condition) and the same hand shape but rotated 90°, resulting in a non-communicative hand configuration (control condition). We found different responses in amplitude between the two conditions, captured in the P400 ERP component. Moreover, the size of this effect was modulated by participants' sex, with girls generally demonstrating a larger relative difference between the two conditions than boys. PMID:25705196

  2. Electrolyte and protein secretion by the perfused rabbit mandibular gland stimulated with acetylcholine or catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Case, R. M.; Conigrave, A. D.; Novak, I.; Young, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    1. A method is described for the isolation and vascular perfusion in vitro of the mandibular gland of the rabbit. The perfusate is a physiological salt solution containing glucose as the only metabolic substrate. 2. During perfusion with solutions containing acetylcholine, the gland secretes vigorously at a rate and in a manner similar to that seen in vivo. Although the gland becomes oedematous during perfusion, the extent of this oedema appears to have no influence on secretory ability: the perfused glands were capable of functioning for at least 4 h, and often for more than 6 h. 3. Acetylcholine evoked a small secretory response at a concentration of 8 × 10-9 mol l-1 and a maximum response at 8 × 10-7 mol l-1. Eserine (2 × 10-5 mol l-1) evoked secretory responses comparable to those evoked by acetylcholine in a concentration of 8 × 10-9 mol l-1. Secretion, whether unstimulated or evoked by acetylcholine or eserine, could be blocked completely by atropine. 4. During prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine, the fluid secretory response declined rapidly over a period of about 15 min from an initial high value to a much lower plateau value. After 3 or more hours of stimulation, the secretory response began once more to decline, this time towards zero. If, before the second period of decline begins, stimulation is interrupted for about 30 min, the gland recovers its initial responsiveness to further stimulation with acetylcholine. 5. The Na, K, Cl and HCO3 concentrations and the osmolality of acetylcholine evoked saliva exhibited flow-dependency similar to that seen in vivo. The concentrations of Na and Cl, but not K and HCO3, increased by about 25 mmol l-1 during periods of prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine even though the salivary secretory rate was constant. The concentrations of K and HCO3, but not Na and Cl, increased progressively as the concentration of infused acetylcholine was increased. 6. Salivary protein secretion increased with increasing

  3. Chalcones as positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a new target for a privileged structure.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Beatriz; Mulet, José; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, José G; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Borges, Ricardo; Freitas, Andiara E; López, Manuela G; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario; Pérez de Vega, María Jesús; Valor, Luis M; Svobodová, Lucie; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2014-10-30

    The α7 acetylcholine nicotine receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is involved in cognition disorders, schizophrenia, pain and inflammation among other diseases. Therefore, the development of new agents that target this receptor has great significance. Positive allosteric modulators might be advantageous, since they facilitate receptor responses without directly interacting with the agonist binding site. Here we report the search for and further design of new positive allosteric modulators having the relatively simple chalcone structure. From the natural product isoliquiritigenin as starting point, chalcones substituted with hydroxyl groups at defined locations were identified as optimal and specific promoters of α7 nicotinic function. The most potent compound (2,4,2',5'-tetrahydroxychalcone, 111) was further characterized showing its potential as neuroprotective, analgesic and cognitive enhancer, opening the way for future developments around the chalcone structure. PMID:25232969

  4. Blockade by 2,2',2''-tripyridine of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels in embryonic Xenopus muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, K. S.; Fu, W. M.; Lin-Shiau, S. Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of 2,2',2''-tripyridine on the nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor channels were studied in the cultured myocytes of 1-day-old Xenopus embryos. 2. 2,2',2''-Tripyridine depressed the amplitude of iontophoretic ACh-induced current at a low frequency of 0.7 Hz stimulation and it not only decreased the initial responses but also enhanced the run-down of ACh-induced current at higher frequency stimulation of 7 Hz and 30 Hz. 3. Single ACh channel recordings showed that 2,2',2''-tripyridine decreased the channel conductance, the opening frequency and mean open time of both types of low- and high-conductance channels. 4. These results suggest that the blocking actions of 2,2',2''-tripyridine on ACh receptor channels in the skeletal muscle may contribute to the depression of the nerve-evoked contraction of the mouse diaphragm as reported previously. PMID:7693275

  5. The multiple roles of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in modulating glutamatergic systems in the normal and diseased nervous system.

    PubMed

    Koukouli, Fani; Maskos, Uwe

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in a variety of modulatory and regulatory processes including neurotransmitter release and synaptic transmission in various brain regions of the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and the glutamatergic system participates in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Underpinning the importance of nAChRs, many studies demonstrated that nAChRs containing the α7 subunit facilitate glutamate release. Here, we review the currently available body of experimental evidence pertaining to α7 subunit containing nAChRs in their contribution to the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission, and we highlight the role of α7 in synaptic plasticity, the morphological and functional maturation of the glutamatergic system and therefore its important contribution in the modulation of neural circuits of the CNS. PMID:26206184

  6. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  7. Calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release and muscarinic autoreceptors in rat cortical synaptosomes during development

    SciTech Connect

    Marchi, M.; Caviglia, A.; Paudice, P.; Raiteri, M.

    1983-05-01

    A number of presynaptic cholinergic parameters (high affinity (/sup 3/H)choline uptake, (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine synthesis, (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release, and autoinhibition of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release mediated by muscarinic autoreceptors) were comparatively analyzed in rat brain cortex synaptosomes during postnatal development. These various functions showed a differential time course during development. At 10 days of age the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine evoked by 15 mM KCl from superfused synaptosomes was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent but insensitive to the inhibitory action of extrasynaptosomal acetylcholine. The muscarinic autoreceptors regulating acetylcholine release were clearly detectable only at 14 days, indicating that their appearance may represent a criterion of synaptic maturation more valuable than the onset of a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release.

  8. TC-1734: an orally active neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulator with antidepressant, neuroprotective and long-lasting cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Gregory J; Bohme, G Andrees; Caldwell, William S; Letchworth, Sharon R; Traina, Vincent M; Obinu, M Carmen; Laville, Michel; Reibaud, Michel; Pradier, Laurent; Dunbar, Geoffrey; Bencherif, Merouane

    2004-01-01

    The development of selective ligands targeting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors to alleviate symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases presents the advantage of affecting multiple deficits that are the hallmarks of these pathologies. TC-1734 is an orally active novel neuronal nicotinic agonist with high selectivity for neuronal nicotinic receptors. Microdialysis studies indicate that TC-1734 enhances the release of acetylcholine from the cortex. TC-1734, by either acute or repeated administration, exhibits memory enhancing properties in rats and mice and is neuroprotective following excitotoxic insult in fetal rat brain in cultures and against alterations of synaptic transmission induced by deprivation of glucose and oxygen in hippocampal slices. At submaximal doses, TC-1734 produced additive cognitive effects when used in combination with tacrine or donepezil. Unlike (-)-nicotine, behavioral sensitization does not develop following repeated administration of TC-1734. Its pharmacokinetic (PK) profile (half-life of 2 h) contrasts with the long lasting improvement in working memory (18 h) demonstrating that cognitive improvement extends beyond the lifetime of the compound. The very low acute toxicity of TC-1734 and its receptor activity profile provides additional mechanistic basis for its suggested potential as a clinical candidate. TC-1734 was very well tolerated in acute and chronic oral toxicity studies in mice, rats and dogs. Phase I clinical trials demonstrated TC-1734's favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile by acute oral administration at doses ranging from 2 to 320 mg. The bioavailability, pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and safety profile of TC-1734 provides an example of a safe, potent and efficacious neuronal nicotinic modulator that holds promise for the management of the hallmark symptomatologies observed in dementia. PMID:15179444

  9. Effect of oxotremorine on the acetylcholine content of whole brain and various brain regions in the pigeon

    PubMed Central

    Igić, R.

    1971-01-01

    Oxotremorine (0·125 mg/kg) produces a significant increase in total acetylcholine content in whole pigeon brain. The contribution of different regions to this increase varies. The largest increase occurs in the nucleus basalis (paleostriatum augmentatum), a region which is highly involved in motor control. The mechanism by which oxotremorine increases the acetylcholine content of brain and the causal relationship between the rise in acetylcholine content and tremor are discussed. PMID:5091163

  10. Acetylcholine receptor and behavioral deficits in mice lacking apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jessica A; Benice, Theodore S; Van Meer, Peter; Park, Byung S; Raber, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is involved in the risk to develop sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since impaired central acetylcholine (ACh) function is a hallmark of AD, apoE may influence ACh function by modulating muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs). To test this hypothesis, mAChR binding was measured in mice lacking apoE and wild type C57BL/6J mice. Mice were also tested on the pre-pulse inhibition, delay eyeblink classical conditioning, and 5-choice serial reaction time tasks, which are all modulated by ACh transmission. Mice were also given scopolamine to challenge central mAChR function. Compared to wild type mice, mice lacking apoE had reduced number of cortical and hippocampal mAChRs. Scopolamine had a small effect on delay eyeblink classical conditioning in wild type mice but a large effect in mice lacking apoE. Mice lacking apoE were also unable to acquire performance on the 5-choice serial reaction time task. These results support a role for apoE in ACh function and suggest that modulation of cortical and hippocampal mAChRs might contribute to genotype differences in scopolamine sensitivity and task acquisition. Impaired apoE functioning may result in cholinergic deficits that contribute to the cognitive impairments seen in AD. PMID:19178986

  11. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  12. Mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor loss in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Drachman, D B; Adams, R N; Stanley, E F; Pestronk, A

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental abnormality affecting the neuromuscular junctions of myasthenic patients is a reduction of available AChRs, due to an autoimmune attack directed against the receptors. Antibodies to AChR are present in most patients, and there is evidence that they have a predominant pathogenic role in the disease, aided by complement. The mechanism of antibody action involves acceleration of the rate of degradation of AChRs, attributable to cross-linking of the receptors. In addition, antibodies may block AChRs, and may participate in producing destructive changes, perhaps in conjunction with complement. The possibility that cell-mediated mechanisms may play a role in the autoimmune responses of some myasthenic patients remains to be explored. Although the target of the autoimmune attack in myasthenic patients is probably always the acetylcholine receptors, it is not yet clear which of these immune mechanisms are most important. It is likely that the relative role of each mechanism varies from patient to patient. One of the goals of future research will be to identify the relative importance of each of these mechanisms in the individual patient, and to tailor specific immunotherapeutic measures to the abnormalities found. PMID:6249894

  13. Genetic Reconstitution of Functional Acetylcholine Receptor Channels in Mouse Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudio, Toni; Green, W. N.; Hartman, Deborah S.; Hayden, Deborah; Paulson, Henry L.; Sigworth, F. J.; Sine, Steven M.; Swedlund, Anne

    1987-12-01

    Foreign genes can be stably integrated into the genome of a cell by means of DNA-mediated gene transfer techniques, and large quantities of homogenous cells that continuously express these gene products can then be isolated. Such an expression system can be used to study the functional consequences of introducing specific mutations into genes and to study the expressed protein in the absence of cellular components with which it is normally in contact. All four Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit complementary DNA's were introduced into the genome of a mouse fibroblast cell by DNA-mediated gene transfer. A clonal cell line that stably produced high concentrations of correctly assembled cell surface AChR's and formed proper ligand-gated ion channels was isolated. With this new expression system, recombinant DNA, biochemical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological techniques were combined to study Torpedo AChR's in a single intact system. The physiological and pharmacological profiles of Torpedo AChR's expressed in mouse fibroblast cells differ in some details from those described earlier, and may provide a more accurate reflection of the properties of this receptor in its natural environment.

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  15. Cycloxaprid insecticide: nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding site and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xusheng; Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-08-21

    Cycloxaprid (CYC) is a novel neonicotinoid prepared from the (nitromethylene)imidazole (NMI) analogue of imidacloprid. In this study we consider whether CYC is active per se or only as a proinsecticide for NMI. The IC50 values (nM) for displacing [(3)H]NMI binding are 43-49 for CYC and 2.3-3.2 for NMI in house fly and honeybee head membranes and 302 and 7.2, respectively, in mouse brain membranes, potency relationships interpreted as partial conversion of some CYC to NMI under the assay conditions. The 6-8-fold difference in toxicity of injected CYC and NMI to house flies is consistent with their relative potencies as in vivo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors in brain measured with [(3)H]NMI binding assays. CYC metabolism in mice largely involves cytochrome P450 pathways without NMI as a major intermediate. Metabolites of CYC tentatively assigned are five monohydroxy derivatives and one each of dihydroxy, nitroso, and amino modifications. CYC appears be a proinsecticide, serving as a slow-release reservoir for NMI with selective activity for insect versus mammalian nAChRs. PMID:23889077

  16. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. PMID:25985102

  17. High-resolution mass spectrometry for detecting Acetylcholine in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Jun; Watanabe, Takehiro; Sugahara, Kohtaro; Yamagaki, Tohru; Takahashi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was first identified a century ago, and has long been known as a neurotransmitter in animals. However, it has been shown recently that the occurrence of ACh is widespread among various non-animal species including higher plants. Although previous reports suggest that various plant species are capable of responding to exogenously applied ACh, the molecular basis for ACh biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms mediated by endogenous ACh are largely unclear. This is partly because of the lack of conclusive data on the occurrence and the tissue specificity of ACh in plants. To this end, we performed various analyses including liquid chromatography electro-chemical detection (LC-ECD), liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. The results, together with electrospray ionization-orbitrap Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-orbitrap FT-MS) analysis provide strong evidence that ACh exists in Arabidopsis thaliana tissues. The results also showed that the level of ACh is highest in seed, followed by root and cotyledon. Moreover, exogenously applied ACh inhibited the elongation of Arabidopsis root hairs. These results collectively indicate that ACh exists primarily in seed and root in Arabidopsis seedlings, and plays a pivotal role during the initial stages of seedling development by controlling root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. PMID:26237653

  18. Transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor delta subunit.

    PubMed

    McCrea, P D; Popot, J L; Engelman, D M

    1987-12-01

    Current folding models for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) predict either four or five transmembrane segments per subunit. The N-terminus of each subunit is almost certainly extracellular. We have tested folding models by determining biochemically the cellular location of an intermolecular disulfide bridge thought to lie at the delta subunit C-terminus. Dimers of AChR linked through the delta-delta bridge were prepared from Torpedo marmorata and T.californica electric organ. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. In right-side-out vesicles (greater than 95% ACh binding sites outwards), the bridge was equally accessible whether or not vesicles had been disrupted by freeze--thawing or by detergents. Control experiments based on the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin and measurements of radioactive reductant efflux demonstrated that the vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier. In reconstituted vesicles containing AChR dimers in scrambled orientations, right-side-out dimers were reduced to monomers three times more rapidly than inside-out dimers, consistent with the measured rate of reductant permeation. These observations indicate that in reconstituted vesicles the delta-delta disulfide bridge lies in the same aqueous space as the ACh binding sites. They are most easily reconciled with folding models that propose an even number of transmembrane crossing per subunit. PMID:3428268

  19. Electrically induced release of acetylcholine from denervated Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M. J.; Miledi, R.

    1974-01-01

    1. Focal electrical stimulation of Schwann cells at the end-plates of denervated frog muscles elicited slow depolarizations of up to 30 mV in the muscle fibres. This response is referred to as a Schwann-cell end-plate potential (Schwann-e.p.p.). 2. Repeated stimulation sometimes evoked further Schwann-e.p.p.s, but they were never sustained for more than 30 pulses. Successive e.p.p.s varied in amplitude and time course independently of the stimulus. 3. The Schwann-e.p.p.s were reversibly blocked by curare, suggesting that they result from a release of acetylcholine (ACh) by the Schwann cells. 4. ACh release by electrical stimulation did not seem to occur in quantal form and was not dependent on the presence of calcium ions in the external medium; nor was it blocked by tetrodotoxin. 5. Stimulation which caused release of ACh also resulted in extensive morphological disruption of the Schwann cells, as seen with both light and electron microscopy. 6. It is concluded that electrical stimulation of denervated Schwann cells causes break-down of the cell membrane and releases ACh, presumably in molecular form. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3Plate 4Plate 5Plate 6Plate 7Plate 8Plate 9Plate 10 PMID:4545183

  20. The twin drug approach for novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Tomassoli, Isabelle; Gündisch, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The association of two pharmacophoric entities generates so-called 'twin drugs' or dimer derivatives. We applied this approach for the design of a small compound library for the interaction with α4β2(∗) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In this compound series, the nAChR ligand N,N-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-3-yloxy)ethan-1-amine 9 served as one pharmacological entity and it was initially kept constant as one part of the 'twin' compound. 'Twin' compounds with identical or non-identical entities using the 'no linker mode' or 'overlap' mode were synthesized and evaluated for their nAChR affinities. Compound 17a showed the highest affinity for the α4β2(∗) nAChR subtype (Ki=0.188 nM) and its (di)fluoro analogs could retain nanomolar affinities, when replacing pyridine as the hydrogen bond acceptor system by mono- or difluoro-phenyls. The 'twin drug' approach proved to provide compounds with high affinity and subtype selectivity for α4β2(∗) nAChRs. PMID:26142318

  1. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Modulators Reduce Sugar Intake

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Masroor; Quik, Maryka; Holgate, Joan; Morgan, Michael; Patkar, Omkar L.; Tam, Vincent; Belmer, Arnauld; Bartlett, Selena E.

    2016-01-01

    Excess sugar consumption has been shown to contribute directly to weight gain, thus contributing to the growing worldwide obesity epidemic. Interestingly, increased sugar consumption has been shown to repeatedly elevate dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), in the mesolimbic reward pathway of the brain similar to many drugs of abuse. We report that varenicline, an FDA-approved nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist that modulates dopamine in the mesolimbic reward pathway of the brain, significantly reduces sucrose consumption, especially in a long-term consumption paradigm. Similar results were observed with other nAChR drugs, namely mecamylamine and cytisine. Furthermore, we show that long-term sucrose consumption increases α4β2 * and decreases α6β2* nAChRs in the nucleus accumbens, a key brain region associated with reward. Taken together, our results suggest that nAChR drugs such as varenicline may represent a novel treatment strategy for reducing sugar consumption. PMID:27028298

  2. Halothane shortens acetylcholine receptor channel kinetics without affecting conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Lechleiter, J; Gruener, R

    1984-01-01

    The extracellular patch-clamp technique was used to examine how halothane, a general anesthetic, affects the properties of single nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels of embryonic Xenopus skeletal muscle cells grown in culture. Under control conditions, single-channel events showed a bimodal distribution on the basis of current amplitudes. This distribution was maintained during exposure to halothane and its washout. In addition, the mean current value of the low-and high-amplitude channels was unaffected by the presence of the anesthetic at clinically relevant concentrations. In contrast, halothane shortened the burst durations of both channel types in a concentration-dependent manner. This shortening of burst durations may be an expression of the more rapid relaxation of the channel protein to the nonconducting state, possibly due to the disordering effect of the anesthetic on membrane lipids in which the receptor protein is embedded. This functional change, in the behavior of the synaptic receptor, provides further direct information on the mode of action of general anesthetics. Images PMID:6326154

  3. Aporphine metho salts as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Pérez, Edwin G; Slater, E Yvonne; Bermúdez, Isabel; Cassels, Bruce K

    2007-05-15

    (S)-Aporphine metho salts with the 1,2,9,10 oxygenation pattern displaced radioligands from recombinant human alpha7 and alpha4beta2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) at low micromolar concentrations. The affinity of the nonphenolic glaucine methiodide (4) (vs [(3)H]cytisine) was the lowest at alpha4beta2 nAChR (K(i)=10 microM), and predicentrine methiodide (2) and xanthoplanine iodide (3), with free hydroxyl groups at C-2 or C-9, respectively, had the highest affinity at these receptors (K(i) approximately 1 microM), while the affinity of the diphenolic boldine methiodide (1) was intermediate between these values. At homomeric alpha7 nAChR, xanthoplanine had the highest affinity (K(i)=10 microM) vs [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin while the other three compounds displaced the radioligand with K(i) values between 15 and 21 microM. At 100 microM, all four compounds inhibited the responses of these receptors to EC(50) concentrations of ACh. The effects of xanthoplanine iodide (3) were studied in more detail. Xanthoplanine fully inhibited the EC(50) ACh responses of both alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nACh receptors with estimated IC(50) values of 9+/-3 microM (alpha7) and 5+/-0.8 microM (alpha4beta2). PMID:17391965

  4. Crosslinking-Induced Endocytosis of Acetylcholine Receptors by Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lin; Peng, H. Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In a majority of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies target postsynaptic AChR clusters and thus compromise the membrane integrity of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and lead to muscle weakness. Antibody-induced endocytosis of AChRs in the postsynaptic membrane represents the initial step in the pathogenesis of MG; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying AChR endocytosis remain largely unknown. Here, we developed an approach to mimic the pathogenic antibodies for inducing the crosslinking and internalization of AChRs from the postsynaptic membrane. Using biotin-α-bungarotoxin and quantum dot (QD)-streptavidin, cell-surface and internalized AChRs could be readily distinguished by comparing the size, fluorescence intensity, trajectory, and subcellular localization of the QD signals. QD-induced AChR endocytosis was mediated by clathrin-dependent and caveolin-independent mechanisms, and the trafficking of internalized AChRs in the early endosomes required the integrity of microtubule structures. Furthermore, activation of the agrin/MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) signaling pathway strongly suppressed QD-induced internalization of AChRs. Lastly, QD-induced AChR crosslinking potentiated the dispersal of aneural AChR clusters upon synaptic induction. Taken together, our results identify a novel approach to study the mechanisms of AChR trafficking upon receptor crosslinking and endocytosis, and demonstrate that agrin-MuSK signaling pathways protect against crosslinking-induced endocytosis of AChRs. PMID:24587270

  5. Wnt proteins regulate acetylcholine receptor clustering in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a cholinergic synapse that rapidly conveys signals from motoneurons to muscle cells and exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization characteristic of chemical synapses. NMJ formation requires agrin and its coreceptors LRP4 and MuSK. Increasing evidence indicates that Wnt signaling regulates NMJ formation in Drosophila, C. elegans and zebrafish. Results In the study we systematically studied the effect of all 19 different Wnts in mammals on acetylcholine receptor (AChR) cluster formation. We identified five Wnts (Wnt9a, Wnt9b, Wnt10b, Wnt11, and Wnt16) that are able to stimulate AChR clustering, of which Wnt9a and Wnt11 are expressed abundantly in developing muscles. Using Wnt9a and Wnt11 as example, we demonstrated that Wnt induction of AChR clusters was dose-dependent and non-additive to that of agrin, suggesting that Wnts may act via similar pathways to induce AChR clusters. We provide evidence that Wnt9a and Wnt11 bind directly to the extracellular domain of MuSK, to induce MuSK dimerization and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinase. In addition, Wnt-induced AChR clustering requires LRP4. Conclusions These results identify Wnts as new players in AChR cluster formation, which act in a manner that requires both MuSK and LRP4, revealing a novel function of LRP4. PMID:22309736

  6. Alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the treatment of pain.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J Michael; Absalom, Nathan; Chebib, Mary; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Vincler, Michelle

    2009-10-01

    Chronic pain is a vexing worldwide problem that causes substantial disability and consumes significant medical resources. Although there are numerous analgesic medications, these work through a small set of molecular mechanisms. Even when these medications are used in combination, substantial amounts of pain often remain. It is therefore highly desirable to develop treatments that work through distinct mechanisms of action. While agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been intensively studied, new data suggest a role for selective antagonists of nAChRs. alpha-Conotoxins are small peptides used offensively by carnivorous marine snails known as Conus. A subset of these peptides known as alpha-conotoxins RgIA and Vc1.1 produces both acute and long lasting analgesia. In addition, these peptides appear to accelerate the recovery of function after nerve injury, possibly through immune mediated mechanisms. Pharmacological analysis indicates that RgIA and Vc1.1 are selective antagonists of alpha9alpha10 nAChRs. A recent study also reported that these alpha9alpha10 antagonists are also potent GABA-B agonists. In the current study, we were unable to detect RgIA or Vc1.1 binding to or action on cloned GABA-B receptors expressed in HEK cells or Xenopus oocytes. We review the background, findings and implications of use of compounds that act on alpha9* nAChRs.(1). PMID:19477168

  7. Serotonergic modulation of muscle acetylcholine receptors of different subunit composition.

    PubMed Central

    García-Colunga, J; Miledi, R

    1996-01-01

    Modulation of muscle acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors (AcChoRs) by serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)] and other serotonergic compounds was studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Various combinations of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunit RNAs were injected into oocytes, and membrane currents elicited by AcCho were recorded under voltage clamp. Judging by the amplitudes of AcCho currents generated, the levels of functional receptor expression were: alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma > alpha gamma delta. The alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta AcChoR Subtypes were strongly blocked by 5HT, whereas the alpha beta gamma receptor was blocked only slightly. The order of blocking potency of AcChoRs by 5HT was: alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta gamma. 5HT receptor antagonists, such as methysergide and spiperone, were even more potent blockers of AcChoRs than 5HT but did not show much subunit selectivity. Blockage of alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta receptors by 5HT was voltage-dependent, and the voltage dependence was abolished when the delta subunit was omitted. These findings may need to be taken into consideration when trying to elucidate the mode of action of many clinically important serotonergic compounds. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8633003

  8. Transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor delta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, P D; Popot, J L; Engelman, D M

    1987-01-01

    Current folding models for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) predict either four or five transmembrane segments per subunit. The N-terminus of each subunit is almost certainly extracellular. We have tested folding models by determining biochemically the cellular location of an intermolecular disulfide bridge thought to lie at the delta subunit C-terminus. Dimers of AChR linked through the delta-delta bridge were prepared from Torpedo marmorata and T.californica electric organ. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. In right-side-out vesicles (greater than 95% ACh binding sites outwards), the bridge was equally accessible whether or not vesicles had been disrupted by freeze--thawing or by detergents. Control experiments based on the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin and measurements of radioactive reductant efflux demonstrated that the vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier. In reconstituted vesicles containing AChR dimers in scrambled orientations, right-side-out dimers were reduced to monomers three times more rapidly than inside-out dimers, consistent with the measured rate of reductant permeation. These observations indicate that in reconstituted vesicles the delta-delta disulfide bridge lies in the same aqueous space as the ACh binding sites. They are most easily reconciled with folding models that propose an even number of transmembrane crossing per subunit. PMID:3428268

  9. Evoked release of acetylcholine from the growing embryonic neuron.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y A; Poo, M M

    1987-01-01

    An excised patch of embryonic muscle membrane was used as a probe for measuring the release of acetylcholine (AcCho) from growing spinal neurons in Xenopus cell culture. The neuron was stimulated extracellularly at the soma, and the evoked AcCho release was monitored at the growth cone, along the neurite, and near the soma. For a majority of the neurons studied, a brief suprathreshold stimulation of the soma triggered a pulse of AcCho release from the growth cone. This release showed many of the characteristics reminiscent of the transmitter release at the nerve terminal of a mature neuromuscular synapse: it occurs within a few ms following the stimulation, depends on extracellular Ca2+ concentration, and exhibits depression and potentiation during and after high-frequency stimulation, respectively. Similar evoked release was also observed only at selected points along the neurite, and prolonged suprathreshold stimulus was required to induce release from the soma. These results indicate that some of the growing spinal neurons have acquired a substantial number of AcCho molecules as well as an efficient mechanism for excitation-secretion coupling at the growth cone, ready for establishing functional contact with the target muscle cell. This notion was further supported by the finding that the evoked AcCho release is capable of inducing suprathreshold excitation of the muscle cell within the first minute following neurite-muscle contact. Images PMID:3470810

  10. Identification of petrogenic produced water components as acetylcholine esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Froment, Jean; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Bråte, Inger Lise N; Brooks, Steven J; Thomas, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors in produced water. Common produced water components from oil production activities, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and naphthenic acids were tested for AChE inhibition using a simple mixture of PAHs and naphthenic acids. Produced water samples collected from two offshore platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea were extracted by solid phase extraction and fractionated by open-column liquid solid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before being tested using a high-throughput and automated AChE assay. The HPLC fractions causing the strongest AChE inhibition were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HR-ToF-MS). Butylated hydroxytoluene and 4-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene were identified as two produced water components capable of inhibiting AChE at low concentrations. In order to assess the potential presence of such compounds discharged into aquatic ecosystems, AChE activity in fish tissues was measured. Saithe (Pollachius virens) caught near two offshore platforms showed lower enzymatic activity than those collected from a reference location. Target analysis of saithe did not detected the presence of these two putative AChE inhibitors and suggest that additional compounds such as PAHs, naphthenic acids and yet un-identified compounds may also contribute to the purported AChE inhibition observed in saithe. PMID:27176761

  11. Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors, a Novel Facet in the Pleiotropic Activities of Snake Venom Phospholipases A2

    PubMed Central

    Vulfius, Catherine A.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Osipov, Alexey V.; Andreeva, Tatyana V.; Filkin, Sergey Yu.; Gorbacheva, Elena V.; Astashev, Maxim E.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Utkin, Yuri N.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 represent the most abundant family of snake venom proteins. They manifest an array of biological activities, which is constantly expanding. We have recently shown that a protein bitanarin, isolated from the venom of the puff adder Bitis arietans and possessing high phospholipolytic activity, interacts with different types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and with the acetylcholine-binding protein. To check if this property is characteristic to all venom phospholipases A2, we have studied the capability of these enzymes from other snakes to block the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis neurons to acetylcholine or cytisine and to inhibit α-bungarotoxin binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins. Here we present the evidence that phospholipases A2 from venoms of vipers Vipera ursinii and V. nikolskii, cobra Naja kaouthia, and krait Bungarus fasciatus from different snake families suppress the acetylcholine- or cytisine-elicited currents in L. stagnalis neurons and compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle- and neuronal α7-types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, as well as to acetylcholine-binding proteins. As the phospholipase A2 content in venoms is quite high, under some conditions the activity found may contribute to the deleterious venom effects. The results obtained suggest that the ability to interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may be a general property of snake venom phospholipases A2, which add a new target to the numerous activities of these enzymes. PMID:25522251

  12. Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of Acetylcholine Using Receptor-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shihong; Kim, Byeongju; Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in a human central nervous system and is related to various neural functions such as memory, learning and muscle contractions. Dysfunctional ACh regulations in a brain can induce several neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis. In researching such diseases, it is important to measure the concentration of ACh in the extracellular fluid of the brain. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive and selective ACh sensor based on single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistors (swCNT-FETs). In our work, M1 mAChR protein, an ACh receptor, was expressed in E.coli and coated on swCNT-FETs with lipid membranes. Here, the binding of ACh onto the receptors could be detected by monitoring the change of electrical currents in the underlying swCNT-FETs, allowing the real-time detection of ACh at a 100 pM concentration. Furthermore, our sensor could selectively detect ACh from other neurotransmitters. This is the first report of the real-time sensing of ACh utilizing specific binding between the ACh and M1 mAChR, and it may lead to breakthroughs in various biomedical applications such as drug screening and disease diagnosis.

  13. Mechanism of phencyclidine binding to the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo electroplaque.

    PubMed

    Oswald, R E; Bamberger, M J; McLaughlin, J T

    1984-05-01

    The mechanism of phencyclidine binding to Torpedo acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes was investigated. The rate of [3H]phencyclidine association is 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold more rapid when phencyclidine and carbamoylcholine are added simultaneously to acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes than when phencyclidine is added to membranes previously equilibrated with carbamoylcholine or membranes in the absence of carbamoylcholine. The mechanism of binding under conditions in which the slower rate was observed was studied with thermodynamic, viscosity, and kinetic experiments. Association and dissociation rates were highly dependent on temperature with activation energies of 26-30 kcal/mole. Viscosity had no effect on the association rate but increased the dissociation rate. These studies suggest that the binding is not diffusion-controlled but rather is limited by a significant energy barrier. The association rate was determined as a function of the concentration of acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and the concentration of phencyclidine. In the presence of carbamoylcholine, the association rate was highly dependent upon the concentration of acetylcholine receptor but virtually insensitive to the concentration of phencyclidine. In the absence of carbamoylcholine, the association rate seemed to be a hyperbolic function of both the phencyclidine and the acetylcholine receptor concentration. The minimal model capable of explaining the data is a mechanism by which phencyclidine binds to two conformations of the acetylcholine receptor, one conformation having a higher affinity and constituting a lower percentage of receptors and the other having a lower affinity and constituting a higher percentage. The data are consistent with the possibility that the high-affinity conformation is the open-channel state of the acetylcholine receptor. PMID:6727862

  14. Attenuation of contractions to acetylcholine in canine bronchi by an endogenous nitric oxide-like substance.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Vanhoutte, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The involvement was assessed of an endogenous nitric oxide-like substance in contractions of canine bronchi to acetylcholine. 2. Canine third order bronchial rings, in some of which the epithelium was removed mechanically, were suspended in organ chambers and isometric tension was recorded. In some experiments, the content of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) of the bronchi was also measured. 3. Acetylcholine induced concentration-dependent contractions. The contractions were potentiated by nitro-L-arginine (an inhibitor of the synthesis of nitric oxide), oxyhaemoglobin (a scavenger of nitric oxide), and methylene blue (an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase). The magnitude of the potentiation to acetylcholine-induced contractions by these inhibitors were not significantly different between tissues with and without epithelium. 4. Acetylcholine induced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular content of cyclic GMP, which was similar in bronchi with and without epithelium. These increases were abolished by nitro-L-arginine and methylene blue. 5. During contractions to acetylcholine, exogenous nitric oxide relaxed the canine bronchi. The relaxations were not affected by nitro-L-arginine, but were augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase, and were abolished by methylene blue. 6. These observations suggest that, during contraction evoked by acetylcholine, the production of an endogenous nitric oxide-like substance increases and in turn attenuates the response of the airways to the muscarinic agonist. However, the endogenous nitric oxide-like substance does not play a major role in the epithelium-dependent attenuation of the contraction to acetylcholine in canine bronchi. PMID:8395301

  15. Lipid Emulsion Attenuates Acetylcholine-Induced Relaxation in Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Lee, Soo Hee; Yu, Jongsun; Park, Jungchul; Shin, Il-Woo; Lee, Youngju; Cho, Hyunhoo; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Baik, Jiseok; Hong, Jeong-Min; Han, Jeong Yeol; Lee, Heon Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Lipofundin MCT/LCT and Intralipid on acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide- (NO-) mediated relaxation in rat aorta to determine which lipid emulsion (LE) is more potent in terms of inhibition of NO-induced relaxation. Dose-response curves of responses induced by acetylcholine, the calcium ionophore A23187, and sodium nitroprusside were generated using isolated rat aorta with or without LE. The effect of Lipofundin MCT/LCT on acetylcholine-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated using western blotting. Lipofundin MCT/LCT (0.1 and 0.2%) attenuated acetylcholine-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact aorta with or without tiron, whereas 0.2% Intralipid only inhibited relaxation. Lipofundin MCT/LCT inhibited relaxation induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 and sodium nitroprusside in endothelium-intact aorta, but Lipofundin MCT/LCT had no effect on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation in the endothelium-denuded aorta. Combined pretreatment with l-arginine plus Lipofundin MCT/LCT increased acetylcholine-induced maximal relaxation in endothelium-intact aorta compared with Lipofundin MCT/LCT alone. l-Arginine attenuated Lipofundin MCT/LCT-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine-induced eNOS phosphorylation in HUVECs. Taken together, Lipofundin MCT/LCT attenuated acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation via an inhibitory effect on the endothelium including eNOS, which is proximal to activation of guanylyl cyclase. PMID:26273653

  16. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; Bartolini, L.; Cecchi, M.; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G.; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and immepip (0.01-10 microM) mimicked the effect of histamine. 3. Neither 2-thiazolylethylamine (TEA), an agonist showing some selectivity for H1 receptors, nor the H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, modified 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine. 4. The inhibitory effect of 100 microM histamine was completely prevented by the highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit but was resistant to antagonism by triprolidine and cimetidine, antagonists at histamine H1 and H2 but not H3 receptors. 5. The H3 receptor-induced inhibition of K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine was fully sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX). 6. The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of imetit (5 mg kg-1) and RAMH (5 mg kg-1) were tested on acetylcholine release and short term memory paradigms. Both drugs reduced 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of cortical acetylcholine, and impaired object recognition and a passive avoidance response. 7. These observations provide the first evidence of a regulatory role of histamine H3 receptors on cortical acetylcholine release in vivo. Moreover, they suggest a role for histamine in learning and memory and may have implications for the treatment of degenerative disorders associated with impaired cholinergic function. PMID:8982515

  17. Enhanced Efficacy of Human Brain-Derived Neural Stem Cells by Transplantation of Cell Aggregates in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Sil; Hwang, Onyou; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Chun, Young Il

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neural tissue transplantation has been a promising strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, transplantation has the disadvantages of low-cell survival and/or development of dyskinesia. Transplantation of cell aggregates has the potential to overcome these problems, because the cells can extend their axons into the host brain and establish synaptic connections with host neurons. In this present study, aggregates of human brain-derived neural stem cells (HB-NSC) were transplanted into a PD animal model and compared to previous report on transplantation of single-cell suspensions. Methods Rats received an injection of 6-OHDA into the right medial forebrain bundle to generate the PD model and followed by injections of PBS only, or HB-NSC aggregates in PBS into the ipsilateral striatum. Behavioral tests, multitracer (2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) and [18F]-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ([18F]-FP-CIT) microPET scans, as well as immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IF) staining were conducted to evaluate the results. Results The stepping test showed significant improvement of contralateral forelimb control in the HB-NSC group from 6-10 weeks compared to the control group (p<0.05). [18F]-FP-CIT microPET at 10 weeks posttransplantation demonstrated a significant increase in uptake in the HB-NSC group compared to pretransplantation (p<0.05). In IHC and IF staining, tyrosine hydroxylase and human β2 microglobulin (a human cell marker) positive cells were visualized at the transplant site. Conclusion These results suggest that the HB-NSC aggregates can survive in the striatum and exert therapeutic effects in a PD model by secreting dopamine. PMID:25535514

  18. Change in desensitization of cat muscle acetylcholine receptor caused by coexpression of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor subunits in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, K; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Cat muscle acetylcholine receptors (AcChoR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes desensitized more slowly than Torpedo electric organ AcChoRs, also expressed in oocytes. To examine the bases for the different degrees of desensitization, cat-Torpedo AcChoR hybrids were formed by injecting oocytes with cat denervated muscle mRNA mixed with a large excess of cloned Torpedo AcChoR subunit mRNAs. Hybrid AcChoRs formed by coinjection of cat muscle mRNA with the Torpedo beta or delta subunit mRNAs desensitized as slowly as cat AcChoR. In contrast, the hybrid AcChoRs expressed by coinjection with the Torpedo gamma subunit mRNA desensitized much more rapidly than cat AcChoR. The AcChoRs expressed in oocytes injected with cat muscle mRNA together with the Torpedo beta, gamma, and delta subunit mRNAs desensitized as rapidly as Torpedo AcChoR, indicating that the cat alpha subunit does not play an important role in determining the slow rate of desensitization. It is concluded that the difference in the rates of desensitization of cat and Torpedo AcChoRs is determined mainly by differences in their respective gamma subunits. Images PMID:2536157

  19. Neural induction, neural fate stabilization, and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Sally A; Je, Hyun-Soo

    2002-04-28

    The promise of stem cell therapy is expected to greatly benefit the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. An underlying biological reason for the progressive functional losses associated with these diseases is the extremely low natural rate of self-repair in the nervous system. Although the mature CNS harbors a limited number of self-renewing stem cells, these make a significant contribution to only a few areas of brain. Therefore, it is particularly important to understand how to manipulate embryonic stem cells and adult neural stem cells so their descendants can repopulate and functionally repair damaged brain regions. A large knowledge base has been gathered about the normal processes of neural development. The time has come for this information to be applied to the problems of obtaining sufficient, neurally committed stem cells for clinical use. In this article we review the process of neural induction, by which the embryonic ectodermal cells are directed to form the neural plate, and the process of neural-fate stabilization, by which neural plate cells expand in number and consolidate their neural fate. We will present the current knowledge of the transcription factors and signaling molecules that are known to be involved in these processes. We will discuss how these factors may be relevant to manipulating embryonic stem cells to express a neural fate and to produce large numbers of neurally committed, yet undifferentiated, stem cells for transplantation therapies. PMID:12805974

  20. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sérgio M.; Almendinger, Johann; Cabello, Juan; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the “eat-me” signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency. PMID:26872385

  1. Ineffectiveness of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists for treatment-resistant depression: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging preclinical and clinical evidences suggest a potential role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the pathophysiology of depression. Several clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists in treatment-resistant depression. We carried out this meta-analysis to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists significantly improve symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder who have an inadequate response to standard antidepressant therapy. A comprehensive literature search identified six randomized-controlled trials. These six trials, which included 2067 participants, were pooled for this meta-analysis using a random-effects model. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists failed to show superior efficacy compared with placebo in terms of the mean change in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score [mean difference=-0.12 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.96 to 0.71]; response rate [risk ratio=0.92 (95% CI=0.83-1.02)]; and remission rate [risk ratio=1.01 (95% CI=0.83-1.23)]. This meta-analysis failed to confirm preliminary positive evidence for the efficacy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists in treatment-resistant depression. Further studies investigating the efficacy of various alternative treatment strategies for treatment-resistant depression will help clinicians to better understand and choose better treatment options for these populations. PMID:26982579

  2. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  3. Acetylcholine content in the brain of rats treated with paraoxon and obidoxime

    PubMed Central

    Milošević, M. P.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of obidoxime on the rise in brain acetylcholine caused by the anticholinesterase paraoxon was studied in the rat. 2. In animals poisoned with a sublethal dose of paraoxon and thereafter treated with obidoxime the levels of both “free” and total brain acetylcholine were practically the same as those in rats injected with paraoxon only. 3. After poisoning with doses of paraoxon which are lethal unless an oxime is also given, the total acetylcholine in the brain of obidoxime-protected rats continued to accumulate, reaching a peak 2 h after injection of paraoxon. At this time no signs of central effects such as convulsions or tremor were seen. 4. Atropine, given 30 min before paraoxon, markedly reduced the rise in total brain acetylcholine seen when the anticholinesterase is given alone. 5. In rats pretreated with atropine and obidoxime excessive doses of paraoxon which are lethal in the absence of the antidotes produced a rise in total brain acetylcholine which was directly proportional to the dose of paraoxon administered. PMID:5485148

  4. Inhibition of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cyclic monoterpene carveol.

    PubMed

    Lozon, Yosra; Sultan, Ahmed; Lansdell, Stuart J; Prytkova, Tatiana; Sadek, Bassem; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Millar, Neil S; Oz, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic monoterpenes are a group of phytochemicals with antinociceptive, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory actions. Effects of cyclic monoterpenes including vanilin, pulegone, eugenole, carvone, carvacrol, carveol, thymol, thymoquinone, menthone, and limonene were investigated on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Monoterpenes inhibited the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order carveol>thymoquinone>carvacrol>menthone>thymol>limonene>eugenole>pulegone≥carvone≥vanilin. Among the monoterpenes, carveol showed the highest potency on acetylcholine-induced responses, with IC50 of 8.3µM. Carveol-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that cyclic monoterpenes such as carveol may interact with an allosteric site located in the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that cyclic monoterpenes inhibit the function of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, with varying potencies. PMID:26849939

  5. Galanin antagonizes acetylcholine on a memory task in basal forebrain-lesioned rats.

    PubMed Central

    Mastropaolo, J; Nadi, N S; Ostrowski, N L; Crawley, J N

    1988-01-01

    Galanin coexists with acetylcholine in medial septal neurons projecting to the ventral hippocampus, a projection thought to modulate memory functions. Neurochemical lesions of the nucleus basalis-medial septal area in rats impaired choice accuracy on a delayed alternation t-maze task. Acetylcholine (7.5 or 10 micrograms intraventricularly or 1 micrograms micro-injected into the ventral hippocampus) significantly improved performance in the lesioned rats. Atropine (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally or 10 micrograms intraventricularly), but not mecamylamine (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally or 20 micrograms intraventricularly), blocked this action of acetylcholine, suggesting involvement of a muscarinic receptor. Galanin (100-500 ng intraventricularly or 200 ng into the ventral hippocampus) attenuated the ability of acetylcholine to reverse the deficit in working memory in the lesioned rats. The antagonistic interaction between galanin and acetylcholine suggests that endogenous galanin may inhibit cholinergic function in memory processes, particularly in pathologies such as Alzheimer disease that involve degeneration of basal forebrain neurons. Images PMID:2462255

  6. Neural Networks for Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Neural networks are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to permit real-time adaptive control of time varying nonlinear systems, enhance the fault-tolerance of mission hardware, and permit online system reconfiguration. In general, the problem of controlling time varying nonlinear systems with unknown structures has not been solved. Adaptive neural control techniques show considerable promise and are being applied to technical challenges including automated docking of spacecraft, dynamic balancing of the space station centrifuge, online reconfiguration of damaged aircraft, and reducing cost of new air and spacecraft designs. Our experiences have shown that neural network algorithms solved certain problems that conventional control methods have been unable to effectively address. These include damage mitigation in nonlinear reconfiguration flight control, early performance estimation of new aircraft designs, compensation for damaged planetary mission hardware by using redundant manipulator capability, and space sensor platform stabilization. This presentation explored these developments in the context of neural network control theory. The discussion began with an overview of why neural control has proven attractive for NASA application domains. The more important issues in control system development were then discussed with references to significant technical advances in the literature. Examples of how these methods have been applied were given, followed by projections of emerging application needs and directions.

  7. Functional analysis of Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in multiple activation states by SSM-based electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Niessen, K V; Muschik, S; Langguth, F; Rappenglück, S; Seeger, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPC), i.e. nerve agents or pesticides, are highly toxic due to their strong inhibition potency against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Inhibited AChE results in accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft and thus the desensitisation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in the postsynaptic membrane is provoked. Direct targeting of nAChR to reduce receptor desensitisation might be an alternative therapeutic approach. For drug discovery, functional properties of potent therapeutic candidates need to be investigated in addition to affinity properties. Solid supported membrane (SSM)-based electrophysiology is useful for functional characterisation of ligand-gated ion channels like nAChRs, as charge translocations via capacitive coupling of the supporting membrane can be measured. By varying the agonist (carbamoylcholine) concentration, different functional states of the nAChR were initiated. Using plasma membrane preparations obtained from Torpedo californica electric organ, functional properties of selected nAChR ligands and non-oxime bispyridinium compounds were investigated. Depending on overall-size, the bispyridinium compounds enhanced or inhibited cholinergic signals induced by 100μM carbamoylcholine. Applying excessive concentrations of the agonist carbamoylcholine provoked desensitisation of the nAChRs, whereas addition of bispyridinium compounds bearing short alkyl linkers exhibited functional recovery of previously desensitised nAChRs. The results suggest that these non-oxime bispyridinium compounds possibly interacted with nAChR subtypes in a manner of a positive allosteric modulator (PAM). The described newly developed functional assay is a valuable tool for the assessment of functional properties of potential compounds such as nAChR modulating ligands, which might be a promising approach in the therapeutically treatment of OPC-poisonings. PMID:26851639

  8. Purification of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, G L; Herron, G S; Yamaki, M; Fullerton, D S; Schimerlik, M I

    1984-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria has been purified 100,000-fold to homogeneity by solubilization in digitonin/cholate and sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, diethylaminoethylagarose, hydroxylapatite, and 3-(2'-aminobenzhydryloxy)tropane-agarose. The yield of purified receptor was 4.3% of that found in the membrane fraction, and the purified receptor bound 11.1-12.8 nmol of L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate per mg of protein, corresponding to a binding component Mr of 78,400-90,000. The purified receptor preparation consisted of two polypeptides in approximately equimolar amounts when examined on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. The larger polypeptide (Mr 78,000 on 8% polyacrylamide gels) was specifically alkylated with [3H]propylbenzilylcholine mustard, whereas the smaller polypeptide (Mr 14,800) was not labeled. The possibility that the small polypeptide is a contaminant fortuitously appearing in equimolar amounts with the large polypeptide cannot be ruled out at this time. The purified preparation was highly stable, with no measurable change in the number of ligand binding sites or the gel pattern after 1 month's storage on ice. Scatchard analysis showed a single class of binding sites for the antagonist L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate with a dissociation constant of 61 +/- 4 pM. Equilibrium titration experiments demonstrated that the antagonist L-hyoscyamine displaced L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate from a single class of sites (Kd = 475 +/- 30 pM), whereas the agonist carbamoylcholine interacted at two populations of sites (53% +/- 3% high affinity, Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.3 microM; 47% +/- 3% low affinity, Kd = 67 +/- 14 microM). The ligand binding data were very similar to that for the membrane-bound receptor, suggesting that the receptor has not been altered radically during purification. Images PMID:6589642

  9. Conduction of hyperpolarization along hamster feed arteries: augmentation by acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Geoffrey G; Neild, Timothy O; Segal, Steven S

    2002-07-01

    The conduction of vasodilation along resistance vessels has been presumed to reflect the electrotonic spread of hyperpolarization from cell to cell along the vessel wall through gap junction channels. However, the vasomotor response to acetylcholine (ACh) encompasses greater distances than can be explained by passive decay. To investigate the underlying mechanism for this behavior, we tested the hypothesis that ACh augments the conduction of hyperpolarization. Feed arteries (n = 23; diameter, 58 +/- 4 microm; segment length, 2-8 mm) were isolated from the hamster retractor muscle, cannulated at each end, and pressurized to 75 mmHg (at 37 degrees C). Vessels were impaled with one or two dye-containing microelectrodes simultaneously (separation distance, 50 microm to 3.5 mm). Membrane potential (E(m)) (rest, approximately -30 mV) and electrical responses were similar between endothelium and smooth muscle, as predicted for robust myoendothelial coupling. Current injection (-0.8 nA, 1.5 s) evoked hyperpolarization (-10 +/- 1 mV; membrane time constant, 240 ms) that conducted along the vessel with a length constant (lambda) = 1.2 +/- 0.1 mm; spontaneous E(m) oscillations (approximately 1 Hz) decayed with lambda = 1.2 + 0.1 mm. In contrast, ACh microiontophoresis (500 nA, 500 ms, 1 microm tip) evoked hyperpolarization (-14 +/- 2 mV) that conducted with lambda = 1.9 +/- 0.1 mm, 60% further (P < 0.05) than responses evoked by purely electrical stimuli. These findings indicate that ACh augments the conduction of hyperpolarization along the vessel wall. PMID:12063280

  10. Functional differences between neurotransmitter binding sites of muscle acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Bruhova, Iva; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Gupta, Shaweta; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has two neurotransmitter binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αε (adult) or αγ (fetal) subunit interfaces. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the effects of mutations of five conserved aromatic residues at each site with regard to their contribution to the difference in free energy of agonist binding to active versus resting receptors (ΔGB1). The two binding sites behave independently in both adult and fetal AChRs. For four different agonists, including ACh and choline, ΔGB1 is ∼−2 kcal/mol more favorable at αγ compared with at αε and αδ. Only three of the aromatics contribute significantly to ΔGB1 at the adult sites (αY190, αY198, and αW149), but all five do so at αγ (as well as αY93 and γW55). γW55 makes a particularly large contribution only at αγ that is coupled energetically to those contributions of some of the α-subunit aromatics. The hydroxyl and benzene groups of loop C residues αY190 and αY198 behave similarly with regard to ΔGB1 at all three kinds of site. ACh binding energies estimated from molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with experimental values from electrophysiology and suggest that the αγ site is more compact, better organized, and less dynamic than αε and αδ. We speculate that the different sensitivities of the fetal αγ site versus the adult αε and αδ sites to choline and ACh are important for the proper maturation and function of the neuromuscular synapse. PMID:25422413

  11. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  12. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj; Wang, Hong; Klein, Anders B; Thiriet, Nathalie; Pinborg, Lars H; Muldoon, Pretal P; Wienecke, Jacob; Imad Damaj, M; Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Thomsen, Morten S

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with nAChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit nAChR-mediated intracellular signaling. We further show that perinatal nicotine exposure in rats (4 mg/kg/day through minipumps to dams from embryonic day 7 to post-natal day 21) significantly increases Lypd6 protein levels in the hippocampus in adulthood, which did not occur after exposure to nicotine in adulthood only. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain, and that Lypd6 is dysregulated by nicotine exposure during early development. Regulatory proteins of the Lynx family modulate the function of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). We report for the first time that the Lynx protein Lypd6 binds to nAChRs in human brain extracts, and that recombinant Lypd6 decreases nicotine-induced ERK phosphorylation and attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain. PMID:27344019

  13. Vascular effects of acetylcholine in the perfused rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, P.D.; Gillis, C.N.

    1986-03-05

    Acetylcholine (ACh) relaxes large, isolated arteries by releasing an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). The authors decided to determine if ACh releases EDRF in rabbit lungs (RL) perfused in situ and if chemical injury with tetradecanoyl phorbol myristate acetate (TPA) could modify EDRF release in RL and in rabbit pulmonary arteries (RPA) in vitro. RL were perfused at 15 ml/min with Krebs-dextran solution. 1 ..mu..M ACh infusion raised perfusion pressure (P) in RL that was blocked by 30 ..mu..M indomethacin (IND) in the perfusate. However, when IND-treated RL were perfused with the stable endoperoxide analog, U46619 (2-6nM) to increase P, ACh infusion (0.01-1.0 ..mu..M) consistently decreased elevated P. The vasodilator response to infusion of 1 ..mu..M ACh was acutely antagonized by infusion of either 20 ..mu..M quinacrine (Q) or 10 ..mu..M Fe/sup + +/-hemoglobin (Hb). ACh did not decrease P in IND-treated RL pre-equilibrated with Q or Hb. TPA (10 nM) antagonized ACh-reduction of P and the ACh-induced relaxation of isolated RPA. The TPA antagonism of ACh-relaxation of RPA was prevented by catalase (300 U/ml). From these results they conclude that: 1) ACh-induced vasoconstriction in RL depends on cyclooxygenase product(s). 2) IND unmasks ACh-induced vasodilatation in RL that is inhibited by Q and by Hb suggesting that the effect is mediated by EDRF. 3) TPA inhibits ACh-induced vasodilatation and relaxation of RPA via the release of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or a related oxidant that injures the endothelium.

  14. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-07-12

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP/sub 1/ synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more (/sup 3/H)AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of (/sup 3/H)vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the VP/sub 2/ vesicles had a ratio of (/sup 3/H)AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients ..cap alpha../sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena.

  15. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  16. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  17. Artificial neural network modeling enhances risk stratification and can reduce downstream testing for patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, negative cardiac biomarkers, and normal ECGs.

    PubMed

    Isma'eel, Hussain A; Cremer, Paul C; Khalaf, Shaden; Almedawar, Mohamad M; Elhajj, Imad H; Sakr, George E; Jaber, Wael A

    2016-04-01

    Despite uncertain yield, guidelines endorse routine stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, unremarkable serial electrocardiograms, and negative troponin measurements. In these patients, outcome prediction and risk stratification models could spare unnecessary testing. This study therefore investigated the use of artificial neural networks (ANN) to improve risk stratification and prediction of MPI and angiographic results. We retrospectively identified 5354 consecutive patients referred from the emergency department for rest-stress MPI after serial negative troponins and normal ECGs. Patients were risk stratified according to thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) scores, ischemia was defined as >5 % reversible perfusion defect, and obstructive coronary artery disease was defined as >50 % angiographic obstruction. For ANN, the network architecture employed a systematic method where the number of neurons is changed incrementally, and bootstrapping was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the models. Compared to TIMI scores, ANN models provided improved discriminatory power. With regards to MPI, an ANN model could reduce testing by 59 % and maintain a 96 % negative predictive value (NPV) for ruling out ischemia. Application of an ANN model could also avoid 73 % of invasive coronary angiograms while maintaining a 98 % NPV for detecting obstructive CAD. An online calculator for clinical use was created using these models. The ANN models improved risk stratification when compared to the TIMI score. Our calculator could also reduce downstream testing while maintaining an excellent NPV, though further study is needed before the calculator can be used clinically. PMID:26626458

  18. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy. PMID:24052227

  19. Delivery of enteric neural progenitors with 5-HT4 agonist-loaded nanoparticles and thermosensitive hydrogel enhances cell proliferation and differentiation following transplantation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Ryo; Cheng, Lily S; Graham, Hannah K; Nagy, Nandor; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Mattheolabakis, George; Amiji, Mansoor M; Goldstein, Allan M

    2016-05-01

    Cell therapy offers an innovative approach for treating enteric neuropathies. Postnatal gut-derived enteric neural stem/progenitor cells (ENSCs) represent a potential autologous source, but have a limited capacity for proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Since serotonin (5-HT) promotes enteric neuronal growth during embryonic development, we hypothesized that serotonin receptor agonism would augment growth of neurons from transplanted ENSCs. Postnatal ENSCs were isolated from 2 to 4 week-old mouse colon and cultured with 5-HT4 receptor agonist (RS67506)-loaded liposomal nanoparticles. ENSCs were co-cultured with mouse colon explants in the presence of RS67506-loaded (n = 3) or empty nanoparticles (n = 3). ENSCs were also transplanted into mouse rectum in vivo with RS67506-loaded (n = 8) or blank nanoparticles (n = 4) confined in a thermosensitive hydrogel, Pluronic F-127. Neuronal density and proliferation were analyzed immunohistochemically. Cultured ENSCs gave rise to significantly more neurons in the presence of RS67506-loaded nanoparticles. Similarly, colon explants had significantly increased neuronal density when RS67506-loaded nanoparticles were present. Finally, following in vivo cell delivery, co-transplantation of ENSCs with 5-HT4 receptor agonist-loaded nanoparticles led to significantly increased neuronal density and proliferation. We conclude that optimization of postnatal ENSCs can support their use in cell-based therapies for neurointestinal diseases. PMID:26922325

  20. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Rorie, D.K.; Rusch, N.J.; Shepherd, J.T.; Vanhoutte, P.M.; Tyce, G.M.

    1981-08-01

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with (/sub 3/H)norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors.

  1. Preparation of right-side-out, acetylcholine receptor enriched intact vesicles from Torpedo californica electroplaque membranes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, P R; Raftery, M A

    1979-04-01

    Intact vesicles enriched in acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica electroplaque membranes can be separated from collapsed or leaky vesicles and membrane sheets on sucrose density gradients. alpha-Bungarotoxin binding in intact vesicles reveals that approximately 95% of the acetylcholine receptor containing vesicles are formed outside-out (with the synaptic membrane face exposed on the vesicle exterior). The binding data also indicated that only 5% or less of the sites for alpha-bungarotoxin binding to synaptic membranes are located on the interior, cytoplasmic face. Intact vesicles are stable to gentle pelleting and resuspension but are easily osmotically shocked. The vesicles are impermeable to sucrose and Ficoll, but glycerol readily transverses to membrane barrier. Intact vesicles provide a sealed, oriented membrane preparation for studies of vectorial acetylcholine receptor mediated processes. PMID:427105

  2. Patch-recorded single-channel currents of the purified and reconstituted Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tank, D W; Huganir, R L; Greengard, P; Webb, W W

    1983-01-01

    Small unilamellar vesicles containing purified and reconstituted nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo electroplax have been fused by a simple freeze-thaw procedure to form large liposomes. Giga-seal patch-recording techniques were used to form isolated patches of liposome-membrane and to measure single-channel properties of the reconstituted receptor-ion channel complex. The observed properties are quantitatively similar to those reported for vertebrate muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor species recorded in situ. The results demonstrate that the pentameric complex consisting of the alpha 2 beta gamma delta subunits is fully functional. The methods used in these experiments should be useful in studying the effects of chemical alterations on the properties of acetylcholine receptor channels as well as other types of purified and reconstituted ion channels. PMID:6308673

  3. Chemical modification and reactivity of sulfhydryls and disulfides of rat brain nicotinic-like acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-06-25

    Rat central nervous system binding sites for ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin display considerable biochemical homology with characterized nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from the periphery. They possess a critical disulfide residue(s), which is susceptible to chemical modification and consequent specific alteration in the affinity of the binding site for cholinergic agonists. After reaction with Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 5/, as with reaction with dithiothreitol and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), the binding site is frozen in a high affinity state toward acetylcholine. After reduction with dithiothreitol and alkylation with a variety of compounds of different molecular configuration or electrical charge, or both, the binding site is frozen in a low affinity state toward acetylcholine. Thus, effects of disulfide/sulfhydryl modification on agonist binding affinity appear to be attributable to the nature of the covalent modification rather than charge or steric alteration at the receptor active site brought about by chemical modification.

  4. (-)-Reboxetine inhibits muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by interacting with luminal and non-luminal sites.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Ortells, Marcelo O; Feuerbach, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of (-)-reboxetine, a non-tricyclic norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor, with muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that (-)-reboxetine: (a) inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in human (h) muscle embryonic (hα1β1γδ) and adult (hα1β1εδ) AChRs in a non-competitive manner and with potencies IC50=3.86±0.49 and 1.92±0.48 μM, respectively, (b) binds to the [(3)H]TCP site with ~13-fold higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to the resting state, (c) enhances [(3)H]cytisine binding to the resting but activatableTorpedo AChR but not to the desensitized AChR, suggesting desensitizing properties, (d) overlaps the PCP luminal site located between rings 6' and 13' in the Torpedo but not human muscle AChRs. In silico mutation results indicate that ring 9' is the minimum structural component for (-)-reboxetine binding, and (e) interacts to non-luminal sites located within the transmembrane segments from the Torpedo AChR γ subunit, and at the α1/ε transmembrane interface from the adult muscle AChR. In conclusion, (-)-reboxetine non-competitively inhibits muscle AChRs by binding to the TCP luminal site and by inducing receptor desensitization (maybe by interacting with non-luminal sites), a mechanism that is shared by tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:23917086

  5. Electrocatalytic Microelectrode Detectors for Choline and Acetylcholine following Separation by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jhindan; Kirchhoff, Jon R.

    2009-01-01

    Two electrocatalytic enzyme modified microelectrode systems were employed as end-column amperometric detectors of choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (ACh) following separation by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Horseradish peroxidase crosslinked in an Os based redox polymer hydrogel (HRP-Os) was physically adsorbed on Au microelectrodes followed by chemical crosslinking of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). An alternative approach utilized the deposition of the transition metal catalyst, Prussian Blue (PB), on Pt microelectrodes as the electrocatalyst. Utilizing butyrylcholine (BuCh) as an internal standard, the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes exhibited excellent linear responses from 2–2000 μM and 10–2000 μM, respectively, for both Ch and ACh. Detection limits of 0.1 μM or 38 amol were determined for the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO electrode. The limit of detection for ACh and Ch at the PB/AChE-ChO electrode was 5 μM or 9.5 fmol. The electrodes were operated at potentials of +0.10 and −0.10 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3M NaCl), respectively, and thus minimized the potential response from oxidizable interferences. In addition, both electrocatalytic electrodes showed good operational stability for more than 70 hours. The enhanced detection capability of the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes in combination with efficient CE separation of Ch and ACh provides a new sensitive and selective strategy for monitoring and quantifying these cholinergic biomarkers in biological fluids. PMID:20337384

  6. In vivo protection against soman toxicity by known inhibitors of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sterling, G H; Doukas, P H; Sheldon, R J; O'Neill, J J

    1988-02-01

    Soman inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, essentially irreversibly, producing an accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) which is responsible for many of its toxic effects. Current approaches to treatment include: (1) atropine, a muscarinic receptor blocker; (2) pyridine-2-aldoxime methylchloride (2-PAM), an enzyme reactivator; and (3) carbamate protection of the enzyme. However, no fully satisfactory regimen has been found, primarily because of the rapid aging process. In this study, compounds known to inhibit ACh synthesis in vitro were evaluated in combination with atropine and 2-PAM so as to assess their potential utility in protection against soman toxicity in rats. Acetylsecohemicholinium (100 micrograms/kg, i.c.v.t., 30 min prior to soman), an inhibitor of high affinity choline uptake (HAChU) and cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in vitro, enhanced the protective effects of atropine and 2-PAM, reducing the mortality within the first 2 hr following soman. N-Hydroxyethylnaphthylvinylpyridine (NHENVP), a quaternary ChAT inhibitor (1.7 mumol/kg, i.m.), significantly reduced the overall percent mortality due to soman from 80% to 20%. The compound was most effective when administered 2-3 min prior to soman and was effective only by the intramuscular route. N-Allyl-3-quinuclidinol, a potent HAChU inhibitor (1 mumol/kg, i.m.) was the most effective quinuclidine analog evaluated, also reducing the percent mortality for a 24-hr period. Unlike NHENVP, it was most effective when given 30-60 min prior to soman. It is suggested from the data that compounds that disrupt presynaptic ACh synthesis in vitro may prove effective in treating organophosphate poisoning. The results demonstrate interesting differences among the compounds studied and provide insight for the design of protectants against soman toxicity. These findings further underscore the need to examine the structure activity and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, i.e. comparison of routes of

  7. Regulation of nerve-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens by acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Audrey; Gabriel, Deborah; McHale, Noel G; Hollywood, Mark A; Thornbury, Keith D; Sergeant, Gerard P

    2015-09-01

    Stimulation of intramural nerves in the vas deferens of many species yields a classical biphasic contraction comprised of an initial fast component, mediated by P2X receptors and a second slower component, mediated by α1-adrenoceptors. It is also recognized that sympathetic nerve-mediated contractions of the vas deferens can be modulated by acetylcholine (Ach), however there is considerable disagreement in the literature regarding the precise contribution of cholinergic nerves to contraction of the vas deferens. In this study we examined the effect of cholinergic modulators on electric field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens and on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in isolated vas deferens smooth muscle cells (VDSMC). The sustained component of EFS-evoked contractions was inhibited by atropine and by the selective M3R antagonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP). EFS-evoked contractions were potentiated by Ach, carbachol (Cch), and neostigmine. The sustained phase of the EFS-evoked contraction was inhibited by prazosin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist and guanethidine, an inhibitor of noradrenaline release, even in the continued presence of Ach, Cch or neostigmine. The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one enhanced the amplitude of EFS-evoked contractions and reduced the inhibitory effects of 4-DAMP. Isolated VDSMC displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations, but did not respond to Cch. However, the α1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, evoked a Ca(2+) transient and contracted the cells. These data suggest that EFS-evoked contractions of the rabbit vas deferens are potentiated by activation of M3 receptors and reduced by activation of a sGC-dependent inhibitory pathway. PMID:26359240

  8. Regulation of nerve-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens by acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Audrey; Gabriel, Deborah; McHale, Noel G; Hollywood, Mark A; Thornbury, Keith D; Sergeant, Gerard P

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of intramural nerves in the vas deferens of many species yields a classical biphasic contraction comprised of an initial fast component, mediated by P2X receptors and a second slower component, mediated by α1-adrenoceptors. It is also recognized that sympathetic nerve-mediated contractions of the vas deferens can be modulated by acetylcholine (Ach), however there is considerable disagreement in the literature regarding the precise contribution of cholinergic nerves to contraction of the vas deferens. In this study we examined the effect of cholinergic modulators on electric field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions of rabbit vas deferens and on cytosolic Ca2+ levels in isolated vas deferens smooth muscle cells (VDSMC). The sustained component of EFS-evoked contractions was inhibited by atropine and by the selective M3R antagonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP). EFS-evoked contractions were potentiated by Ach, carbachol (Cch), and neostigmine. The sustained phase of the EFS-evoked contraction was inhibited by prazosin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist and guanethidine, an inhibitor of noradrenaline release, even in the continued presence of Ach, Cch or neostigmine. The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one enhanced the amplitude of EFS-evoked contractions and reduced the inhibitory effects of 4-DAMP. Isolated VDSMC displayed spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, but did not respond to Cch. However, the α1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, evoked a Ca2+ transient and contracted the cells. These data suggest that EFS-evoked contractions of the rabbit vas deferens are potentiated by activation of M3 receptors and reduced by activation of a sGC-dependent inhibitory pathway. PMID:26359240

  9. Selectivity optimization of substituted 1,2,3-triazoles as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Fokin, Valery V; Vajragupta, Opa; Taylor, Palmer

    2015-08-19

    Three series of substituted anti-1,2,3-triazoles (IND, PPRD, and QND), synthesized by cycloaddition from azide and alkyne building blocks, were designed to enhance selectivity and potency profiles of a lead α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) agonist, TTIn-1. Designed compounds were synthesized and screened for affinity by a radioligand binding assay. Their functional characterization as agonists and antagonists was performed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay using cell lines expressing transfected cDNAs, α7-nAChRs, α4β2-nAChRs, and 5HT3A receptors, and a fluorescence cell reporter. In the IND series, a tropane ring of TTIn-1, substituted at N1, was replaced by mono- and bicyclic amines to vary length and conformational flexibility of a carbon linker between nitrogen atom and N1 of the triazole. Compounds with a two-carbon atom linker optimized binding with Kd's at the submicromolar level. Further modification at the hydrophobic indole of TTIn-1 was made in PPRD and QND series by fixing the amine center with the highest affinity building blocks in the IND series. Compounds from IND and PPRD series are selective as agonists for the α7-nAChRs over α4β2-nAChRs and 5HT3A receptors. Lead compounds in the three series have EC50's between 28 and 260 nM. Based on the EC50, affinity, and selectivity determined from the binding and cellular responses, two of the leads have been advanced to behavioral studies described in the companion article (DOI: 10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00059). PMID:25932897

  10. Nicotine improves the functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Liu, Qian; Sun, Jing; Yi, Kaihong; Wu, Libiao; Tan, Xuerui

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the modulation of functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) induced by nicotine. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and then the cells were plated on fibronectin-coated culture plates. Late EPCs were positive for 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-acLDL) uptake and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin lectin (UEA-1) binding. Expression of von Willbrand factor (vWF), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), and α7 nAChR was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Late EPCs of 3-5 passages were treated for 32 h with either vehicle or nicotine with or without pre-incubation of nAChR antagonism, mecamylamine, or α-bungarotoxin. The viability, migration, and in vitro vasculogenesis activity of late EPCs were assayed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and in vitro angiogenesis assay, respectively. Late EPCs adhesion assay was performed by replating cells on fibronectin-coated plates, and then adherent cells were counted. Incubation with 10 nmol/L nicotine enhanced viable, migratory, adhesive, and in vitro vasculogenesis capacity of late EPCs. The effect of nicotine on late EPCs can be attenuated by mecamylamine or α-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, nicotine improves the functional activity of late EPCs via nAChRs. PMID:21774635

  11. Solubilization and hydrodynamic properties of pig atrial muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in dodecyl beta-D-maltoside.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, G L; Rosenbaum, L C; Schimerlik, M I

    1988-01-01

    The pig atrial muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAcChR) has been solubilized from the membrane-bound state in high yield and in stable conformation by the non-ionic detergent dodecyl beta-D-maltoside (DBM). The yield and selectivity for receptor solubilization is dependent on the detergent/protein ratio during extraction. Extraction at 2 mg of DBM/mg of protein gave a 75% yield of solubilized receptor with a 1.5-fold enrichment. A double-extraction procedure, in which non-receptor protein was first extracted at 0.4 mg of DBM/mg of protein and mAcChR was selectively solubilized by a second extraction at 0.35 mg of DBM/mg of protein, gave a 50% overall yield and a 2.8-fold enrichment. Both preparations had a half-life of about 20 days on ice without addition of muscarinic ligands. Receptor stability was decreased by the presence of cations, particularly bivalent cations, and enhanced by the agonist carbachol. Dissociation constants for the interaction of the DBM-solubilized receptor with the antagonist L-quinuclidinyl benzilate (Kd = 223 pM) and the agonist carbachol (Kd = 100 microM) were similar to those for the digitonin/cholate-solubilized receptor. Pig atrial mAcChR purified in digitonin/cholate and exchanged into DBM displayed reliable hydrodynamic behaviour during sucrose density sedimentation in gradients of 2H2O and H2O and during gel filtration in Sephacryl S-300. DBM is thus the first detergent which will solubilize a stable form of the ligand-free mAcChR in yields similar to those with digitonin, and is the only stabilizing detergent thus far suitable for hydrodynamic studies. DBM is also likely to be similarly useful in studying other membrane proteins for which digitonin has been the solubilizing detergent of choice. PMID:3202834

  12. Solubilization and hydrodynamic properties of pig atrial muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in dodecyl beta-D-maltoside.

    PubMed

    Peterson, G L; Rosenbaum, L C; Schimerlik, M I

    1988-10-15

    The pig atrial muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAcChR) has been solubilized from the membrane-bound state in high yield and in stable conformation by the non-ionic detergent dodecyl beta-D-maltoside (DBM). The yield and selectivity for receptor solubilization is dependent on the detergent/protein ratio during extraction. Extraction at 2 mg of DBM/mg of protein gave a 75% yield of solubilized receptor with a 1.5-fold enrichment. A double-extraction procedure, in which non-receptor protein was first extracted at 0.4 mg of DBM/mg of protein and mAcChR was selectively solubilized by a second extraction at 0.35 mg of DBM/mg of protein, gave a 50% overall yield and a 2.8-fold enrichment. Both preparations had a half-life of about 20 days on ice without addition of muscarinic ligands. Receptor stability was decreased by the presence of cations, particularly bivalent cations, and enhanced by the agonist carbachol. Dissociation constants for the interaction of the DBM-solubilized receptor with the antagonist L-quinuclidinyl benzilate (Kd = 223 pM) and the agonist carbachol (Kd = 100 microM) were similar to those for the digitonin/cholate-solubilized receptor. Pig atrial mAcChR purified in digitonin/cholate and exchanged into DBM displayed reliable hydrodynamic behaviour during sucrose density sedimentation in gradients of 2H2O and H2O and during gel filtration in Sephacryl S-300. DBM is thus the first detergent which will solubilize a stable form of the ligand-free mAcChR in yields similar to those with digitonin, and is the only stabilizing detergent thus far suitable for hydrodynamic studies. DBM is also likely to be similarly useful in studying other membrane proteins for which digitonin has been the solubilizing detergent of choice. PMID:3202834

  13. Structure-activity relationship of ibogaine analogs interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine analogs with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that ibogaine analogs: (a) inhibit (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca²⁺ influx in human embryonic muscle AChRs with the following potency sequence (IC(50) in μM): (±)-18-methylaminocoronaridine (5.9±0.3)∼(±)-18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) (6.8±0.8)>(-)-ibogaine (17±3)∼(+)-catharanthine (20±1)>(±)-albifloranine (46±13), (b) bind to the [³H]TCP binding site with higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to that in the resting state. Similar results were obtained using [³H]18-MC. These and docking results suggest a steric interaction between TCP and ibogaine analogs for the same site, (c) enhance [³H]cytisine binding to resting but not to desensitized AChRs, with desensitizing potencies (apparent EC₅₀) that correlate very well with the pK(i) values in the desensitized state, and (d) there are good bilinear correlations between the ligand molecular volumes and their affinities in the desensitized and resting states, with an optimal volume of ∼345 ų for the ibogaine site. These results indicate that the size of the binding sites for ibogaine analogs, located between the serine and nonpolar rings and shared with TCP, is an important structural feature for binding and for inducing desensitization. PMID:21642011

  14. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew K.; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H.; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldwide, playing an important role in crop pollination, and is also a valuable model system for studies on social interaction, sensory processing, learning, and memory. We have used the A. mellifera genome information to characterize the complete honey bee nAChR gene family. Comparison with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae shows that the honey bee possesses the largest family of insect nAChR subunits to date (11 members). As with Drosophila and Anopheles, alternative splicing of conserved exons increases receptor diversity. Also, we show that in one honey bee nAChR subunit, six adenosine residues are targeted for RNA A-to-I editing, two of which are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and Heliothis virescens orthologs, and that the extent of editing increases as the honey bee lifecycle progresses, serving to maximize receptor diversity at the adult stage. These findings on Apis mellifera enhance our understanding of nAChR functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the development of improved insecticides that spare a major beneficial insect species. PMID:17065616

  15. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression. PMID:27474687

  16. Functional Expression of Two Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors from cDNA Clones Identifies a Gene Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulter, Jim; Connolly, John; Deneris, Evan; Goldman, Dan; Heinemann, Steven; Patrick, Jim

    1987-11-01

    A family of genes coding for proteins homologous to the α subunit of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been identified in the rat genome. These genes are transcribed in the central and peripheral nervous systems in areas known to contain functional nicotinic receptors. In this paper, we demonstrate that three of these genes, which we call alpha3, alpha4, and beta2, encode proteins that form functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes expressing either alpha3 or alpha4 protein in combination with the beta2 protein produced a strong response to acetylcholine. Oocytes expressing only the alpha4 protein gave a weak response to acetylcholine. These receptors are activated by acetylcholine and nicotine and are blocked by Bungarus toxin 3.1. They are not blocked by α -bungarotoxin, which blocks the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thus, the receptors formed by the alpha3, alpha4, and beta2 subunits are pharmacologically similar to the ganglionic-type neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. These results indicate that the alpha3, alpha4, and beta2 genes encode functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits that are expressed in the brain and peripheral nervous system.

  17. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  18. Neural correlates of HIV risk feelings.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Frank E K; Schmälzle, Ralf; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T

    2015-04-01

    Field studies on HIV risk perception suggest that people rely on impressions they have about the safety of their partner. The present fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of the intuitive perception of risk. First, during an implicit condition, participants viewed a series of unacquainted persons and performed a task unrelated to HIV risk. In the following explicit condition, participants evaluated the HIV risk for each presented person. Contrasting responses for high and low HIV risk revealed that risky stimuli evoked enhanced activity in the anterior insula and medial prefrontal regions, which are involved in salience processing and frequently activated by threatening and negative affect-related stimuli. Importantly, neural regions responding to explicit HIV risk judgments were also enhanced in the implicit condition, suggesting a neural mechanism for intuitive impressions of riskiness. Overall, these findings suggest the saliency network as neural correlate for the intuitive sensing of risk. PMID:24982263

  19. Neural correlates of HIV risk feelings

    PubMed Central

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T.

    2015-01-01

    Field studies on HIV risk perception suggest that people rely on impressions they have about the safety of their partner. The present fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of the intuitive perception of risk. First, during an implicit condition, participants viewed a series of unacquainted persons and performed a task unrelated to HIV risk. In the following explicit condition, participants evaluated the HIV risk for each presented person. Contrasting responses for high and low HIV risk revealed that risky stimuli evoked enhanced activity in the anterior insula and medial prefrontal regions, which are involved in salience processing and frequently activated by threatening and negative affect-related stimuli. Importantly, neural regions responding to explicit HIV risk judgments were also enhanced in the implicit condition, suggesting a neural mechanism for intuitive impressions of riskiness. Overall, these findings suggest the saliency network as neural correlate for the intuitive sensing of risk. PMID:24982263

  20. Modulation of the anti-acetylcholine receptor response and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by recombinant fragments of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Asher, O; Tzartos, S J; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1998-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder of man caused by a humoral response to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Most of the antibodies in MG and in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are directed to the extracellular portion of the AChR alpha subunit, and within it, primarily to the main immunogenic region (MIR). We have cloned and expressed recombinant fragments, corresponding to the entire extracellular domain of the AChR alpha subunit (H alpha1-210), and to portions of it that encompass either the MIR (H alpha1-121) or the ligand binding site of AChR (H alpha122-210), and studied their ability to interfere with the immunopathological anti-AChR response in vitro and in vivo. All fragments were expressed as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase. Fragments H alpha1-121 and H alpha1-210 protected AChR in TE671 cells against accelerated degradation induced by the anti-MIR monoclonal antibody (mAb)198 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, these fragments had a similar effect on the antigenic modulation of AChR by other anti-MIR mAb and by polyclonal rat anti-AChR antibodies. Fragments H alpha1-121 and H alpha1-210 were also able to modulate in vivo muscle AChR loss and development of clinical symptoms of EAMG, passively transferred to rats by mAb 198. Fragment H alpha122-210 did not have such a protective activity. Our results suggest that the appropriate recombinant fragments of the human AChR may be employed in the future for antigen-specific therapy of myasthenia. PMID:9521072

  1. Use of acetylcholine mustard to study allosteric interactions at the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Figueroa, Katherine W.; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the interaction of a nitrogen mustard derivative of acetylcholine with the human M2 muscarinic receptor expressed in CHO cells using the muscarinic radioligand, [3H]N-methylscopolamine. Acetylcholine mustard caused a concentration-dependent, first order loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding at 37°C, with the half maximal rate constant occurring at 24 µM and a maximal rate constant of 0.16 min−1. We examined the effects of various ligands on the rate of alkylation of M2 receptors by acetylcholine mustard. N-methylscopolamine and McN-A-343 (4-(trimethylamino)-2-butynyl-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate) competitively slowed the rate of alkylation, whereas the inhibition by gallamine reached a plateau at high concentrations, indicating allosteric inhibition. In contrast, WIN 51708 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-5-α-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) had no effect. We also measured the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by acetylcholine mustard at 0°C, conditions under which there is little or no detectable covalent binding. In these experiments, the dissociation constant of the aziridinium ion of acetylcholine mustard was estimated to be 12.3 µM. In contrast, the parent mustard and alcoholic hydrolysis product of acetylcholine mustard were without effect. Our results show that measurement of the effects of ligands on the rate of inactivation of the orthosteric site by a small site-directed electrophile is a powerful method for discriminating competitive inhibition from allosterism. PMID:18682569

  2. Agonist self-inhibition at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor a nonspecific action

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Firestone, L.L.; Miller, K.W.

    1987-05-19

    Agonist concentration-response relationships at nicotinic postsynaptic receptors were established by measuring /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from acetylcholine receptor rich native Torpedo membrane vesicles under three different conditions: (1) integrated net ion efflux (in 10 s) from untreated vesicles, (2) integrated net efflux from vesicles in which most acetylcholine sites were irreversibly blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin, and (3) initial rates of efflux (5-100 ms) from vesicles that were partially blocked with ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Exposure to acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, or (-)-nicotine over 10/sup 8/-fold concentration ranges results in bell-shaped ion flux response curves due to stimulation of acetylcholine receptor channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channel function at 60-2000 times higher concentrations. Concentrations of agonists that inhibit their own maximum /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux by 50% (K/sub B/ values) are 110, 211, 3.0, 39, and 8.9 mM, respectively, for the agonists listed above. For acetylcholine and carbamylcholine, K/sub B/ values determined from both 10-s and 15-ms efflux measurements are the same, indicating that the rate of agonist-induced desensitization increases to maximum at concentrations lower than those causing self-inhibition. For all partial and full agonists studied, Hill coefficients for self-inhibition are close to 1.0. Concentrations of agonists up to 8 times K/sub B/ did not change the order parameter reported by a spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated in Torpedo membranes. The authors conclude that agonist self-inhibition cannot be attributed to a general nonspecific membrane perturbation. Instead, these results are consistent with a saturable site of action either at the lipid-protein interface or on the acetylcholine receptor protein itself.

  3. Central nervous system promotes thermotolerance via FoxO/DAF-16 activation through octopamine and acetylcholine signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2016-03-25

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) responds to many kinds of stressors to maintain homeostasis. Although the ANS is believed to regulate stress tolerance, the exact mechanism underlying this is not well understood. To understand this, we focused on longevity genes, which have functions such as lifespan extension and promotion of stress tolerance. To understand the relationship between ANS and longevity genes, we analyzed stress tolerance of Caenorhabditis elegans treated with octopamine, which has an affinity to noradrenaline in insects, and acetylcholine. Octopamine and acetylcholine did not show resistance against H2O2, but the neurotransmitters promoted thermotolerance via DAF-16. However, chronic treatment with octopamine and acetylcholine did not extend the lifespan, although DAF-16 plays an important role in longevity. In conclusion, our results show that octopamine and acetylcholine activate DAF-16 in response to stress, but chronic induction of octopamine and acetylcholine is not beneficial for increasing longevity. PMID:26903298

  4. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  5. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  6. (/sup 14/C)chloroacetylcholine as an advantageous affinity label of the acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, D.M.; Sin-Ren, A.C.; Waser, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The alkylating agent (/sup 14/C)chloroacetylcholine perchlorate ((/sup 14/C) ClACh) was synthesized and used for affinity labelling of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata. Solubilized and affinity-purified receptor proteins were reduced and alkylated according to the bromoacetylcholine-method. Covalent binding of (/sup 14/C) ClACh to the cholinergic receptor proved to be specific and saturable, and occurred exclusively to the alpha-subunit. Halogen substitution of acetylcholine by chlorine and insertion of a /sup 14/C-isotope instead of the widely used /sup 3/H resulted in favorable properties of the affinity label.

  7. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals. PMID:27054179

  8. Acetylcholine-induced cation translocation across cell membranes and inactivation of the acetylcholine receptor: chemical kinetic measurements in the millisecond time region.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, D J; Aoshima, H; Hess, G P

    1981-01-01

    Acetylcholine-induced flux of inorganic ions across membranes and inactivation of the acetylcholine receptor were measured at pH 7.0, 1 degrees C, over a 5000-fold concentration range of acetylcholine. Receptor-containing electroplax membrane vesicles prepared from Electrophorus electricus and a quench-flow technique were used, allowing flux to be measured in the 2-msec to 1-min time region. Five different measurements were made: (i) rate of ion translocation with the active state of the receptor, (ii) rate of the slower ion translocation after equilibration of active and inactive receptor states, (iii) rate of inactivation, (iv) equilibrium between active and inactive forms of the receptor, and (v) reactivation of inactivated receptor. The kinetics of the steps in the receptor-controlled ion flux follow single-exponential rate laws, and simple analytical expressions for their ligand concentration dependence can be used. Thus, the rate and equilibrium constants in a scheme that relates the ligand binding steps to ion translocation could be evaluated. It was found that the dependence of the receptor-controlled ion translocation over the concentration range investigated obeys the integrated rate equation based on the proposed mechanism. The flux rate before inactivation was approximately 10(7) ions sec-1 per receptor, which is comparable with that measured electrophysiologically in muscle cells. The half-time of inactivation is approximately 100 msec when the receptor is saturated with acetylcholine. The specific reaction rate of the ion translocation (J) is 3 X 10(7) M-1 sec-1. The results support a minimum reaction mechanism previously proposed on the basis of experiments in which carbamylcholine was used. PMID:6267581

  9. Amino acids of the Torpedo marmorata acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunit labeled by a photoaffinity ligand for the acetylcholine binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, M.; Giraudat, J.; Kotzyba-Hibert, F.; Goeldner, M.; Hirth, C.; Chang, J.Y.; Lazure, C.; Chretien, M.; Changeux, J.P.

    1988-04-05

    The acetylcholine-binding sites on the native, membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata were covalently labeled with the photoaffinity reagent (/sup 3/H)-p-(dimethylamino)-benzenediazonium fluoroborate (DDF) in the presence of phencyclidine by employing an energy-transfer photolysis procedure. The ..cap alpha..-chains isolated from receptor-rich membranes photolabeled in the absence or presence of carbamoylcholine were cleaved with CNBr and the radiolabeled fragments purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid and/or sequence analysis demonstrated that the ..cap alpha..-chain residues Trp-149, Tyr-190, Cys-192, and Cys-193 and an unidentified residue(s) in the segment ..cap alpha.. 31-105 were all labeled by the photoaffinity reagent in an agonist-protectable manner. The labeled amino acids are located within three distinct regions of the large amino-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ..cap alpha..-subunit primary structure and plausibly lie in proximity to one another at the level of the acetylcholine-binding sites in the native receptor. These findings are in accord with models proposed for the transmembrane topology of the ..cap alpha..-chain that assign the amino-terminal segment ..cap alpha.. 1-210 to the synaptic cleft. Furthermore, the results suggest that the four identified (/sup 3/H)DDF-labeled resides, which are conserved in muscle and neuronal ..cap alpha..-chains but not in the other subunits, may be directly involved in agonist binding.

  10. FGF signaling transforms non-neural ectoderm into neural crest.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-12-15

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in response to FGF the non-neural ectoderm can ectopically express several early neural crest markers (Pax7, Msx1, Dlx5, Sox9, FoxD3, Snail2, and Sox10). Importantly this response to FGF signaling can occur without inducing ectopic mesodermal tissues. Furthermore, the non-neural ectoderm responds to FGF by expressing the prospective neural marker Sox3, but it does not express definitive markers of neural or anterior neural (Sox2 and Otx2) tissues. These results suggest that the non-neural ectoderm can launch the neural crest program in the absence of mesoderm, without acquiring definitive neural character. Finally, we report that prior to the upregulation of these neural crest markers, the non-neural ectoderm upregulates both BMP and Wnt molecules in response to FGF. Our results provide the first effort to understand the molecular events leading to neural crest development via the non-neural ectoderm in amniotes and present a distinct response to FGF signaling. PMID:23000357

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  12. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  13. Acetylcholine Release in the Hippocampus and Striatum during Place and Response Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pych, Jason C.; Chang, Qing; Colon-Rivera, Cynthia; Haag, Renee; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    These experiments examined the release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus and striatum when rats were trained, within single sessions, on place or response versions of food-rewarded mazes. Microdialysis samples of extra-cellular fluid were collected from the hippocampus and striatum at 5-min increments before, during, and after training. These…

  14. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  15. Septohippocampal Acetylcholine: Involved in but Not Necessary for Learning and Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitt