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Sample records for acetylene jet diffusion

  1. Soot Volume Fraction Maps for Normal and Reduced Gravity Laminar Acetylene Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1997-01-01

    The study of soot particulate distribution inside gas jet diffusion flames is important to the understanding of fundamental soot particle and thermal radiative transport processes, as well as providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety, soot emissions, and radiant heat loads for combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Compared to those under normal gravity (1-g) conditions, the elimination of buoyancy-induced flows is expected to significantly change the flow field in microgravity (O g) flames, resulting in taller and wider flames with longer particle residence times. Work by Bahadori and Edelman demonstrate many previously unreported qualitative and semi-quantitative results, including flame shape and radiation, for sooting laminar zas jet diffusion flames. Work by Ku et al. report soot aggregate size and morphology analyses and data and model predictions of soot volume fraction maps for various gas jet diffusion flames. In this study, we present the first 1-g and 0-g comparisons of soot volume fraction maps for laminar acetylene and nitrogen-diluted acetylene jet diffusion flames. Volume fraction is one of the most useful properties in the study of sooting diffusion flames. The amount of radiation heat transfer depends directly on the volume fraction and this parameter can be measured from line-of-sight extinction measurements. Although most Soot aggregates are submicron in size, the primary particles (20 to 50 nm in diameter) are in the Rayleigh limit, so the extinction absorption) cross section of aggregates can be accurately approximated by the Rayleigh solution as a function of incident wavelength, particles' complex refractive index, and particles' volume fraction.

  2. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  3. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  4. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  5. Diffusion of acetylene inside the Cu-BTC metal organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhudesai, S. A.; Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic of acetylene molecule adsorbed in Copper 1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxylate metal-organic framework as studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique is reported here. The results showed that the translational motion of the guest molecule exist in two different time scales; faster one behave as free particle and other one is found to follow jump diffusion. Rotational motion of acetylene is found to be an order of magnitude faster than translational motion. Intermediate scattering functions corresponding to rotational motion show an unusual dip, which is described by the m-diffusion model.

  6. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  7. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  8. Microgravity Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A gas-jet diffusion flame is similar to the flame on a Bunsen burner, where a gaseous fuel (e.g., propane) flows from a nozzle into an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., air). The difference is that a Bunsen burner allows for (partial) premixing of the fuel and the air, whereas a diffusion flame is not premixed and gets its oxygen (principally) by diffusion from the atmosphere around the flame. Simple gas-jet diffusion flames are often used for combustion studies because they embody the mechanisms operating in accidental fires and in practical combustion systems. However, most practical combustion is turbulent (i.e., with random flow vortices), which enhances the fuel/air mixing. These turbulent flames are not well understood because their random and transient nature complicates analysis. Normal gravity studies of turbulence in gas-jet diffusion flames can be impeded by buoyancy-induced instabilities. These gravitycaused instabilities, which are evident in the flickering of a candle flame in normal gravity, interfere with the study of turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. By conducting experiments in microgravity, where buoyant instabilities are avoided, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center hope to improve our understanding of turbulent combustion. Ultimately, this could lead to improvements in combustor design, yielding higher efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Gas-jet diffusion flames are often researched as model flames, because they embody mechanisms operating in both accidental fires and practical combustion systems (see the first figure). In normal gravity laboratory research, buoyant air flows, which are often negligible in practical situations, dominate the heat and mass transfer processes. Microgravity research studies, however, are not constrained by buoyant air flows, and new, unique information on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames has been obtained.

  9. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  10. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  11. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  12. Diffuse ionizing radiation within HH jets

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx

    2013-12-20

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of a time-dependent ejection velocity precessing jet. The parameters used in our models correspond to a high excitation Herbig-Haro object, such as HH 80/81. We have included the transfer of ionizing radiation produced within the shocked regions of the jet. The radiative transfer is computed with a ray-tracing scheme from all the cells with an emissivity above a certain threshold. We show the development of a radiative precursor, and compare the morphology with a model without the diffuse radiation. Our simulations show that the morphology of the Hα emission is affected considerably if the diffuse ionizing radiation is accounted for. The predicted Hα position-velocity diagram (i.e., spatially resolved emission line profiles) from a model with the transfer of ionizing radiation has a relatively strong component at zero velocity, corresponding to the radiative precursor. Qualitatively similar 'zero velocity components' are observed in HH 80/81 and in the jet from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  13. The Breathing Orbital Valence Bond Method in Diffusion Monte Carlo: C-H Bond Dissociation ofAcetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Domin, D.; Braida, Benoit; Lester Jr., William A.

    2008-05-30

    This study explores the use of breathing orbital valence bond (BOVB) trial wave functions for diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). The approach is applied to the computation of the carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond dissociation energy (BDE) of acetylene. DMC with BOVB trial wave functions yields a C-H BDE of 132.4 {+-} 0.9 kcal/mol, which is in excellent accord with the recommended experimental value of 132.8 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol. These values are to be compared with DMC results obtained with single determinant trial wave functions, using Hartree-Fock orbitals (137.5 {+-} 0.5 kcal/mol) and local spin density (LDA) Kohn-Sham orbitals (135.6 {+-} 0.5 kcal/mol).

  14. Jet-diffuser Ejector - Attached Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M.; Wu, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Attached primary nozzles were developed to replace the detached nozzles of jet-diffuser ejectors. Slotted primary nozzles located at the inlet lip and injecting fluid normal to the thrust axis, and rotating the fluid into the thrust direction using the Coanda Effect were investigated. Experiments indicated excessive skin friction or momentum cancellation due to impingement of opposing jets resulted in performance degradation. This indicated a desirability for location and orientation of the injection point at positions removed from the immediate vicinity of the inlet surface, and at an acute angle with respect to the thrust axis. Various nozzle designs were tested over a range of positions and orientations. The problems of aircraft integration of the ejector, and internal and external nozzle losses were also considered and a geometry for the attached nozzles was selected. The effect of leaks, protrusions, and asymmetries in the ejector surfaces was examined. The results indicated a relative insensitivity to all surface irregularities, except for large protrusions at the throat of the ejector.

  15. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Laminar-Jet Diffusion Flames in Coflowing Air. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round luminous hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame shapes were measured from photographs of flames burning at low pressures in order to minimize the effects of buoyancy. Test conditions involved acetylene-, propylene. and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 19-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 18-121, and initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0.22-32.45 to yield luminous flame lengths of 21-198 mm. The present flames were close to the laminar smoke point but were not soot emitting. Simple expressions to estimate the shapes of nonbuoyant laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflow were found by extending an earlier analysis of Mahalingam et al. These formulas provided a good correlation of present measurements except near the burner exit where self-similar approximations used in the simplified analysis are no longer appropriate.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy and Mie scattering of acetylene aerosols formed in a low temperature diffusion cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming and spectroscopically characterizing cryogenic aerosols formed in a low temperature gas cell. By adjusting the cell pressure, gas composition and flow rate, the size distribution of aerosol particles can be varied over a wide range. The combination of pressure and flow rate determine the residence time of the aerosols in the cell and hence the time available for the particles to grow. FTIR spectroscopy, over the range from 600/cm to 6000/cm, is used to characterize the aerosols. The particle size distribution can be varied so that, at one extreme, the spectra show only absorption features associated with the infrared active vibrational bands and, at the other, they display both absorption and Mie scattering. In the latter case, Mie scattering theory is used to obtain semiquantitative aerosol size distributions, which can be understood in terms of the interplay between nucleation and condensation. In the case of acetylene aerosols, the infrared spectra suggest that the particles exist in the high temperature cubic phase of the solid.

  17. Jet Diffusion in Proximity of a Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuechemann, D.

    1949-01-01

    When auxiliary jet engines are installed on airframes; as well as in some new designs, the jet engines are mounted in such a way that the jet stream exhausts in close proximity to the fuselage. This report deals with the behavior of the jet in close proximity to a two-dimensional surface. The experiments were made to find out whether the axially symmetric stream tends to approach the flat surface. This report is the last of a series of four partial test reports of the Goettingen program for the installation of jet engines, dated October 12, 1943. This report is the complement of the report on intake in close proximity to a wall.

  18. Counter gradient diffusion in a plane wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Dhamotharan, V.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent wall-jets are important in a variety of applications such as the Coanda effect for boundary layer separation control, film-cooling applications in a jet engine etc., One of the important features of a wall jet is the existence of a region of counter gradient diffusion of momentum. The counter-gradient region is a sort of pathological situation for RANS based turbulence models as they would not be able to predict this region. In this study we show from our experiments in a wall jet the counter-gradient region of diffusion can be understood from simple structural models for a wall jet eddy. Towards this flow visualization and hotwire measurements have been performed. It is seen from the smoke flow visualizations that the outward portion of the flow is backward leaning i.e. in the upstream direction. This is consistent with the orientation of eddy structure obtained from two-point correlation measurements. A building block eddy of a wall jet is proposed that has aspects of a boundary layer eddy in the inner wall region and a jet eddy in the outer region. It is argued by a simple vortex dynamics model that the counter-gradient region occurs due to the influence of the jet eddies in the near-wall region.

  19. Characteristics of transitional and turbulent jet diffusion flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, Yousef M.; Small, James F., Jr.; Hegde, Uday G.; Zhou, Liming; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the ground-based results obtained to date in preparation of a proposed space experiment to study the role of large-scale structures in microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames by investigating the dynamics of vortex/flame interactions and their influence on flame characteristics. The overall objective is to gain an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. Understanding of the role of large-scale structures on the characteristics of microgravity transitional and turbulent flames will ultimately lead to improved understanding of normal-gravity turbulent combustion.

  20. Particle-Image Velocimetry in Microgravity Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Greenberg, P. S.; Urban, D. L.; Wernet, M. P.; Yanis, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses planned velocity measurements in microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames. These measurements will be conducted using Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower. The observations are of fundamental interest and may ultimately lead to improved efficiency and decreased emissions from practical combustors. The velocity measurements will support the evaluation of analytical and numerical combustion models. There is strong motivation for the proposed microgravity flame configuration. Laminar jet flames are fundamental to combustion and their study has contributed to myriad advances in combustion science, including the development of theoretical, computational and diagnostic combustion tools. Nonbuoyant laminar jet flames are pertinent to the turbulent flames of more practical interest via the laminar flamelet concept. The influence of gravity on these flames is deleterious: it complicates theoretical and numerical modeling, introduces hydrodynamic instabilities, decreases length scales and spatial resolution, and limits the variability of residence time. Whereas many normal-gravity laminar jet diffusion flames have been thoroughly examined (including measurements of velocities, temperatures, compositions, sooting behavior and emissive and absorptive properties), measurements in microgravity gas-jet flames have been less complete and, notably, have included only cursory velocity measurements. It is envisioned that our velocity measurements will fill an important gap in the understanding of nonbuoyant laminar jet flames.

  1. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM MAGNETICALLY DIFFUSIVE ACCRETION DISKS. I. EJECTION EFFICIENCY VERSUS FIELD STRENGTH AND DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian; Porth, Oliver; Vaidya, Bhargav; Ghanbari, Jamshid E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the launching of jets and outflows from magnetically diffusive accretion disks. Using the PLUTO code, we solve the time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations taking into account the disk and jet evolution simultaneously. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? In particular, we study how the magnitude and distribution of the (turbulent) magnetic diffusivity affect mass loading and jet acceleration. We apply a turbulent magnetic diffusivity based on {alpha}-prescription, but also investigate examples where the scale height of diffusivity is larger than that of the disk gas pressure. We further investigate how the ejection efficiency is governed by the magnetic field strength. Our simulations last for up to 5000 dynamical timescales corresponding to 900 orbital periods of the inner disk. As a general result, we observe a continuous and robust outflow launched from the inner part of the disk, expanding into a collimated jet of superfast-magnetosonic speed. For long timescales, the disk's internal dynamics change, as due to outflow ejection and disk accretion the disk mass decreases. For magnetocentrifugally driven jets, we find that for (1) less diffusive disks, (2) a stronger magnetic field, (3) a low poloidal diffusivity, or (4) a lower numerical diffusivity (resolution), the mass loading of the outflow is increased-resulting in more powerful jets with high-mass flux. For weak magnetization, the (weak) outflow is driven by the magnetic pressure gradient. We consider in detail the advection and diffusion of magnetic flux within the disk and we find that the disk and outflow magnetization may substantially change in time. This may have severe impact on the launching and formation process-an initially highly magnetized disk may evolve into a disk of weak magnetization which cannot drive strong outflows. We further investigate the jet asymptotic velocity and the jet rotational velocity in

  2. Structure of Microgravity Transitional and Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Hegde, Uday; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained in a study of pulsed gas jet diffusion flames to better characterize the recently observed vortex/flame interactions in microgravity transitional and turbulent diffusion flames, and to improve the understanding of large-scale structures in corresponding normal-gravity flames. In preparation for a space experiment, tests were conducted in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Both unpulsed and pulsed laminar flames were studied and numerical modeling of these flames was carried out for data comparison and model validation. In addition, complementary tests for a series of unpulsed flames were conducted on-board the NASA KC-135 research aircraft. The microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been observed to be dominated by large-scale disturbances, or structures. These structures first appear intermittently in the flame at Reynolds numbers (based on the cold jet injection properties) of about 2100. With increase in injection Reynolds number, the rate of intermittent disturbances increases until the generation becomes continuous at Reynolds numbers of 3000 and higher. The behavior of these structures depends upon the velocity and temperature characteristics of the jet/flame shear layer. These characteristics are different in normal gravity and microgravity.

  3. Flame and Soot Boundaries of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) or steady weakly buoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K. ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9, and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at microgravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary-layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 of the lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions because of the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  4. Effects of Buoyancy in Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Al-Ammar, K.; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    This project was carried out to understand the effects of heat release and buoyancy on the flame structure of diffusion flames. Experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure in both normal gravity and microgravity conditions in the NASA LeRC 2.2 s drop tower. Experiments were also conducted in a variable pressure combustion facility in normal gravity to scale buoyancy and thus, to supplement the drop tower experiments. Pure H2 or H2 mixed with He was used as the jet fluid to avoid the complexities associated with soot formation. Fuel jet burning in quiescent air was visualized and quantified by the Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry (RSD) to obtain scalar profiles (temperature, oxygen concentration) within the flame. Burner tube diameter (d) was varied from 0.3 to 1.19 mm producing jet exit Reynolds numbers ranging from 40 to 1900, and generating flames encompassing laminar and transitional (laminar to turbulent) flow structure. Some experiments were also complemented with the CFD analysis. In a previous paper, we have presented details of the RSD technique, comparison of computed and measured scalar distributions, and effects of buoyancy on laminar and transitional H2 gas-jet diffusion flames. Results obtained from the RSD technique, variable pressure combustion chamber, and theoretical models have been published. Subsequently, we have developed a new drop rig with improved optical and image acquisition. In this set up, the schlieren images are acquired in real time and stored digitally in RAM of an onboard computer. This paper deals with laminar diffusion flames of pure H2 in normal and microgravity.

  5. Hydrodynamic Suppression of Soot Formation in Laminar Coflowing Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of flow (hydrodynamic) properties on limiting conditions for soot-free laminar non-premixed hydrocarbon/air flames (called laminar soot-point conditions) were studied, emphasizing non-buoyant laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames. Effects of air/fuel-stream velocity ratios were of particular interest; therefore, the experiments were carried out at reduced pressures to minimize effects of flow acceleration due to the intrusion of buoyancy. Test conditions included reactant temperatures of 300 K; ambient pressures of 3.7-49 8 kPa; methane-, acetylene-, ethylene-, propane-, and methane-fueled flames burning in coflowing air with fuel-port diameters of 1.7, 3.2, and 6.4 mm, fuel jet Reynolds numbers of 18-121; air coflow velocities of 0-6 m/s; and air/fuel-stream velocity ratios of 0.003-70. Measurements included laminar soot-point flame lengths, laminar soot-point fuel flow rates, and laminar liftoff conditions. The measurements show that laminar soot-point flame lengths and fuel flow rates can be increased, broadening the range of fuel flow rates where the flames remain soot free, by increasing air/fuel-stream velocity ratios. The mechanism of this effect involves the magnitude and direction of flow velocities relative to the flame sheet where increased air/fuel-stream velocity ratios cause progressive reduction of flame residence times in the fuel-rich soot-formation region. The range of soot-free conditions is limited by both liftoff, particularly at low pressures, and the intrusion of effects of buoyancy on effective air/fuel-stream velocity ratios, particularly at high pressures. Effective correlations of laminar soot- and smoke-point flame lengths were also found in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate parameter, based on simplified analysis of laminar jet diffusion flame structure. The results show that laminar smoke-point flame lengths in coflowing air environments are roughly twice as long as soot-free (blue) flames under comparable conditions due to

  6. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  7. Effects of buoyancy on gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in laminar gas jet diffusion flames in the absence of buoyancy by studying the transient phenomena of ignition and flame development, (quasi-) steady-state flame characteristics, soot effects, radiation, and, if any, extinction phenomena. This involved measurements of flame size and development, as well as temperature and radiation. Additionally, flame behavior, color, and luminosity were observed and recorded. The tests quantified the effects of Reynolds number, nozzle size, fuel reactivity and type, oxygen concentration, and pressure on flame characteristics. Analytical and numerical modeling efforts were also performed. Methane and propane flames were studied in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower and the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA LeRC. In addition, a preliminary series of tests were conducted in the KC-135 research aircraft. Both micro-gravity and normal-gravity flames were studied in this program. The results have provided unique and new information on the behavior and characteristics of gas jet diffusion flames in micro-gravity environments.

  8. Fuel Preheat Effects on Soot-Field Structure in Laminar Gas Jet Diffusion Flames Burning in 0-g and 1-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konsur, Bogdan; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation conducted at the 2.2-s drop tower of the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented to quantify the influence of moderate fuel preheat on soot-field structure within 0-g laminar gas jet diffusion flames. Parallel work in 1-g is also presented to delineate the effect of elevated fuel temperatures on soot-field structure in buoyant flames. The experimental methodology implements jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted acetylene fuel burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure. Fuel preheat of approximately 100 K in the 0-g laminar jet diffusion flames is found to reduce soot loadings in the annular region, but causes an increase in soot volume fractions at the centerline. In addition, fuel preheat reduces the radial extent of the soot field in 0-g. In 1-g, the same fuel preheat levels have a more moderated influence on soot loadings in the annular region, but are also seen to enhance soot concentrations near the axis low in the flame. The increased soot loadings near the flame centerline, as caused by fuel preheat, are consistent with the hypothesis that preheat levels of approximately 100 K enhance fuel pyrolysis rates. The results show that the growth stage of particles transported along the soot annulus is shortened both in 1-g and 0-g when elevated fuel temperatures are used.

  9. Radiation from Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the first demonstration of quantitative flame-radiation measurement in microgravity environments, with the objective of studying the influences and characteristics of radiative transfer on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames with possible application to spacecraft fire detection. Laminar diffusion flames of propane, burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure, are studied in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA Lewis Research Center. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view angle, thermopile-detector radiometer, and comparisons are made with normal-gravity flames. The results show that the radiation level is significantly higher in microgravity compared to normal-gravity environments due to larger flame size, enhanced soot formation, and entrapment of combustion products in the vicinity of the flame. These effects are the consequences of the removal of buoyancy which makes diffusion the dominant mechanism of transport. The results show that longer test times may be needed to reach steady state in microgravity environments.

  10. Vortex/Flame Interactions in Microgravity Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Hegde, U.; Stocker, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of vortex/flame interaction is of fundamental importance to turbulent combustion. These interactions have been studied in normal gravity. It was found that due to the interactions between the imposed disturbances and buoyancy induced instabilities, several overall length scales dominated the flame. The problem of multiple scales does not exist in microgravity for a pulsed laminar flame, since there are no buoyancy induced instabilities. The absence of buoyant convection therefore provides an environment to study the role of vortices interacting with flames in a controlled manner. There are strong similarities between imposed and naturally occurring perturbations, since both can be described by the same spatial instability theory. Hence, imposing a harmonic disturbance on a microgravity laminar flame creates effects similar to those occurring naturally in transitional/turbulent diffusion flames observed in microgravity. In this study, controlled, large-scale, axisymmetric vortices are imposed on a microgravity laminar diffusion flame. The experimental results and predictions from a numerical model of transient jet diffusion flames are presented and the characteristics of pulsed flame are described.

  11. Vortex/Flame Interactions in Microgravity Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Hegde, U.; Stocker, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    Significant differences have been observed between the structure of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames under downward, upward, and microgravity conditions. These include flame height, jet shear layer, flame instability, flicker, lift-off height, blow-off Reynolds number, and radiative properties. The primary objective of this investigation is to identify the mechanisms involved in the generation and interaction of large-scale structures in microgravity flames. This involves a study of vortex/flame interactions in a space-flight experiment utilizing a controlled, well-defined set of disturbances imposed on a laminar diffusion flame. The results provide a better understanding of the naturally occurring structures that are an inherent part of microgravity turbulent flames. The paper presents the current progress in this program.

  12. Jet Diffusion Flame Stabilization via Pulsed Plasma Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungal, Godfrey

    2008-10-01

    In this work we investigate the use of high repetition rate pulsed plasma sources as a means to enhance the stability of jet diffusion flames for application to practical combustion devices. Such plasma sources have recently become popular owing to their low power requirements and their proven abilities to ignite leaner mixtures and hold stable flames. They are known to create a radical pool which can enhance combustion chemistry and thus provide increased flame stability. By first investigating a fully premixed methane/air environment we show that the resulting radical species quickly decay but leave behind a set of stable chemical species. Thus, the plasma source appears to act as a fuel reformer leading to the formation of a ``cool flame'' -- a trailing zone of weak oxidation consisting of a slightly elevated temperature stream of products containing small amounts of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These two key species are then directly responsible for the enhanced flame behaviors. Flame stability enhancements are shown for methane jets in co-flow and cross-flow in room temperature air, and in elevated temperature vitiated air environments. Elevated ambient temperatures deplete the hydrogen and carbon monoxide due to enhanced oxidation, so while there is an enhancement to flame stability, the beneficial effects diminish with increasing temperatures in a non-linear fashion, and ultimately, provide very limited benefits at ˜1000K ambient temperature for the present studies. The conclusions here are supported by simple plasma and chemical kinetic modeling and spectroscopic and chemiluminescence measurements.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of a Sooting Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanquart, Guillaume; Pitsch, Heinz

    2007-11-01

    The understanding of soot particle dynamics in combustion systems is a key issue in the development of low emission engines. Of particular importance are the processes shaping the soot particle size distribution function (PSDF). However, it is not always necessary to represent exactly the full distribution, and often information about its moments only is sufficient. The Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) allows for an efficient and accurate prediction of the moments of the soot PSDF. This method has been validated for laminar premixed and diffusion flames with detailed chemistry and is now implemented in a semi-implicit low Mach-number Navier-Stokes solver. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a piloted sooting jet diffusion flame (Delft flame) is performed to study the dynamics of soot particles in a turbulent environment. The profiles of temperature and major species are compared with the experimental measurements. Soot volume fraction profiles are compared with the recent data of Qamar et al. (2007). Aggregate properties such as the diameter and the fractal shape are studied in the scope of DQMOM.

  14. Properties of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovcak, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Acetylene continues to be the most widely used fuel in the oxyfuel cutting and welding industry. It displays properties that enhance its benefits to the industry, but at the same time, present potential hazards that have to be addressed. The presentation explores the main properties or characteristics of acetylene -- odor, toxicity, flammability, composition, and manufacture. it expands on those properties that are unique to acetylene and which account for its main value to the user or which constitute the chief concern for safe use of acetylene. The presentation explains characteristics such as anosmia, flammable or explosive range, ignition energy, autoignition temperature, and flame temperature, comparing these values for acetylene to other common gaseous fuels. it explains the unique property of acetylene to decompose explosively in the absence of air or oxygen. The toxicological aspects of acetylene is discussed, including anesthetic effect and simple asphyxiant, showing the increasing severity of symptoms to increasing levels of oxygen deficiency. The main value of this basic review of the properties of acetylene is to remind people of the benefits of acetylene due to its unique properties, and to realert them to the potential hazards that also have to be addressed to control the properties of acetylene.

  15. Soot and Radiation Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of soot formation and radiation heat transfer in microgravity jet diffusion flames is important not only for the understanding of fundamental transport processes involved but also for providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety and soot emissions and radiant heat loads of combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Our objectives are to measure and model soot volume fraction, temperature, and radiative heat fluxes in microgravity jet diffusion flames. For this four-year project, we have successfully completed three tasks, which have resulted in new research methodologies and original results. First is the implementation of a thermophoretic soot sampling technique for measuring particle size and aggregate morphology in drop-tower and other reduced gravity experiments. In those laminar flames studied, we found that microgravity soot aggregates typically consist of more primary particles and primary particles are larger in size than those under normal gravity. Comparisons based on data obtained from limited samples show that the soot aggregate's fractal dimension varies within +/- 20% of its typical value of 1.75, with no clear trends between normal and reduced gravity conditions. Second is the development and implementation of a new imaging absorption technique. By properly expanding and spatially-filtering the laser beam to image the flame absorption on a CCD camera and applying numerical smoothing procedures, this technique is capable of measuring instantaneous full-field soot volume fractions. Results from this technique have shown the significant differences in local soot volume fraction, smoking point, and flame shape between normal and reduced gravity flames. We observed that some laminar flames become open-tipped and smoking under microgravity. The third task we completed is the development of a computer program which integrates and couples flame structure, soot formation, and flame radiation analyses together. We found good

  16. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-16

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  17. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  18. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  19. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  20. Spectra and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1951-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through band-pass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectra of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined.

  1. Spectrums and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1950-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through bandpass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectrums of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined. (author)

  2. Experimental and Numerical Studies for Soot Formation in Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames of Jet A-1 and Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaripour, Meghdad

    In the present doctoral thesis, fundamental experimental and numerical studies are conducted for the laminar, atmospheric pressure, sooting, coflow diffusion flames of Jet A-1 and synthetic jet fuels. The first part of this thesis presents a comparative experimental study for Jet A-1, which is a widely used petroleum-based fuel, and four synthetically produced alternative jet fuels. The main goals of this part of the thesis are to compare the soot emission levels of the alternative fuels to those of a standard fuel, Jet A-1, and to determine the effect of fuel chemical composition on soot formation characteristics. To achieve these goals, experimental measurements are constructed and performed for flame temperature, soot concentration, soot particle size, and soot aggregate structure in the flames of pre-vaporized jet fuels. The results show that a considerable reduction in soot production, compared to the standard fuel, can be obtained by using synthetic fuels which will help in addressing future regulations. A strong correlation between the aromatic content of the fuels and the soot concentration levels in the flames is observed. The second part of this thesis presents the development and experimental validation of a fully-coupled soot formation model for laminar coflow jet fuel diffusion flames. The model is coupled to a detailed kinetic mechanism to predict the chemical structure of the flames and soot precursor concentrations. This model also provides information on size and morphology of soot particles. The flames of a three-component surrogate for Jet A-1, a three-component surrogate for a synthetic jet fuel, and pure n-decane are simulated using this model. Concentrations of major gaseous species and flame temperatures are well predicted by the model. Soot volume fractions are predicted reasonably well everywhere in the flame, except near the flame centerline where soot concentrations are underpredicted by a factor of up to five. There is an excellent

  3. Oxygen and Fuel Jet Diffusion Flame Studies in Microgravity Motivated by Spacecraft Oxygen Storage Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Krishnan, S. S.; Abshire, J. M.; Gore, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the absence of past work involving flames similar to the Mir fire namely oxygen-enhanced, inverse gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity the objectives of this work are as follows: 1. Observe the effects of enhanced oxygen conditions on laminar jet diffusion flames with ethane fuel. 2. Consider both earth gravity and microgravity. 3. Examine both normal and inverse flames. 4. Compare the measured flame lengths and widths with calibrated predictions of several flame shape models. This study expands on the work of Hwang and Gore which emphasized radiative emissions from oxygen-enhanced inverse flames in earth gravity, and Sunderland et al. which emphasized the shapes of normal and inverse oxygen-enhanced gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity.

  4. Generation of Diffuse Large Volume Plasma by an Ionization Wave from a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Razavi, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature plasma jets emitted in ambient air are the product of fast ionization waves that are guided within a channel of a gas flow, such as helium. This guided ionization wave can be transmitted through a dielectric material and under some conditions can ignite a discharge behind the dielectric material. Here we present a novel way to produce large volume diffuse low pressure plasma inside a Pyrex chamber that does not have any electrodes or electrical energy directly applied to it. The diffuse plasma is ignited inside the chamber by a plasma jet located externally to the chamber and that is physically and electrically unconnected to the chamber. Instead, the plasma jet is just brought in close proximity to the external wall/surface of the chamber or to a dielectric tubing connected to the chamber. The plasma thus generated is diffuse, large volume and with physical and chemical characteristics that are different than the external plasma jet that ignited it. So by using a plasma jet we are able to ``remotely'' ignite volumetric plasma under controlled conditions. This novel method of ``remote'' generation of a low pressure, low temperature diffuse plasma can be useful for various applications including material processing and biomedicine.

  5. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - I. Steady-state spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We study the acceleration, transport, and emission of particles in relativistic jets. Localized stochastic particle acceleration, spatial diffusion, and synchrotron as well as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission are considered in a leptonic model. To account for inhomogeneity, we use a 2D axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for both relativistic electrons and magnetic field. In this first phase of our work, we focus on steady-state spectra that develop from a time-dependent model. We demonstrate that small isolated acceleration region in a much larger emission volume are sufficient to accelerate particles to high energy. Diffusive escape from these small regions provides a natural explanation for the spectral form of the jet emission. The location of the acceleration regions within the jet is found to affect the cooling break of the spectrum in this diffusive model. Diffusion-caused energy-dependent inhomogeneity in the jets predicts that the SSC spectrum is harder than the synchrotron spectrum. There can also be a spectral hardening towards the high-energy section of the synchrotron spectrum, if particle escape is relatively slow. These two spectral hardening effects indicate that the jet inhomogeneity might be a natural explanation for the unexpected hard γ-ray spectra observed in some blazars.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Laminar Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Thomas H.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the burning of laminar gas jet diffusion flames in a zero-gravity environment. The tests were conducted in a 2.2-Second-Zero-Gravity Facility and were a part of a continuing effort investigating the effects of gravity on basic combustion processes. The photographic results indicate that steady state gas jet diffusion flames existed in zero gravity but they were geometrically quite different than their normal-gravity counterparts. Methane-air flames were found to be approximately 50 percent longer and wider in zero gravity than in normal gravity.

  7. Suppression of Soot Formation and Shapes of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than practical turbulent flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Finally, laminar diffusion flame shapes have been of interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they involve a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame shape predictions. Motivated by these observations, the shapes of round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames were considered, emphasizing conditions where effects of buoyancy are small because most practical flames are not buoyant. Earlier studies of shapes of hydrocarbon-fueled nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames considered combustion in still air and have shown that flames at the laminar smoke point are roughly twice as long as corresponding soot-free (blue) flames and have developed simple ways to estimate their shapes. Corresponding studies of hydrocarbon-fueled weakly-buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air have also been reported. These studies were limited to soot-containing flames at laminar smoke point conditions and also developed simple ways to estimate their shapes but the behavior of corresponding soot-free flames has not been addressed. This is unfortunate because ways of selecting flame flow properties to reduce soot concentrations are of great interest; in addition, soot-free flames are fundamentally important because they are much more computationally tractable than corresponding soot-containing flames. Thus, the objectives of the present investigation were to observe the shapes of weakly-buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at both soot-free and smoke point conditions and to use the results to evaluate simplified flame shape models. The present discussion is brief.

  8. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  9. Acylamidation of acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Gridnev, I.D.; Balenkova, E.S.

    1989-01-10

    The reactions of phenylacetylene, 1-heptyne, and diphenylacetylene with the complexes of acetylfluoroborate with acetonitrile and with chloroacetonitrile take place regiospecifically and stereospecifically as syn-addition of the acetyl group and nitrile at the triple bond of the acetylene and lead to previously unknown Z-N-acyl-/beta/-amino, /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated ketones.

  10. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  11. Turbine exhaust diffuser with a gas jet producing a coanda effect flow control

    DOEpatents

    Orosa, John; Montgomery, Matthew

    2014-02-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine includes an inner boundary and an outer boundary with a flow path defined therebetween. The inner boundary is defined at least in part by a hub structure that has an upstream end and a downstream end. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inward toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. The hub structure includes at least one jet exit located on the hub structure adjacent to the upstream end of the tail cone. The jet exit discharges a flow of gas substantially tangential to an outer surface of the tail cone to produce a Coanda effect and direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the inner boundary.

  12. Reduction of Altitude Diffuser Jet Noise Using Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.; Langford, Lester A.

    2011-01-01

    A feasibility study on the effects of injecting water into the exhaust plume of an altitude rocket diffuser for the purpose of reducing the far-field acoustic noise has been performed. Water injection design parameters such as axial placement, angle of injection, diameter of injectors, and mass flow rate of water have been systematically varied during the operation of a subscale altitude test facility. The changes in acoustic far-field noise were measured with an array of free-field microphones in order to quantify the effects of the water injection on overall sound pressure level spectra and directivity. The results showed significant reductions in noise levels were possible with optimum conditions corresponding to water injection at or just upstream of the exit plane of the diffuser. Increasing the angle and mass flow rate of water injection also showed improvements in noise reduction. However, a limit on the maximum water flow rate existed as too large of flow rate could result in un-starting the supersonic diffuser.

  13. Reduction of Altitude Diffuser Jet Noise Using Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.; Langford, Lester A.

    2014-01-01

    A feasibility study on the effects of injecting water into the exhaust plume of an altitude rocket diffuser for the purpose of reducing the far-field acoustic noise has been performed. Water injection design parameters such as axial placement, angle of injection, diameter of injectors, and mass flow rate of water have been systematically varied during the operation of a subscale altitude test facility. The changes in acoustic far-field noise were measured with an array of free-field microphones in order to quantify the effects of the water injection on overall sound pressure level spectra and directivity. The results showed significant reductions in noise levels were possible with optimum conditions corresponding to water injection at or just upstream of the exit plane of the diffuser. Increasing the angle and mass flow rate of water injection also showed improvements in noise reduction. However, a limit on the maximum water flow rate existed as too large of flow rate could result in un-starting the supersonic diffuser.

  14. Visualization of vortex generator jets for conical diffuser separation control using PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yonghui; Fan, Tao; Zhang, Di

    2008-11-01

    Vortex generator jets (VGJs) have been recognized as an effective active control method for the flow separation. To investigate its mechanism in conical diffuser, PIV was used to study the interaction of VGJs with freestream in this study. A conical diffuser model, with divergence angle of 14° was used. The jet holes were drilled with pitch angle of 30° and skew angle of 90°. At several streamwise locations, two-dimensional traverses were set up to obtain the velocity distribution and vorticity in the interaction region of vortex. PIV measurements provide a global depiction of the interaction of boundary layer transition and separation in this unsteady environment. It is shown that vortical flows generated by VGJs significantly fluctuate velocity profiles. The steady jets create vortices that swept the low momentum fluid up from the boundary layer while transporting high momentum freestream fluid towards the wall, which provides the ingredients for flow control. It is also revealed that the longitudinal vortices are generated in the boundary layer by shear stress and friction from jets, which increase cross-stream mixing of streamwise momentum and then suppress separation in conical diffuser. Some new phenomena and rules presented would offer valuable information for further study.

  15. Reaction Kernel Structure of a Slot Jet Diffusion Flame in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, F.; Katta, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion flame stabilization in normal earth gravity (1 g) has long been a fundamental research subject in combustion. Local flame-flow phenomena, including heat and species transport and chemical reactions, around the flame base in the vicinity of condensed surfaces control flame stabilization and fire spreading processes. Therefore, gravity plays an important role in the subject topic because buoyancy induces flow in the flame zone, thus increasing the convective (and diffusive) oxygen transport into the flame zone and, in turn, reaction rates. Recent computations show that a peak reactivity (heat-release or oxygen-consumption rate) spot, or reaction kernel, is formed in the flame base by back-diffusion and reactions of radical species in the incoming oxygen-abundant flow at relatively low temperatures (about 1550 K). Quasi-linear correlations were found between the peak heat-release or oxygen-consumption rate and the velocity at the reaction kernel for cases including both jet and flat-plate diffusion flames in airflow. The reaction kernel provides a stationary ignition source to incoming reactants, sustains combustion, and thus stabilizes the trailing diffusion flame. In a quiescent microgravity environment, no buoyancy-induced flow exits and thus purely diffusive transport controls the reaction rates. Flame stabilization mechanisms in such purely diffusion-controlled regime remain largely unstudied. Therefore, it will be a rigorous test for the reaction kernel correlation if it can be extended toward zero velocity conditions in the purely diffusion-controlled regime. The objectives of this study are to reveal the structure of the flame-stabilizing region of a two-dimensional (2D) laminar jet diffusion flame in microgravity and develop a unified diffusion flame stabilization mechanism. This paper reports the recent progress in the computation and experiment performed in microgravity.

  16. Ignition and Unburned Hydrogen Escaping from Hydrogen Diffusion Jet Flame Diluted with Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee

    2007-07-01

    Ignition and unburned hydrogen escaping from hydrogen jet diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen up to 70% were experimentally studied. The successful ignition locations were about 2/3 of the flame length above the jet exit for undiluted flames and moved much closer to the exit for diluted flames. For higher levels of dilution or higher flow rates, there existed a region within which a diluted hydrogen diffusion flame can be ignited and burns with a stable liftoff height. This is contrary to previous findings that pure and diluted hydrogen jet diffusion cannot achieve a stable lifted flame configuration. With liftoff, the flame is noisy and short with significant amount of unburned hydrogen escaping into the product gases. If ignition is initiated below this region, the flame propagates upstream quickly and attaches to the burner rim. Results from measurements of unburned hydrogen in the combustion products showed that the amount of unburned hydrogen increased as the nitrogen dilution level was increased. Thus, hydrogen diffusion flame diluted with nitrogen cannot burn completely.

  17. Analysis of opposed-jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.; Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    An opposed-jet counterflow diffusion-flame configuration is considered for the analysis of a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame. A boundary-layer similarity solution is employed in order to reduce the governing equations to a set of equations in one independent variable. The equation set is written in the time-dependent form and solved by the finite-volume time-marching technique. This model uses detailed chemistry and accounts for the variations of Prandtl number and Lewis number as well as the effect of thermal diffusion on the flame. It is noted that a one-step model can predict several features of the flame, while the detailed-chemistry model can be used for fine-tuning the results. The present results indicate that thermal diffusion has negligible effect on the characteristics of the flame.

  18. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  19. Breaking of Subtropical Jet diffuses Potential Vorticity from one to the other Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thokuluwa, Ramkumar

    Severe and abnormally large variations of horizontal wind are observed in the Indian tropical troposphere for a few days centered around 7 January 2007. The Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere (MST) radar operating at 53 MHz at the Indian tropical station of Gadanki is utilized to measure the wind velocities from 1 to 10 January and the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-interim) 200 hPa level data are utilized to study the global scale characteristics of subtropical jet, propagation and dissipation of Rossby waves manifested in the meridional wind velocity, intrusion of potential vorticity from the mid latitudes to the equatorial region through disrupting the subtropical westerly jet etc. Here we report that the dissipating Rossby waves, emanated from the north Atlantic region and directed towards the Indian region, disrupted the subtropical jet and thus caused the intrusion of potential vorticity from the mid latitudes to the Indian equatorial region. This caused large variations of horizontal winds in the whole troposphere and even disrupted the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) located in the southern tropical region for a few days. It is also observed that the subtropical westerly jet was intact as the severe disruption, occurred due to the diffusion of potential vorticity from mid to tropical latitudes, moves along with the jet from the North African to the east of the Indian region This would clearly rule out the concept that when the jets influenced by strong Rossby waves, then the large latitudinal meandering of the jet would have caused the large variations in the tropical tropospheric winds as observed by the MST radar over Gadanki. As the Rossby waves are synoptic in nature and can be more easily identified in the meridional winds, the meridional wind velocity obtained from the ECMWF-interim data indicated alternating northward southward directed winds in longitudes, representing Rossby waves, confined in the mid latitudes

  20. Microgravity Superagglomerates Produced By Silane And Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor); Bundy, Matthew; Mulholland, George W.; Manzello, Samuel; Yang, Jiann; Scott, John Henry; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2003-01-01

    The size of the agglomerates produced in the upper portion of a flame is important for a variety of applications. Soot particle size and density effect the amount of radiative heat transfer from a fire to its surroundings. Particle size determines the lifetime of smoke in a building or in the atmosphere, and exposure hazard for smoke inhaled and deposited in the lungs. The visibility through a smoke layer and dectectability of the smoke are also greatly affected by agglomerate size. Currently there is limited understanding of soot growth with an overall dimension of 10 m and larger. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed raining out from large fires. Unlike hydrocarbon fuels, silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke. There are two very desirable properties of silica aero-gels that are important for both space and earth based applications. The first important property is its inertness to most oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. Therefore, silica aero-gels make excellent fire ablatives and can be used in very demanding applications. The second important property is that silica aero-gels are expected to have very high porosity (greater than 0.999), making them lightweight and ideal for aerospace applications. The added benefit of the high porosity is that they can be used as extremely efficient filters for many earth based applications as well. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame was found by Sorensen et al. [1]. An interconnecting web of super-agglomerates was observed to span the width of the soot plume in the region just above the flame tip and described as a gel state. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates as larges as 100 m due to buoyancy induced turbulence. Large soot agglomerates were

  1. Dust and gas jets: Evidence for a diffuse source in Halley's coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clairemidi, Jacques; Rousselot, Philippe; Vernotte, F.; Moreels, Guy

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of dust-scattered intensity in Halley's inner coma is measured with the Vega three-channel spectrometer at three selected wavelengths: 377, 482, and 607 nm. The variation along a cometo-centric radius may be described by a p(sup -s) law where p is the distance between nucleus and optical axis and s is an exponent which is equal to 1 except in an intermediate 3000 less than p less than 7000 km region where s = 1.5. The shape of the radial distribution may be explained with a model including solar radiation pressure effect and quantum scattering efficiencies calculated from Mie theory. Monochromatic images inside an angular sector having its apex at the nucleus show evidence of two dust jets which extend to 40,000 Km. The pixel-to-pixel ratio of two images of dust intensity at 377 and 482 nm shows that the scattered intensity presents an excess of blue coloration in a zone located around the jets between 10,000 and 25,000 km. This coloration is interpreted as being due to a population of sub-micronic grains which result of the fragmentation of dust particles transported in the jets. It is suggested that the diffuse source where an additional quantity of CO was detected might be connected with the presence of a dust jet. In the present scheme, grain particles with a size of several micron or 10 micron would be transported inside a dust jet to distances of several 10,000 km where they would suffer fragmentation and produce sub-micronic particles and a release of gas which would be at the origin of the diffuse source.

  2. Numerical Simulation of an Enclosed Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame in Microgravity Environment: Comparison with ELF Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Kezhong; Venuturumilli, Rajasekhar; Ryan, Brandon J.; Chen, Lea-Der

    2001-01-01

    Enclosed diffusion flames are commonly found in practical combustion systems, such as the power-plant combustor, gas turbine combustor, and jet engine after-burner. In these systems, fuel is injected into a duct with a co-flowing or cross-flowing air stream. The diffusion flame is found at the surface where the fuel jet and oxygen meet, react, and consume each other. In combustors, this flame is anchored at the burner (i.e., fuel jet inlet) unless adverse conditions cause the flame to lift off or blow out. Investigations of burner stability study the lift off, reattachment, and blow out of the flame. Flame stability is strongly dependent on the fuel jet velocity. When the fuel jet velocity is sufficiently low, the diffusion flame anchors at the burner rim. When the fuel jet velocity is increased, the flame base gradually moves downstream. However, when the fuel jet velocity increases beyond a critical value, the flame base abruptly jumps downstream. When this "jump" occurs, the flame is said to have reached its lift-off condition and the critical fuel jet velocity is called the lift-off velocity. While lifted, the flame is not attached to the burner and it appears to float in mid-air. Flow conditions are such that the flame cannot be maintained at the burner rim despite the presence of both fuel and oxygen. When the fuel jet velocity is further increased, the flame will eventually extinguish at its blowout condition. In contrast, if the fuel jet velocity of a lifted flame is reduced, the flame base moves upstream and abruptly returns to anchor at the burner rim. The fuel jet velocity at reattachment can be much lower than that at lift off, illustrating the hysteresis effect present in flame stability. Although there have been numerous studies of flame stability, the controlling mechanisms are not well understood. This uncertainty is described by Pitts in his review of various competing theories of lift off and blow out in turbulent jet diffusion flames. There has

  3. Effects of Buoyancy on Laminar, Transitional, and Turbulent Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Stocker, Dennis P.; Vaughan, David F.; Zhou, Liming; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    Gas jet diffusion flames have been a subject of research for many years. However, a better understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena occurring in these flames is still needed, and, while the effects of gravity on the burning process have been observed, the basic mechanisms responsible for these changes have yet to be determined. The fundamental mechanisms that control the combustion process are in general coupled and quite complicated. These include mixing, radiation, kinetics, soot formation and disposition, inertia, diffusion, and viscous effects. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling a fire, laboratory-scale laminar and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been extensively studied, which have provided important information in relation to the physico-chemical processes occurring in flames. However, turbulent flames are not fully understood and their understanding requires more fundamental studies of laminar diffusion flames in which the interplay of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics is more tractable. But even this basic, relatively simple flame is not completely characterized in relation to soot formation, radiation, diffusion, and kinetics. Therefore, gaining an understanding of laminar flames is essential to the understanding of turbulent flames, and particularly fires, in which the same basic phenomena occur. In order to improve and verify the theoretical models essential to the interpretation of data, the complexity and degree of coupling of the controlling mechanisms must be reduced. If gravity is isolated, the complication of buoyancy-induced convection would be removed from the problem. In addition, buoyant convection in normal gravity masks the effects of other controlling parameters on the flame. Therefore, the combination of normal-gravity and microgravity data would provide the information, both theoretical and experimental, to improve our understanding of diffusion flames in general, and the effects of gravity on the

  4. Acetylene-Terminated Polyimide Siloxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Maudgal, Shubba

    1987-01-01

    Siloxane-containing addition polyimides yield toughened high-temperature adhesives and matrix resins. Addition polyimide made by reaction of aromatic tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride with aromatic diamine in presence of ethynyl-substituted aromatic monoamine. Acetylene-terminated siloxane imide cured by heating to yield acetylene-terminated polyimide siloxane.

  5. Experimental investigation of stabilization mechanisms in turbulent, lifted jet diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Su, L.K.; Sun, O.S.; Mungal, M.G.

    2006-02-01

    Simultaneous planar-laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) provide a comprehensive view of the molecular mixing and velocity fields in the stabilization region of turbulent, lifted jet diffusion flames. The Mie scattering medium for PIV is a glycerol-water fog, which evaporates at elevated temperatures and allows inference of the location of the high-temperature interface at the flame base. The jet Reynolds numbers vary from 4400 to 10,700. The mixing and velocity fields upstream of the flame base evolve consistently with nonreacting jet scaling. Conditional statistics of the fuel mole fraction at the instantaneous high-temperature interface show that the flame stabilization point does not generally correspond to the most upstream point on the interface (called here the leading point), because the mixture there is typically too lean to support combustion. Instead, the flame stabilization point lies toward the jet centerline relative to the leading point. Conditional axial velocity statistics indicate that the mean axial velocity at the flame front is {approx}1.8S{sub L}, where S{sub L} is the stoichiometric laminar flame speed. The data also permit determination of the scalar dissipation rates, {chi}, with the results indicating that {chi} values near the high-temperature interfaces do not typically exceed the quenching value. Thus, the flame stabilization process is more consistent with theories based on partial fuel-air premixing than with those dependent on diffusion flame quenching. We propose a description of flame stabilization that depends on the large-scale organization of the mixing field. (author)

  6. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.

    1999-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness. Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding (1979); this approach provided Successful Correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  7. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  8. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  9. Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

  10. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy. PMID:24658888

  11. Experimental investigation of turbulent wall-jets in the presence of adverse pressure gradients in a rectangular diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L.; Cuffel, R.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of wall static pressure distributions and mean velocity profiles along a duct and diffuser downstream of wall-jet injection was conducted over a range of diffuser total angles from 15 to 40 deg at injection to core flow mass flux ratios from 0 to 6. Pressure recovery in the diffuser increased with injection ratio and decreased with diffuser total angle. Peak velocities in the wall-jet decayed along the flow and the inner shear layer and outer mixing region grew in thickness along the flow. The inner layer was near similarity condition, but non-similar variations were found in the outer layer. Estimated wall shear stresses depended upon injection mass fluxes, downstream distance and diffuser total angle. Greater decay of peak velocity and larger friction coefficients were found in the diffuser than indicated by correlations from data for a wall-jet without a pressure gradient. At the largest diffuser total angle and the highest injection ratio flow reversal occurred in the core region.

  12. Temperature and Radiative Heat Flux Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide detailed measurements and modeling analyses of local soot concentration, temperature and radiation heat flux distributions in laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames under normal (1-g) and reduced gravity (0-g) conditions. Results published to date by these co-PI's and their co-workers include: 1. thermophoretic sampling and size and morphological analyses of soot aggregates in laminar flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions; 2. full-field absorption imaging for soot volume fraction maps in laminar and turbulent flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions; 3. an accurate solver module for detailed radiation heat transfer in nongray nonhomogeneous media; 4. a complete model to include flame structure, soot formation and an energy equation to couple with radiation solver.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation Of Gravitational Effects In Transitional And Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, Farhad A.; Givi, Peyman

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the spatial and the compositional structures of transitional and turbulent hydrocarbon diffusion flames are studies via large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of round and planar jets. The subgrid-scale (SGS) closures in LES are based on the filtered mass density function (FMDF) methodology. The FMDF represents the joint probability density function (PDF) of the SGS scalars, and is obtained by solving its transport equation. The fundamental advantage of LES/FMDF is that it accounts for the effects of chemical reaction and buoyancy exactly. The methodology is employed for capturing some of the fundamental influences of gravity in equilibrium flames via realistic chemical kinetic schemes. Some preliminary investigation of the gravity effects in non-equilibrium flames is also conducted, but with idealized chemical kinetics models.

  14. Effects of buoyancy on gas jet diffusion flames - Experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R. B.; Bahadori, M. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research on the effects of buoyancy on gas-jet diffusion flames is described. Part of this research involves an assessment of existing data obtained under reduced-gravity conditions. The results show that uncertainties in the current understanding of flame structure exist and further research is required before reliable predictions of ignition, stabilization, and propagation of flames under microgravity conditions can be made. Steady-state and transient theories have been developed and used in the analysis of existing drop-tower data and new data obtained from a stationary experiment involving inverted flames. The result of this research has led to the definition of a microgravity experiment to be performed in space.

  15. Measurements and Modeling of Soot Formation and Radiation in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames. Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, Li; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. A compact, self-contained drop rig is used for microgravity experiments in the 2.2-second drop tower facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. On modeling, we have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed Beta-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude- Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H20 and C02. It is shown that when compared to results from true spectral integration, the Rosseland mean absorption coefficient can provide reasonably accurate predictions for the type of flames studied. The soot formation model proposed by Moss, Syed, and Stewart seems to produce better fits to experimental data and more physically sound than the simpler model by Khan et al. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar

  16. Smoke-Point Properties of Non-Buoyant Round Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The laminar smoke-point properties of non-buoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied emphasizing results from long-duration (100-230 s) experiments at microgravity carried out in orbit aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, pressures of 35-130 kPa, jet exit diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, jet exit velocities of 170-690 mm/s, jet exit Reynolds numbers of 46-172, characteristic flame residence times of 40-302 ms, and luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. Contrary to the normal-gravity laminar smoke point, in microgravity, the onset of laminar smoke-point conditions involved two flame configurations: closed-tip flames with soot emissions along the flame axis and open-tip flames with soot emissions from an annular ring about the flame axis. Open-tip flames were observed at large characteristic flame residence times with the onset of soot emissions associated with radiative quenching near the flame tip: nevertheless, unified correlations of laminar smoke-point properties were obtained that included both flame configurations. Flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were well correlated in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate suggested by a simplified analysis of flame shape. The present steady and non-buoyant flames emitted soot more readily than non-buoyant flames in earlier tests using ground-based microgravity facilities and than buoyant flames at normal gravity, as a result of reduced effects of unsteadiness, flame disturbances, and buoyant motion. For example, present measurements of laminar smoke-point flame lengths at comparable conditions were up to 2.3 times shorter than ground-based microgravity measurements and up to 6.4 times shorter than buoyant flame measurements. Finally, present laminar smoke-point flame lengths were roughly inversely proportional to pressure to a degree that is a somewhat smaller than observed during

  17. Smoke-Point Properties of Nonbuoyant Round Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, R. B.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    The laminar smoke-point properties of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied emphasizing results from long duration (100-230 s) experiments at microgravity carried -out on- orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, initial jet exit diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, jet exit velocities of 170-1630 mm/s, jet exit Reynolds numbers of 46-172, characteristic flame residence times of 40-302 ms, and luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The onset of laminar smoke-point conditions involved two flame configurations: closed-tip flames with first soot emissions along the flame axis and open-tip flames with first soot emissions from an annular ring about the flame axis. Open-tip flames were observed at large characteristic flame residence times with the onset of soot emissions associated with radiative quenching near the flame tip; nevertheless, unified correlations of laminar smoke-point properties were obtained that included both flame configurations. Flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were well-correlated in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate suggested by a simplified analysis of flame shape. The present steady and nonbuoyant flames emitted soot more readily than earlier tests of nonbuoyant flames at microgravity using ground-based facilities and of buoyant flames at normal gravity due to reduced effects of unsteadiness, flame disturbances and buoyant motion. For example, laminar smoke-point flame lengths from ground-based microgravity measurements were up to 2.3 times longer and from buoyant flame measurements were up to 6.4 times longer than the present measurements at comparable conditions. Finally, present laminar smoke-point flame lengths were roughly inversely proportional to pressure, which is a somewhat slower variation than observed during earlier tests both at microgravity using ground-based facilities and at normal

  18. Smoke-Point Properties of Nonbuoyant Round Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, H. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The laminar smoke-point properties of non-buoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied emphasizing results from long-duration (100-230 s) experiments at microgravity carried out in orbit aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, pressures of 35-130 kPa, jet exit diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, jet exit velocities of 170-690 mm/s, jet exit Reynolds numbers of 46-172, characteristic flame residence times of 40-302 ms, and luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. Contrary to the normal-gravity laminar smoke point, in microgravity the onset of laminar smoke-point conditions involved two flame configurations: closed-tip flames with soot emissions along the flame axis and open-tip flames with soot emissions from an annular ring about the flame axis. Open-tip flames were observed at large characteristic flame residence times with the onset of soot emissions associated with radiative quenching near the flame tip: nevertheless, unified correlations of laminar smoke-point properties were obtained that included both flame configurations. Flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were well correlated in terms of a corrected fuel flow rate suggested by a simplified analysis of flame shape. The present steady and nonbuoyant flames emitted soot more readily than non-buoyant flames in earlier tests using ground-based microgravity facilities and than buoyant flames at normal gravity, as a result of reduced effects of unsteadiness, flame disturbances, and buoyant motion. For example, present measurements of laminar smokepoint flame lengths at comparable conditions were up to 2.3 times shorter than ground-based microgravity measurements and up to 6.4 times shorter than buoyant flame measurements. Finally, present laminar smoke-point flame lengths were roughly inversely proportional to pressure to a degree that is a somewhat smaller than observed during

  19. Research in acetylene containing monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogliaruso, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of precursor bisbenzils with pendant acetylene linkages for use in the synthesis of new aromatic poly (phenyl quinoxalines) was investigated. Attempts to condense para, para prime-dibromo benzil and potassium acetylide in liquid ammonia and in toluene, to prepare 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, 4-(paraacetylphenyl) acetyl phenyl ether, 4-phenyl acetyl-4 primeacetyl phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent to prepare 4-(beta-chloro cinnamaldehyde) phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-(para-acetyl phenyl) acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent, and the oxidation of bibenzil to prepare benzil are described. The reactions of phenyl acetylene with oxidizing agent, of phenyl acetylene with bromine, of 1,1,2,2-tetrabromo ethyl benzene with zinc and with oxidizing agent are described.

  20. THE FERMI BUBBLES: SUPERSONIC ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS WITH ANISOTROPIC COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.-Y. K.; Ruszkowski, M.; Ricker, P. M.; Zweibel, E.; Lee, D.

    2012-12-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveals two large bubbles in the Galaxy, which extend nearly symmetrically {approx}50 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic center. Using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic simulations that self-consistently include the dynamical interaction between cosmic rays (CRs) and thermal gas and anisotropic CR diffusion along the magnetic field lines, we show that the key characteristics of the observed gamma-ray bubbles and the spatially correlated X-ray features in the ROSAT 1.5 keV map can be successfully reproduced by recent jet activity from the central active galactic nucleus. We find that after taking into account the projection of the 3D bubbles onto the sky the physical heights of the bubbles can be much smaller than previously thought, greatly reducing the formation time of the bubbles to about a Myr. This relatively small bubble age is needed to reconcile the simulations with the upper limit of bubble ages estimated from the cooling time of high-energy electrons. No additional physical mechanisms are required to suppress large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities because the evolution time is too short for them to develop. The simulated CR bubbles are edge-brightened, which is consistent with the observed projected flat surface brightness distribution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the sharp edges of the observed bubbles can be due to anisotropic CR diffusion along magnetic field lines that drape around the bubbles during their supersonic expansion, with suppressed perpendicular diffusion across the bubble surface. Possible causes of the slight bends of the Fermi bubbles to the west are also discussed.

  1. Universality of the diffusion wake from stopped and punch-through jets in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Barbara; Noronha, Jorge; Torrieri, Giorgio; Gyulassy, Miklos; Mishustin, Igor; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2009-03-01

    We solve (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamical equations with source terms that describe punch-through and fully stopped jets to compare their final away-side angular correlations in a static medium. For fully stopped jets, the backreaction of the medium is described by a simple Bethe-Bloch-like model that leads to an explosive burst of energy and momentum (Bragg peak) close to the end of the jet's evolution through the medium. Surprisingly enough, we find that the medium's response and the corresponding away-side angular correlations are largely insensitive to whether the jet punches through or stops inside the medium. This result is also independent of whether momentum deposition is longitudinal (as generally occurs in pQCD energy loss models) or transverse (as the Bethe-Bloch formula implies). The existence of the diffusion wake is therefore shown to be universal to all scenarios where momentum as well as energy is deposited into the medium, which can readily be understood in ideal hydrodynamics through vorticity conservation. The particle yield coming from the strong forward moving diffusion wake that is formed in the wake of both punch-through and stopped jets largely overwhelms their weak Mach cone signal after freeze-out.

  2. Universality of the diffusion wake from stopped and punch-through jets in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, Barbara; Noronha, Jorge; Torrieri, Giorgio; Mishustin, Igor; Gyulassy, Miklos; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2009-03-15

    We solve (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamical equations with source terms that describe punch-through and fully stopped jets to compare their final away-side angular correlations in a static medium. For fully stopped jets, the backreaction of the medium is described by a simple Bethe-Bloch-like model that leads to an explosive burst of energy and momentum (Bragg peak) close to the end of the jet's evolution through the medium. Surprisingly enough, we find that the medium's response and the corresponding away-side angular correlations are largely insensitive to whether the jet punches through or stops inside the medium. This result is also independent of whether momentum deposition is longitudinal (as generally occurs in pQCD energy loss models) or transverse (as the Bethe-Bloch formula implies). The existence of the diffusion wake is therefore shown to be universal to all scenarios where momentum as well as energy is deposited into the medium, which can readily be understood in ideal hydrodynamics through vorticity conservation. The particle yield coming from the strong forward moving diffusion wake that is formed in the wake of both punch-through and stopped jets largely overwhelms their weak Mach cone signal after freeze-out.

  3. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaliuk, D. O.; Kovaliuk, Oleg; Burlibay, Aron; Gromaszek, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    The method of acetylene production in acetylene generator was analyzed. It was found that impossible to provide the desired process characteristics by the PID-controller. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator was developed. The proposed system combines the classic controller and fuzzy subsystem for controller parameters tuning.

  4. Turbulent structure and emissions of strongly-pulsed jet diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, Mathieu

    -pulsed flames was not strongly impacted by buoyancy. This lack of sensitivity to buoyancy was consistent with offsetting changes in flame puff celerity and time to burnout for the microgravity versus normal-gravity cases. The emissions of CO and NO were examined in the vicinity of the visible flame tip and at the combustor exit for strongly-pulsed flames. The highest exhaust-point emission indices of CO for compact, isolated puffs were as much as a factor of six higher than those of elongated flames with longer injection times. The amount of CO decreased substantially with a decreased amount of flame puff interaction. The higher CO levels for pulsed flames with the shortest injection times were consistent with quenching due to the very rapid mixing and dilution with excess air for the most compact flame puffs. The injection time for which steady-flame emission levels were attained was comparable to the injection time for which the visible flame length approached the flame length of steady flames. The CO emissions, for a given fuelling rate, were strongly dependent on both the injection time and jet-off time for a jet-on fraction less than approximately 50%. The NO levels were generally proportional to the fuelling rate. This work indicates that there are specific combinations of injection time and jet-off time that considerably change the fuel/air mixing, resulting in emissions comparable to those of the steady flame while the flame length is significantly shorter. This points the potential utility of the strongly-pulsed injection technique in the development of compact, low emissions combustors involving turbulent diffusion flames. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  6. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    The recent ban on the production of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br) because of its high stratospheric ozone depletion potential has led to interest in finding alternative agents for fire extinguishing applications. Some of the promising alternatives are fluorinated hydrocarbons. A clear understanding of the effects of CF3Br and alternative chemical suppressants on diffusion flames is therefore necessary in the selection of alternative suppressants for use in normal and microgravity. The flame inhibition effects of halogen compounds have been studied extensively in premixed systems. The effect of addition of halocarbons (carbon-halogen compounds) to diffusion flames has been studied experimentally in coflow configurations and in counterflow gaseous and liquid-pool flames. Halogenated compounds are believed to inhibit combustion by scavenging hydrogen radicals to form the relatively unreactive compound HF, or through a catalytic recombination cycle involving HBr to form H2. Comparisons between halogens show that bromine inhibition is significantly more effective than chlorine or fluorine. Although fluorinated compounds are only slightly more effective inhibitors on a mass basis than nitrogen, they are more effective on a volume basis and are easily stored in liquid form. The objectives of this study are (a) to determine the stability limits of laminar jet diffusion flames with respect to inhibitor concentration in both normal and microgravity, and (b) to investigate the structure of halocarbon-inhibited flames. In the initial phase of this project, visual diagnostics were used to observe the structure and behavior of normal and microgravity flames. The initial observations showed significant changes in the structure of the flames with the addition of halocarbons to the surrounding environment, as discussed below. Furthermore, the study established that the flames are more stable relative to the addition of halocarbons in microgravity than in normal gravity. Visual

  7. Unsteady pressure measurements and numerical investigation of the jet control method in a conical diffuser with swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosioc, A. I.; Tanasa, C.; Muntean, S.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents our numerical results and experimental measurements for swirling flow with precessing vortex rope into a conical diffuser with water jet control. A test rig was designed and developed at Politehnica University of Timisoara in order to investigate different flow control techniques. Consequently, a vortex rope like in Francis turbine cone at 70% partial discharge is generated into the test rig section. The jet control method is experimentally investigated in order to mitigate the vortex rope and its associated pressure fluctuations. The unsteady pressure is recorded in 8 transducers flush mounted on the wall of the test section at different values of the jet discharge. The amplitude and frequency of the vortex rope is obtained based on unsteady pressure measurements using Fourier analysis. The 3D computational domain corresponds to the test rig section. The three-dimensional full unsteady turbulent computation is performed with jet control for different values of discharge. In numerical simulation, the unsteady pressures are obtained on the cone wall at the same positions as those in experimental investigation. Consequently, the amplitude and frequency of the vortex rope are computed and validated with experimental data. As a result, the amplitude and frequency are diminished if the water jet discharge is increased.

  8. Effects of differential diffusion on the flame structure of oxygen enhanced turbulent non-premixed jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Felix; Gauding, Michael; Hasse, Christian

    2014-11-01

    By means of Direct Numerical Simulation we have investigated the influence of differential diffusion for non-premixed oxygen-enhanced turbulent flames. Oxygen-enhanced conversion usually yields higher amounts of H2 as compared to conventional air combustion. It is well known that H2 as a very diffusive species leads to differential diffusion effects. In addition to the diffusive transport mixing processes are also often controlled by turbulent transport. Previous investigations of a turbulent CH4/H2 oxygen-enhanced jet flame have shown that in mixture fraction space it is important to distinguish between regions of equal diffusivities and detailed transport. These findings are of particular interest when performing Large-Eddy simulations applying a flamelet approach. Using this approach a LES study was performed of the aforementioned flame considering differential diffusion. Therefore, flamelet equations including differential diffusion via non-unity constant Lewis numbers were solved. However, this study showed that keeping the non-unity Lewis numbers constant, is not sufficient to capture the diffusion phenomena in this particular flame. Direct Numerical Simulations have been conducted in order to investigate how Lewis numbers are affected in mixture fraction space. Computer resources for this project have been provided by the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing/Leibniz Supercomputing Centre under Grant: pr83xa.

  9. Acetylene from the co-pyrolysis of biomass and waste tires or coal in the H{sub 2}/Ar plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, W.; Cao, Q.; Lv, Y.; Chang, L.

    2008-07-01

    Acetylene from carbon-containing materials via plasma pyrolysis is not only simple but also environmentally friendly. In this article, the acetylene produced from co-pyrolyzing biomass with waste tire or coal under the conditions of H{sub 2}/Ar DC arc plasma jet was investigated. The experimental results showed that the co-pyrolysis of mixture with biomass and waste tire or coal can improve largely the acetylene relative volume fraction (RVF) in gaseous products and the corresponding yield of acetylene. The change trends for the acetylene yield of plasma pyrolysis from mixture with raw sample properties were the same as relevant RVF. But the yield change trend with feeding rate is different from its RVF. The effects of the feeding rate of raw materials and the electric current of plasmatron on acetylene formation are also discussed.

  10. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-13 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples.

  11. Acetylene-terminated polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanky, A. O.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The nadic-encapped LARC-43 addition polyimide exhibits excellent flow, is easy to process, and can be utilized for short terms at temperatures up to 593 C. It retains good lap shear strength as an adhesive for titanium after aging in air up to 125 hours at 316 C; but lap shear strength degrades with longer exposures at that temperature. Thermid 600, an addition polyimide that is acetylene encapped, exhibits thermomechanical properties even after long term exposure in at air at 316 C. An inherent drawback of this system is that it has a narrow processing window. An acetylene encapped, addition polyimide which is a hybrid of these two systems was developed. It has good retention of strength after long term aging and is easily processed. The synthesis and characterization of various molecular weight oligomers of this system are discussed as well as the bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear adhesive samples. Previously announced in STAR as N83-18910

  12. Vorticity models of ocean surface diffusion in coastal jets and eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, D.; Matulka, A.; Sekula, E.

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss the use of multi-fractal techniques used to investigete vorticity and jet dynamical state of these features detected in the sea surface as well as to identify possible local parametrizations of turbulent diffusion in complex non-homogeneous flows. We use a combined vorticity/energy equation to parametrize mixing at the Rossby Deformation Radius, which may be used even in non Kolmogorov types of flows. The vorticity cascade is seen to be different to the energy cascade and may have important cnsecuences in pollutant dispersion prediction, both in emergency accidental releases and on a day to day operational basis. We also identify different SAR signatures of river plumes near the coast, which are usefull to provide calibrations for the different local configurations that allow to predict the behaviour of different tracers and tensioactives in the coastal sea surface area by means of as a geometrical characterization of the vorticity and velocity maps which induce local mixing and dilution jet processes. The satellite-borne SAR seems to be a good system for the identification of dynamic. lt is also a convenient tool to investigate the eddy structures of a certain area where the effect of bathymetry and local currents are important in describing the ocean surface behavior. Maximum eddy size agrees remarkably well with the limit imposed by the local Rossby deformation radius using the usual thermocline induced stratification, Redondo and Platonov (2000). The Rossby deformation radius, defined as Rd = (N/f)h, where N is the Brunt-Vaisalla frequency, f is the local Coriolis parameter (f=2Osin(lat), where O is the rotation of the earth as function of the latitude), The role of buoyancy may be also detected by seasonal changes in h, the thermocline depth, with these considerations Rd is ranged between 6 and 30 Km. Bezerra M.O., Diez M., Medeiros C. Rodriguez A., Bahia E., Sanchez Arcilla A and Redondo J.M. (1998) "Study on the influence of waves on

  13. THE FERMI BUBBLES. II. THE POTENTIAL ROLES OF VISCOSITY AND COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN JET MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.; Oh, S. Peng

    2012-09-10

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo and Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity ({mu}{sub visc} {approx}> 3 g cm{sup -1} s{sup -1}, or {approx}0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  14. Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

  15. Acetylene terminated aspartimides and resins therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acetylene terminated aspartimides are prepared using two methods. In the first, an amino-substituted aromatic acetylene is reacted with an aromatic bismaleimide in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In the second method, an aromatic diamine is reacted with an ethynyl containing maleimide, such an N-(3-ethynyl phenyl) maleimide, in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In addition, acetylene terminated aspartimides are blended with various acetylene terminated oligomers and polymers to yield composite materials exhibiting improved mechanical properties.

  16. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  17. Laser Raman scattering measurements of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.L.; Dibble, R.W.; Talbot, L.; Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores effects of differential diffusion in nonpremixed turbulent jet flames. Pulsed Raman scattering spectroscopy is used to measure temperature and species concentrations in chemically reacting jets of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} into air, over a range of jet Reynolds numbers from 1,000 to 30,000 based on cold jet fluid properties. Results show significant effects of differential diffusion at all jet Reynolds numbers considered. Differential diffusion between H{sub 2} and C0{sub 2} produces differences between the hydrogen element mixture fraction ({xi}{sub H}) and the carbon element mixture fraction ({xi}{sub c}). The greatest effects occur on the rich side of stoichiometric, where {xi}{sub H} is observed to be smaller than {xi}{sub C} at all Reynolds numbers. Differential diffusion between H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O creates a net flux of hydrogen element toward the stoichiometric contour and causes a local maximum in {xi}H that occurs near the stoichiometric condition. A differential diffusion variable {sup Z}H is defined as the difference between {xi}{sub H} and {xi}{sub C}. The variance Of {sup Z}H conditional on {xi}{sub C} also shows that differential diffusion effects are greatest on the rich side of the flame. Conditional variances of {sup Z}H are largest at intermediate Reynolds numbers.

  18. Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Hamins, A.; Sivathanu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of smoke in a laminar diffusion flame involves several steps. The first step is particle inception/nucleation in the high-temperature fuel-rich region of the flame followed by surface growth and coagulation/coalescence of the small particles. As the primary spheres grow in size and lose hydrogen, the colliding particles no longer coalesce but retain their identity as a cluster of primary spheres, termed an agglomerate. Finally, in the upper portion of the flame, the particles enter an oxidizing environment which may lead to partial or complete burnout of the agglomerates. Currently there is no quantitative model for describing the growth of smoke agglomerates up to superagglomerates with an overall dimension of 10 microns and greater. Such particles are produced during the burning of acetylene and fuels containing benzene rings such as toluene and polystyrene. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed "raining" out from large fires. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame has been recently reported. Acetylene was chosen as the fuel since the particulate loading in acetylene/air diffusion flames is very high. Photographs were obtained by Sorensen using a microsecond xenon lamp of the "stream" of soot just above the flame. For low flow rates of acetylene, only submicrometer soot clusters are produced and they give rise to the homogeneous appearance of the soot stream. When the flow rate is increased to 1.7 cu cm/s, soot clusters up to 10 microns are formed and they are responsible for the graininess and at a flow rate of 3.4 cu cm/s, a web of interconnected clusters as large as the width of the flame is seen. This interconnecting web of superagglomerates is described as a gel state by Sorensen et al (1998). This is the first observation of a gel for a gas phase system. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates due to buoyancy

  19. The effect of incomplete acetylene washout on cardiac output measurement using open circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Balouch, Jamal; Olfert, I Mark; Wagner, Peter D; Hopkins, Susan R

    2007-02-15

    The open circuit acetylene uptake method is a useful non-invasive means of measuring cardiac output. However, because of accumulation of inhaled acetylene in tissues, the cardiac output uptake is underestimated, if residual acetylene is not allowed to wash out completely in between measurements. We determined the effect of applying a correction factor that estimates mixed venous acetylene concentration from endtidal values to the calculation of cardiac output. This accounts for mixed venous acetylene present during measurements made before complete washout. Six healthy subjects performed steady-state exercise at approximately 30% and 60% of V(O2 max). Cardiac output measurements were made at each exercise intensity using the open circuit acetylene uptake method (inspired [acetylene] approximately 1%), with the first and last measurements having no detectible levels of acetylene in expired gas (reference measurement). Data were also obtained with immediate pre-measurement endtidal concentrations ranging from 3% to 15% of the inspired [acetylene], in random order in between. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and heart rate did not change significantly during testing at each exercise intensity. Reference cardiac output also did not change significantly and averaged 11.1+/-0.8 L/min at 30% of V(O2 max) and 16.5+/-2.0 L/min at 60% of V(O2 max). Uncorrected cardiac output measurements progressively underestimated cardiac output by 15% at the 3% of inspired endtidal [acetylene] and by over 50% at 15% [acetylene] (p<0.0001). However, when corrected for residual endtidal [acetylene], cardiac outputs were not significantly different from the reference measurements. The results of this study suggest that by accounting for residual endtidal acetylene in mixed venous blood, cardiac output can be accurately measured even when washout of acetylene is incomplete, allowing measurements as often as every 10-15 s. PMID:16714151

  20. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Acetylene is a highly reactive component of planet(oid)s with anoxic, methane-rich atmospheres, such as Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and perhaps the primordial Earth. Included in this group is Enceladus, although it is not clear if the acetylene detected within its jets by Cassini was formed by photolysis of methane, from thermo-catalysis of organic matter in the orb's interior, or a fragmentation artifact of the mass spectrum of a larger hydrocarbon. Acetylene inhibits many microbial processes (e.g., methanogenesis, methane oxidation, hydrogen metabolism, denitrification) yet a number of anaerobes can use it as a carbon and energy source to support growth. The best studied is Pelobacter acetylenicus, which carries out a two-step reaction involving the enzymes acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutase. The former, a low potential W-containing enzyme, forms acetaldehyde while the latter produces ethanol and acetate. Metabolism of acetylene by mixed microbial communities (sediments and/or enrichment cultures) produces these intermediates, and when coupled with sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis respectively forms CO2 or an equal mixtures of CO2 plus CH4. It is not inconceivable that such an anaerobic, microbial food chain could exist in the waters beneath the ice cap of Enceladus, Titan, or even in the mesothermal atmospheric regions of the gas giants. Detection of the identified intermediate products of acetylene fermentation, namely acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and formate in the atmospheres of these planet(oid)s would constitute evidence for a microbial life signature. This evidence would be strongly reinforced if a stable carbon isotope fractionation was identified as well, whereby the products of acetylene fermentation were enriched in 12C relative to 13C (i.e., had a lighter δ13C signal) when compared to that of the starting acetylene. The most practical target to test this hypothesis would be Enceladus (if the detected acetylene is shown to be a real

  1. Diffuse neutrino intensity from the inner jets of active galactic nuclei: Impacts of external photon fields and the blazar sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Dermer, Charles D.

    2014-07-01

    We study high-energy neutrino production in inner jets of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), taking into account effects of external photon fields and the blazar sequence. We show that the resulting diffuse neutrino intensity is dominated by quasar-hosted blazars, in particular, flat spectrum radio quasars, and that PeV-EeV neutrino production due to photohadronic interactions with broadline and dust radiation is unavoidable if the AGN inner jets are ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. Their neutrino spectrum has a cutoff feature around PeV energies since target photons are due to Lyα emission. Because of infrared photons provided by the dust torus, neutrino spectra above PeV energies are too hard to be consistent with the IceCube data unless the proton spectral index is steeper than 2.5, or the maximum proton energy is ≲100 PeV. Thus, the simple model has difficulty in explaining the IceCube data. For the cumulative neutrino intensity from blazars to exceed ˜10-8 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1, their local cosmic-ray energy generation rate would be ˜10-100 times larger than the local UHECR emissivity but is comparable to the averaged γ-ray blazar emissivity. Interestingly, future detectors such as the Askaryan Radio Array can detect ˜0.1-1 EeV neutrinos even in more conservative cases, allowing us to indirectly test the hypothesis that UHECRs are produced in the inner jets. We find that the diffuse neutrino intensity from radio-loud AGN is dominated by blazars with γ-ray luminosity of ≳1048 erg s-1, and the arrival directions of their ˜1-100 PeV neutrinos correlate with the luminous blazars detected by Fermi.

  2. State Relationships of Laminar Permanently-Blue Opposed-Jet Hydrocarbon-Fueled Diffusion Flames. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and state relationships of laminar soot-free (permanently-blue) diffusion flames at various strain rates were studied experimentally using an opposed-jet configuration, motivated by the importance of soot-free hydrocarbon-fueled diffusion flames for many practical applications. Measurements of gas velocities, temperatures and compositions were carried out along the stagnation stream line. Flame conditions studied included propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled opposed-jet diffusion flames having a stoichiometric mixture fractions of 0.7 and strain rates of 60-240 s (exp -1) at normal temperature and pressure. It was found that oxygen leakage to fuel-rich conditions and carbon monoxide leakage to fuel-lean conditions both increased as strain rates increased. Furthermore, increased strain rates caused increased fuel concentrations near the flame sheet, decreased peak gas temperatures, and decreased concentrations of carbon dioxide and water vapor throughout the flames. State relationships for major gas species and gas temperatures for these flames were found to exist over broad ranges of strain rates. In addition, current measurements, as well as previous measurements and predictions of ethylene-fueled permanently-blue diffusion flames, all having a stoichiometric mixture fraction of 0.7, were combined to establish generalized state relationships for permanently-blue diffusion flames for this stoichiometric mixture fraction. The combined measurements and predictions support relatively universal generalized state relationships for N2, CO2, H2O and fuel over a broad range of strain rates and fuel types. State relationships for O2 in the fuel-rich region, and for CO in the fuel-lean region, however, are functions of strain rate and fuel type. State relationships for H2 and temperature exhibit less universality, mainly due to the increased experimental uncertainties for these variables. The existence of state relationships for soot-free hydrocarbon

  3. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; Gruber, Andrea; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization aremore » located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that hydrogen

  4. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; Gruber, Andrea; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization are located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that

  5. Soot formation and radiation in turbulent jet diffusion flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Sun, Jun; Greenberg, Paul S.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1993-01-01

    Most practical combustion processes, as well as fires and explosions, exhibit some characteristics of turbulent diffusion flames. For hydrocarbon fuels, the presence of soot particles significantly increases the level of radiative heat transfer from flames. In some cases, flame radiation can reach up to 75 percent of the heat release by combustion. Laminar diffusion flame results show that radiation becomes stronger under reduced gravity conditions. Therefore, detailed soot formation and radiation must be included in the flame structure analysis. A study of sooting turbulent diffusion flames under reduced-gravity conditions will not only provide necessary information for such practical issues as spacecraft fire safety, but also develop better understanding of fundamentals for diffusion combustion. In this paper, a summary of the work to date and of future plans is reported.

  6. Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

  7. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  8. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  9. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  10. Anomalous diffusion across the magnetic field-plasma boundary - The Porcupine artificial plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Kapitanov, V. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.

    1986-09-01

    Very fast magnetic field diffusion into the beam is required for observation of the nearly undisturbed penetration of the Porcupine's dense, fast and heavy ion beam into the magnetized ionospheric plasma after termination of the short adiabatic phase. The diffusion is presently attributed to a transverse electron drift current-driven electrostatic instability that is excited by the diamagnetic current flowing in the boundary layer between the injected beam and the ambient field. The anomalous collision frequencies turn out to be of the order of the local lower hybrid frequency in the dense Xe plasma. Since only a very small fraction of beam energy is dissipated in the diffusion process, no significant deceleration of the ion beam is observable.

  11. Structure and Soot Properties of Non-Buoyant Laminar Round-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortazavi, Saeed; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jurng, Jongsoo; Faeth, Gerard M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of nonbuoyant laminar diffusion flames are being studied experimentally and theoretically in order to better understand the soot and thermal radiation emissions from luminous flames. The measurements involve weakly-buoyant flames at low pressure in normal gravity (ng) and nonbuoyant flames at normal pressures in microgravity (micro g). The objectives of the present investigation are to study the differences of soot properties between nonbuoyant and buoyant diffusion flames, and to evaluate predictions based on the laminar flamelet approach.

  12. Holographic Interferometry and Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in the Presence of Non-Uniform Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J.; Calvert, M. E.; Saito, K.; VanderWal, R.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields impact combustion processes in a manner analogous to that of buoyancy, i.e., as a body force. It is well known that in a terrestrial environment buoyancy is one of the principal transport mechanisms associated with diffusion flame behavior. Unfortunately, in a terrestrial environment it is difficult if not impossible to isolate flame behavior due magnetic fields from the behavior associated with buoyancy. A micro-, or reduced, gravity environment is ideally suited for studying the impact of magnetic fields on diffusion flames due to the decreased impact of buoyancy on flame behavior.

  13. Triple flame structure and dynamics at the stabilization point of a lifted jet diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.; Milne, R.B.; Devine, K.D.; Kempka, S.N.

    1998-03-01

    A coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian low-Mach-number numerical scheme is developed, using the vortex method for the momentum equations, and a finite difference approach with adaptive mesh refinement for the scalar conservation equations. The scheme is used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced lifted buoyant planar jet flame. Outer buoyant structures, driven by baroclinic vorticity generation, are observed. The flame base is found to stabilize in a region where flow velocities are sufficiently small to allow its existence. A triple flame is observed at the flame base, a result of premixing of fuel and oxidizer upstream of the ignition point. The structure and dynamics of the triple flame, and its modulation by jet vortex structures, are studied. The spatial extent of the triple flame is small, such that it fits wholly within the rounded flame base temperature field. The dilatation rate field outlines the edge of the hot fluid at the flame base. Neither the temperature field nor the dilatation rate field seem appropriate for experimental measurement of the triple flame in this flow.

  14. Transverse momentum diffusion and collisional jet energy loss in non-Abelian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Strickland, Michael; Dumitru, Adrian; Nara, Yasushi; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-03-15

    We consider momentum broadening and energy loss of high-momentum partons in a hot non-Abelian plasma due to collisions. We solve the coupled system of Wong-Yang-Mills equations on a lattice in real time, including binary hard elastic collisions among the partons. The collision kernel is constructed such that the total collisional energy loss and momentum broadening are lattice-spacing independent. We find that the transport coefficient q corresponding to transverse momentum broadening receives sizable contributions from a power-law tail in the p{sub perpendicular} distribution of high-momentum partons. We establish the scaling of q and of dE/dx with density, temperature, and energy in the weak-coupling regime. We also estimate the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} due to elastic energy loss of a jet in a classical Yang-Mills field.

  15. Computation of NOx emission of a methane - air diffusion flame in a two-dimensional laminar jet with detailed chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Yiguang; Niioka, Takashi

    1997-09-01

    NOx formation from a methane - air diffusion flame in a two-dimensional jet involving highly preheated air, which has recently become an important topic in industrial furnaces, is investigated numerically using a full chemistry approach including C2, prompt and thermal mechanisms. Effects of increased air temperature on NOx formation are examined. Numerical results show that both NO formation mechanisms increase dramatically with increasing air temperature. A C-shaped production zone of NOx, corresponding to the fuel-lean and fuel-rich regions of triple flame, is identified. It is shown that NO formation with high air temperature can be suppressed efficiently by decreasing the oxygen concentration in the airstream. Production rate analyses of elementary reactions are made. Formation paths of NOx at low and high temperatures are obtained and compared. The results show that the NOx formation path depends strongly on the air temperature. In addition to the thermal route and the HCN⇒NO route, the HCN⇒CN and NO⇒CN recycling routes are greatly enhanced at high air temperature. The results show that the prompt mechanism and the thermal mechanism are strongly coupled at high air temperature. Calculations of prompt NO and thermal NO in a two-dimensional jet and in the counterflow configuration reveal that the conventional method cannot give a correct prediction of prompt NO and thermal NO, particularly at high air temperature. A method using the concept of fixed nitrogen is presented. Numerical results indicate that the formation process of prompt NO and thermal NO can be evaluated properly by the present method.

  16. Numerical modeling of separated flows in three-dimensional diffusers and application of synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Pudovikov, D. E.; Torohov, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solving the problem of creating an environmentally friendly "green plane" implies development and implementation of several actions aimed at increasing airplane performance and reducing environmental contamination. One possible way to solve this problem is to reduce the powerplant weight, in particular, by decreasing its length. The airplane engine flowpath comprises transition ducts: those between the low- and high-pressure compressors, between the compressor and combustor, and between the high- and low-pressure turbines. In a modern high-bypass turbofan, the flowpath varies in the streamwise direction. Shorter transition ducts have greater curvature. Because of this, intensive separation may occur, which leads to increased losses in the flowpath and to significant growth of nonuniformity of flow parameters. Vast experience of numerical and experimental studies of unsteady separated flows has been accumulated by now. In many cases, however, these investigations are performed in a two-dimensional (2D) formulation, which is primarily caused by the high cost of three-dimensional (3D) unsteady calculations. The numerical and experimental work [1] shows that flows in diffuser ducts can have an essentially unsteady 3D structure. This is valid even for ducts modeling 2D configurations. This paper describes the results of a numerical study of the flow structure and its features in model S-shaped transition ducts, as well as the results of using a synthetic jet generator for flow control and for reduction of total pressure losses. Three-dimensional flows are numerically modeled by the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) / RANS methods. The calculations show that the use of the synthetic jet generator can lead to duct loss reduction by 45%.

  17. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  18. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  19. Observations of Shock Diffusion and Interactions in Supersonic Freestreams with Counterflowing Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Pritchett, Victor E.; Wang, Ten-See; Blankson, Isiah M.; Auslender, Aaron H.

    2006-01-01

    One of the technical challenges in long-duration space exploration and interplanetary missions is controlled entry and re-entry into planetary and Earth atmospheres, which requires the dissipation of considerable kinetic energy as the spacecraft decelerates and penetrates the atmosphere. Efficient heat load management of stagnation points and acreage heating remains a technological challenge and poses significant risk, particularly for human missions. An innovative approach using active flow control concept is proposed to significantly modify the external flow field about the spacecraft in planetary atmospheric entry and re-entry in order to mitigate the harsh aerothermal environments, and significantly weaken and disperse the shock-wave system to reduce aerothermal loads and wave drag, as well as improving aerodynamic performance. To explore the potential benefits of this approach, we conducted fundamental experiments in a trisonic blow down wind tunnel to investigate the effects of counterflowing sonic and supersonic jets against supersonic freestreams to gain a better understanding of the flow physics of the interactions of the opposing flows and the resulting shock structure.

  20. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  1. Laser Raman diagnostics in subsonic and supersonic turbulent jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, T. S.; Wehrmeyer, J. A.; Pitz, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering combined with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) is developed for temperature and multi-species concentration measurements. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, major species (H2, O2, N2, H2O), and minor species (OH) concentrations are made with a 'single' narrow band KrF excimer laser in subsonic and supersonic lifted turbulent hydrogen-air diffusion flames. The UV Raman system is calibrated with a flat-flame diffusion burner operated at several known equivalence ratios from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Temperature measurements made by the ratio of Stokes/anti-Stokes signal and by the ideal gas law are compared. The single shot measurement precision for concentration and temperature measurement is 5 to 10 pct. Calibration constants and bandwidth factors are determined from the flat burner measurements and used in a data reduction program to arrive at temperature and species concentration measurements. These simultaneous measurements of temperature and multi-species concentrations allow a better understanding of the complex turbulence-chemistry interactions and provide information for the input and validation of CFD models.

  2. Use of laser-induced spark for studying ignition stability and unburned hydrogen escaping from laminar diluted hydrogen diffusion jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Tran X.; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Ignition and unburned hydrogen escaping from hydrogen jet diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen up to 70% were experimentally studied. The successful ignition locations were about 2/3 of the flame length above the jet exit for undiluted flames and moved much closer to the exit for diluted flames. For higher levels of dilution or higher flow rates, there existed a region within which a diluted hydrogen diffusion flame can be ignited and burns with a stable liftoff height. This is contrary to previous findings that pure and diluted hydrogen jet diffusion cannot achieve a stable lifted flame configuration. With liftoff, the flame is noisy and short with significant amount of unburned hydrogen escaping into the product gases. If ignition is initiated below this region, the flame propagates upstream quickly and attaches to the burner rim. Results from measurements of unburned hydrogen in the combustion products showed that the amount of unburned hydrogen increased as the nitrogen dilution level was increased. Thus, hydrogen diffusion flame diluted with nitrogen cannot burn completely.

  3. Laser Raman Diagnostics in Subsonic and Supersonic Turbulent Jet Diffusion Flames.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tsarng-Sheng

    1991-02-01

    UV spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering combined with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) is developed for temperature and multi-species concentration measurements. For the first time, simultaneous measurements of temperature, major species (H_2, O_2, N_2, H_2O), and minor species (OH) concentrations are made with a "single" narrowband KrF excimer laser in subsonic and supersonic lifted turbulent hydrogen-air diffusion flames. The UV Raman system is calibrated with a flat -flame diffusion burner operated at several known equivalence ratios from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Temperature measurements made by the ratio of Stokes/anti-Stokes signal and by the ideal gas law are compared. Single-shot uncertainties for temperature and concentration measurements are analyzed with photon statistics. Calibration constants and bandwidth factors are used in the data reduction program to arrive at temperature and species concentration measurements. UV Raman measurements in the subsonic lifted turbulent diffusion flame indicate that fuel and oxidizer are in rich, premixed, and unignited conditions in the center core of the lifted flame base. The unignited mixtures are due to rapid turbulent mixing that affects chemical reaction. Combustion occurs in an intermittent annular turbulent flame brush with strong finite-rate chemistry effects. The OH radical exists in sub-equilibrium and super-equilibrium concentrations. Major species and temperature are found with non-equilibrium values. Further downstream the super-equilibrium OH radicals decay toward equilibrium through slow three-body recombination reactions. In the supersonic lifted flame, a little reaction occurs upstream of the flame base, due to shock wave interactions and mixing with hot vitiated air. The strong turbulent mixing and total enthalpy fluctuations lead to temperature, major, and minor species concentrations with non-equilibrium values. Combustion occurs farther downstream of the lifted region. Slow

  4. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - II. Stochastic variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus; Gao, Shan

    2016-05-01

    We study the stochastic variation of blazar emission under a 2D spatially resolved leptonic jet model we previously developed. Random events of particle acceleration and injection in small zones within the emission region are assumed to be responsible for flux variations. In addition to producing spectral energy distributions that describe the observed flux of Mrk 421, we further analyse the timing properties of the simulated light curves, such as the power spectral density (PSD) at different bands, flux-flux correlations, as well as the cross-correlation function between X-rays and TeV γ-rays. We find spectral breaks in the PSD at a time-scale comparable to the dominant characteristic time-scale in the system, which is usually the pre-defined decay time-scale of an acceleration event. Cooling imposes a delay, and so PSDs taken at lower energy bands in each emission component (synchrotron or inverse Compton) generally break at longer time-scales. The flux-flux correlation between X-rays and TeV γ-rays can be either quadratic or linear, depending on whether or not there are large variation of the injection into the particle acceleration process. When the relationship is quadratic, the TeV flares lag the X-ray flares, and the optical and GeV flares are large enough to be comparable to the ones in X-ray. When the relationship is linear, the lags are insignificant, and the optical and GeV flares are small.

  5. Microporous metal–organic framework with dual functionalities for highly efficient removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tong-Liang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Bin; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Wang, Xue; Zhu, Weidong; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin

    2015-01-01

    The removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene is a technologically very important, but highly challenging task. Current removal approaches include the partial hydrogenation over a noble metal catalyst and the solvent extraction of cracked olefins, both of which are cost and energy consumptive. Here we report a microporous metal–organic framework in which the suitable pore/cage spaces preferentially take up much more acetylene than ethylene while the functional amine groups on the pore/cage surfaces further enforce their interactions with acetylene molecules, leading to its superior performance for this separation. The single X-ray diffraction studies, temperature dependent gas sorption isotherms, simulated and experimental column breakthrough curves and molecular simulation studies collaboratively support the claim, underlying the potential of this material for the industrial usage of the removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene at room temperature through the cost- and energy-efficient adsorption separation process. PMID:26041691

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Gravitational Effects on Transitional and Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2001-01-01

    The basic objective of this work is to assess the influence of gravity on "the compositional and the spatial structures" of transitional and turbulent diffusion flames via large eddy simulation (LES), and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The DNS is conducted for appraisal of the various closures employed in LES, and to study the effect of buoyancy on the small scale flow features. The LES is based on our "filtered mass density function"' (FMDF) model. The novelty of the methodology is that it allows for reliable simulations with inclusion of "realistic physics." It also allows for detailed analysis of the unsteady large scale flow evolution and compositional flame structure which is not usually possible via Reynolds averaged simulations.

  7. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  8. An Analytical Model for Non-Uniform Magnetic Field Effects on Two-Dimensional Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, M. E.; Baker, J.; Saito, K.; VanderWal, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    In 1846, Michael Faraday found that permanent magnets could cause candle flames to deform into equatorial disks. He believed that the change in flame shape was caused by the presence of charged particles within the flames interacting with the magnetic fields. Later researchers found that the interaction between the flame ions and the magnetic fields were much too small to cause the flame deflection. Through a force analysis, von Engel and Cozens showed that the change in the flame shape could be attributed to the diamagnetic flame gases in the paramagnetic atmosphere. Paramagnetism occurs in materials composed of atoms with permanent magnetic dipole moments. In the presence of magnetic field gradients, the atoms align with the magnetic field and are drawn into the direction of increasing magnetic field. Diamagnetism occurs when atoms have no net magnetic dipole moment. In the presence of magnetic gradient fields, diamagnetic substances are repelled towards areas of decreasing magnetism. Oxygen is an example of a paramagnetic substance. Nitrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, and most hydrocarbon fuels are examples of diamagnetic substances. In order to evaluate the usefulness of these magnets in altering flame behavior, a study has been undertaken to develop an analytical model to describe the change in the flame length of a laminar diffusion jet in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field.

  9. Effect of Acetylene on Root Respiration and Acetylene Reducing Activity in Nodulated Soya Bean

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Acetylene decreased root and nodule respiration, as measured by CO2 evolution of nodulated or non-nodulated Glycine max. An inhibition of 25 to 35% in 15 to 30 minutes occurred when 13% C2H2 was introduced in the gas flux which aerated the root nutrient solution. When the light intensity was doubled to 800 microeinsteins per square meter per second, the inhibition increased to 50% and nodule acetylene reduction activity was inhibited 50%. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667582

  10. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  11. Living on acetylene. A primordial energy source.

    PubMed

    Ten Brink, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The tungsten iron-sulfur enzyme acetylene hydratase catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde by addition of one water molecule to the C-C triple bond. For a member of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family this is a rather unique reaction, since it does not involve a net electron transfer. The acetylene hydratase from the strictly anaerobic bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus is so far the only known and characterized acetylene hydratase. With a crystal structure solved at 1.26 Å resolution and several amino acids around the active site exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis, many key features have been explored to understand the function of this novel tungsten enzyme. However, the exact reaction mechanism remains unsolved. Trapped in the reduced W(IV) state, the active site consists of an octahedrally coordinated tungsten ion with a tightly bound water molecule. An aspartate residue in close proximity, forming a short hydrogen bond to the water molecule, was shown to be essential for enzyme activity. The arrangement is completed by a small hydrophobic pocket at the end of an access funnel that is distinct from all other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family. PMID:25416389

  12. A mid-infrared absorption diagnostic for acetylene detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Utsav; Nasir, Ehson F.; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-08-01

    Acetylene is an important combustion intermediate and plays a critical role in soot formation. Accurate measurements of trace concentrations of acetylene can be very useful in validating hydrocarbon oxidation and soot formation mechanisms. Strongest vibrational band of acetylene near 13.7 μm is probed here to develop a highly sensitive absorption diagnostic. Experiments are carried out behind reflected shock waves to measure absorption cross sections of acetylene near 730 cm-1 over a wide range of temperatures (1000-2200 K) and pressures (1-5 bar). The diagnostic is demonstrated by measuring acetylene formation during the shock-heated pyrolysis and oxidation of propene.

  13. Acetylenes and fatty acids from Codonopsis pilosula

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueping; Liu, Yufeng; Guo, Qinglan; Jiang, Zhibo; Xu, Chengbo; Zhu, Chenggen; Yang, Yongchun; Lin, Sheng; Shi, Jiangong

    2015-01-01

    Four new acetylenes (1–4) and one new unsaturated ω-hydroxy fatty acid (5), together with 5 known analogues, were isolated from an aqueous extract of Codonopsis pilosula roots. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. The new acetylenes are categorized as an unusual cyclotetradecatrienynone (1), tetradecenynetriol (2), and rare octenynoic acids (3 and 4), respectively, and 3 and 4 are possibly derived from oxidative metabolic degradation of 1 and/or 2. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned by comparison of the experimental circular dichroism (CD) spectrum with the calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra of stereoisomers based on the quantum-mechanical time-dependent density functional theory, while the configuration of 2 was assigned by using modified Mosher׳s method based on the MPA determination rule of ΔδRS values for diols. PMID:26579449

  14. Two new acetylenic compounds from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Two new acetylenic compounds, asparoffins A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds, nyasol (3) and 3″-methoxynyasol (4), were isolated from stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures of two new compounds were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, MS, 1D, and 2D NMR). All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against three human cancer cell lines. PMID:26558641

  15. Opposite influence of haloalkanes on combustion and pyrolysis of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A. V.; Emelianov, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu

    2015-11-01

    An influence of haloalkanes CF3H and CCl4 (known as inflammation and explosion suppressors) on combustion and pyrolysis of acetylene behind shock waves was experimentally studied. While ignition delay times in stoihiometric acetylene-oxygen mixtures were expectedly increased by halogenoalkanes admixtures, the induction times of carbon particle formation at acetylene pyrolysis were dramatically reduced in presence of CCl4. A simplified kinetic model was suggested and characteristic rates of diacetylene C4H2 formation were estimated as a limiting stage of acetylene polymerization. An analysis of obtained data has indicated that promoting species is atomic chlorine forming in CCl4 pyrolysis, which interacts with acetylene and produces C2H radical, initiating a chain mechanism of acetylene decomposition. The results of kinetic modeling agree well with experimental data.

  16. Spectroscopic study of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozario, Hoimonti Immaculata

    High-resolution molecular spectroscopy has been used to study acetylene line parameters and emission spectra of hydrogen cyanide. All acetylene spectra were recorded in our laboratory at the University of Lethbridge using a 3-channel tuneable diode laser spectrometer. N2-broadened line widths and N2-pressure induced line shifts have been measured for transitions in the v1+v3 band of acetylene at seven temperatures in the range 213-333K to obtain the temperature dependences of broadening and shift coefficients. The Voigt and hard-collision line profile models were used to retrieve the line parameters. The line-broadening and line-shift coefficients as well as their temperature-dependent parameters have been also evaluated theoretically, in the frame work of a semi-classical approach based on an exponential representation of the scattering operator, an intermolecular potential composed of electrostatic quadrupole--quadrupole and pairwise atom--atom interactions as well as on exact trajectories driven by an effective isotropic potential. The experimental results for both N2-broadening and shifting show good agreement with the theoretical results. We have studied the line intensities of the 1vl 20←0v120 band system from the HCN emission spectrum. The infrared emission spectrum of H12C 14N was measured at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. The emission spectrum was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software Symath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve information on band intensity parameters.

  17. RECRYSTALLIZATION OF PMDA AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ACETYLENIC DIAMINE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, R; Cook, R C

    2004-09-21

    This memo provides documentation for the method of recrystallization of pyromeletic dianhydride (PMDA), the dianhydride used in the vapor deposition of Kapton-like polyimide for ICF shell ablators and for the synthesis of bis(3-aminophenyl) acetylene, a unique acetylenic diamine developed for vapor deposition testing.

  18. 76 FR 75782 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... standards that reference or include language from outdated standards published by standards developing organizations (``SDO standards'') (69 FR 68283). A SDO standard referenced in OSHA's Acetylene Standard (29 CFR... of the Compressed Gas Association standard, CGA G-1-2003, in the Acetylene Standard. See 74 FR...

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  20. Acetylene-based chemicals from coal and other natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The economic and technological changes which have affected acetylene directly are examined. Commodity chemicals, which were manufactured from acetylene more than thirty years ago, are now made almost entirely from hydrocarbons such as ethylene, propylene, or butadiene. During this period, calcium carbide acetylene was displaced by petrochemical acetylene, the latter was gradually displaced by less expensive olefins and alkanes. The calcium carbide process viewed in terms of its abundant raw materials, might again become an attractive technology as petroleum-based feedstocks become scarcer and more expensive. With improved furnace design and solids handling, further economics in this process may be possible. The greatest growth area for acetylene is now in Reppe-type chemicals such as butyndiol, tetrahydrofuran, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, vinyl pyrrolidone, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone, and a variety of acetylenic alcohols and glycols. The technology and applications for large-volume acetylenic products and their derivatives are outlined. Acetylene production processes purification, stability and guidelines for its safe use in chemical operations are described. 327 references, 30 figures, 19 tables.

  1. Acetylene-Based Materials in Organic Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Fabio; Marrocchi, Assunta

    2010-01-01

    Fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar energy, are moving to the forefront in a variety of research fields. Organic photovoltaic systems hold the promise of a lightweight, flexible, cost-effective solar energy conversion platform, which could benefit from simple solution-processing of the active layer. The discovery of semiconductive polyacetylene by Heeger et al. in the late 1970s was a milestone towards the use of organic materials in electronics; the development of efficient protocols for the palladium catalyzed alkynylation reactions and the new conception of steric and conformational advantages of acetylenes have been recently focused the attention on conjugated triple-bond containing systems as a promising class of semiconductors for OPVs applications. We review here the most important and representative (poly)arylacetylenes that have been used in the field. A general introduction to (poly)arylacetylenes, and the most common synthetic approaches directed toward making these materials will be firstly given. After a brief discussion on working principles and critical parameters of OPVs, we will focus on molecular arylacetylenes, (co)polymers containing triple bonds, and metallopolyyne polymers as p-type semiconductor materials. The last section will deal with hybrids in which oligomeric/polymeric structures incorporating acetylenic linkages such as phenylene ethynylenes have been attached onto C60, and their use as the active materials in photovoltaic devices. PMID:20480031

  2. Pressure-induced Polymerization in Substituted Acetylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of shock-induced chemical reactions in organics is still lacking and there are limited studies devoted to determining reaction mechanisms, evolution of bonding, and effect of functional group substitutions. The fast timescale of reactions occurring during shock compression create significant experimental challenges (diagnostics) to fully quantify the mechanisms involved. Static compression provides a complementary route to investigate the equilibrium phase space and metastable intermediates during high pressure chemistry, although at a much slower timescale. In this study, we present our results from our ongoing high pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy experiments on substituted acetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH3)3 -C ≡CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH3)3 -Si ≡CH]. We observed that the onset pressure of chemical reactions (at room temperature) in these compounds is significantly higher in static compression (TBA: 11 GPa and ETMS: 26 GPa) when compared to shock input pressures (TBA: 6.1 GPa and ETMS: 6.6 GPa). The products were polymeric in nature, recovered to ambient conditions with little degradation and fully characterized using spectroscopy, calorimetry, and other techniques to identify reaction mechanisms. LDRD-DR (PI: Dana Dattelbaum)

  3. Interpenetrating polymer networks from acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a program to develop high temperature/high performance structural resins for aerospace applications, the chemistry and properties of a novel class of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) were investigated. These IPNs consist of a simple diacetylenic compound (aspartimide) blended with an acetylene terminated arylene ether oligomer. Various compositional blends were prepared and thermally cured to evaluate the effect of crosslink density on resin properties. The cured IPNs exhibited glass transition temperatures ranging from 197 to 254 C depending upon the composition and cure temperature. The solvent resistance, fracture toughness and coefficient of thermal expansion of the cured blends were related to the crosslink density. Isothermal aging of neat resin moldings, adhesive and composite specimens showed a postcure effect which resulted in improved elevated temperature properties. The chemistry, physical and mechanical properties of these materials will be discussed.

  4. Anaerobic oxidation of acetylene by estuarine sediments and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Acetylene disappeared from the gas phase of anaerobically incubated estuarine sediment slurries, and loss was accompanied by increased levels of carbon dioxide. Acetylene loss was inhibited by chloramphenicol, air, and autoclaving. Addition of 14C2H2 to slurries resulted in the formation of 14CO2 and the transient appearance of 14C-soluble intermediates, of which acetate was a major component. Acetylene oxidation stimulated sulfate reduction; however, sulfate reduction was not required for the loss of C2H2 to occur. Enrichment cultures were obtained which grew anaerobically at the expense of C2H2.

  5. Second hyperpolarizability of delta shaped disubstituted acetylene complexes of beryllium, magnesium, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Hatua, Kaushik; Nandi, Prasanta K

    2015-10-01

    Present theoretical study involves the delta shape complexes of beryllium, magnesium, and calcium where the metal atom interacts perpendicularly with disubstituted acetylene. Most of the complexes are found to be fairly stable. The dependence of second-hyperpolarizability on the basis set with increasing polarization and diffuse functions has been examined which showed the importance of 'f-type' type polarization function for heavy metal (Mg, Ca) and 'd-type' polarization function for beryllium. Larger second hyperpolarizability has been predicted for complexes having significant ground state polarization and low lying excited states favoring strong electronic coupling. Transition energy plays the most significant role in modulating the second hyperpolarizability. PMID:26361770

  6. Interpretation of PAN, acetone and acetylene measurements from the MIPAS-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. P.; Remedios, J. J.; Parker, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic pollution, from biomass burning events in particular, result in the injection of a wide range of carbon compounds into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released in significant amounts, affecting both the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and ozone production. Upper troposphere (UT) measurements of PAN, acetone and acetylene have, in the past, been generally limited to sporadic in situ sampling during specialised campaign periods. The recent rapid progress in both the detection and retrieval of many VOC species from spaceborne instrumentation has been large. It has recently been established that the observation of the global distribution of VOCs in the UT can be made by measurements provided by instruments such as the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) or the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard SCISAT-1. In this work, we discuss the ability of MIPAS-E to provide new global measurements of acetone in the UT. We also describe both the distribution and seasonality observed in UT PAN volume mixing ratios (vmrs). From the MIPAS-E acetylene measurements, we analyse the extent and magnitude of the chemical isolation observed over the Middle East during August 2003. We show that this enhancement is due to fast westward transport from Asia via the Easterly Jet associated with the Asian monsoon anticyclone. A full error analysis is carried out for each of the three gases we analyse. Previous work has shown that characteristic infrared signatures of PAN, acetone and acetylene can be detected in MIPAS-E thermal emission spectra, with the 787-790 cm-1, 1216-1218 cm-1 and 776.0-776.15 cm-1 spectral ranges respectively being particularly sensitive to changes in each of the gases. We invert the measured MIPAS-E spectra into vmrs using an independent offline-retrieval scheme based on the optimal estimation approach which was

  7. Experimental Investigation of Diffuser Pressure-ratio Control with Shock-positioning Limit on 28-inch Ram-jet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, William R; Wentworth, Carl B; Crowl, Robert J

    1957-01-01

    The performance of a control system designed for variable thrust applications was determined in an altitude free-jet facility at various Mach numbers, altitudes and angles of attack for a wide range of engine operation. The results are presented as transient response characteristics for step disturbances in fuel flow and stability characteristics as a function of control constants and engine operating conditions. The results indicate that the control is capable of successful operation over the range of conditions tested, although variations in engine gains preclude optimum response characteristics at all conditions with fixed control constants.

  8. Inhibiting the combustion of air-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S. N.; Gubina, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect propane, methane, and a mixture of 18 vol % C3H6-40 vol % C3H8-42 vol % C4H10 have on the combustion of air-acetylene mixtures is investigated experimentally. The upper concentration limit of flame propagation, maximum explosion pressure, and maximum rate of rise of explosion pressure are determined. It is found that propane and a mixture of 18 vol % C3H6-40 vol % C3H8-42 vol % C4H10 are strong inhibitors of combustion of acetylene in its concentration ranges of 2-8 vol %. The inhibition effect becomes weaker as the acetylene content in the mixture increases. It disappears completely at C2H2 concentrations exceeding 15 vol %. The above experimental findings are explained using the proposed scheme of acetylene oxidation.

  9. Pyrethrum stabilization by inactivation of natural acetylenic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.J.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a mixture of naturally occurring pyrethroid substances and derivatives of naturally occurring polyacetylenic substances wherein the derivatives of polyacetylenic substances are formed by substantially inactivating the acetylenic functional groups to promote the stability of the pyrethroid substances.

  10. Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics of the Acetylene - Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Shan-Shan

    The structures, intermolecular forces and excited state dynamics of acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex are investigated by combination of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy pairwise potential model calculations. Acetylene is linear in the X state while trans-bent in the (A) state. Although only one structure has been known to exist for the acetylene(X) cdot Ar complex, two isomeric structures are determined for the acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex from the rotational band shape analysis of the fluorescence excitation spectra. One of the isomers has the argon sitting in the molecular plane of C _2H_2 (A), 3.77 A away from the center-of-mass of acetylene, the other has the argon 3.71 A above the plane on the C_2 axis. Formulas useful for calculating axis switching angles in non-planar molecules have been derived and applied to the two isomeric structures. It was found that despite the acetylene geometry change from the (X) to the (A) state, the axis switching effect is negligible for the complex spectral calculation. A pair potential model with parameters directly extracted from the ones calculated for ethene (X) cdot Ar is able to produce the two structures. Based on the structures and the calculated potential surface, three of the vdW frequencies are assigned to be: upsilon_{rm stretch } = 28 cm^{-1} for the out-of-plane isomer, upsilon_ {rm bend1} = 11 cm^ {-1} (the in-plane bend) and upsilon_{rm bend2} = 8.5 cm^{-1} (the out -of-plane bend) for the in-plane isomer. The existence of the two isomers allowed the study of the orientation dependence in intersystem crossing (ISC) of acetylene(S _1) induced by interaction with argon. Similar ISC lifetimes (~100 ns) were observed for the two isomers, suggesting that the pi and pi^* orbitals are equally susceptible to spin-changing interactions with Ar.

  11. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF 3C RADIO SOURCES WITH z < 0.3: NUCLEI, DIFFUSE EMISSION, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Axon, D.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Capetti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W.; Gilli, R.; Giovannini, G.; Grandi, P.; Risaliti, G.

    2010-05-01

    We report on our Chandra Cycle 9 program to observe half of the 60 (unobserved by Chandra) 3C radio sources at z < 0.3 for 8 ks each. Here we give the basic data: the X-ray intensity of the nuclei and any features associated with radio structures such as hotspots and knots in jets. We have measured fluxes in soft, medium, and hard bands and are thus able to isolate sources with significant intrinsic column density. For the stronger nuclei, we have applied the standard spectral analysis which provides the best-fit values of X-ray spectral index and column density. We find evidence for intrinsic absorption exceeding a column density of 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} for one-third of our sources.

  12. Mortality of workers at acetylene production plants.

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, M L; Matthews, G; Sheikh, K; Knight, K L; Oakes, D; Sullivan, K R

    1988-01-01

    To reduce the risk of explosion oxyacetylene cylinders are filled with a spongy mass, acetone is added to saturate the mass, and acetylene is pumped into the cylinder. The first cylinders manufactured before 1936 used a kapok filling topped off with about 16 oz of crocidolite asbestos, with a metal gauze thimble inserted to reduce risk of flash back. Cylinders must be examined annually. The use of crocidolite ceased in 1972 and other fillings have been adopted since 1970; kapok cylinders now constitute less than 5% of the total stock. To assess possible hazards, a mortality study of workers first employed between 1935 and 1975 and followed up to December 1984 was undertaken. Simulation tests showed low concentrations of asbestos in the air even in the earliest period. The population studied consisted of 370 workers at the Bilston plant in the West Midlands, 611 at the 14 other plants in England and Wales, and 120 in Scotland. No deaths occurred from mesothelial tumours but there was an excess of deaths from cancer, particularly lung cancer, cancer of the stomach, and cancer of the pancreas, the latter accounting for eight deaths. Risks appeared to be concentrated at the Bilston plant. The importance of these findings is discussed. PMID:3342189

  13. Electron impact induced anion production in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewelina; Čadež, Iztok; Krishnakumar, E; Mason, Nigel J

    2014-02-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of electron induced anion production in acetylene, C2H2, in the energy range between 1 and 90 eV is presented. The anions are formed by two processes in this energy range: dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dipolar dissociation (DD). DEA in C2H2 is found to lead to the formation of H(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) through excitation of resonances in the electron energy range 1-15 eV. These anionic fragments are formed with super thermal kinetic energy and reveal no anisotropy in the angular distributions. DD in C2H2 leads to the formation of H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) with threshold energies of 15.7, 20.0 and 16.5 eV respectively. The measured anion yields have been used to calculate anion production rates for H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) in Titan's ionosphere. PMID:24343432

  14. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  15. Process hydrogenates unwanted diolefins and acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, B.V. )

    1988-12-05

    Diolefins and actetylenes in C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin streams can be selectively hydrogenated to produce high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefin production. C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin sources, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), steam crackers, and dehydrogenation of C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ paraffins, all contain these undesirable polyunsaturated compounds. Hydrogenation of these compounds in alkylation unit feeds can also improve the economics of the alkylation process. Production of high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefins production requires a feedstock that is essentially free of dienes and acetylenes to minimize undesirable side reactions. Although alkylation units can tolerate some diolefins in the feed, economics dictate that these diolefins should be minimized. The selective hydrogenation process (SHP) developed by others at its Marl, West Germany, plant, has undergone additional development work since commercialization of the process in 1980. The unit was designed to feed 160,000 metric tons/year of clean C/sub 4/ raffinate from a steam cracker, with a maximum polyunsaturated content of 0.8 wt%.

  16. Acetylene on Titan’s Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Rodriguez, S.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Clark, R. N.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is opaque in the near-infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few “transparency windows.” Thus, the composition of Titan’s surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained. Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescales. Acetylene (C2H2) net production in the atmosphere is predicted to be larger than any other compound and C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan. C2H2 was detected as a trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface using the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer after the landing of the Huygens probe. Here we show evidence of C2H2 on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 and 4.93 μm using the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer at three different equatorial areas—Tui Regio, eastern Shangri La, and Fensal–Aztlan/Quivira. We found that C2H2 is preferentially detected in low-albedo areas, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.

  17. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM ACCRETION DISKS. II. THE FORMATION OF ASYMMETRIC JETS AND COUNTER JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: nezami@mpia.de

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the jet launching from accretion disks, in particular the formation of intrinsically asymmetric jet/counter jet systems. We perform axisymmetric MHD simulations of the disk-jet structure on a bipolar computational domain covering both hemispheres. We apply various models such as asymmetric disks with (initially) different scale heights in each hemisphere, symmetric disks into which a local disturbance is injected, and jets launched into an asymmetric disk corona. We consider both a standard global magnetic diffusivity distribution and a novel local diffusivity model. Typical disk evolution first shows substantial disk warping and then results in asymmetric outflows with a 10%-30% mass flux difference. We find that the magnetic diffusivity profile is essential for establishing a long-term outflow asymmetry. We conclude that bipolar asymmetry in protostellar and extragalactic jets can indeed be generated intrinsically and maintained over a long time by disk asymmetries and the standard jet launching mechanism.

  18. Identification of Acetylene on Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Rodriguez, S.; Combe, J. P.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouelic, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V.; Clark, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere is opaque in the near infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few "transparency windows" (e.g., Sotin et al., 2005). Thus, the composition of Titan surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained, limited to ethane in the polar lakes (Brown et al., 2008) and a few possible organic molecules on the surface (Clark et al., 2010). Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescale (Cordier et al., 2009, 2011). Acetylene (C2H2) is one of the most abundant organic molecules in the atmosphere and thus thought to present on the surface as well. Here we report direct evidence of solid C2H2 on Titan's surface using Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. By comparing VIMS observations and laboratory measurements of solid and liquid C2H2, we identify a specific absorption at 1.55 µm that is widespread over Titan but is particularly strong in the brightest terrains. This surface variability suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering, topography, and dissolution/evaporation. The detection of C2H2 on the surface of Titan opens new paths to understand and constrain Titan's surface activity. Since C2H2 is highly soluble in Titan liquids (Singh et al. 2015), it can easily dissolve in methane/ethane and may play an important role in carving of fluvial channels and existence of karstic lakes at higher latitudes on Titan. These processes imply the existence of a dynamic surface with a continued history of erosion and deposition of C2H2 on Titan.

  19. NO{sub x} emissions of a jet diffusion flame which is surrounded by a shroud of combustion air

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; White, F.P.; Mathur, M.P.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present work reports an experimental study on the behavior of a jet flame surrounded by a shroud of combustion air. Measurements focussed on the flame length and the emissions of NO{sub x}, total unburned hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. Four different fuel flow rates (40.0, 78.33, 138.33, and 166.6 cm/s), air flow rates up to 2500 cm{sup 3}/s and four different air injector diameters (0.079 cm, 0. 158 cm, 0.237 cm, and 0.316 cm) were used. The shroud of combustion air causes the flame length to decrease by a factor proportional to 1/[p{sub a}/p{sub f} + C{sub 2}({mu}{sub a}Re,a/{mu}{sub f}Re,f){sup 2}]{sup {1/2}}. A substantial shortening of the flame length occurred by increasing the air injection velocity keeping fuel rate fixed or conversely by lowering the fuel flow rate keeping air flow rate constant. NO{sub x} emissions ranging from 5 ppm to 64 ppm were observed and the emission of NO{sub x} decreased strongly with the increased air velocity. The decrease of NO{sub x} emissions was found to follow a similar scaling law as does the flame length. However, the emission of the total hydrocarbons increased with the increased air velocity or the decreased fuel flow rate. A crossover condition where both NO{sub x} and unburned- hydrocarbon emissions are low, was identified. At an air-to-fuel velocity ratio of about 1, the emissions of NO{sub x} and the total hydrocarbons were found to be under 20 ppm.

  20. Chemistry and properties of blends of acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to develop new high temperature/high performance structural materials, the chemistry and properties of acetylene-containing materials and their cured resins are under investigation. The objective of this work is to develop materials that are readily processable (i.e., 200-300 C and about 1.4 MPa or less) and possess usable mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 177 C. An acetylene-terminated aspartimide (ATA) was blended with an equal weight of an acetylene-terminated arylene ether (ATAE) oligomer. The blend was subsequently thermally cured to yield a resin which was evaluated in the form of neat resin moldings, adhesive specimens, and laminates. Adhesive specimens and laminates gave good mechanical properties to temperatures as high as 177 C. In addition, preliminary laminate work is presented on the resin from a blend of a new N-methyl substituted ATA and an ATAE.

  1. Forced and natural convection in laminar-jet diffusion flames. [normal-gravity, inverted-gravity and zero-gravity flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on methane, laminar-jet, diffusion flames with coaxial, forced-air flow to examine flame shapes in zero-gravity and in situations where buoyancy aids (normal-gravity flames) or hinders (inverted-gravity flames) the flow velocities. Fuel nozzles ranged in size from 0.051 to 0.305 cm inside radius, while the coaxial, convergent, air nozzle had a 1.4 cm inside radius at the fuel exit plane. Fuel flows ranged from 1.55 to 10.3 cu cm/sec and air flows from 0 to 597 cu cm/sec. A computer program developed under a previous government contract was used to calculate the characteristic dimensions of normal and zero-gravity flames only. The results include a comparison between the experimental data and the computed axial flame lengths for normal gravity and zero gravity which showed good agreement. Inverted-gravity flame width was correlated with the ratio of fuel nozzle radius to average fuel velocity. Flame extinguishment upon entry into weightlessness was studied, and it was found that relatively low forced-air velocities (approximately 10 cm/sec) are sufficient to sustain methane flame combustion in zero gravity. Flame color is also discussed.

  2. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  3. A parametric study of NO{sub 2} emission from turbulent H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} jet diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) emission levels of fuel jets were experimentally studied for H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/He mixtures, a H{sub 2}/He/CH{sub 4} mixture, and CH{sub 4}. The study was undertaken to understand the dependence of NO{sub 2} emission in turbulent diffusion flames on parameters other than the widely known effects of rapid mixing. These parameters are fuel types (CH{sub 4} vs H{sub 2}), the initial NO level, and the flame temperature. The fuel mixtures were chosen such that these factors could be investigated independently. In all the flames studied, NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} increases with decreasing NO concentration in the flame and with decreasing adiabatic flame temperature. The CH{sub 4} fuel demonstrates a qualitatively different influence on the NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratio than H{sub 2}. Its effects are most pronounced when the flame blowout limit is approached. Adding a small amount of CH{sub 4} to the H{sub 2} flames also qualitatively affected the NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratio.

  4. Unlocking the Keys to Vortex/Flame Interactions in Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames--Dynamic Behavior Explored on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Dennis P.

    1999-01-01

    Most combustion processes in industrial applications (e.g., furnaces and engines) and in nature (e.g., forest fires) are turbulent. A better understanding of turbulent combustion could lead to improved combustor design, with enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Despite its importance, turbulent combustion is poorly understood because of its complexity. The rapidly changing and random behavior of such flames currently prevents detailed analysis, whether experimentally or computationally. However, it is possible to learn about the fundamental behavior of turbulent flames by exploring the controlled interaction of steady laminar flames and artificially induced flow vortices. These interactions are an inherent part of turbulent flames, and understanding them is essential to the characterization of turbulent combustion. Well-controlled and defined experiments of vortex interaction with laminar flames are not possible in normal gravity because of the interference of buoyancy- (i.e., gravity) induced vortices. Therefore, a joint microgravity study was established by researchers from the Science and Technology Development Corp. and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The experimental study culminated in the conduct of the Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames (TGDF) Experiment on the STS-87 space shuttle mission in November 1997. The fully automated hardware, shown in photo, was designed and built at Lewis. During the mission, the experiment was housed in a Get Away Special (GAS) canister in the cargo bay.

  5. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  6. Large eddy simulation of soot formation in a turbulent non-premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Menon, Suresh

    2009-02-15

    A recently developed subgrid model for soot dynamics [H. El-Asrag, T. Lu, C.K. Law, S. Menon, Combust. Flame 150 (2007) 108-126] is used to study the soot formation in a non-premixed turbulent flame. The model allows coupling between reaction, diffusion and soot (including soot diffusion and thermophoretic forces) processes in the subgrid domain without requiring ad hoc filtering or model parameter adjustments. The combined model includes the entire process, from the initial phase, when the soot nucleus diameter is much smaller than the mean free path, to the final phase, after coagulation and aggregation, where it can be considered in the continuum regime. A relatively detailed but reduced kinetics for ethylene-air is used to simulate an experimentally studied non-premixed ethylene/air jet diffusion flame. Acetylene is used as a soot precursor species. The soot volume fraction order of magnitude, the location of its maxima, and the soot particle size distribution are all captured reasonably. Along the centerline, an initial region dominated by nucleation and surface growth is established followed by an oxidation region. The diffusion effect is found to be most important in the nucleation regime, while the thermophoretic forces become more influential downstream of the potential core in the oxidation zone. The particle size distribution shows a log-normal distribution in the nucleation region, and a more Gaussian like distribution further downstream. Limitations of the current approach and possible solution strategies are also discussed. (author)

  7. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  8. Siloxane containing addition polyimides. II - Acetylene terminated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Acetylene terminated polyimide oligomers having a range of molecular weights have been synthesized by reacting bis (gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane, aminophenylacetylene and 3, 3', 4, 4' benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride in different molar ratios. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for melt flow and cure properties. They show promise as adhesives for bonding titanium to titanium and as matrix resins for graphite cloth reinforced composites. The most promising system has been blended in varying proportions with Thermid 600, a commercially available acetylene terminated polyimide oligomer, and the mixtures have been tested for application as composite matrix resins.

  9. Acetylene, a mammalian metabolite of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Dürk, H; Poyer, J L; Klessen, C; Frank, H

    1992-09-01

    1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCE) is a widely used industrial solvent of low acute toxicity. It is slowly oxidized to trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid by cytochrome P-450-dependent mono-oxygenases. Increased inhalative uptake by rats under hypoxia and spin-trapping experiments indicate that TCE is also reductively metabolized to a radical intermediate. Acetylene is formed as a metabolite, suggesting transfer of an additional electron to form the corresponding carbene. Hypoxia and induction of mixed-function mono-oxygenases accelerate the formation of acetylene. Experiments performed in vitro with rat liver microsomal fractions yield analogous results. PMID:1326938

  10. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source. PMID:22378645

  11. Channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-04-24

    We experimentally investigate the channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization (ATDI) of acetylene in the multiphoton regime using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse centered at 395 nm by measuring all the ejected electrons and ions in coincidence. As compared to the sequential process, diagonal lines in the electron-electron joint energy spectrum are observed for the nonsequential ATDI owing to the correlative sharing of the absorbed multiphoton energies. We demonstrate that the distinct channel-resolved sequential and nonsequential ATDI spectra can clearly reveal the photon-induced acetylene-vinylidene isomerization via proton migration on the cation or dication states. PMID:25955049

  12. ABSORPTION CROSS SECTION OF GASEOUS ACETYLENE AT 85 K IN THE WAVELENGTH RANGE 110-155 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chen, Hui-Fen; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hong-Kai; Alam, M. S.; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lin, Meng-Yeh

    2011-09-01

    Absorption spectra and absorption cross sections of gaseous acetylene, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, at 298 and 85 K were measured in the wavelength range 110-155 nm with a slit-jet system coupled to a synchrotron as a source of vacuum ultraviolet light. Using published spectral parameters of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, we simulated the absorption profile for the Rydberg transition to state 4R{sub 0} in the range 124.6-125.1 nm, according to which the temperature of the jet-expanded sample at stagnation pressure 200 Torr is 85 {+-} 5 K. Our cross sections of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} are applicable for determining properties sensitive to temperature for diagnostic work on Saturn and Titan.

  13. Infrared spectra reveal box-like structures for a pentamer and hexamer of mixed carbon dioxide-acetylene clusters.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mojtaba; Norooz Oliaee, J; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; McKellar, A R W

    2016-01-21

    Except for a few cases like water and carbon dioxide, identification and structural characterization of clusters with more than four monomers is rare. Here, we provide experimental and theoretical evidence for existence of box-like structures for a pentamer and a hexamer of mixed carbon dioxide-acetylene clusters. Two mid-infrared cluster absorption bands are observed in the CO2ν3 band region using a tunable diode laser to probe a pulsed supersonic jet. Each requires the presence of both carbon dioxide and acetylene in the jet, and (from observed rotational spacings) involves clusters containing about 4 to 7 molecules. Structures are predicted for mixed CO2 + C2H2 clusters using a distributed multipole model, and the bands are assigned to a specific pentamer, (CO2)3-(C2H2)2, and hexamer, (CO2)4-(C2H2)2. The hexamer has a box-like structure whose D2d symmetry is supported by observed intensity alternation in the spectrum. The pentamer has a closely related structure which is obtained by removing one CO2 molecule from the hexamer. These are among the largest mixed molecular clusters to be assigned by high-resolution spectroscopy. PMID:26315679

  14. Transient responses of nitrogenase to acetylene and oxygen in actinorhizal nodules and cultured Frania

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, W.B.; Winship, L.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nitrogenase activity in root nodules of four species of actinorhizal plants showed varying declines in response to exposure to acetylene (10% v/v). Gymnostoma papuanum (S.Moore) L. Johnson. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. nodules showed a small decline (5-15%) with little or no recovery over 15 minutes. Myrica gale L. nodules showed a sharp decline followed by a rapid return to peak activity. Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (Du Roi) Clausen. nodules usually showed varying degrees of decline followed by a slower return to peak or near-peak activity. We call these effects acetylene-induced transients. Rapid increases in oxygen tension also caused dramatic transient decreases in nitrogenase activity in all species. The magnitude of the transient decrease was related to the size of the O{sub 2} partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) rise, to the proximity of the starting and ending oxygen tensions to the pO{sub 2} optimum, and to the time for which the plant was exposed to the lower pO{sub 2}. Oxygen-induced transients, induced both by step jumps in pO{sub 2} and by O{sub 2} pulses, were also observed in cultures of Frankia. The effects seen in nodules are purely a response by the bacterium and not a nodule effect per se. Oxygen-induced nitrogenase transients in actinorhizal nodules from the plant genera tested here do not appear to be a result of changes in nodule diffusion resistance.

  15. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  16. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  17. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  18. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  19. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  20. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  1. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  2. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  3. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mixture must have a refrigeration system without vapor compression or have a refrigeration system with the... separate cargo piping, vent piping, and refrigeration equipment for methyl acetylene-propadiene that are segregated from other cargo piping, vent piping and refrigeration equipment on the vessel....

  4. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented. PMID:23307861

  5. Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Duckweed (Lemnaceae) Mats

    PubMed Central

    Zuberer, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Duckweed (Lemnaceae) mats in Texas and Florida were investigated, using the acetylene reduction assay, to determine whether nitrogen fixation occurred in these floating aquatic macrophyte communities. N2-fixing microorganisms were enumerated by plating or most-probable-number techniques, using appropriate N-free media. Results of the investigations indicated that substantial N2-fixation (C2H2) was associated with duckweed mats in Texas and Florida. Acetylene reduction values ranged from 1 to 18 μmol of C2H4 g (dry weight)−1 day−1 for samples incubated aerobically in light. Dark N2 fixation was always two- to fivefold lower. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (7 to 10 μM) reduced acetylene reduction to levels intermediate between light and dark incubation. Acetylene reduction was generally greatest for samples incubated anaerobically in the light. It was estimated that 15 to 20% of the N requirement of the duckweed could be supplied through biological nitrogen fixation. N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria (105 cells g [wet weight]−1 and cyanobacteria (105 propagules g [wet weight]−1 were associated with the duckweed mats. Azotobacter sp. was not detected in these investigations. One diazotrophic isolate was classified as Klebsiella. PMID:16345992

  6. Low energy electron impact vibrational excitation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sigma; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Experimental differential cross sections for the vibration excitation of the four fundamental modes of acetylene at low incident electron energies from 1 eV to 20 eV and scattering angles of 10o to 130o will be presented. The results will be compared to results available in the literature. Funded by NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  7. 77 FR 13969 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Association (GGA) acetylene standard (see 76 FR 75782). In the DFR, OSHA deleted reference to CGA G-1-2003 and... final rule published on December 5, 2011 (76 FR 75782), is effective on March 5, 2012. For the purposes....C. 553, Secretary of Labor's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912), and 29 CFR part 1911. Signed at...

  8. 76 FR 75840 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... language from outdated standards published by standards developing organizations (``SDO standards'') (69 FR... Association standard, CGA G-1-2003, in the Acetylene Standard. See 74 FR 40442 and 74 FR 40450, respectively. OSHA received no adverse comments on the DFR, and it became effective on November 9, 2009. See 74...

  9. Near-threshold vibrational excitation of acetylene by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Sanchez, Sergio d'A.; Varella, Marcio T. do N.

    2010-01-15

    We report vibrational excitation cross sections for C-C and C-H symmetric stretch modes of acetylene by positron impact. The contribution of these infrared inactive modes to the annihilation parameter is also addressed. The Feshbach projection operator approach was employed to vibrationally resolve e{sup +}-acetylene scattering phase shifts obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. The present results point out a virtual state pole at the equilibrium geometry of acetylene that becomes a bound state as either bond is stretched, in qualitative agreement with previous calculations for small hydrocarbons. The vibrational couplings are stronger for the C-C mode, giving rise to a bound state pole within the Franck-Condon region of the vibrational ground state. These bound and virtual states give rise to sharp threshold structures (vibrational resonances) in both the vibrational excitation cross sections and the annihilation parameter (Z{sub eff}). We found fair agreement between the present calculations and previously reported e{sup +}-acetylene vibrational excitation cross sections.

  10. Potent In Vitro Antifungal Activities of Naturally Occurring Acetylenic Acids▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Ashfaq, M. Khalid; Babu, K. Suresh; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; ElSohly, Hala N.; Manly, Susan P.; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Our continuing effort in antifungal natural product discovery has led to the identification of five 6-acetylenic acids with chain lengths from C16 to C20: 6-hexadecynoic acid (compound 1), 6-heptadecynoic acid (compound 2), 6-octadecynoic acid (compound 3), 6-nonadecynoic acid (compound 4), and 6-icosynoic acid (compound 5) from the plant Sommera sabiceoides. Compounds 2 and 5 represent newly isolated fatty acids. The five acetylenic acids were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activities against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum by comparison with the positive control drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, caspofungin, terbinafine, and undecylenic acid. The compounds showed various degrees of antifungal activity against the 21 tested strains. Compound 4 was the most active, in particular against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum and the opportunistic pathogens C. albicans and A. fumigatus, with MICs comparable to several control drugs. Inclusion of two commercially available acetylenic acids, 9-octadecynoic acid (compound 6) and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (compound 7), in the in vitro antifungal testing further demonstrated that the antifungal activities of the acetylenic acids were associated with their chain lengths and positional triple bonds. In vitro toxicity testing against mammalian cell lines indicated that compounds 1 to 5 were not toxic at concentrations up to 32 μM. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 4 did not produce obvious toxic effects in mice at a dose of 34 μmol/kg of body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Taking into account the low in vitro and in vivo toxicities and significant antifungal potencies, these 6-acetylenic acids may be excellent leads for further preclinical studies. PMID:18458131

  11. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  12. A Model for Self-Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene Based on Real-Time Studies of Vertically Aligned Growth Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved optical reflectivity was used to study the kinetics in the early stages of vertically aligned carbon nanotube array growth from a molecular beam of acetylene. The molecular beam environment was used to suppress gas phase reaction pathways and limit the growth to surface reactions specific to the molecular structure of acetylene. The observed acetylene flux dependent induction delay and the threshold for vertically aligned growth are characteristic features of heterogeneous chain reactions. Propagation of chain reactions requires regeneration of the active sites that can occur only if catalytic activity is transferred from the metal catalyst film to surface carbon species. After the active site transformation, acetylene self-assembles into carbon structures of progressively increasing size such as chains, graphene fragments, and nanotubes. In this paper we show that a conceptual framework supported by ab initio density functional theory calculations in which active carbon species facilitate incorporation of new carbon readily explains recent results in vertically aligned nanotube growth that are puzzling in the context of the diffusion/precipitation model.

  13. Low optical insertion-loss and vacuum-pressure all-fiber acetylene cell based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Light, P S; Couny, F; Benabid, F

    2006-09-01

    We report a novel and easy-to-implement hollow-core photonic crystal fiber cell fabrication technique based on helium diffusion through silica. The formed gas cells combine low optical insertion loss (1.8 dB) and vacuum acetylene pressure (microbar regime). The estimates of the final gas pressure, using both Voigt interpolation and electromagnetically induced transparency, show a good match with the initial fitting pressure. PMID:16902611

  14. Enhanced acetylene emission near the north pole of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drossart, Pierre; Bezard, Bruno; Encrenaz, Therese; Atreya, Sushil; Lacy, John; Serabyn, Eugene; Tokunaga, Alan

    1986-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with observations of acetylene fundamental and hot band vibrational emission lines from the planet Jupiter. It is pointed out that the observation of a polar bright spot in the atmosphere of Jupiter is characterized by an enhancement in the individual lines of C2H2 which can be interpreted as an enhancement in the acetylene abundance. However, a purely thermal effect, on non-LTE phenomena cannot be excluded. The intensity of the observed hot band lines is also consistent with either hypothesis. The reported observations were performed with a cooled Fabry-Perot Grating Spectrometer (FPGS). Observations and instrumentation are considered in detail along with the calculation of synthetic spectra on the basis of a line-by-line computation, and the interpretation of the obtained data.

  15. Enhanced acetylene emission near the north pole of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drossart, P.; Bezard, B.; Atreya, S.; Lacy, J.; Serabyn, E.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with observations of acetylene fundamental and hot band vibrational emission lines from the planet Jupiter. It is pointed out that the observation of a polar bright spot in the atmosphere of Jupiter is characterized by an enhancement in the individual lines of C2H2 which can be interpreted as an enhancement in the acetylene abundance. However, a purely thermal effect, or non-LTE phenomena cannot be excluded. The intensity of the observed hot band lines is also consistent with either hypothesis. The reported observations were performed with a cooled Fabry-Perot Grating Spectrometer (FPGS). Observations and instrumentation are considered in detail along with the calculation of synthetic spectra on the basis of a line-by-line computation, and the interpretation of the obtained data.

  16. Detonation engine fed by acetylene-oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Koo, Jaye

    2014-11-01

    The advantages of a constant volume combustion cycle as compared to constant pressure combustion in terms of thermodynamic efficiency has focused the search for advanced propulsion on detonation engines. Detonation of acetylene mixed with oxygen in various proportions is studied using mathematical modeling. Simplified kinetics of acetylene burning includes 11 reactions with 9 components. Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is obtained in a cylindrical tube with a section of obstacles modeling a Shchelkin spiral; the DDT takes place in this section for a wide range of initial mixture compositions. A modified ka-omega turbulence model is used to simulate flame acceleration in the Shchelkin spiral section of the system. The results of numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which had been performed in the same size detonation chamber and turbulent spiral ring section, and with theoretical data on the Chapman-Jouguet detonation parameters.

  17. Orbital-resolved strong-field single ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qinying; Cui, Sen; You, Xinyuan; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; He, Feng; Wu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    We resolve the strong-field single ionization of acetylene into different channels by differentially normalizing the lateral momenta of the directly escaped electrons from the aligned and antialigned molecules. Distinct electron momentum distributions for different channels are observed using both near-infrared and ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses with Keldysh parameters close to 1. The results are interpreted as a signature of multiple ionization orbitals.

  18. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario. PMID:814983

  19. Tuning the Electronic Properties of Acetylenic Fluorenes by Phosphaalkene Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Svyaschenko, Yurii V; Orthaber, Andreas; Ott, Sascha

    2016-03-14

    Versatile synthetic protocols for 2,7- and 3,6-diacetylenic fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes (F9Ps) were developed. Protodesilylation of trimethylsilyl-protected acetylenic F9Ps affords terminal acetylenes that can be employed in Sonogashira and Glaser-type C-C coupling reactions to give thienyl-decorated and butadiyne-bridged fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes, respectively. As evidenced by UV/Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry and corroborated by ab initio calculations, the presence of the P center in the F9Ps induces a significantly reduced HOMO-LUMO splitting that originates from stabilization of the LUMO levels. Variation of the acetylene substitution pattern is an additional tool to influence the optical and electronic properties. Whereas 3,6-disubstituted F9Ps have strong absorptions around 400 nm, mainly due to π-π* transitions, 2,7-diacetylenic F9Ps exhibit longest-wavelength absorptions that have significant charge-transfer character with an onset around 520 nm. PMID:26833389

  20. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  1. Acetylene-derived polymers and their applications in hair and skin care.

    PubMed

    Petter, P J

    1989-02-01

    Synopsis Since the introduction over 30 years ago of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the first synthetic hairspray resin, acetylene-derived polymers have found wide and increasing applications in the cosmetics and toiletries industry. This review covers the two main classes of acetylenic polymers. In the first class, in which the chemistry may be traced back to reaction of acetylene with formaldehyde, are included PVP homopolymers and copolymers of VP with vinyl acetate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, vinylcaprolactam and styrene. In the second class, stemming from reaction of acetylene with methanol, are the poly (vinyl methyl ether/maleic acid) monoester resins. PMID:19456933

  2. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  3. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  4. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  5. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  6. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  7. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  8. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2014-02-01

    Acetylene supports the growth of some terrestrial anaerobes. The reaction is highly exothermic. The abundance of acetylene in the methane-rich planet(oid)s of the outer solar system could represent a means of nourishment for resident alien microbes.

  9. Numerical study of ethylene and acetylene laminar flame speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed chemical kinetic computations for ethylene-air and acetylene-air mixtures have been performed to simulate laminar flame speeds. Sensitivity analysis was applied to determine those reactions which strongly influence flame propagation. In ethylene-air mixtures, the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + O{sub 2} = CH{sub 2}CHO + O reaction was one of the most sensitive reactions in the C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/C{sub 2}H{sub 3} submechanism and therefore this reaction was very important to ethylene flame propagation. This reaction was not considered in previously reported mechanisms used to model ethylene-air flame propagation. In acetylene-air mixtures, the C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+O {yields} Products, HCCO+H=CH{sub 2}(s)+CO, HCCO+O{sub 2}=CO{sub 2}+CO+H, H+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}(+M) = C{sub 2}H{sub 3}(+M) and CH{sub 2}(s)+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} = H{sub 2}CCCH+H were the most sensitive reactions in the C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/HCCO / CH{sub 2}(s) reaction set.

  10. Pleomorphism and acetylene-reducing activity of free-living rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, T; Baker, F L; Johnson, D E

    1983-01-01

    Cowpea-type Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum USDA 26 and 110 grown on a glutamate-mannitol-gluconate agar medium showed increases in the number of pleomorphic cells coincident with their acetylene-reducing activity. Pleomorphs appeared to be inhibited in growth nonuniformly, because acetylene-reducing cultures were mixtures of rod, branched (V, Y, and T), and other irregularly shaped cells. In contrast, strain USDA 10 consistently failed to reduce acetylene, even though it also could grow and yield pleomorphic cells under various conditions. With minimal inhibitory supplements (5 micrograms per ml of medium) of nalidixic acid and novobiocin as cell division inhibitors, an increase in pleomorphic cells was observed, but the inhibited cultures displayed lower acetylene-reducing activity. A study of pleomorphic cells derived in different ways indicated that not all pleomorphs reduce acetylene. Images PMID:6822472

  11. Ultrafast hydrogen migration in acetylene cation driven by non-adiabatic effects.

    PubMed

    Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-03-01

    Non-adiabatic dynamics of the acetylene cation is investigated using mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on trajectory surface hopping. To describe the non-adiabatic effects, two surface hopping methods are used, namely, Tully's fewest switches and Landau-Zener surface hopping. Similarities and differences between the results based on those two methods are discussed. We find that the photoionization of acetylene into the first excited state A(2)Σg(+) drives the molecule from the linear structure to a trans-bent structure. Through a conical intersection the acetylene cation can relax back to either the ground state of acetylene or vinylidene. We conclude that hydrogen migration always takes place after non-radiative electronic relaxation to the ground state of the monocation. Based on the analysis of correlation functions we identify coherent oscillations between acetylene and vinylidene with a period of about 70 fs after the electronic relaxation. PMID:23485298

  12. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  13. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  14. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeli, Demeter; Mavridis, Aristides; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-04-08

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C{sub 2v}) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C{sub 2v} arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C{sub 2v} symmetry our best estimates are {delta}E{sub e}=-2.87 kcal/mol ({delta}E{sub 0}=-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R{sub e}=2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E{sub e}=0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene

  15. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  16. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  17. Correlation between hydrogen bond basicity and acetylene solubility in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Palgunadi, Jelliarko; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jin Kyu; Lee, Hyunjoo; Lee, Sang Deuk; Cheong, Minserk; Kim, Hoon Sik

    2011-02-10

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are proposed as the alternative solvents for the acetylene separation in ethylene generated from the naphtha cracking process. The solubility behavior of acetylene in RTILs was examined using a linear solvation energy relationship based on Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters including the hydrogen-bond acidity or donor ability (α), the hydrogen-bond basicity or acceptor ability (β), and the polarity/polarizability (π*). It is found that the solubility of acetylene linearly correlates with β value and is almost independent of α or π*. The solubility of acetylene in RTILs increases with increasing hydrogen-bond acceptor (HBA) ability of the anion, but is little affected by the nature of the cation. Quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that the acidic proton of acetylene specifically forms hydrogen bond with a basic oxygen atom on the anion of a RTIL. On the other hand, although C-H···π interaction is plausible, all optimized structures indicate that the acidic protons on the cation do not specifically associate with the π cloud of acetylene. Thermodynamic analysis agrees well with the proposed correlation: the higher the β value of a RTIL is, the more negative the enthalpy of acetylene absorption in the RTIL is. PMID:21218815

  18. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Michael Chubb

    2003-12-12

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  19. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  20. Inclusion of 13C and D in protonated acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Roueff, Evelyne; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    The rovibrational spectrum of cyclic, protonated acetylene has been established. The improvement in modern telescopes coupled with the different branching ratios in reaction models welcomes study of 13C-substitution for C2H3+. Quartic force fields (QFFs) have been previously utilized to predict the antisymmetric HCCH stretch in standard c-C2H3+ to within 0.1 cm-1 of experiment and are employed here to generate rovibrational insights for the 13C isotopologues. The zero-point energies are also given for the cyclic and 'Y'-shaped isomers for both 13C and D substitutions. Vibrational intensities and the dipole moments are provided in order to characterize more fully this simple cation.

  1. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, Artem; Herrwerth, O.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Lezius, M.; Kling, Matthias; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Belkacem, Ali; Ueda, K.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robbert; Ullrich, Joachim

    2011-06-17

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC = CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52 {+-} 15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8 < KER < 8 eV, providing clear evidence for the existence of a fast, nonradiative decay channel.

  2. Adhesive and composite evaluation of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A series of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) oligomers of various molecular weights were prepared and subsequently chain extended by the thermally induced reaction of the ethynyl groups. The processability and thermal properties of these oligomers and their cured resins were compared with that of a relatively high molecular weight linear polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) with the same chemical backbone. The ATPQ oligomers exhibited significantly better processability than the linear PPQ but the PPQ displayed substantially better thermooxidative stability. Adhesive (Ti/Ti) and composite (graphite filament reinforcement) work was performed to evaluate the potential of these materials for structural applications. The PPQ exhibited better retention of adhesive and laminate properties than the ATPQ resins at 260 C after aging for 500 hr at 260 C in circulating air.

  3. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. H.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.; Tilborg, J. van; Belkacem, A.; Ueda, K.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-12-31

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC=CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +}+CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52{+-}15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8

  4. Acetylene as Fast Food: Implications for Development of Life on Anoxic Primordial Earth and in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem.

  5. Acetylene as fast food: Implications for development of life on anoxic primordial earth and in the outer solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  6. Acetylene as fast food: implications for development of life on anoxic primordial Earth and in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Voytek, Mary A

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered approximately 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. PMID:18199006

  7. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: cluster ion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kočišek, J; Lengyel, J; Fárník, M

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of ≈8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations (≈0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C2H2)n(+). At the electron energies ≥21.5 eV above the CH+CH(+) dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C2H2)nCH(+), n ≥ 2, are observed. For n ≤ 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C2H2)n - k × H](+) and [(C2H2)nCH - k × H](+). The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C3H3(+) ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of ≈13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C6H6(+) ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Arn(C2H2)(+) fragments above ≈15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Arn≥2(C2H2)m≥2(+) at ≈13.7 eV is discussed in terms of an exciton transfer mechanism. PMID:23556722

  8. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  9. Inhibition of alkylbenzene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions by using the acetylene block technique.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, S R

    1992-01-01

    Addition of acetylene to microcosms simultaneously amended with nitrate and alkylbenzenes resulted in inhibition of the rate of alkylbenzene biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. Toluene, xylenes, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were recalcitrant, whereas ethylbenzene was degraded at a slower rate than usual. Benzene was not degraded in either case. Addition of acetylene to microcosms preexposed to nitrate and alkylbenzenes produced similar inhibition. These data indicate that the activities of microorganisms that degrade alkylbenzenes under denitrifying conditions may be suppressed if the standard acetylene block technique is used to verify denitrifying activity. PMID:1444371

  10. Acetylene as a substrate in the development of primordial bacterial communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, C.W.; Strohmaier, F.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The fermentation of atmospheric acetylene by anaerobic bacteria is proposed as the basis of a primordial heterotrophic food chain. The accumulation of fermentation products (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen) would create niches for sulfate-respiring bacteria as well as methanogens. Formation of acetylene-free environments in soils and sediments would also alter the function of nitrogenase from detoxification to nitrogen-fixation. The possibility of an acetylene-based anaerobic food chain in Jovian-type atmospheres is discussed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  11. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. PMID:22559580

  12. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  13. A systematic investigation of acetylene activation and hydracyanation of the activated acetylene on Aun (n = 3-10) clusters via density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Seema; Sarkar, Abir De

    2016-05-18

    A systematic investigation of the selective catalytic conversion of poisonous HCN gas through hydracyanation of C2H2 activated on Au clusters, presented here for the first time, is of paramount importance from both scientific and technological perspectives. Hydracyanation of activated acetylene on an Au-cluster based catalyst leads to vinyl isocyanide (H2C[double bond, length as m-dash]CHNC) formation, a versatile chemical intermediate. Using density functional theory, bond activation of acetylene and selective catalytic hydracyanation of activated acetylene on small gold clusters Aun (n = 3-10) have been studied through a detailed analysis of the geometric and electronic structures. Different possible complexes of Aun-CHCH have been studied and two possible modes of adsorption of acetylene over the gold clusters, namely, the π- and di-σ modes, have been observed. The hydracyanation of the acetylene molecule is found to occur via the cleavage of one of acetylene triple bonds at the cost of formation of two Au-C bonds followed by the binding of HCN to the activated C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond via nitrogen's lone pair. Preferential binding sites for HCN and C2H2 are analyzed through Fukui function calculations, frontier molecular orbital analysis and natural population charge distribution analysis. Based on adsorption energies, odd-sized Aun clusters are found to be significantly more favorable for C2H2 adsorption with the C-C bond stretching up to 1.31 Å with respect to the C-C triple bond length of 1.21 Å in the gas phase. The stretching frequency of adsorbed complexes, C2H2/Aun, (3460 cm(-1)), decreases notably relative to the frequency of the free acetylene molecule (7948 cm(-1)), which is a signature of the bond activation of the acetylene molecule over the Au clusters. The high adsorption energy of HCN on the Au9-C2H2 complex implies the considerable binding strength and activation of C2H2 and HCN on the Au9 clusters. Due to the importance of

  14. Simulations of sooting turbulent jet flames using a hybrid flamelet/stochastic Eulerian field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, Jean-Louis; Nmira, Fatiha; Burot, Daria

    2016-03-01

    The stochastic Eulerian field method is applied to simulate 12 turbulent C1-C3 hydrocarbon jet diffusion flames covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers and fuel sooting propensities. The joint scalar probability density function (PDF) is a function of the mixture fraction, enthalpy defect, scalar dissipation rate and representative soot properties. Soot production is modelled by a semi-empirical acetylene/benzene-based soot model. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled using a wide-band correlated-k model. Emission turbulent radiation interactions (TRIs) are taken into account by means of the PDF method, whereas absorption TRIs are modelled using the optically thin fluctuation approximation. Model predictions are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data in terms of flame structure, soot quantities and radiative loss. Mean soot volume fractions are predicted within a factor of two of the experiments whereas radiant fractions and peaks of wall radiative fluxes are within 20%. The study also aims to assess approximate radiative models, namely the optically thin approximation (OTA) and grey medium approximation. These approximations affect significantly the radiative loss and should be avoided if accurate predictions of the radiative flux are desired. At atmospheric pressure, the relative errors that they produced on the peaks of temperature and soot volume fraction are within both experimental and model uncertainties. However, these discrepancies are found to increase with pressure, suggesting that spectral models describing properly the self-absorption should be considered at over-atmospheric pressure.

  15. Periodic Excitation for Jet Vectoring and Enhanced Spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    1999-01-01

    The effects of periodic excitation on the evolution of a turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit and excitation was introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet. The introduction of high amplitude periodic excitation at the jet exit enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Vectoring is achieved by applying the excitation over a fraction of the circumference of the circular jet, enhancing its spreading rate on the excited side and its tendency to reattach to that side. Static deflection studies demonstrate that the presence of the wide-angle diffuser increases the effectiveness of the added periodic momentum due to a favorable interaction between the excitation, the jet shear-layer and the diffuser wall. This point was further demonstrated by the evolution of a wave packet that was excited in the jet shear-layer. Strong amplification of the wave packet was measured with a diffuser attached to the jet exit. The turbulent jet responds quickly (10-20 msec) to step changes in the level of the excitation input. The response scales with the jet exit velocity and is independent of the Reynolds number. Jet deflection angles were found to be highly sensitive to the relative direction between the excitation and the jet flow and less sensitive to the excitation frequency. The higher jet deflection angles were obtained for a diffuser length of about two diameters and for diffusers with half-angles greater than 15 degrees.

  16. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  17. LDV Measurement of Confined Parallel Jet Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    R.F. Kunz; S.W. D'Amico; P.F. Vassallo; M.A. Zaccaria

    2001-01-31

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken in a confinement, bounded by two parallel walls, into which issues a row of parallel jets. Two-component measurements were taken of two mean velocity components and three Reynolds stress components. As observed in isolated three dimensional wall bounded jets, the transverse diffusion of the jets is quite large. The data indicate that this rapid mixing process is due to strong secondary flows, transport of large inlet intensities and Reynolds stress anisotropy effects.

  18. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xili; Chen, Kaijie; Xing, Huabin; Yang, Qiwei; Krishna, Rajamani; Bao, Zongbi; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Yu; Li, Bin; Ren, Qilong; Zaworotko, Michael J; Chen, Banglin

    2016-07-01

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination networks with hexafluorosilicate and organic linkers for the purpose of preferential binding and orderly assembly of acetylene molecules through cooperative host-guest and/or guest-guest interactions. The specific binding sites for acetylene are validated by modeling and neutron powder diffraction studies. The energies associated with these binding interactions afford high adsorption capacity (2.1 millimoles per gram at 0.025 bar) and selectivity (39.7 to 44.8) for acetylene at ambient conditions. Their efficiency for the separation of acetylene/ethylene mixtures is demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves (0.73 millimoles per gram from a 1/99 mixture). PMID:27198674

  19. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials

  20. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials.

  1. KISS: Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Yang, J. C.; Scott, J. H.; Sivithanu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of gas phase agglomeration leading to superagglomerates and a gel-like structure for microgravity (0-g) silane and acetylene flames. Ultimately one would apply this understanding to predicting flame conditions that could lead to the gas phase production of an aero-gel. The approach is to burn acetylene and silane and to analyze the evolution of the soot and silica agglomerates. Acetylene is chosen because it has one of the highest soot volume fractions and there is evidence of super agglomerates being formed in laminar acetylene flames. Silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke.

  2. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the Reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene and for a number of isomers of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene.

  3. Structure of the non-redox-active tungsten/[4Fe:4S] enzyme acetylene hydratase.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Grazyna B; Ullmann, G Matthias; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Schink, Bernhard; Kroneck, Peter M H; Einsle, Oliver

    2007-02-27

    The tungsten-iron-sulfur enzyme acetylene hydratase stands out from its class because it catalyzes a nonredox reaction, the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Sequence comparisons group the protein into the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family, and it contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide-ligated tungsten atom and a cubane-type [4Fe:4S] cluster. The crystal structure of acetylene hydratase at 1.26 A now shows that the tungsten center binds a water molecule that is activated by an adjacent aspartate residue, enabling it to attack acetylene bound in a distinct, hydrophobic pocket. This mechanism requires a strong shift of pK(a) of the aspartate, caused by a nearby low-potential [4Fe:4S] cluster. To access this previously unrecognized W-Asp active site, the protein evolved a new substrate channel distant from where it is found in other molybdenum and tungsten enzymes. PMID:17360611

  4. Adsorption of Acetylene on a Pd-Pb Bimetallic Surface — a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, R. M.; Touroude, R.; Castellani, N. J.

    A semiempirical molecular orbital study of acetylene adsorption over Pd(111) and Pd3Pb(111) has been performed. A strong negative effect of Pb atoms on Pd chemisorptive strength was observed in the alloy. This behavior is related to a lower hybridization between acetylene π* and Pd orbitals when this mental interacts with Pb. Moreover this negative effect of Pb is of a strong local character.

  5. Tunable thermal conductivity in carbon allotrope sheets: Role of acetylenic linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Ai-Juan; Tang, Yuansheng

    2015-11-01

    The versatility of carbon in forming the hybridization states allows one to design more carbon allotropes with various fascinating properties by replacing some aromatic bonds with acetylenic linkages. We investigate thermal conductivities of carbon allotrope sheets with different configurations by nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations. It is found that the acetylenic linkages not only considerably reduce thermal conductivity but also can effectively tune thermal conductivity through the various bonding methods. We suggest that the structure of stripes of benzene rings transversely bonded with the acetylenic linkages can potentially be one of high thermoelectric materials. We find that the reason for the manipulation of thermal conductivity by the acetylenic linkage can be attributed to the strong localizations of phonon modes that result in the reduced phonon group velocity and the shortened lifetime of phonons. It is also observed that thermal conductivity of graphyne sheet shows a power-law divergence with respect to the length. We propose a new approach to manipulating thermal conductivities in the carbon allotropes through the assembling of acetylenic linkages. Our findings conclusively clarify the role of acetylenic linkages in thermal transport and offer some valuable insights into the exploration of new thermoelectric materials as well as the experimental control of heat flux.

  6. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (∼200 cm(3) (STP) g(-1)). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption-desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake. PMID:26123775

  7. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm3 (STP) g−1 and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm3 (STP) cm−3 at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (∼200 cm3 (STP) g−1). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption–desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake. PMID:26123775

  8. Mechanism-based inactivation of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase by aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.; Lu, J.Y.L.; Alworth, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxgenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene, 3-ethynylperylene, 2-ethynylfluorene, methyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene, cis- and trans-1-(2-bromovinyl)pyrene, and 1-allylpyrene serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, while 1-vinylpyrene and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes (suicide destruction). The suicide inhibition by these aryl acetylenes therefore does not involve covalent binding to the heme moiety of the monooxygenase. Nevertheless, in the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled 1-ethynylpyrene becomes covalently attached to the cytochrome P-450 protein; the measured stoichiometry of binding is one 1-ethynylpyrene per P-450 heme unit. The authors conclude that the inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase produced by 1-ethynylpyrene may be related to the mechanism of suicide inhibition of P-450 activity by chloramphenicol rather than the mechanism of suicide destruction of P-450 previously described for acetylene and propyne.

  9. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  10. Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

  11. Discovery, Development, and Commercialization of Gold Catalysts for Acetylene Hydrochlorination.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter; Carthey, Nicholas; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-11-25

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a major chemical intermediate for the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which is the third most important polymer in use today. Hydrochlorination of acetylene is a major route for the production of vinyl chloride, since production of the monomer is based in regions of the world where coal is abundant. Until now, mercuric chloride supported on carbon is used as the catalyst in the commercial process, and this exhibits severe problems associated with catalyst lifetime and mercury loss. It has been known for over 30 years that gold is a superior catalyst, but it is only now that it is being commercialized. In this Perspective we discuss the use and disadvantages of the mercury catalyst and the advent of the gold catalysts for this important reaction. The nature of the active site and the possible reaction mechanism are discussed. Recent advances in the design and preparation of active gold catalysts containing ultralow levels of gold are described. In the final part, a view to the future of this chemistry will be discussed as well as the possible avenues for the commercial potential of gold catalysis. PMID:26529366

  12. An improved processible acetylene-terminated polyimide for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, A. L.; Naselow, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The newest member of a family of thermosetting acetylene-substituted polyimide oligomers is HR600P. This oligomer is the isoimide version of the oligomer known as HR600P and Thermid 600. Although both types of material yield the same heat resistant end products after cure, HR600P has much superior processing characteristics. This attributed to its lower melting temperature (160 + or - 10 C, 320 + or - 20 F) in contrast to 202 C (396 F) for Thermid MC-600, its longer gel time at its processing temperature (16 to 30 minutes bvs 3 minutes), and its excellent solubility in low boiling solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, glymes, or 4:1 methyl ethyl ketone/toluene mixtures. These advantages provide more acceptable coating and impregnation procedures, allow for more complete removal at lower temperatures, provide a longer pot life or working time, and allow composite structure fabrication in conventional autoclaves used for epoxy composite curing. The excellent processing characteristics of HR600P allow its use in large area laminated structures, structural composites, and molding compositions.

  13. Acetylene fermentation: An Earth-based analog of biological carbon cycling on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Hoeft, S. E.; Kirshtein, J.; Wolf, K.; Voytek, M. A.; Oremland, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is present in part per million quantities in the atmosphere of Titan; conceivably as an intermediate product of methane photolysis. Currently, Earth’s atmosphere contains only trace amounts of C2H2 (~40 pptv), however higher concentrations likely prevailed during the Hadean and early Archean eons (4.5 - 3.5 Ga). We isolated C2H2-fermenting microbes from various aquatic and sedimentary environments. Acetylene fermentation proceeds via acetylene hydratase (AH) through acetaldehyde, which dismutates to ethanol and acetate, and if oxidants are present (e.g., sulfate) eventually to CO2. Thus, the remnants of a C2H2 cycle exists today on Earth but may also occur on Titan and/or Enceladus, both being planetary bodies hypothesized to have liquid water underlying their frozen surfaces. We developed a molecular method for AH by designing PCR primers to target the functional gene in Pelobacter acetylenicus. We used this method to scan new environments for the presence of AH and we employed DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in order to positively identify pelobacters in environmental samples. Acetylene fermentation was documented in five diverse salt-, fresh-, and ground-water sites. Pelobacter was identified as the genus responsible for acetylene fermentation in some, but not all, of these sites. Successful probing for AH preceded the discovery of acetylene consumption in a contaminated groundwater site, demonstrating the utility of functional gene probing. A pure culture of a C2H2-fermenting pelobacter was obtained from an intertidal mudflat. We also obtained an enrichment culture (co-cultured with a sulfate reducer) from freshwater lake sediments, but neither was pelobacter nor AH detected in this sample, suggesting that an alternative pathway may be involved here. Slurry experiments using these lake sediments either with or without added C2H2 or sulfate showed that sulfate reduction and acetylene fermentation were independent processes. In general, the

  14. Multiple Mode Actuation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2001-01-01

    The effects of multiple mode periodic excitation on the evolution of a circular turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit. Streamwise and cross-stream excitations were introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet on opposing sides of the jet. The introduction of high amplitude, periodic excitation in the streamwise direction enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Cross-stream excitation applied over a fraction of the jet circumference can deflect the jet away from the excitation slot. The two modes of excitation were combined using identical frequencies and varying the relative phase between the two actuators in search of an optimal response. It is shown that, for low and moderate periodic momentum input levels, the jet deflection angles depend strongly on the relative phase between the two actuators. Optimum performance is achieved when the phase difference is pi +/- pi/6. The lower effectiveness of the equal phase excitation is attributed to the generation of an azimuthally symmetric mode that does not produce the required non-axisymmetric vectoring. For high excitation levels, identical phase becomes more effective, while phase sensitivity decreases. An important finding was that with proper phase tuning, two unsteady actuators can be combined to obtain a non-linear response greater than the superposition of the individual effects.

  15. Chromophores from Photolyzed Ammonia Reacting with Acetylene: Application to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Robert W.; Baines, K. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.

    2012-10-01

    The production mechanisms of chromophores at Jupiter, and notably at the Great Red Spot (GRS), have been long-standing puzzles. A clue to the formation of the GRS coloring agent may be the great height of this storm, which can upwell ammonia to pressure levels of a few hundred mbar where solar photons capable of dissociating NH3 penetrate. Acetylene formed at higher altitudes can diffuse down and react with the NH3 photodissociation products, forming a deposit that absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible region (Ferris and Ishikawa, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312, 1988). We have investigated the system NH3 + C2H2 + CH4 using a Zn lamp emitting at 214 nm to produce NH2 + H and subsequent reaction products. The deposits produced in these reactions were analyzed by optical and infrared spectroscopy and soft-ionization (He*) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The combination of NH3 + CH4 produced no visibly absorbing material, but NH3 + C2H2 and NH3 + C2H2 + CH4 mixtures both produced a yellow-orange film whose transmission spectra are similar to that of the GRS obtained by Cassini VIMS. Infrared spectra show a strong band at 2056 wavenumbers which may arise from nitrile (-CN), isonitrile (-NC), or diazide (-CNN) functional groups. The high-resolution mass spectra are consistent with compounds of the form CnH2n+1Nm, similar to the products formed in NH3 + CH4 spark discharges (Molton and Ponnamperuma, Icarus 21, 166-174, 1974). We thank NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program for support.

  16. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Acetylene and Ethane Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Ferrante, R. F.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-containing ices have characteristic absorption bands in both the mid- and near-infrared spectral regions, yet accurate optical constants are not available for most of these molecules. Ices with a hydrocarbon component have been identified on several TNOs (1) and the presence of volatiles, such as hydrocarbons, is inferred for intermediate or large TNOs based on sublimation models (2, 3). In our laboratory we recently have undertaken low-temperature spectroscopic studies of C2 hydrocarbons. We report IR spectra for acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) ice in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at multiple temperatures. We include measurements of the refractive index at 670 nm for both the amorphous and crystalline phases of each ice. The optical constants, the real (n) and imaginary (k) components of the complex index of refraction, were determined from 7000 - 400 cm-1 (1.4 - 25 microns) at multiple temperatures using a Kramers-Kronig analysis. A goal of the present work is to provide a data base of optical constants of C2 molecules similar to that of Hudgins et al. (4) and Moore et al. (5). These values, as well as our calculated individual band strengths, will have great practical importance for the ongoing analysis of TNO spectra. (1) Brown, M.E. et al., Astron J., 133, 284, 2007. (2) Delsanti, A. et al., A&A, 52, A40, 2010. (3) Schaller, E. L. & Brown, M. E., ApJ, 659, L61, 2007. (4) Hudgins, D. M. et al., ApJS, 86, 713, 1993. (5) Moore, M. H. et al., ApJS, 191, 96, 2010. This work is supported by NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres, Outer Planets, and Cassini Data Analysis programs, and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  17. Acetylene fuels reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter-containing microbial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Mao, X.; Mahandra, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Gushgari, S.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Liu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) poses a threat to health and leads to the generation of vinyl chloride (VC), a carcinogen. Dehalococcoides mccartyi is the only bacterium that can completely dechlorinate TCE to ethene (C2H4). Acetylene (C2H2) occurs in TCE-contaminated sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of TCE. Yet acetylene inhibits a variety of microbial processes including methanogesis and reductive dechlorination. Pelobacter acetylenicus and related species can metabolize acetylene via acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutatse thereby generating acetate and H2 as endproducts, which could serve as electron donor and carbon source for growth of D. mccartyi. We found that 1mM acetylene (aqueous) inhibits growth of D. mccartyi strain 195 on 0.3 mM TCE, but that the inhibition was removed after 12 days with the addition of an acetylene-utilizing isolate from San Francisco Bay, Pelobacter strain SFB93. TCE did not inhibit the growth of this Pelobacter at the concentrations tested (0.1-0.5 mM) and TCE was not consumed by strain SFB93. Co-cultures of strain 195 with strain SFB93 at 5% inoculation were established in 120 mL serum bottles containing 40 mL defined medium. TCE was supplied at a liquid concentration of 0.1 mM, with 0.1 mM acetylene and N2/CO2 (90:10 v/v) headspace at 34 °C. Co-cultures were subsequently transferred (5% vol/vol inoculation) to generate subcultures after 20 μmol TCE was reduced to VC and 36 μmol acetylene was depleted. Aqueous H2 ranged from 114 to 217 nM during TCE-dechlorination, and the cell yield of strain 195 was 3.7 ±0.3 × 107 cells μmol-1 Cl- released. In a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture (ANAS) under the same conditions as above, it was found that inhibition of dechlorination by acetylene was reversed after 19 days by adding SFB93. Thus we showed that a co-culture of Pelobacter SFB93 and D. mccartyi 195 could be maintained with C2H2 as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE

  18. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: Cluster ion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kocisek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Farnik, M.

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of Almost-Equal-To 8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations ( Almost-Equal-To 0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}{sup +}. At the electron energies Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 21.5 eV above the CH+CH{sup +} dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sup +}, n Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2, are observed. For n Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}-k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +} and [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH -k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +}. The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of Almost-Equal-To 13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +} ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Ar{sub n}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sup +} fragments above Almost-Equal-To 15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Ar{sub n{>=}2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub m{>=}2}{sup +} at Almost-Equal-To 13

  19. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  20. Flexible band gap tuning of hexagonal boron nitride sheets interconnected by acetylenic bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Luo, Youhua; Feng, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Lixia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-08-21

    The energetic and electronic properties of acetylenic-bond-interconnected hexagonal boron nitride sheets (BNyne), in which the number of rows of BN hexagonal rings (denoted as BN width) between neighboring arrays of acetylenic linkages increases consecutively, have been explored using first-principles calculations. Depending on the spatial position of B/N atoms with respect to the acetylenic linkages, there are two different types of configurations. The band structure features and band gap evolutions of BNyne structures as a function of the BN width can be categorized into two families, corresponding to two distinct types of configurations. In particular, for both types of BNyne structures, the band gap variations exhibit odd-even oscillating behavior depending on the BN width, which is related to the different symmetries of acetylenic chains in the unit cell. These results suggest that the embedded linear acetylenic chains can provide more flexibility for manipulation of the atomic and electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride. These sp-sp(2) hybrid structures might promise importantly potential applications for developing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26194068

  1. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  2. Jet pump with labyrinth seal

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, L.L.; Kudirka, A.A.

    1981-08-25

    In a jet pump for a nuclear reactor a slip joint is provided between the mixer and diffuser sections thereof to facilitate jet pump maintenance and to allow thermal expansion. To limit leakage flow through the slip joint to a rate below that which causes unacceptable flow induced vibration of the pump, there is provided a labyrinth seal for the slip joint in the form of a series of flow expansion chambers formed by a series of spaced grooves in the annulus of the slip joint.

  3. Highly enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes via rhodium catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jong Uk; Krische, Michael J

    2006-08-23

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetylenic aldehydes 1a-12a using chirally modified cationic rhodium catalysts enables highly enantioselective reductive cyclization to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 1b-12b. Using an achiral hydrogenation catalyst, the chiral racemic acetylenic aldehydes 13a-15a engage in highly syn-diastereoselective reductive cyclizations to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 13b-15b. Ozonolysis of cyclization products 7b and 9b allows access to optically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones 7c and 9c. Reductive cyclization of enyne 7a under a deuterium atmosphere provides the monodeuterated product deuterio-7b, consistent with a catalytic mechanism involving alkyne-carbonyl oxidative coupling followed by hydrogenolytic cleavage of the resulting oxametallacycle. These hydrogen-mediated transformations represent the first examples of the enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes. PMID:16910650

  4. Examining the impact of acetylene on N-fixation and the active sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Heiss, Elise M.; Rogener, Mary Kate; Newell, Silvia E.; LeCleir, Gary R.; Kortebein, Sarah M.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Here we examined the impact of a commonly employed method used to measure nitrogen fixation, the acetylene reduction assay (ARA), on a marine sediment community. Historically, the ARA technique has been broadly employed for its ease of use, in spite of numerous known artifacts. To gauge the severity of these effects in a natural environment, we employed high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to detect differences in acetylene-treated sediments vs. non-treated control sediments after a 7 h incubation. Within this short time period, significant differences were seen across all activity of microbes identified in the sediment, implying that the changes induced by acetylene occur quickly. The results have important implications for our understanding of marine nitrogen budgets. Moreover, because the ARA technique has been widely used in terrestrial and freshwater habitats, these results may be applicable to other ecosystems. PMID:26029177

  5. Deactivation mechanisms for Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} acetylene hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.B.; Huggins, B.J.; Meyers, B.L.; Kaminsky, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The selective hydrogenation of acetylenic impurities to ethylene is a crucial purification step in the production of olefins by steam cracking. This hydrogenation is done catalytically using a Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in a fixed bed reactor. The designed lifetime of the catalyst in a front end acetylene converter is about 4 years. Accelerated catalyst deactivation and thermal runaways caused by loss in catalyst selectivity are common problems which plague acetylene converters. Such problems result in unscheduled shutdowns and increased costs to replace deactivated catalyst. This presentation outlines several deactivation mechanisms of the catalyst and discusses how they affect catalyst lifetime and performance. Catalyst characterization using electron microscopy and CO chemisorption provides information on how poisons deteriorate the catalyst and Pd particle size changes produced by use and regeneration. Thermal gravimetric analysis was also used to determine the extent of coke burn-off using less severe regeneration procedures.

  6. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  7. Effect of Protein Additives on Acetylene Reduction (Nitrogen Fixation) by Rhizobium in the Presence and Absence of Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stephen J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of protein additives on acetylene reduction (N2 fixation) by Rhizobium associated with soybean cells (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in vitro was studied. Acetylene reduction was promoted on the basal medium supplemented with 1.4 mg of N/ml supplied as aqueous extracts of hexane-extracted soybean, red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), or peas (Pisum sativum L.). Commercial samples of α-casein, or bovine serum albumin also promoted acetylene reduction at a concentration of 1.4 mg of N/ml of basal medium, but egg albumin supplying an equal amount of nitrogen to the basal medium completely suppressed acetylene reduction. Autoclaving the aqueous extract of hexane-extracted soybean meal had no effect on its ability to promote acetylene reduction. The presence of 40 mm succinate decreased acetylene reduction with leguminous proteins supplying 1.4 mg of N/ml but promoted acetylene reduction by Rhizobium 32H1-soybean cell associations on media containing α-casein, bovine serum albumin, or egg albumin suppling 1.4 mg of N/ml. Similar results were obtained with both cowpea Rhizobium 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum 61A96. Pure cultures of Rhizobium 32H1 developed acetylene-reducing activity in the presence of soybean extract on basal agar medium and in vermiculite supplied with N-free mineral salts plus crude soybean meal. The results suggest that in certain situations, free living Rhizobium may reduce N2 under field conditions. PMID:16659592

  8. Estimation of nitrogenase activity in the presence of ethylene biosynthesis by use of deuterated acetylene as a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Vien, D.; Fateley, W.G.; Davis, L.C. )

    1989-02-01

    Nitrogenase reduces deuterated acetylene primarily to cis dideuterated ethylene. This can be distinguished from undeuterated ethylene by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Characteristic bands in the region from 800 to 3,500 cm-1 can be used to identify and quantitate levels of these products. This technique is applicable to field studies of nitrogen fixation where ethylene biosynthesis by plants or bacteria is occurring. We have verified the reaction stoichiometry by using Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in soybeans. The most useful bands for quantitation of substrate purity and product distribution are as follows: acetylene-d0, 3,374 cm-1; acetylene-d1, 2,584 cm-1; acetylene-d2, 2,439 cm-1; cis-ethylene-d2, 843 cm-1; trans-ethylene-d2, 988 cm-1; ethylene-d1, 943 cm-1; ethylene-d0, 949 cm-1. (The various deuterated ethylenes and acetylenes are designated by a lowercase d and subscript to indicate the number, but not the position, of deuterium atoms in the molecule.) Mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph system has been used to assist in quantitation of the substrate and product distributions. Significant amounts of trans-ethylene-d2 were produced by both wild-type and nifV mutant K. pneumoniae. Less of this product was observed with the soybean system.

  9. Heats of Formation of Triplet Ethylene, Ethylidene, and Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.T.; Matus, M.H.; Lester Jr, W.A.; Dixon, David A.

    2007-06-28

    Heats of formation of the lowest triplet state of ethylene and the ground triplet state of ethylidene have been predicted by high level electronic structure calculations. Total atomization energies obtained from coupled-cluster CCSD(T) energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation consistent basis sets (CBS), plus additional corrections predict the following heats of formation in kcal/mol: Delta H0f(C2H4,3A1) = 80.1 at 0 K and 78.5 at 298 K, and Delta H0f(CH3CH,3A") = 86.8 at 0 K and 85.1 at 298 K, with an error of less than +-1.0 kcal/mol. The vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet separation energies of ethylene were calculated as Delta ES-T,vert = 104.1 and Delta ES-T,adia = 65.8 kcal/mol. These results are in excellent agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) values of 103.5 +- 0.3 and 66.4 +- 0.3 kcal/mol. Both sets of computational values differ from the experimental estimate of 58 +- 3 kcal/mol for the adiabatic splitting. The computed singlet-triplet gap at 0 K for acetylene is Delta ES-T,adia(C2H2) = 90.5 kcal/mol, which is in notable disagreement with the experimental value of 82.6 kcal/mol. The heat of formation of the triplet is Delta H0f(C2H2,3B2) = 145.3 kcal/mol. There is a systematic underestimation of the singlet-triplet gaps in recent photodecomposition experiments by ~;;7 to 8 kcal/mol. For vinylidene, we predict Delta H0f(H2CC,1A1) = 98.8 kcal/mol at 298 K (exptl. 100.3 +- 4.0), Delta H0f(H2CC,3B2) = 146.2 at 298 K, and an energy gap Delta ES-T-adia(H2CC) = 47.7 kcal/mol.

  10. Oxygen transport through polyethylene terephthalate (PET) coated with plasma-polymerized acetylene at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick; Garcia-Pérez, Manuel; Sablani, Shyam

    2011-10-01

    Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. E.M. Moser, R. Urech, E. Hack, H. Künzli, E. Müller, Thin

  11. Simulations of shock-induced mixing& combustion of an acetylene cloud in a chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J B; Day, M S; Beckner, V E; Kuhl, A L; Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H

    2001-02-06

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of the interaction of a blast wave with an acetylene bubble in a closed chamber. We model the system using the inviscid Euler equations for a mixture of ideal gases. The formulation specifies the thermodynamic behavior of the system using a Chemkin interface and includes the capability to model combustion as the ambient air mixes with the acetylene. The simulations are performed using a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on a second-order Godunov integration scheme. Simulations are compared with experimental measurements for the same configuration.

  12. Acetylene- and Phenylacetylene-Terminated Poly(Arylene Ether Benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Polymers prepared by first synthesizing polymers terminated with hydroxy groups, then reacting them with either 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride or 4-fluoro-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone. Endcapped polymers thermally cured to yield materials with attractive combination of properties. Cured acetylene-and phenylacetylene-terminated PAEBI's exhibit higher glass-transition temperatures and better retention of mechanical properties at high temperatures. Cured acetylene- and phenylacetylene-terminated polymers exhibit excellent adhesion to copper foil and polyimide film. Potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, composite matrices, fibers, films, membranes, and moldings.

  13. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  14. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  15. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  16. DNS of autoigniting turbulent jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaithambi, Rajapandiyan; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a round turbulent hydrogen jet injected into vitiated coflowing air is performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 and the results are discussed. A predictor-corrector density based method for DNS/LES of compressible chemically reacting flows is developed and used on a cylindrical grid. A novel strategy to remove the center-line stiffness is developed. A fully developed turbulent pipe flow simulation is prescribed as the velocity inlet for the fuel jet. The flame base is observed to be stabilized primarily by autoignition. Further downstream the flame exhibits a diffusion flame structure with regions of rich and lean premixed regimes flanking the central diffusion flame. The lift-off height is well predicted by a simple relation between the ignition delay of the most-reactive mixture fraction and the streamwise velocity of the jet and coflow.

  17. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  18. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  19. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  20. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  1. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.60 Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene. (a) Type and service pressure. A DOT 8AL cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder...

  2. Association Mechanisms of Unsaturated C2 Hydrocarbons with Their Cations: Acetylene and Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The ion-molecule association mechanism of acetylene and ethylene with their cations is investigated by ab initio quantum chemical methods to understand the structures, association energies, and the vibrational and electronic spectra of the products. Stable puckered cyclic isomers are found as the result of first forming less stable linear and bridge isomers. The puckered cyclic complexes are calculated to be strongly bound, by 87, 35 and 56 kcal/mol for acetylene-acetylene cation, ethylene-ethylene cation and acetylene-ethylene cation, respectively. These stable complexes may be intermediates that participate in further association reactions. There are no association barriers, and no significant inter-conversion barriers, so the initial linear and bridge encounter complexes are unlikely to be observable. However, the energy gap between the bridged and cyclic puckered isomers greatly differs from complex to complex: it is 44 kcal/mol in C4H4 +, but only 6 kcal/mol in C4H8 +. The accurate CCSD(T) calculations summarized above are also compared against less computationally expensive MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for structures, relative energies, and vibrational spectra. Calculated vibrational spectra are compared against available experiments for cyclobutadiene cation. Electronic spectra are also calculated using time-dependent DFT.

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or have a refrigeration system with the following features: (1) A vapor compressor that does not raise the... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded...

  8. OZONE PRODUCTION FROM IRRADIATION OF ACETYLENE/CHLORINE MIXTURES IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of chlorine radicals with acetylene in air in the absence of oxides of nitrogen result In the formation of ozone. o ozone is observed when chlorine radicals react with methylacetylene or ethylacetylene under similar conditions. ormyl chloride is observed in all syste...

  9. Methane emissions measured at two California landfills by OTM-10 and an acetylene tracer method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane emissions were measured at two municipal solid waste landfills in California using static flux chambers, an optical remote sensing approach known as vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) using a tunable diode laser (TDL) and a novel acetylene tracer method. The tracer meth...

  10. Conformational flexibility of fused tetracenedione propellers obtained from one-pot reductive dimerization of acetylenic quinones.

    PubMed

    Vasilevsky, Sergei F; Baranov, Denis S; Mamatyuk, Victor I; Fadeev, Dmitry S; Gatilov, Yurii V; Stepanov, Aleksandr A; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Alabugin, Igor V

    2015-02-01

    Reductive dimerization of acetylenic anthraquinones provides synthetic access to flexible nonplanar polyaromatics with a tetracenedione core. In solution, these nonplanar, contorted polycycles exist as equilibrating mixtures of two symmetric conformers. The fused tetracenediones are easily reduced and exhibit rich electrochemical behavior. PMID:25575160

  11. Selective hydrogenation of dienic and acetylenic compounds on metal-containing catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytsenko, V. D.; Mel'nikov, D. P.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on selective hydrogenation of dienic and acetylenic hydrocarbons and their derivatives on metal-containing catalysts are reviewed. The review covers publications over a wide period of time and concentrates on the fundamental principles of catalyst operation. The catalysts modified in the surface layer were shown to be promising for selective hydrogenation.

  12. A Safe and Easy Classroom Demonstration of the Generation of Acetylene Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Marilyn Blagg; Krause, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In this demonstration of the generation and combustion of acetylene, calcium carbide and water are allowed to react in a latex examination glove. Two student volunteers perform the demonstration with instructor guidance. This safe, popular demonstration, originally intended to illustrate the alkyne family of compounds, can be used with a variety…

  13. Acetylene measurement in flames by chirp-based quantum cascade laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Quine, Zachary R; McNesby, Kevin L

    2009-06-01

    We have designed and characterized a mid-IR spectrometer built around a pulsed distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser using the characteristic frequency down-chirp to scan through the spectral region 6.5 cm(-1) spectral region. The behavior of this chirp is extensively measured. The accuracy and detection limits of the system as an absorption spectrometer are demonstrated first by measuring spectra of acetylene through a single pass 16 cm absorption cell in real time at low concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The smallest detectable peak is measured to be approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) absorbance units, yielding a minimum detectable concentration length product of 2.4 parts per million meter at standard temperature and pressure. This system is then used to detect acetylene within an ethylene-air opposed flow flame. Measurements of acetylene content as a function of height above the fuel source are presented, as well as measurements of acetylene produced in fuel breakdown as a function of preinjection fuel temperature. PMID:19488121

  14. Laboratory astrochemistry: catalytic conversion of acetylene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over SiC grains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Q; Li, Q; Liu, B S; Gover, R K E; Sarre, P J; Cheung, A S-C

    2016-02-01

    Catalytic conversion reactions of acetylene on a solid SiC grain surface lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and are expected to mimic chemical processes in certain astrophysical environments. Gas-phase PAHs and intermediates were detected in situ using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and their formation was confirmed using GC-MS in a separate experiment by flowing acetylene gas through a fixed-bed reactor. Activation of acetylene correlated closely with the dangling bonds on the SiC surface which interact with and break the C-C π bond. The addition of acetylene to the resulting radical site forms a surface ring structure which desorbs from the surface. The results of HRTEM and TG indicate that soot and graphene formation on the SiC surface depends strongly on reaction temperature. We propose that PAHs as seen through the 'UIR' emission bands can be formed through decomposition of a graphene-like material, formed on the surface of SiC grains in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. PMID:26752613

  15. TOXICITY OF ACETYLENIC ALCOHOLS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS: NARCOSIS AND PROELECTROPHILE ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 96-h LC50 values for 16 acetylenic alcohols in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were determined using continuous-flow diluters. The measured LC50 values for seven tertiary propargylic alcohols agreed closely with the QSAR predictions based upon data for other organic ...

  16. Mechanism of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase from quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; Himo, Fahmi

    2010-12-28

    Acetylene hydratase is a tungsten-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the nonredox hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the reaction mechanism of this enzyme with a large model of the active site devised on the basis of the native X-ray crystal structure. Based on the calculations, we propose a new mechanism in which the acetylene substrate first displaces the W-coordinated water molecule, and then undergoes a nucleophilic attack by the water molecule assisted by an ionized Asp13 residue at the active site. This is followed by proton transfer from Asp13 to the newly formed vinyl anion intermediate. In the subsequent isomerization, Asp13 shuttles a proton from the hydroxyl group of the vinyl alcohol to the α-carbon. Asp13 is thus a key player in the mechanism, but also W is directly involved in the reaction by binding and activating acetylene and providing electrostatic stabilization to the transition states and intermediates. Several other mechanisms are also considered but the energetic barriers are found to be very high, ruling out these possibilities. PMID:21149684

  17. A theory for turbulent curved wall jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1986-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed to describe the flow of a turbulent wall jet along a curved surface into a quiescent atmosphere. An integral method is used to solve the momentum equation and identifies three contributions to the spreading rate of the wall jet: (1) turbulent diffusion in the wall jet; (2) wall curvature; and (3) rate of change of wall curvature. Closed from approximate solutions are found for the case of a plane wall, a circular cylinder, and a logarithmic spiral surface. Comparison with experimental data for these three cases is made showing good agreement.

  18. Purification and characterization of acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus, a tungsten iron-sulfur protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, B M; Schink, B

    1995-01-01

    Acetylene hydratase of the mesophilic fermenting bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus catalyzes the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Growth of P. acetylenicus with acetylene and specific acetylene hydratase activity depended on tungstate or, to a lower degree, molybdate supply in the medium. The specific enzyme activity in cell extract was highest after growth in the presence of tungstate. Enzyme activity was stable even after prolonged storage of the cell extract or of the purified protein under air. However, enzyme activity could be measured only in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as titanium(III) citrate or dithionite. The enzyme was purified 240-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and a second anion-exchange chromatography step, with a yield of 36%. The protein was a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of 73 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was at pH 4.2. Per mol of enzyme, 4.8 mol of iron, 3.9 mol of acid-labile sulfur, and 0.4 mol of tungsten, but no molybdenum, were detected. The Km for acetylene as assayed in a coupled photometric test with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH was 14 microM, and the Vmax was 69 mumol.min-1.mg of protein-1. The optimum temperature for activity was 50 degrees C, and the apparent pH optimum was 6.0 to 6.5. The N-terminal amino acid sequence gave no indication of resemblance to any enzyme protein described so far. PMID:7592321

  19. Seasonal Variations of Temperature, Acetylene and Ethane in Saturn's Stratosphere from 2005 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, James; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Moses, J. I.; Greathouse, T. K.; Friedson, A. J.; Hesman, B.; Hurley, J.; Merlet, C.

    2012-10-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) exemplify by-products of complex photochemistry in Saturn’s stratosphere. Their relative stability together with their strong vertical gradients in concentration allow for their use as tracers of vertical motion in Saturn’s lower stratosphere. Earlier studies of Saturn's hydrocarbons have provided only a snapshot of their behaviour with temporal variations remaining to be determined. In this study, we investigate how the thermal structure and concentrations of acetylene and ethane have evolved on Saturn with the changing season. We use FIRMAP (15.5 cm-1 spectral resolution) Cassini-CIRS observations, initially retrieve temperature and subsequently retrieve the abundances of acetylene and ethane. In comparing 2005, 2009 and 2010 results, we observe the disappearance of Saturn's southern warm polar hood with cooling of up to 18.6 K ± 0.9 K at 1.1 mbar south of 75°S (planetographic). This suggests dissipation of Saturn's south polar vortex in addition to an autumnal cooling. We observe a 20% ± 9% enrichment of acetylene and a 30% ± 10% enrichment of ethane at 2.1 mbar at 25°N, together with a 14% ± 9% depletion of acetylene and an 18% ± 7% depletion of ethane at the same altitude at 15°S. This suggests the presence of localised downwelling and upwelling at these latitudes, respectively. These vertical motions are consistent with a recently-developed GCM (global circulation model) of Saturn's tropopause and stratosphere, which predicts this pattern of upwelling and downwelling as a result of seasonally-reversing Hadley circulation.

  20. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  1. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  2. Jet Deflection by Very Weak Guide Fields during Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Che, H.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2011-09-23

    Previous 2D simulations of reconnection using a standard model of initially antiparallel magnetic fields have detected electron jets outflowing from the x point into the ion outflow exhausts. Associated with these jets are extended ''outer electron diffusion regions.'' New PIC simulations with an ion to electron mass ratio as large as 1836 (an H{sup +} plasma) now show that the jets are strongly deflected and the outer electron diffusion region is broken up by a very weak out-of-plane magnetic guide field, even though the diffusion rate itself is unchanged. Jet outflow and deflection are interpreted in terms of electron dynamics and are compared to recent measurements of jets in the presence of a small guide field in Earth's magnetosheath.

  3. Terahertz Spectroscopy of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2H2 and 12C2D2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, B.; Pearson, J.

    2009-12-01

    Several fundamental interstellar molecules, e.g., C2H2, CH4 and C3, are completely symmetric molecules and feature no permanent dipole moment and no pure rotation spectrum. As a result they have only previously been observed in the infrared. However, directly observing them with the rest of the molecular column especially when the source is spatially resolved would be very valuable in understanding chemical evolution. Vibrational difference bands provide a means to detect symmetric molecules with microwave precision using terahertz techniques. Herschel, SOFIA and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of vibrational difference bands of light symmetric species. This paper reports laboratory results on 12C2H2 and 12C2D2. Symmetric acetylene isotopologues have two bending modes, the trans bending and the cis bending. Their difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 3500 GHz for 12C2H2 and 900 GHz for 12C2D2. Twenty 12C2H2 P branch high-J transitions and two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 P Q and R branch transitions have been measured in the 0.2 - 1.6 THz region with precision of 50 to 100 kHz. These lines were modeled together with prior data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2H2 and 12C2D2 with the combined data set, and new frequency and intensity predictions were made to support astrophysics applications. The research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. S. Y. was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program, administrated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  4. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  6. A diffusion model for tungsten powder carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Lewis V.; Donelson, Richard; Hehemann, Robert f.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the carburization kinetics of tungsten powders mixed with carbon and heated in hydrogen. It is based on diffusion of carbon through a shell of WC growing into particles which are modeled as spheres. The activation energy is 58 kcal/mole in the temperature range 1056 to 1833 °C. Hydrogen gas is important to transport carbon as methane or acetylene, but increased hydrogen pressure increases the rate of carburization so little that an adsorbed species such as CH probably controls the carbon concentration at the particle surface.

  7. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  8. Acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of the tungsten iron-sulfur enzyme.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, R U; Krieger, R; Ensign, S; Kroneck, P M; Schink, B

    1999-08-01

    Acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus is a tungsten iron-sulfur protein involved in the fermentation of acetylene to ethanol and acetate. Expression of the enzyme was increased 10-fold by feeding a 50-L batch culture continuously with 104 Pa acetylene at pH 6.8-7.0. Acetylene hydratase was purified to homogeneity by a three-step procedure in either the absence or presence of dioxygen. The enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 73 kDa (SDS/PAGE) or 83 kDa (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization MS) and contained 0.5 +/- 0.1 W (inductively coupled plasma/MS) and 1.3 +/- 0.1 molybdopterin-guanine dinucleotide per mol. Selenium was absent. EPR spectra (enzyme as isolated, under air) showed a signal typical of a [3Fe-4S] cluster with gav = 2.01, at 10 K. In enzyme prepared under N2/H2, this signal was absent and reaction with dithionite led to a rhombic signal with gz = 2.048, gy = 1.939 and gx = 1.920 indicative of a low-potential ferredoxin-type [4Fe-4S] cluster. Upon oxidation with hexacyanoferrate(III), a new signal appeared with gx = 2.007, gy = 2.019 and gz = 2.048 (gav = 2.022), which disappeared after further oxidation. The signal was still visible at 150 K and was tentatively assigned to a W(V) center. The iron-sulfur center of acetylene hydratase (prepared under N2/H2) gave a midpoint redox potential of -410 +/- 20 mV in a spectrophotometric titration with dithionite. Enzyme activity depended on the redox potential of the solution, with 50% of maximum activity at -340 +/- 20 mV. The presence of a pterin-guanine dinucleotide cofactor differentiates acetylene hydratase from the aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase-type enzymes which have a pterin mononucleotide cofactor. PMID:10447686

  9. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  10. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  11. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  12. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  13. Effects of sulfide and low redox potential on the inhibition of nitrous oxide reduction by acetylene in Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K M; Cox, R P

    1992-09-01

    Membrane introduction mass spectrometry was used to investigate the inhibitory effect of acetylene on the nitrous oxide reductase activity of intact cells of Pseudomonas nautica. We studied the effects of the concentrations of nitrate and sulfide, and the redox potential, which have all been implicated in causing a decrease in the inhibitory effects of acetylene during measurements of denitrification in natural environments. There was no evidence that the concentration of nitrate influenced the effect of acetylene. Lowering the redox potential with the reductant Ti(III)-nitrilotriacetate caused a slight alleviation of acetylene inhibition. Much greater effects at the same redox potential were obtained with concentrations of sulfide in the range 1-10 microM. PMID:1526461

  14. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  15. An extended source for CN jets in Comet P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavetter, J. J.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    1994-02-01

    We examined radial intensity profiles of CN jets in comparison with the diffuse, isotropic component of the CN coma of Comet P/Halley. All images were bias-subtracted, flat-fielded, and continuum-subtracted. We calculated the diffuse profiles by finding the azimuthal mean of the coma least contaminated by jets yielding profiles similar to those of vectorial and Haser models of simple photodissociation. We found the jet profiles by calculating a mean around a Gaussian-fitted center in r-theta space. There is an unmistakable difference between the profiles of the CN jets and the profiles of the diffuse CN. Spatial derivatives of these profiles, corrected for geometrical expansion, show that the diffuse component is consistent with a simple photodissociation process, but the jet component is not. The peak production of the jet profile occurs 6000 km from the nucleus at a heliocentric distance of 1.4 AU. Modeling of both components of the coma indicate results that are consistent with the diffuse CN photochemically produced, but the CN jets need an additional extended source. We found that about one-half of the CN in the coma of Comet P/Halley originated from the jets, the rest from the diffuse component. These features, along with the width of the jet being approximately constant, are consistent with a CHON grain origin for the jets.

  16. An extended source for CN jets in Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavetter, James Jay; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    1994-01-01

    We examined radial intensity profiles of CN jets in comparison with the diffuse, isotropic component of the CN coma of Comet P/Halley. All images were bias-subtracted, flat-fielded, and continuum-subtracted. We calculated the diffuse profiles by finding the azimuthal mean of the coma least contaminated by jets yielding profiles similar to those of vectorial and Haser models of simple photodissociation. We found the jet profiles by calculating a mean around a Gaussian-fitted center in r-theta space. There is an unmistakable difference between the profiles of the CN jets and the profiles of the diffuse CN. Spatial derivatives of these profiles, corrected for geometrical expansion, show that the diffuse component is consistent with a simple photodissociation process, but the jet component is not. The peak production of the jet profile occurs 6000 km from the nucleus at a heliocentric distance of 1.4 AU. Modeling of both components of the coma indicate results that are consistent with the diffuse CN photochemically produced, but the CN jets need an additional extended source. We found that about one-half of the CN in the coma of Comet P/Halley originated from the jets, the rest from the diffuse component. These features, along with the width of the jet being approximately constant, are consistent with a CHON grain origin for the jets.

  17. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  18. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  19. Formation of Large Ag Clusters with Shells of Methane, Ethylene, and Acetylene in He Droplets.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Evgeny; Gomez, Luis F; Sartakov, Boris G; Vilesov, Andrey F

    2016-09-01

    Helium droplets were used to assemble composite metal-molecular clusters. Produced clusters have several hundreds of silver atoms in the core, immersed in a shell consisting of methane, ethylene, or acetylene molecules. The structure of the clusters was studied via infrared spectra of the C-H stretches of the hydrocarbon molecules. The spectra of the clusters containing methane and acetylene show two distinct features due to molecules on the interface with silver core and those in the volume of the neat molecular part of the clusters. The relative intensities of the peaks are in good agreement with the estimates based on the number of the captured particles. Experiments also suggest that selection rules for infrared transitions for molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces are also valid for silver clusters as small as 300 atoms. PMID:27500443

  20. Cold-atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour for improved wood plastics composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William; Pedrow, Patrick; Englund, Karl; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Plastic composites have become a large class of construction material for exterior applications. One of the main disadvantages of wood plastic composites resides in the weak adhesion between the polar and hydrophilic surface of wood and the non-polar and hydrophobic polyolefin matrix, hindering the dispersion of the flour in the polymer matrix. To improve interfacial compatibility wood flour can be pretreated with environmentally friendly methods such as cold-atmospheric pressure plasma. The objective of this work is therefore to evaluate the potential of plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour to improve the compatibility with polyolefins. This presentation will describe the reactor design used to modify wood flour using acetylene plasma polymerization. The optimum conditions for plasma polymerization on wood particles will also be presented. Finally preliminary results on the wood flour surface properties and use in wood plastic composites will be discussed.

  1. Thermally and oxidatively stable carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based thermosetting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, L.J. Jr.; Keller, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers that can be pyrolyzed to generate new ceramics are of current interest as a route to high temperature materials. Ceramics have desirable thermal stabilities, but are difficult to process. Inorganic-organic hybrid polymers as ceramic precursors combine organic`s ease of processability with inorganic`s desirable thermal and oxidative stability. Carborane-siloxane-acetylenic-based polymers are an application of this approach. The synthesis, characterization and thermooxidative properties of poly(butadiyne-1,7,bis(tetramethyldisiloxyl)-m-carborane) (polymer 2) is described. Polymer 2 is a viscous dark brown polymer that is soluble in most organic solvents making it was to process. Thermal crosslinking of acetylenic groups generates a thermoset which in turn can be pyrolyzed to ceramic material. Thermal and thermo-oxidative characterization is by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cure studies of larger samples are also presented.

  2. The ozone acetylene reaction: concerted or non-concerted reaction mechanism? A quantum chemical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; Crehuet, Ramon; Anglada, Josep; Gräfenstein, Jürgen

    2001-10-01

    The ozone-acetylene reaction is found to proceed via an intermediate van der Waals complex (rather than a biradical), which is the precursor for a concerted symmetry-allowed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction leading to 1,2,3-trioxolene. CCSD(T)/6-311G+(2d, 2p) and CCSD(T)/CBS (complete basis set) calculations predict the ozone-acetylene van der Waals complex to be stable by 2.2 kcal mol -1, the calculated activation enthalpy for the cycloaddition reaction is 9.6 kcal mol -1 and the reaction enthalpy -55.5 kcal mol -1. Calculated kinetic data for the overall reaction ( k=0.8 l mol -1 s-1, A=1.71×10 6 l mol -1 s-1, E a=8.6 kcal mol -1) suggest that there is a need for refined kinetic measurements.

  3. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helps to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.

  4. Low pressure R.F. plasma reactions in light hydrocarbons. Ethylene and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Pietro; Castello, Gianrico; Nicchia, Mario; Munari, Stelio

    The results obtained in the plasmolysis of ethylene and acetylene in an inductively coupled radiofrequency glow discharge are reported. A static system at a constant initial pressure of 0.5 torr and input power of 50 W was used; the gaseous and polymeric products were evaluated and compared with previous data on ethane plasmolysis and other available literature data. The decomposition products of ethylene were similar to those obtained during the plasmolysis of ethane, with a different distribution and a smaller initial increase of the total pressure. The total pressure of acetylene quickly decreased to near zero value at small specific energy, due to rapid polymerization. No gaseous products were detected, except hydrogen and traces of diacetylene.

  5. Application of the photoacoustic method to the measurement of acetylene reduction by nitrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, D. U.; Sthel, M. S.; Carneiro, L. O.; Franco, A. A.; Campos, A. C.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Nitrogenase is an enzyme responsible for the reduction of the atmospheric N2 into NH4^+, which represents the key entry point of the molecular nitrogen into the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen. This enzyme is present in the rhizobial bacteroids, which are symbionts in a Leguminosae plant (Acacia Holosericea), and also reduces acetylene into ethylene at the same rate as the nitrogen reduction. Therefore, a CO2 Laser Photoacoustic system was used for detecting and monitoring the ethylene emission by the nitrogenase activity, in the rhizobial symbionts in Acacia Holosericea, when they are confined in test tubes with acetylene at two different volumes (0.1 and 0.5 ml). Ethylene concentrations are also determined in the ppm range.

  6. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinylacetylene and for a number of isomers Of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinylacetylene.

  7. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  8. Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

  9. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  10. Probing Ionic Complexes of Ethylene and Acetylene with Vacuum-Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Stein, Tamar; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg; White, Alec; Head-Gordon, Martin; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-07-14

    Mixed complexes of acetylene-ethylene are studied using vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. These complexes are produced and ionized at different distances from the exit of a continuous nozzle followed by reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection. Acetylene, with a higher ionization energy (11.4 eV) than ethylene (10.6 eV), allows for tuning the VUV energy and initializing reactions either from a C2H2(+) or a C2H4(+) cation. Pure acetylene and ethylene expansions are separately carried out to compare, contrast, and hence identify products from the mixed expansion: these are C3H3(+) (m/z = 39), C4H5(+) (m/z = 53), and C5H5(+) (m/z = 65). Intensity distributions of C2H2, C2H4, their dimers and reactions products are plotted as a function of ionization distance. These distributions suggest that association mechanisms play a crucial role in product formation closer to the nozzle. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves of the mixed complexes demonstrate rising edges closer to both ethylene and acetylene ionization energies. We use density functional theory (ωB97X-V/aug-cc-pVTZ) to study the structures of the neutral and ionized dimers, calculate their adiabatic and vertical ionization energies, as well as the energetics of different isomers on the potential energy surface (PES). Upon ionization, vibrationally excited clusters can use the extra energy to access different isomers on the PES. At farther ionization distances from the nozzle, where the number densities are lower, unimolecular decay is expected to be the dominant mechanism. We discuss the possible decay pathways from the different isomers on the PES and examine the ones that are energetically accessible. PMID:26983013

  11. Deposition of Functional Coatings from an Acetylene-Containing Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevako, F. V.; Gorbatov, S. V.; Davidovich, P. A.; Prikhod‧ko, E. M.; Shushkov, S. V.; Krul‧, L. P.; Butovskaya, G. V.; Shakhno, O. V.; Gusakova, S. V.; Korolik, O. V.; Mazanik, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Properties of thin coatings formed on polymer and glass substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of nitrogen with acetylene at atmospheric pressure were investigated. It was established that chemically stable transparent films with a mass ratio of fixed carbon and nitrogen C:N ~ 2:1 are formed on the surface of these substrates. When the deposition time was increased, arrays of dendrite-like structures were formed on the substrates.

  12. A new C-10 acetylene and A new triterpenoid from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei Dong; Gao, Xue; Jia, Zhong Jian

    2007-05-01

    From the whole plants of Conyza canadensis (Compositae), a new C-10 acetylene, namely 8R, 9R-dihydroxymatricarine methyl ester (1), and a new triterpenoid, namely 3beta, 16beta, 20beta-trihydroxytaraxast-3-O-palmitoxyl ester (4), were isolated along with eleven known compounds (2, 3, 5-13). The structures of all 13 compounds were elucidated on the basis of their spectral data. The antibacterial activities of compounds 1-3 were evaluated. PMID:17615671

  13. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energy of acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical study of the convergence of the C-H bond dissociation energy (D sub o) of acetylene with respect to both the one- and n-particle spaces. Their best estimate for D sub o of 130.1 plus or minus 1.0 kcal/mole is slightly below previous theoretical estimates, but substantially above the value determined using Stark anticrossing spectroscopy that is asserted to be an upper bound.

  14. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 97. Solubility of Higher Acetylenes and Triple Bonded Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Peter G. T.

    2013-03-01

    Solubility of Ethyne in Liquids was published in 2001 as Vol. 76 of the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. The current work extends the coverage to the solubility in liquids of higher gaseous and liquid acetylenes and to derivatives that contain a triple carbon-carbon bond. Predictive methods for estimating solubilities in water are summarised and usually give values to within an order of magnitude. The literature has been surveyed to the end of 2010.

  15. Pulsed erbium fiber laser with an acetylene-filled photonic crystal fiber for saturable absorption.

    PubMed

    Marty, Patrick Thomas; Morel, Jacques; Feurer, Thomas

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the dynamics of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser that is equipped with an intracavity hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas cell. The cell is filled with acetylene as a saturable absorber. We observe cw operation at low pressures, Q switching at intermediate pressure levels, and mode locking at high pressures applied. Moreover, we show that the transition from the cw to the pulsed mode may be exploited for sensitive gas detection. PMID:21931393

  16. Soluble fluorinated polyimides that contain curable acetylene units in the backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Takeichi, T.; Ogura, S.

    1993-12-31

    Soluble polyimides that contain internal acetylene groups in the backbone were prepared by reacting 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride with various ratio of bis(3-aminophenyl)acetylene and 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl ether. The polyimides were soluble in organic solvents such as N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and N,N-dimethylacetamide, and exhibited reduced viscosities in the range of 0.76-1.44 (in NMP at 30{degrees}C). The crosslinking behavior was examined by DSC. The onset of exotherm appeared at 321-345{degrees}C depending on the acetylene content. After thermal treatment at 350{degrees}C, the polyimides became insoluble in any organic solvents examined and in conc. sulfuric acid. The viscoelastic analyses showed the effect of crosslinking clearly. For example, Tg increased with thermal treatment, and was finally above 400{degrees}C. The drop of modulus at higher temperature also became very small. The TGA analyses also showed excellent thermal stability.

  17. Dehalogenative Homocoupling of Terminal Alkynyl Bromides on Au(111): Incorporation of Acetylenic Scaffolding into Surface Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-26

    On-surface C-C coupling reactions of molecular precursors with alkynyl functional groups demonstrate great potential for the controllable fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures/nanomaterials, such as carbyne, graphyne, and graphdiyne, which demand the incorporation of highly active sp-hybridized carbons. Recently, through a dehydrogenative homocoupling reaction of alkynes, the possibility was presented to fabricate surface nanostructures involving acetylenic linkages, while problems lie in the fact that different byproducts are inevitably formed when triggering the reactions at elevated temperatures. In this work, by delicately designing the molecular precursors with terminal alkynyl bromide, we introduce the dehalogenative homocoupling reactions on the surface. As a result, we successfully achieve the formation of dimer structures, one-dimensional molecular wires and two-dimensional molecular networks with acetylenic scaffoldings on an inert Au(111) surface, where the unexpected C-Au-C organometallic intermediates are also observed. This study further supplements the database of on-surface dehalogenative C-C coupling reactions, and more importantly, it provides us an alternative efficient way for incorporating the acetylenic scaffolding into low-dimensional surface nanostructures. PMID:27326451

  18. Toward spectroscopically accurate global ab initio potential energy surface for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Huixian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    A new full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization on the ground (S{sub 0}) electronic state has been constructed by fitting ∼37 000 high-level ab initio points using the permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method with a root mean square error of 9.54 cm{sup −1}. The geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of acetylene, vinylidene, and all other stationary points (two distinct transition states and one secondary minimum in between) have been determined on this PES. Furthermore, acetylene vibrational energy levels have been calculated using the Lanczos algorithm with an exact (J = 0) Hamiltonian. The vibrational energies up to 12 700 cm{sup −1} above the zero-point energy are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians, suggesting that the PES is approaching spectroscopic accuracy. In addition, analyses of the wavefunctions confirm the experimentally observed emergence of the local bending and counter-rotational modes in the highly excited bending vibrational states. The reproduction of the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians for highly excited bending states signals the coming of age for the ab initio based PES, which can now be trusted for studying the isomerization reaction.

  19. An autopsy case of suicide by acetylene explosion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Takamoto, Mutsuo; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a male welder in his thirties who was found dead in an exploded truck cabin. The roof, windows and doors of the cabin had been blown up to 50 metres away. An oxygen cylinder and an acetylene cylinder, both unexploded, were found in the back of the truck. The deceased was lying on the driver's seat. His entire body was burnt, carbonised and partially skeletonised. There was a small amount of soot in his oesophagus and stomach and a large volume of bloody fluid in the trachea and bronchi. There was an extensive haemorrhage in the posterior thoracic wall. No drugs were detected in the blood. Hardly any carbon monoxide and combustion-related gases were detected in the blood, therefore he was not considered to have died from the fire. Acetylene was detected in his blood (21.5 microg/ml in the femoral vein blood) and urine (7.49 microg/ml), with marked haemorrhaging in his back. We therefore concluded that the victim died because of an acetylene explosion in the cabin and also that this was a suicide. PMID:19537452

  20. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions. PMID:22339468

  1. Discovery of acetylene hydratase activity of the iron–sulphur protein IspH

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Li, Kai; Schulz, Charles; Oldfield, Eric; Groll, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The final step of the methylerythritol phosphate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is catalysed by the iron–sulphur enzyme IspH, producing the universal precursors of terpenes: isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Here we report an unforeseen reaction discovered during the investigation of the interaction of IspH with acetylene inhibitors by X-ray crystallography, Mößbauer, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to its role as a 2H+/2e− reductase, IspH can hydrate acetylenes to aldehydes and ketones via anti-Markovnikov/Markovnikov addition. The reactions only occur with the oxidised protein and proceed via η1-O-enolate intermediates. One of these is characterized crystallographically and contains a C4 ligand oxygen bound to the unique, fourth iron in the 4Fe-4S cluster: this intermediate subsequently hydrolyzes to produce an aldehyde product. This unexpected side to IspH reactivity is of interest in the context of the mechanism of action of other acetylene hydratases, as well as in the design of antiinfectives targeting IspH. PMID:22948824

  2. New insights into the anion formation mechanisms in dusty acetylene discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ming; Benedikt, Jan; Consoli, Angelo; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2008-10-01

    Dust (or nanoparticle) formation is a well-known phenomenon occurring in reactive gas plasmas, such as silane or acetylene. Under some conditions, the dust formation is considered to be harmful, whereas for other applications, it turns out to be beneficial. In this presentation, the initial mechanisms of nanoparticle formation and growth in radiofrequency (RF) acetylene (C2H2) plasmas are investigated by means of a comprehensive self-consistent one-dimensional (1D) fluid model. Based on the comparison of our calculation results with available experimental data for acetylene plasmas in the literature, some new mechanisms for negative ion formation and growth are proposed. Possible routes are considered for the formation of larger (linear and branched) hydrocarbons C2nH2 (n=3-5), which contribute to the generation of C2nH^-anions (n=3-5) due to dissociative electron attachment. Moreover, beside the C2nH^- ions, also the vinylidene anion (H2CC^-) and higher C2nH2^- anions (n=2-4) are found to be important plasma species. This project was supported financially by the Fund for Scientific Research (FWO) Flanders (Project G. 0068.07), the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme of the Belgian State (Belgian Science Policy; Project P6/42) and the CALCUA computing facilities of the University of Antwerp.

  3. Large area supersonic jet epitaxy of AlN, GaN, and SiC on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lauhon, L.J.; Ustin, S.A.; Ho, W.

    1997-12-31

    AlN, GaN, and SiC thin films were grown on 100 mm diameter Si(111) and Si(100) substrates using Supersonic Jet Epitaxy (SJE). Precursor gases were seeded in lighter mass carrier gases and free jets were formed using novel slit-jet apertures. The jet design, combined with substrate rotation, allowed for a uniform flux distribution over a large area of a 100 mm wafer at growth pressures of 1--20 mTorr. Triethylaluminum, triethylgallium, and ammonia were used for nitride growth, while disilane, acetylene, and methylsilane were used for SiC growth. The films were characterized by in situ optical reflectivity, x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  4. Explosive formation of coherent particle jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, D. L.; Ruel, J.-F.; Zarei, Z.; Goroshin, S.; Gregoire, Y.; Zhang, F.; Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.

    2014-05-01

    A coherent jet of particles may be generated by accelerating a conical volume of particles by detonating a layer of explosive lining the outside of the cone. Experiments have been carried out to determine the dependence of the velocity history and coherency of the jet on the particle properties and the ratio of the masses of the particles and explosive. Steel particles form thin, coherent jets, whereas lighter glass particles lead to more diffuse jets. For steel particles, the cone angle had little effect on the coherency of the jet. The efficiency of the conversion of chemical to kinetic energy is explored by comparing the experimental jet velocity with the velocity predicted from a formulation of the Gurney method for a conical geometry. The effect of particle density and cone angle on the jet formation and development was also investigated using a multimaterial hydrocode. The simulations give insight into the extent of the deformation of the particle bed in the early stages of explosive particle dispersal.

  5. The anomalous behavior of the Zeeman anticrossing spectra of à 1Au acetylene: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, George; Sherrill, C. David; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-02-01

    P. Dupré, R. Jost, M. Lombardi, P. G. Green, E. Abramson, and R. W. Field have observed anomalous behavior of the anticrossing density in the Zeeman anticrossing (ZAC) spectra of gas phase à 1Au acetylene in the 42 200 to 45 300 cm-1 energy range. To best explain this result, they hypothesize a large singlet-triplet coupling due to the existence of a linear isomerization barrier connecting a triplet-excited cis- and trans-acetylene in the vicinity of the studied energy range (˜45 500 cm-1). Theoretically such a linear stationary point, however, must have two different degenerate bending vibrational frequencies which are either imaginary or exactly zero. Neither case has yet been experimentally detected. Here, we have studied the two lowest-lying linear triplet-excited-state stationary points of acetylene, 3Σ+u and 3Δu, to see if they fit Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. We have completed geometry optimization and harmonic vibrational frequency analysis using complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave functions as well as determined energy points at those geometries using the second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) method. Harmonic vibrational analyses of both stationary points reveal two different doubly degenerate vibrational modes with imaginary vibrational frequencies (or negative force constants) indicating that they are indeed saddle points with a Hessian index of four. At the DZP SOCI//CASSCF level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the 3Σ+u stationary point lies 35 840 cm-1 above the ground state of acetylene. This is much too low in energy to contribute to the ZAC spectral anomaly. At the same level of theory with ZPVE correction, the 3Δu stationary point lies 44 940 cm-1 above the ground state consistent with Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. Several solutions to the anomalous ZAC spectra are discussed. We propose that the anomaly may also be due to coupling with a nearly linear structure on the T3 surface of

  6. The Relationship Between ENSO Phases and Southern Hemisphere Jet Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, N.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical convection affects Southern Hemisphere jet dynamics through the process of mass outflow in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and through radiation of planetary wave trains through the connecting westerly waveguide. Seasonal changes and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases have an impact on the structure of the Subtropical, Polar and Polar Night Jet in the high latitude Southern Hemisphere. Through reanalysis of ERA-Interim data sets, an investigation of the different southern hemispheric jet structures that result from the various phases of ENSO. A classification of months into categories of El Niño, neutral and La Niña and then further sub classify the El Niño and La Niña into strong, moderate and weak events. The strength of the polar jet and subtropical jet vary greatly between the El Niño and La Niña episodes and also vary in latitudinal placement. Also, the structure of the jets vary between the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean Basins. Seasonal progression also has an impact on the structure and shape of the polar and subtropical jets. During the Winter in the Southern Atlantic Ocean, a more diffuse jet structure occurs during La Nina while a more focused jet structure is favored in El Niño periods. In addition, a strong link between the Polar-Night Jet and and the tropospheric polar jet is discovered.

  7. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  8. Formation of Complex Organics by Gas Phase and Intracluster Ion-Molecule Reactions Involving Acetylene and Hydrogen Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, S.; Hamed, A.; Soliman, A. R.; Momoh, P. O.

    2011-05-01

    Many complex organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in flames and combustion processes as well as in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae. Here, we present evidence for the formation of complex covalent organics by gas phase and intracluster reactions of the benzene, phenylium, pyridine, pyrimidine, phenylacetylene and benzonitrile cations with acetylene and hydrogen cyanide molecules. These reactions are studied using mass-selected ion mobility, chemical reactivity, collisional dissociation, and ab initio calculations. Measurements of collision cross sections in helium provide structural information on the adducts and allow probing structural changes at different temperatures (isomerization). We observed multiple additions of five acetylene molecules on the pyridine cation at room temperature. This is a remarkable result considering that only two acetylene molecules were added to the phenyl cation and no addition was observed on the benzene cation at room temperature. The experimental results are in full agreement with the ab initio calculations which predict that the first and second acetylenes add to the pyridine ion in barrierless, highly exothermic reactions. Similar reactions have been observed for the pyrimidine radical cation although the extent of the addition reactions is limited to only two acetylene molecules at room temperature. The results provide the first evidence for the incorporation of nitrogen in the formation cyclic hydrocarbons via the gas phase reactions of pyridine and pyrimidine ions with acetylene molecules. In addition, the formation of covalent adducts in the ionized acetylene/HCN system will be reported for the first time. Sequential reactions leading to the formation of pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and higher adducts are observed over a wide range of temperature and pressure. The formation of these covalent adducts may represent a general class of addition reactions that can form complex

  9. Does Thermal Granulation Drive Tephra Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D.; Zimanowski, B.; Buettner, R.; Sonder, I.; Dellino, P.

    2011-12-01

    Surtseyan tephra jets, also called cypressoid or cock's tail plumes, comprise a characteristic mixture of ash with bombs travelling roughly ballistic paths that tip the individual fingers of the projecting jet. Jets of similar form but smaller scale are generated by littoral magma-water interactions, confirming the general inference that surtseyan tephra jets are a characteristic product of explosive magma-water interaction, and suggesting that magmatic volatiles play a subsidiary role, if any, in their formation. Surtseyan jets have been inferred to result from both intense fuel-coolant interactions, and from simple boiling of water entrained into rising magma, and little new information has become available to test these two positions since they were clearly developed in the 1980s. Recent experiments in which magma is poured into standing water have produced vigorous jetting of hot water as melt solidifies and undergoes extensive thermal granulation. We present high-resolution hi-speed video of these jets, which we see as having the following origin. As thermal granulation takes place, a fracture network advances into the melt/glass body, and water invading the cracks at the rate of propagation is heated nearly instantaneously. Vapor produced at the contact expands and drives outward through cooled cracks, condensing as it moves to the exterior of the magma body where it is emitted as a jet of hot water. In ocean ridge hydrothermal systems a diffuse crack network inducts cold water, which is heated and expelled in focused jets. Focusing of hot outflow in experiments is inferred to result, as suggested for ridge hydrothermal systems, from thermoelastic closure of cracks near the one(s) feeding the jet. From the cooled products of our experimental runs, we know that thermal contraction produces a network of curved cracks with modal spacing of 1-2 mm, which separate domains of unbroken glass. It is during growth of this crack network that cold water enters, is

  10. Jet Engines as High-Capacity Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large diffuser operations envelope and long run times possible. Jet engine driven ejector/diffuser system combines two turbojet engines and variable-area-ratio ejector in two stages. Applications in such industrial proesses as handling corrosive fumes, evaporation of milk and fruit juices, petroleum distillation, and dehydration of blood plasma and penicillin.

  11. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during bacterial acetylene fermentation: Potential for life detection in hydrocarbon-rich volatiles of icy planet(oid)s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence; Baesman, Shaun; Oremland, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus.

  12. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Bacterial Acetylene Fermentation: Potential for Life Detection in Hydrocarbon-Rich Volatiles of Icy Planet(oid)s

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the first study of stable carbon isotope fractionation during microbial fermentation of acetylene (C2H2) in sediments, sediment enrichments, and bacterial cultures. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) averaged 3.7 ± 0.5‰ for slurries prepared with sediment collected at an intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay and 2.7 ± 0.2‰ for a pure culture of Pelobacter sp. isolated from these sediments. A similar KIE of 1.8 ± 0.7‰ was obtained for methanogenic enrichments derived from sediment collected at freshwater Searsville Lake, California. However, C2H2 uptake by a highly enriched mixed culture (strain SV7) obtained from Searsville Lake sediments resulted in a larger KIE of 9.0 ± 0.7‰. These are modest KIEs when compared with fractionation observed during oxidation of C1 compounds such as methane and methyl halides but are comparable to results obtained with other C2 compounds. These observations may be useful in distinguishing biologically active processes operating at distant locales in the Solar System where C2H2 is present. These locales include the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan and the vaporous water- and hydrocarbon-rich jets emanating from Enceladus. Key Words: Acetylene—Fermentation—Isotope fractionation—Enceladus—Life detection. Astrobiology 15, 977–986. PMID:26539733

  13. High-resolution photoemission study of acetylene adsorption and reaction with the Si(100)-2x1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.H.; Yang, Y.; Keeffe, M.; Lapeyre, G.J.; Rotenberg, E.

    1999-02-09

    The adsorption and reaction of acetylene with the Si{approximately}100-231 surface has been studied using high-resolution photoemission by monitoring the Si 2p,C 1s, and valence-band (VB) spectra as a function of both acetylene coverage and post-adsorption annealing temperature. After the clean Si(100) surface is exposed to 0.5 monolayer (ML) acetylene, the surface state in the VB is absent. Meanwhile, the curve-fitting results show that there is only one interface component in the Si 2p core level. These results indicate that the asymmetric Si dimers may become symmetric dimers after acetylene adsorption, which can be explained well by the tetra-sigma model determined from our previous photoelectron holographic results. Significant changes in the electronic structure (Si 2p,C 1s, and VB) are found after subsequent annealing of the saturation overlayer. Annealing at lower temperature can induce some acetylene molecule desorption while most of the molecules decompose into C2Hx (x=1,0) and H species. After annealing above 660C, both of the reacted components of the Si 2p and C 1s lines show that the SiC species form clusterlike features. At the same time, the VB and Si 2p spectra indicate a restoration of a Si(100)-2x1 structure, and the asymmetric Si dimers reappear on the surface.

  14. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  15. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  16. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C2H2 PIII is composed of mainly TiCx with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti4+, Ti3+ and Ti2+.

  17. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1988-01-01

    Work performed during the first six months of the project duration for NASA Grant (NAG-1-861) is reported. An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies attempted so far are described.

  18. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  19. Rotational spectroscopy and molecular structure of the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-acetylene complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Grimes, David D

    2011-01-21

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave spectra in the 6-21 GHz region are obtained for seven isotopomers of the complex formed between 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene and acetylene. These include the four possible combinations of (35)Cl- and (37)Cl-containing CH(2)CClF with the most abundant acetylene isotopic modification, HCCH, and its H(13)C(13)CH analogue, as well as three singly substituted deuterated isotopomers. Analysis of the spectra determines the rotational constants and additionally, the complete chlorine quadrupole hyperfine coupling tensors in both the inertial and principal electric field gradient axis systems, and where appropriate, the diagonal components of the deuterium quadrupole coupling tensors. The inertial information contained in the rotational constants provides the structure for CH(2)CClF-HCCH: a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction existing between the HCCH donor and the F atom acceptor on the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the acetylenic bond on the HCCH molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene, which causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. This is similar to the structure obtained for 1,1-difluoroethylene-HCCH [H. O. Leung and M. D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 154301 (2006)], and indeed, to within experimental uncertainty, the intermolecular interactions in CH(2)CClF-HCCH and its 1,1-difluoroethylene counterpart are practically indistinguishable, even though ab initio calculations at the MP2∕6-311G++(2d, 2p) level suggest that the former complex is more strongly bound. PMID:21261349

  20. A biogeochemical and genetic survey of acetylene fermentation by environmental samples and bacterial isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary A.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Anoxic samples (sediment and groundwater) from 13 chemically diverse field sites were assayed for their ability to consume acetylene (C2H2). Over incubation periods ranging from ˜ 10 to 80 days, selected samples from 7 of the 13 tested sites displayed significant C2H2 removal. No significant formation of ethylene was noted in these incubations; therefore, C2H2 consumption could be attributed to acetylene hydratase (AH) rather than nitrogenase activity. This putative AH (PAH) activity was observed in only 21% of the total of assayed samples, while amplification of AH genes from extracted DNA using degenerate primers derived from Pelobacter acetylenicus occurred in even fewer (9.8%) samples. Acetylene-fermenting bacteria were isolated as a pure culture from the sediments of a tidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay (SFB93) and as an enrichment culture from freshwater Searsville Lake (SV7). Comparison of 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SFB93 was closely related to P. carbolinicus, while SV7 consisted of several unrelated bacteria. AH gene was amplified from SFB93 but not SV7. The inability of the primers to generate amplicons in the SV7 enrichment, as well as from several of the environmental samples that displayed PAH activity, implied that either the primers were too highly constrained in their specificity or that there was a different type of AH gene in these environmental samples than occurs in P. acetylenicus. The significance of this work with regard to the search for life in the outer Solar System, where C2HL2 is abundant, is discussed.

  1. Explosive formation of coherent particle jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David; Ruel, Jean-Frederic; Zarei, Zouya; Goroshin, Sam; Gregoire, Yann; Zhang, Fan; Milne, Alec; Longbottom, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    A high-speed jet of solid particles may be formed by detonating an explosive layer lining the outside of a conically-shaped volume of particles. Experiments have been carried out to determine the velocity history and the coherency of a particle jet formed using this shaped-charge arrangement. Important parameters include the cone angle, the ratio of the masses of the explosive and particles, and the particle size and density. Dense particles (e.g., iron) form thin, stable, coherent jets, whereas lighter particles (e.g., glass or Al) lead to more diffuse jets. The jet velocities observed experimentally were close to the predictions from a Gurney velocity formulation for conical geometry. The effects of cone angle and particle density on the jet formation and development were explored with calculations using a multimaterial hydrocode. The simulations indicate that the converging shock and Mach disk within the particle bed have a strong influence on the uniformity of the particle density field. With iron particles, the particle volume remains coherent whereas for glass particles, during the particle acceleration phase, the shock interactions within the particle bed cause the particles to be concentrated in a thin shell surrounding a low density region.

  2. Electrochromic poly(acetylene)s with switchable visible/near-IR absorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Anja C; Varnado, C Daniel; Bielawski, Christopher W; Theato, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Ferrocene is incorporated into a poly(acetylene) derivative via the postpolymerization amidation of a polymer precursor bearing pentafluorophenyl ester-leaving groups with aminoferrocene. While the neutral polymer exhibits a strong absorbance at 553 nm due to its conjugated backbone, oxidation of the ferrocene moieties with silver tetrafluoroborate causes the material to absorb in the near-IR (λ max ≈ 1215 nm). Subsequent reduction of the oxidized polymer with decamethylferrocene restores the initial absorbance profile, demonstrating that the material features switchable visible/near-IR absorption characteristics. PMID:23996218

  3. (-)-Duryne and its homologues, cytotoxic acetylenes from a marine Sponge Petrosia sp.

    PubMed

    Hitora, Yuki; Takada, Kentaro; Okada, Shigeru; Ise, Yuji; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2011-05-27

    Six linear acetylenes, (-)-duryne (1) and (-)-durynes B-F (2-6), were isolated from the marine sponge Petrosia sp. Their structures were elucidated by NMR and tandem FABMS analyses. The positions of the olefinic bonds were confirmed by ozonolysis experiments, and the absolute configurations were determined by the modified Mosher's method. Compound 1 was found to be the enantiomer of duryne, a previously reported sponge metabolite. Compounds 1-6 show cytotoxicity against HeLa cells with IC50 values between 0.08 and 0.50 μM. PMID:21534590

  4. Adhesion of diamond coatings synthesized by oxygen-acetylene flame CVD on tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, S.; Stankovic, S.; Dekanski, A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a study concerned with chemical vapor deposition of diamond on tungsten carbide cutting tools using an oxygen-acetylene flame in a normal ambient environment are presented. Effects of preparation conditions on the adhesion of the coating have been investigated, including different surface treatment, different position of the flame with respect to the coated surface, effect of an intermediate poorly crystalline diamond layer, etc. In particular, effect of polishing and ultrasonic lapping with diamond powder was compared with that of a corresponding treatment with SiC powder.

  5. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene, Ethylene, and Diborane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with a mixture of acetylene and ethylene was found to be 20,440 +/- 150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net-heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,850 +/- 150 Btu per pound.

  6. Synthesis of (iso)quinoline, (iso)coumarin and (iso)chromene derivatives from acetylene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabukhin, D. S.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Published data on the methods of synthesis of quinoline, isoquinoline, coumarin, isocoumarin, chromene and isochromene derivatives from acetylene compounds are summarized. The reactions catalyzed by metal complexes (Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh, Au, Ag, Ni, Cu, etc.) and transformations induced by various electrophilic reagents (Brynsted and Lewis acids) are considered. Moieties of the mentioned heterocyclic systems are present in many biologically active natural products and pharmaceutical agents. Besides, derivatives of these heterocycles are used in the manufacture of catalysts, dyes, perfumery and cosmetic products, corrosion inhibitors and so on. The bibliography includes 211 references.

  7. Mechanisms of. pi. -bond oxidation by cytochrome p-450: acetylenes as probes

    SciTech Connect

    Komives, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Phenylacetylene and biphenylacetylene are oxidized by microsomal and purified P-450 to the corresponding arylacetic acids. During this transformation, the acetylenic hydrogen undergoes a 1,2 shift which causes a kinetic isotope effect of 1.8 on the overall enzymatic rate. The same products and kinetic isotope effects are observed when the arylacetylenes are oxidized by m-chloroperbenzoic acid. Suicide inactivation of P-450 by the arylacetylenes, which occurs simultaneously with metabolite formation, is insensitive to isotopic substitution so the partition ratio changes from 26 for phenylacetylene of 14 for (1-/sup 2/H) phenylacetylene.

  8. Bromotheoynic acid, a brominated acetylenic acid from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Nobuwa; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Ogawa, Takayuki; Ohta, Emi; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Kamemura, Kazuo; Ikegami, Susumu; Ohta, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    A new brominated C(17) acetylenic acid (1) designated as bromotheoynic acid has been isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei, collected off the coast of Tanegashima, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The structure was determined on the basis of the analysis of its extensive 2D NMR spectroscopic data as well as HRMS. Bromotheoynic acid (1) inhibited maturation of starfish oocytes and cell division of fertilised starfish eggs. Bromotheoynic acid (1) also inhibited proliferation of human leukaemia U937 and HL60 cells, human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells, and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. PMID:22324431

  9. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs. PMID:27455741

  10. Single-molecule phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based optoelectronic switch functioning as a quantum-interference-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-11-01

    This work proposes a new type of optoelectronic switch, the phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistor, which utilizes photon-assisted tunneling and destructive quantum interference. The analysis uses single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory. Without the optical field, phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle exhibits a wide range of strong antiresonance between its frontier orbitals. The simulations show large on-off ratios (over 10(4)) and measurable currents (~10(-11) A) enabled by photon-assisted tunneling in a weak optical field (~2 × 10(5) V/cm) and at a small source-drain voltage (~0.05 V). Field amplitude power scaling laws and a range of field intensities are given for operating one- and two-photon assisted tunneling in phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistors. This development opens up a new direction for creating molecular switches. PMID:23215309

  11. Polymerization of ionized acetylene clusters into covalent bonded ions: evidence for the formation of benzene radical cation.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Paul O; Abrash, Samuel A; Mabrouki, Ridha; El-Shall, M Samy

    2006-09-27

    Since the discovery of acetylene and benzene in protoplanetary nebulae under powerful ultraviolet ionizing radiation, efforts have been made to investigate the polymerization of ionized acetylene. Here we report the efficient formation of benzene ions within gas-phase ionized acetylene clusters (C2H2)n+ with n = 3-60. The results from experiments, which use mass-selected ion mobility techniques, indicate that the (C2H2)3+ ion has unusual stability similar to that of the benzene cation; its primary fragment ions are similar to those reported from the benzene cation, and it has a collision cross section of 47.4 A2 in helium at 300 K, similar to the value of 47.9 A2 reported for the benzene cation. In other words, (C2H2)3+ structurally looks like benzene, it has stability similar to that of benzene, it fragments such as benzene, therefore, it must be benzene! PMID:16984178

  12. Synthesis of complex pyridine bases in the reaction of. cap alpha. ,omega-nitrileacetylenes with acetylene, catalyzed by cobalt complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Selimov, F.A.; Khafizov, V.R.

    1987-01-20

    It has been shown that ..cap alpha..,omega-nitrileacetylenes under the action of homogeneous cobalt-containing catalysts undergo transformations into pyridine derivatives. In order to expand the scope of this method for synthesis of complex pyridine bases, for investigation of the reactivity of nitrileacetylenes of various structure in the reaction of cooligomerization with acetylene, as well as for the introduction to these reactions of new types of ..cap alpha..,omega-nitrileacetylenes, containing in their molecules an oxygen atom, they studied the homo- and codimerization of ..cap alpha..,omega-nitrileacetylenes with acetylene under the action of a Co(2-ethyl hexanoate)/sub 2/-AIR/sub 3/ catalyst in a toluene solution. Cyclodimerization of acetylene with ..cap alpha..,omega-nitrileacetylenes, catalyzed by a Co(2-ethyl hexanoate)/sub 2/-AlEt/sub 3/ system gives new types of mono- and bicyclic pyridines.

  13. CFD simulation of boundary effects on closely spaced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Ishita; Adams, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In coastal areas characterized by shallow water depth, industrial effluents are often diluted using multiple closely spaced jets. Examples of such effluents include brine from desalination plants, treated wastewater from sewage treatment plants and heated water from thermal power plants. These jets are arranged in various orientations, such as unidirectional diffusers and rosette groups, to maximize mixing with ambient water. Due to effects of dynamic pressure, the jets interact with each other leading to mixing characteristics which are quite different from those of individual jets. The effect of mutual interaction is exaggerated under confinement, when a large number of closely spaced jets discharge into shallow depth. Dilution through an outfall, consisting of multiple jets, depends on various outfall and ambient parameters. Here we observe the effects of shoreline proximity, in relation to diffuser length and water depth, on the performance of unidirectional diffusers discharging to quiescent water. For diffusers located closer to shore, less dilution is observed due to the limited availability of ambient water for dilution. We report on the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and compare the results with experimental observations.

  14. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  15. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  16. Acetylene trimerization on Ag, Pd and Rh atoms deposited on MgO thin films.

    PubMed

    Judai, Ken; Wörz, Anke S; Abbet, Stéphane; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Del Vitto, Annalisa; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2005-03-01

    The acetylene trimerization on the group VIII transition metal atoms, Rh and Pd, as well as on Ag atoms supported on MgO thin films has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The three metal atoms with the atomic configurations 4d(8)5s1 (Rh), 4d10s0 (Pd) and 4d(10)5s1 (Ag) behave distinctly differently. The coinage metal atom silver is basically inert for this reaction, whereas Pd is active at 220 and 320 K, and Rh produces benzene in a rather broad temperature range from 350 to ca. 430 K. The origins of these differences are not only the different electronic configurations, leading to a weak interaction of acetylene with silver due to strong Pauli repulsion with the 5s electron but also the different stability and dynamics of the three atoms on the MgO surface. In particular, Rh and Pd atoms interact differently with surface defects like the oxygen vacancies (F centers) and the step edges. Pd atoms migrate already at low temperature exclusively to F centers where the cyclotrimerization is efficiently promoted. The Rh atoms on the other hand are not only trapped on F centers but also at step edges up to about 300 K. Interestingly, only Rh atoms on F centers catalyze the trimerization reaction whereas they are turned inert on the step edges due to strong steric effects. PMID:19791385

  17. Nonoxidative methane conversion to acetylene over zeolite in a low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Mallinson, R.; Lobban, L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous investigations have found that the plasma catalytic conversion of methane is a low-temperature process for the activation of methane, the major component of natural gas. In this paper, the production of acetylene via plasma catalytic conversion of methane over NaY zeolite is discussed. Hydrogen is produced as a by-product during this plasma catalytic methane conversion. A methane/hydrogen feed with oxygen as an additive and helium as a diluent has been studied in this investigation. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} system is found to be more selective for the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons, compared to the CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} systems reported previously. A higher hydrogen concentration feed is more favorable for acetylene formation. The selectivity and yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons are related to the hydrogen feed rate, gas temperature, concentration of oxygen additive, and flowrate. The highest yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons (32%) is obtained at the lowest flowrate used (10 cm{sup 3}/s; residence time {approximately}2.3 s). A reaction mechanism is also presented to explain the experimental results.

  18. Taple-top imaging of the non-adiabatically driven isomerization in the acetylene cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Samuel; Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T.; Wanie, Vincent; Giguere, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joe; Schuurman, Michael S.; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    One of the primary goals of modern ultrafast science is to follow nuclear and electronic evolution of molecules as they undergo a photo-chemical reaction. Most of the interesting dynamics phenomena in molecules occur when an electronically excited state is populated. When the energy difference between electronic ground and excited states is large, Free Electron Laser (FEL) and HHG-based VUV sources were, up to date, the only light sources able to efficiently initiate those non-adiabatic dynamics. We have developed a simple table-top approach to initiate those rich dynamics via multiphoton absorption. As a proof of principle, we studied the ultrafast isomerization of the acetylene cation. We have chosen this model system for isomerization since the internal conversion mechanism which leads to proton migration is still under debate since decades. Using 266 nm multiphoton absorption as a pump and 800 nm induced Coulomb Explosion as a probe, we have shoot the first high-resolution molecular movie of the non-adiabatically driven proton migration in the acetylene cation. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with high level ab initio trajectory simulations.

  19. Selective Hydrogenation of Acetylene over Pd, Au, and PdAu Supported Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Michael P.

    The removal of trace amounts of acetylene in ethylene streams is a high-volume industrial process that must possess high selectivity of alkyne hydrogenation over hydrogenation of alkenes. Current technology uses metallic nanoparticles, typically palladium or platinum, for acetylene removal. However, problems arise due to the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures as well as low selectivities at high conversions. Pore expanded MCM-41 is synthesized via a two-step strategy in which MCM-41 was prepared via cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMABr) followed by the hydrothermal treatment with N,N-dimethyldecylamine (DMDA). This material was washed with ethanol to remove DMDA, or calcined to remove both surfactants. PE-MCM-41 based materials were impregnated with palladium, gold, and palladium-gold nanoparticles. The removal of DMDA had an effect on both the conversion and selectivity, in which they were found to drop significantly. However, by using the bimetallic PdAu catalysts, higher selectivity could be achieved due to increased electron density.

  20. Formation of artificial pores in nano-TiO2 photo-electrode films using acetylene-black for high-efficiency, dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tae-Yeon; Han, Chi-Whan; Jun, Yongseok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Acetylene-black paste without a light scattering layer was applied to meso-porous TiO2 photo-electrode films with a crystalline framework, a low residual carbon, and a tunable morphological pore size. The thermal-treated TiO2 photo-electrode films had an increased acetylene-black concentration with an increase in artificial pores and a decrease in residual carbon. The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was enhanced by the use of the TiO2 photo-anode pastes at various acetylene-black concentrations. The photo-conversion efficiency of the DSSCs using TiO2 photo-electrode films with 1.5 wt% acetylene-black was enhanced from 7.98 (no acetylene-black) to 9.75% without the integration of a light- scattering layer. PMID:23511122

  1. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  2. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincke, J. R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C. G.

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing.

  4. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  5. The ADPI of cold air jets in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Knappmiller, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    The subject of this paper is the computational determination of the air diffusion performance index (ADPI) of a cold air jet in an enclosure. The jet outlet size, temperature, momentum, and Archimedes number were varied to produce a range of attached and separated flow regimes. The cooling load was produced by heating one of the room walls. The effect of using conventional and cold supply jets was investigated for two heat source locations. The results indicate that, for the type of diffuser and room configuration studied, an optimum ADPI was obtained when the jet separation distance is approximately equal to the room characteristic length. Room airflow conditions produced by conventional and cold air supply temperature air are almost identical to each other when the same separation distance criteria, i.e., same momentum flux, are used.

  6. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  7. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  8. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  9. Acetylene-argon plasmas measured at a biased substrate electrode for diamond-like carbon deposition: I. Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baby, A.; Mahony, C. M. O.; Maguire, P. D.

    2011-02-01

    We report, for the first time, quadrupole mass spectrometry of neutral and positive ionic hydrocarbon species measured at the rf-biased substrate electrode of an inductively coupled plasma for acetylene rich C2H2 : Ar mixtures under various bias, frequency and pressure conditions. It has been observed that, irrespective of initial gas mixture, the resultant plasma is dominated by argon neutrals and ions. This is attributed to highly efficient conversion of acetylene to C2H due to the enhanced electron density compared with a standard capacitive plasma where the acetylene (neutral and ion) species remain dominant. This conversion may be crucial to film formation via inert rather than hydrocarbon ion bombardment. In addition, the transient formation of CH4 from acetylene has been discovered using IR absorption spectroscopy with time constants similar to observed pressure variations. Rate coefficients and rates for many of the reaction mechanisms, calculated using measured electron energy distribution functions and species densities, are given. These results have important application in plasma models and growth studies for hydrogenated amorphous or diamond-like carbon film deposition. Film growth under similar plasma conditions is reported in an associated paper along with ion energy distributions for important growth species. .

  10. Nonstationary coherent optical effects caused by pulse propagation through acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocegueda, M.; Hernandez, E.; Stepanov, S.; Agruzov, P.; Shamray, A.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental observations of nonstationary coherent optical phenomena, i.e., optical nutation, free induction, and photon echo, in the acetylene (12C2H2) filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) are reported. The presented results were obtained for the acetylene vibration-rotational transition P9 at wavelength 1530.37 nm at room temperature under a gas pressure of <0.5 Torr. An all-fiber pumped-through cell based on the commercial 2.6-m-long PCF with a 10-μm hollow-core diameter was used. The characteristic relaxation time T2 during which the optical coherent effects were typically observed in our experiments was estimated to be ≈8 ns. This time is governed by the limited time of the acetylene molecules' presence inside the effective PCF modal area and by intermolecule collisions. An accelerated attenuation of the optical nutation oscillations is explained by a random orientation of acetylene molecules.

  11. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation with vinyl esters as an acetylene equivalent.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicola J; Marsden, Stephen P; Raw, Steven A

    2014-09-19

    The behavior of electron-rich alkenes in rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation reactions is investigated. Vinyl acetate emerges as a convenient acetylene equivalent, facilitating the synthesis of sixteen 3,4-unsubstituted isoquinolones, as well as select heteroaryl-fused pyridones. The complementary regiochemical preferences of enol ethers versus enol esters/enamides is discussed. PMID:25165993

  12. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  13. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  14. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  15. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  16. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  18. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths for the Ring Closure Reactions of C4H3 with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    The ring closure reaction of C4H3 with acetylene to give phenyl radical is one proposed mechanism for the formation of the first aromatic ring in hydrocarbon combustion. There are two low-lying isomers of C4H3; 1-dehydro-buta-l-ene-3-yne (n-C4H3) and 2-dehydro-buta-l-ene-3-yne (iso-C4H3). It has been proposed that only n-C4H3 reacts with acetylene to give phenyl radical, and since iso-C4H3 is more stable than n-C4H3, formation of phenyl radical by this mechanism is unlikely. We report restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) plus singles and doubles configuration interaction calculations with a Davidson's correction (RHF+1+2+Q) using the Dunning correlation consistent polarized valence double zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ) for stationary point structures along the reaction pathway for the reactions of n-C4H3 and iso-C4H3 with acetylene. n-C4H3 plus acetylene (9.4) has a small entrance channel barrier (17.7) (all energetics in parentheses are in kcal/mol with respect to iso-C4H3 plus acetylene) and the subsequent closure steps leading to phenyl radical (-91.9) are downhill with respect to the entrance channel barrier. Iso-C4H3 Plus acetylene also has an entrance channel barrier (14.9) and there is a downhill pathway to 1-dehydro-fulvene (-55.0). 1-dehydro-fulvene can rearrange to 6-dehydro-fulvene (-60.3) by a 1,3-hydrogen shift over a barrier (4.0), which is still below the entrance channel barrier, from which rearrangement to phenyl radical can occur by a downhill pathway. Thus, both n-C4H3 and iso-C4H3 can react with acetylene to give phenyl radical with small barriers.

  19. Induced velocity field of a jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a subsonic round jet exhausting perpendicularly from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was conducted. Velocity and pressure measurements were made in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet for ratios of jet velocity to crossflow velocity ranging from 3 to 10. The results of these measurements are presented in tabular and graphical forms. A pair of diffuse contrarotating vortices is identified as a significant feature of the flow, and the characteristics of the vortices are discussed.

  20. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric jets of air and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.

    Turbulent axisymmetric jets of air helium with the same nozzle momentum flux were studied experimentally using hot-wire probes. An X-wire hot-wire probe was used in the air jet and a composite probe consisting of an X-wire and an interference probe of the Way-Libby type was used in the helium jet to measure the helium concentration and two velocity components. Moments of turbulent fluctuations, up to fourth order, were calculated to characterize turbulent transport in the jet and to evaluate current models for triple moments that occur in the Reynolds stress equation. In the air jet, the momentum flux across the jet was found to be within +/- 5 percent of the nozzle input and the integral of the radial diffusive flux of the turbulent kinetic energy across the jet was found to be close to zero indicating consistency of measurements with the equations of motion. The fourth moments were very well described in terms of the second moments by the quasi-Gaussian approximation across the entire jet. Profiles of third moments were found to be significantly different from earlier measurements - (u(v exp 2)) (u(w exp 2)) and ((u exp 2)v) were found to be negative near the axis of the jet. The measurements in the helium jet were in the intermediate region between the non-buoyant jet and the plume regions. The helium mass flux across the jet was found to be within +/- 0 percent of the nozzle input. The far field behavior was in accord with the expected plume scalings. The near field behavior of the mean velocity along the axis of the jet follows the scaling expressed by the effective diameter but the mean concentration decay has a different density ratio dependence. The radical profiles of mean velocity and concentration indicate a turbulent Schmidt number of 0.7, the same as for passive scalars in round jets. Turbulent intensity of axial velocity fluctuations was significantly higher than that observed in the air jet while the radial and azimuthal intensities are virtually

  1. High-resolution photoemission study of acetylene adsorption and reaction with the Si(100)-2{times}1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.H.; Yang, Y.; Keeffe, M.; Lapeyre, G.J.; Rotenberg, E.

    1999-10-01

    The adsorption and reaction of acetylene with the Si(100)-2{times}1 surface has been studied using high-resolution photoemission by monitoring the Si&hthinsp;2p, C&hthinsp;1s, and valence-band (VB) spectra as a function of both acetylene coverage and post-adsorption annealing temperature. After the clean Si(100) surface is exposed to 0.5 monolayer (ML) acetylene, the surface state in the VB is absent. Meanwhile, the curve-fitting results show that there is only one interface component in the Si&hthinsp;2p core level. These results indicate that the asymmetric Si dimers may become symmetric dimers after acetylene adsorption, which can be explained well by the tetra-{sigma} model determined from our previous photoelectron holographic results. Significant changes in the electronic structure (Si&hthinsp;2p, C&hthinsp;1s, and VB) are found after subsequent annealing of the saturation overlayer. Annealing at lower temperature can induce some acetylene molecule desorption while most of the molecules decompose into C{sub 2}H{sub x} (x=1,0) and H species. After annealing above 660&hthinsp;{degree}C, both of the reacted components of the Si&hthinsp;2p and C&hthinsp;1s lines show that the SiC species form clusterlike features. At the same time, the VB and Si&hthinsp;2p spectra indicate a restoration of a Si(100)-2{times}1 structure, and the asymmetric Si dimers reappear on the surface. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Carbon material formation on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 and residue constituents during acetylene decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hung-Lung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Ho, Yung-Shou; Zeng, Li-Xuan

    2014-07-15

    Carbon materials including carbon spheres and nanotubes were formed from acetylene decomposition on hydrogen-reduced SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 at 650-850°C. The physicochemical characteristics of SBA-15, Ni-SBA-15 and carbon materials were analyzed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectrometry, and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). In addition, the contents of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the tar and residue and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaust were determined during acetylene decomposition on SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15. Spherical carbon materials were observed on SBA-15 during acetylene decomposition at 750 and 850°C. Carbon filaments and ball spheres were formed on Ni-SBA-15 at 650-850°C. Raman spectroscopy revealed peaks at 1290 (D-band, disorder mode, amorphous carbon) and 1590 (G-band, graphite sp(2) structure)cm(-1). Naphthalene (2 rings), pyrene (4 rings), phenanthrene (3 rings), and fluoranthene (4 rings) were major PAHs in tar and residues. Exhaust constituents of hydrocarbon (as propane), H2, and C2H2 were 3.9-2.6/2.7-1.5, 1.4-2.8/2.6-4.3, 4.2-2.4/3.2-1.7% when acetylene was decomposed on SBA-15/Ni-SBA-15, respectively, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 650 to 850°C. The concentrations of 52 VOCs ranged from 9359 to 5658 and 2488 to 1104ppm for SBA-15 and Ni-SBA-15 respectively, at acetylene decomposition temperatures from 650 to 850°C, and the aromatics contributed more than 87% fraction of VOC concentrations. PMID:24858051

  3. Acetylene Black Induced Heterogeneous Growth of Macroporous CoV2O6 Nanosheet for High-Rate Pseudocapacitive Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Kangning; Luo, Yanzhu; Dong, Yifan; Xu, Wangwang; Yan, Mengyu; Ren, Wenhao; Zhou, Liang; Qu, Longbing; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-23

    Metal vanadates suffer from fast capacity fading in lithium-ion batteries especially at a high rate. Pseudocapacitance, which is associated with surface or near-surface redox reactions, can provide fast charge/discharge capacity free from diffusion-controlled intercalation processes and is able to address the above issue. In this work, we report the synthesis of macroporous CoV2O6 nanosheets through a facile one-pot method via acetylene black induced heterogeneous growth. When applied as lithium-ion battery anode, the macroporous CoV2O6 nanosheets show typical features of pseudocapacitive behavior: (1) currents that are mostly linearly dependent on sweep rate and (2) redox peaks whose potentials do not shift significantly with sweep rate. The macroporous CoV2O6 nanosheets display a high reversible capacity of 702 mAh g(-1) at 200 mA g(-1), excellent cyclability with a capacity retention of 89% (against the second cycle) after 500 cycles at 500 mA g(-1), and high rate capability of 453 mAh g(-1) at 5000 mA g(-1). We believe that the introduction of pseudocapacitive properties in lithium battery is a promising direction for developing electrode materials with high-rate capability. PMID:26938306

  4. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Acetylene Sensing Properties of Variety Low Dimensional Zinc Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weigen; Peng, Shudi; Zeng, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Various morphologies of low dimensional ZnO nanostructures, including spheres, rods, sheets, and wires, were successfully synthesized using a simple and facile hydrothermal method assisted with different surfactants. Zinc acetate dihydrate was chosen as the precursors of ZnO nanostructures. We found that polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), glycine, and ethylene glycol (EG) play critical roles in the morphologies and microstructures of the synthesized nanostructures, and a series of possible growth processes were discussed in detail. Gas sensors were fabricated using screen-printing technology, and their sensing properties towards acetylene gas (C2H2), one of the most important arc discharge characteristic gases dissolved in oil-filled power equipments, were systematically measured. The ZnO nanowires based sensor exhibits excellent C2H2 sensing behaviors than those of ZnO nanosheets, nanorods, and nanospheres, indicating a feasible way to develop high-performance C2H2 gas sensor for practical application. PMID:24672324

  5. Shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene - Sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism for soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Gardiner, W. C., Jr.; Stein, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of thermodynamic parameters on the sensitivity of model predictions of soot formation by shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene were assessed analytically. The pyrolysis process was treated as having three components: initiation, the initial pyrolysis stages; cyclization, formation of larger molecules and radicals and small aromatic molecules; and polymerization, further growth of aromatic rings. Rate equations are reviewed for each component. Thermodynamic effects were assessed by varying the C2H-H and C2H3-H bond energies and the Ct-(Ct) group additivity value. Any change in the C2H-H bond energy had a significant impact on the temperature and the maximum amount of the soot yield. The findings underscore the necessity of using accurate thermodynamic data for modeling high-temperature chemical kinetics.

  6. Interference in acetylene intersystem crossing acts as the molecular analog of Young's double-slit experiment

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mattijs; Field, Robert W.; Buma, Wybren J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on an experimental approach that reveals crucial details of the composition of singlet-triplet mixed eigenstates in acetylene. Intersystem crossing in this prototypical polyatomic molecule embodies the mixing of the lowest excited singlet state (S1) with 3 triplet states (T1, T2, and T3). Using high-energy (157-nm) photons from an F2 laser to record excited-state photoelectron spectra, we have decomposed the mixed eigenstates into their S1, T3, T2, and T1 constituent parts. One example of the interpretive power that ensues from the selective sensitivity of the experiment to the individual electronic state characters is the discovery and examination of destructive interference between two doorway-mediated intersystem crossing pathways. This observation of an interference effect in nonradiative decay opens up possibilities for rational coherent control over molecular excited state dynamics. PMID:19179288

  7. Synthesis, structure and cytotoxic activity of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bębenek, Ewa; Chrobak, Elwira; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kadela, Monika; Chrobak, Artur; Kusz, Joachim; Książek, Maria; Jastrzębska, Maria; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    A series of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids has been synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and MS spectroscopy. The structure of propargyl betulonate 4 and propargyl betulinate-DMF solvate 8A was solved by X-ray diffraction. Thermal properties were examined using a DSC technique. The resulting alkynyl derivatives, as well as betulin 1 and betulinic acid 3, were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human T47D breast cancer, CCRF/CEM leukemia, SW707 colorectal, murine P388 leukemia and BALB3T3 normal fibroblasts cell lines. Several of the obtained compounds have a favorable cytotoxic profile than betulin 1. Propargyl betulinate 8 was the most active derivative, being up to 3-fold more potent than betulin 1 against the human leukemia (CCRF/CEM) cell line, with an IC50 value of 3.9 μg/mL.

  8. A novel metal-organic framework for high storage and separation of acetylene at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xing; Wang, Huizhen; Ji, Zhenguo; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2016-09-01

    A novel 3D microporous metal-organic framework with NbO topology, [Cu2(L)(H2O)2]•(DMF)6·(H2O)2 (ZJU-10, ZJU = Zhejiang University; H4L =2‧-hydroxy-[1,1‧:4‧,1″-terphenyl]-3,3″,5,5″-tetracarboxylic acid; DMF =N,N-dimethylformamide), has been synthesized and structurally characterized. With suitable pore sizes and open Cu2+ sites, ZJU-10a exhibits high BET surface area of 2392 m2/g, as well as moderately high C2H2 volumetric uptake capacity of 132 cm3/cm3. Meanwhile, ZJU-10a is a promising porous material for separation of acetylene from methane and carbon dioxide gas mixtures at room temperature.

  9. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: I. Amorphous and Crystalline Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report recent measurements on acetylene (C2H2) ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System and the interstellar medium. New near- and mid-infrared data, including optical constants (n, k), absorption coefficients (alpha), and absolute band strengths (A), are presented for both amorphous and crystalline phases of C2H2 that exist below 70 K. Comparisons are made to earlier work. Electronic versions of the data are made available, as is a computer routine to use our reported n and k values to simulate the observed IR spectra. Suggestions are given for the use of the data and a comparison to a spectrum of Makemake is made.

  10. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  11. Carbon dioxide reduction to methane and coupling with acetylene to form propylene catalyzed by remodeled nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Moure, Vivian R.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2012-01-01

    A doubly substituted form of the nitrogenase MoFe protein (α-70Val→Ala, α-195His→Gln) has the capacity to catalyze the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to yield methane (CH4). Under optimized conditions, 1 nmol of the substituted MoFe protein catalyzes the formation of 21 nmol of CH4 within 20 min. The catalytic rate depends on the partial pressure of CO2 (or concentration of HCO3−) and the electron flux through nitrogenase. The doubly substituted MoFe protein also has the capacity to catalyze the unprecedented formation of propylene (H2C = CH-CH3) through the reductive coupling of CO2 and acetylene (HC≡CH). In light of these observations, we suggest that an emerging understanding of the mechanistic features of nitrogenase could be relevant to the design of synthetic catalysts for CO2 sequestration and formation of olefins. PMID:23150564

  12. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions demonstrated for the acetylene cation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Fowe, Emmanuel P; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Spanner, Michael; Bandrauk, André D; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging, we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations. PMID:25034613

  13. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  14. Analysis for Mar Vel Black and acetylene soot low reflectivity surfaces for star tracker sunshade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, E.

    1974-01-01

    Mar Vel Black is a revolutionary new extremely low reflectivity anodized coating developed by Martin Marietta of Denver. It is of great interest in optics in general, and in star trackers specifically because it can reduce extraneous light reflections. A sample of Mar Vel Black was evaluated. Mar Vel Black looks much like a super black surface with many small peaks and very steep sides so that any light incident upon the surface will tend to reflect many times before exiting that surface. Even a high reflectivity surface would thus appear to have a very low reflectivity under such conditions. Conversely, acetylene soot does not have the magnified surface appearance of a super black surface. Its performance is, however, predictable from the surface structure, considering the known configuration of virtually pure carbon.

  15. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions demonstrated for the acetylene cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Fowe, Emmanuel P.; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T.; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Spanner, Michael; Bandrauk, André D.; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S.; Légaré, François

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging, we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  16. Dubinin-Astakhov model for acetylene adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peifu; Hu, Yun Hang

    2016-07-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is explosive at a pressure above 29 psi, causing a safety issue for its storage and applications. C2H2 adsorption on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been explored to solve the issue. However, a suitable isotherm equation for C2H2 adsorption on various MOFs has not been found. In this paper, it was demonstrated that Dubinin-Astakhov equation can be exploited as a general isotherm model to depict C2H2 adsorption on MOF-5, ZIF-8, HKUST-1, and MIL-53. In contrast, commonly used Langmuir and BET models exhibited their inapplicability for C2H2 adsorption on those MOFs.

  17. Analysis of Effluent Gases During the CCVD Growth of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, T. C.; Biris, A. S.; Miller, D. W.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition was used to grow multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a Fe:Co:CaCO3 catalyst from acetylene. The influent and effluent gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry at different time intervals during the nanotubes growth process in order to better understand and optimize the overall reaction. A large number of byproducts were identified and it was found that the number and the level for some of the carbon byproducts significantly increased over time. The CaCO3 catalytic support thermally decomposed into CaO and CO2 resulting in a mixture of two catalysts for growing the nanotubes, which were found to have outer diameters belonging to two main groups 8 to 35 nm and 40 to 60 nm, respectively.

  18. Computational simulations of hydrogen circular migration in protonated acetylene induced by circularly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuetao; Li, Wen; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2016-08-28

    The hydrogens in protonated acetylene are very mobile and can easily migrate around the C2 core by moving between classical and non-classical structures of the cation. The lowest energy structure is the T-shaped, non-classical cation with a hydrogen bridging the two carbons. Conversion to the classical H2CCH(+) ion requires only 4 kcal/mol. The effect of circularly polarized light on the migration of hydrogens in oriented C2H3 (+) has been simulated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Classical trajectory calculations were carried out with the M062X/6-311+G(3df,2pd) level of theory using linearly and circularly polarized 32 cycle 7 μm cosine squared pulses with peak intensity of 5.6 × 10(13) W/cm(2) and 3.15 × 10(13) W/cm(2), respectively. These linearly and circularly polarized pulses transfer similar amounts of energy and total angular momentum to C2H3 (+). The average angular momentum vectors of the three hydrogens show opposite directions of rotation for right and left circularly polarized light, but no directional preference for linearly polarized light. This difference results in an appreciable amount of angular displacement of the three hydrogens relative to the C2 core for circularly polarized light, but only an insignificant amount for linearly polarized light. Over the course of the simulation with circularly polarized light, this corresponds to a propeller-like motion of the three hydrogens around the C2 core of protonated acetylene. PMID:27586924

  19. Rotational and vibrational energy transfer in vibrationally excited acetylene at energies near 6560 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Han, Jiande; Freel, Keith; Heaven, Michael C

    2011-12-28

    Collisional energy transfer kinetics of vibrationally excited acetylene has been examined for states with internal energies near 6560 cm(-1). Total population removal rate constants were determined for selected rotational levels of the (1,0,1,0(0),0(0)) and (0,1,1,2(0),0(0)) states. Values in the range of (10-18) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) were obtained. Measurements of state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants were also carried out for these states. The rotational energy transfer kinetics was found to be consistent with simple energy gap models for the transfer probabilities. Vibrational transfer out of the (0,1,1,2(0),0(0)) state accounted for no more than 16% of the total removal process. Transfer from (1,0,1,0(0),0(0)) to the u-symmetry (0,2,0,3(1),1(-1)), (0,1,1,2(0),0(0)), and (1,1,0,1(1),1(-1)) states was observed. Applying the principle of detailed balance to these data indicated that vibrational transfer to (1,0,1,0(0),0(0)) accounted for ~0.1% of the population loss from (0,2,0,3(1),1(-1)) or (0,1,1,2(0),0(0)), and 3% of the loss from (1,1,0,1(1),1(-1)). Relative rotational transfer probabilities were obtained for transfer to the g-symmetry (1,1,0,2(0),0(0))∕(0,0,2,0(0),0(0)) dyad. These results are related to recent studies of optically pumped acetylene lasers. PMID:22225153

  20. A DFT computational study of the bis-silylation reaction of acetylene catalyzed by palladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, Andrea; Higueruelo, Alicia Perez; Miscione, Gian Pietro

    2002-05-15

    In this paper we have investigated at the DFT(B3LYP) level the catalytic cycle for the bis-silylation reaction of alkynes promoted by palladium complexes. A model-system formed by an acetylene molecule, a disilane molecule, and the Pd(PH(3))(2) complex has been used. The most relevant features of this catalytic cycle can be summarized as follows: (i) The first step of the cycle is an oxidative addition involving H(3)Si-SiH(3) and Pd(PH(3))(2). It occurs easily and leads to the cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex that is 5.39 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy than reactants. (ii) The transfer of the two silyl groups to the C-C triple bond does not occur in a concerted way, but involves many steps. (iii) The cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex, obtained from the oxidative addition, is involved in the formation of the first C-Si bond (activation barrier of 18.34 kcal mol(-1)). The two intermediates that form in this step cannot lead directly to the formation of the final bis(silyl)ethene product. However, they can isomerize rather easily (the two possible isomerizations have a barrier of 16.79 and 7.17 kcal mol(-1)) to new more stable species. In both these new intermediates the second silyl group is adjacent to the acetylene moiety and the formation of the second C-Si bond can occur rapidly leading to the (Z)-bis(silyl)ethene, as experimentally observed. (iv) The whole catalytic process is exothermic by 41.54 kcal mol(-1), in quite good agreement with the experimental estimate of this quantity (about 40 kcal mol(-1)). PMID:11996593

  1. A Computational Investigation of Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, and residence time. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with residence times longer than 200 ms were found to have temperatures near 1190 K where C/O = 0.6, whereas flames with shorter residence times required increased temperatures. Acetylene was found to be a reasonable surrogate for soot precursor species in these flames, having peak mole fractions of about 0.01.

  2. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  3. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  4. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  5. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  6. Two scenarios on the driving mechanism of the Jovian equatorial jet with secondary hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y. H.; Read, P. L.

    2006-01-01

    We test the feasibility of two scenarios that may drive the broad, prograde, equatorial jets in the Jovian atmosphere within the shallow "weather layer". The first idea attempts to explain the flat-headed jet as a consequence of a hydrodynamic instability along an equatorially trapped primarily jet. The strong primary jet is induced by a 300 m s -1 Kelvin wave. The second idea is a bridging of a pair of off-equatorial jets due to horizontal eddy diffusion (the so-called Gierasch mechanism). The primary jets can be induced by a Hadley circulation, and might then be interconnected by subsequent hydrodynamic instabilities between them. We test the two scenarios using a general circulation model, but have so far been unable to obtain an equatorial jet that resembles observations. It appears, therefore, that the previously proposed model of combining Kelvin and Hadley forcing, is more plausible under the shallow hypothesis.

  7. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  8. Development of PIV for Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.; Yanis, William; Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) to the overfire region of a laminar gas jet diffusion flame in normal gravity. A methane flame burning in air at 0.98 bar was considered. The apparatus demonstrated here is packaged in a drop rig designed for use in the 2.2 second drop tower.

  9. Development of a spectrofluorimetry-based device for determining the acetylene content in the oils of power transformers.

    PubMed

    Quintella, Cristina M; Meira, Marilena; Silva, Weidson Leal; Filho, Rogério G D; Araújo, André L C; Júnior, Elias T S; Sales, Lindolfo J O

    2013-12-15

    Power transformers are essential for a functioning electrical system and therefore require special attention by maintenance programs because a fault can harm both the company and society. The temperature inside a power transformer and the dissolved gases, which are primarily composed of acetylene, are the two main parameters monitored when detecting faults. This paper describes the development of a device for analyzing the acetylene content in insulating oil using spectrofluorimetry. Using this device introduces a new methodology for the maintaining and operating power transformers. The prototype is currently operating in a substation. The results presented by this system were satisfactory; when compared to chromatographic data, the errors did not exceed 15%. This prototype may be used to confirm the quality of an insulating oil sample to detect faults in power transformers. PMID:24209339

  10. Ferrimagnetism in 2D networks of porphyrin-X and -XO (X=Sc,...,Zn) with acetylene bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetism in 2D networks of the acetylene-bridged transition metal porphyrins M(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TM), and oxo-TM-porphyrins OM(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TMO), is studied with the density functional theory (DFT) and the self-interaction corrected pseudopotential scheme (pSIC). Addition of oxygen lowers magnetism of P-TMO with respect to the corresponding P-TM for most of the first-half 3d-row TMs. In contrast, binding O with the second-half 3d-row TMs or Sc increases the magnetic moments. Ferrimagnetism is found for the porphyrin networks with the TMs from V to Co and also for these cases with oxygen. This is a long-range effect of the delocalized spin-polarization, extended even to the acetylene bridges.

  11. Three-dimensional carbon allotropes comprising phenyl rings and acetylenic chains in sp+sp2 hybrid networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jian -Tao; Chen, Changfeng; Li, Han -Dong; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-18

    Here, we here identify by ab initio calculations a new type of three-dimensional (3D) carbon allotropes that consist of phenyl rings connected by linear acetylenic chains in sp+sp2 bonding networks. These structures are constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into an all sp2-hybridized rhombohedral polybenzene lattice, and the resulting 3D phenylacetylene and phenyldiacetylene nets comprise a 12-atom and 18-atom rhombohedral primitive unit cells R-3m symmetry, which are characterized as the 3D chiral crystalline modification of 2D graphyne and graphdiyne, respectively. Simulated phonon spectra reveal that these structures are dynamically stable. Electronic band calculations indicate that phenylacetylene is metallic, whilemore » phenyldiacetylene is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 0.58 eV. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties.« less

  12. Three-Dimensional Carbon Allotropes Comprising Phenyl Rings and Acetylenic Chains in sp+sp(2) Hybrid Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Chen, Changfeng; Li, Han-Dong; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We here identify by ab initio calculations a new type of three-dimensional (3D) carbon allotropes that consist of phenyl rings connected by linear acetylenic chains in sp+sp(2) bonding networks. These structures are constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into an all sp(2)-hybridized rhombohedral polybenzene lattice, and the resulting 3D phenylacetylene and phenyldiacetylene nets comprise a 12-atom and 18-atom rhombohedral primitive unit cells in the symmetry, which are characterized as the 3D chiral crystalline modification of 2D graphyne and graphdiyne, respectively. Simulated phonon spectra reveal that these structures are dynamically stable. Electronic band calculations indicate that phenylacetylene is metallic, while phenyldiacetylene is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 0.58 eV. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties. PMID:27087405

  13. Three-Dimensional Carbon Allotropes Comprising Phenyl Rings and Acetylenic Chains in sp+sp2 Hybrid Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Chen, Changfeng; Li, Han-Dong; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We here identify by ab initio calculations a new type of three-dimensional (3D) carbon allotropes that consist of phenyl rings connected by linear acetylenic chains in sp+sp2 bonding networks. These structures are constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into an all sp2-hybridized rhombohedral polybenzene lattice, and the resulting 3D phenylacetylene and phenyldiacetylene nets comprise a 12-atom and 18-atom rhombohedral primitive unit cells in the symmetry, which are characterized as the 3D chiral crystalline modification of 2D graphyne and graphdiyne, respectively. Simulated phonon spectra reveal that these structures are dynamically stable. Electronic band calculations indicate that phenylacetylene is metallic, while phenyldiacetylene is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 0.58 eV. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties. PMID:27087405

  14. Three-Dimensional Carbon Allotropes Comprising Phenyl Rings and Acetylenic Chains in sp+sp2 Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Chen, Changfeng; Li, Han-Dong; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    We here identify by ab initio calculations a new type of three-dimensional (3D) carbon allotropes that consist of phenyl rings connected by linear acetylenic chains in sp+sp2 bonding networks. These structures are constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into an all sp2-hybridized rhombohedral polybenzene lattice, and the resulting 3D phenylacetylene and phenyldiacetylene nets comprise a 12-atom and 18-atom rhombohedral primitive unit cells in the symmetry, which are characterized as the 3D chiral crystalline modification of 2D graphyne and graphdiyne, respectively. Simulated phonon spectra reveal that these structures are dynamically stable. Electronic band calculations indicate that phenylacetylene is metallic, while phenyldiacetylene is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 0.58 eV. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties.

  15. Can Analysis of Acetylene and Its Biodegradation Products in Enceladus Plumes be Used to Detect the Presence of Sub-Surface Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The search for biosignatures of life on Earth includes measurement of the stable isotope fractionation of reactants and products attributed to enzymatic processes and comparison with the often smaller chemical (abiotic) fractionation. We propose that this approach might be applied to study the origin and fate of organic compounds contained in water vapor plumes emanating from Enceladus or other icy bodies, perhaps revealing information about the potential for biology occurring within a sub-surface "habitable" zone. Methanol and C2-hydrocarbons including ethylene, ethane and acetylene (C2H2) have been identified in the plumes of Enceladus. Biological degradation of acetylene proceeds by anaerobic fermentation via acetylene hydratase through acetaldehyde, with a second enzyme (acetaldehyde dismutase) forming acetate and ethanol. We found that incubation of cultures of acetylene-fermenting bacteria exhibit a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the net removal of C2H2. Consumption of acetylene by both growing and washed-cell cultures of bacteria closely related to Pelobacter acetylenicus (e.g, strain SFB93) was accompanied by a carbon isotopic fractionation of about 2 per mil (KIE = 1.8-2.7 ‰), a result we are examining with other cultures of acetylene fermenters. In addition, we are measuring the carbon isotopic composition of acetaldehyde, ethanol and acetate during fermentation to learn whether these products are fractionated sufficiently, relative to their substrate, to warrant measurement of their isotopic composition in Enceladus (or Europa) plumes to indicate enzymatic activity in liquid environments below the crust of these moons.

  16. Frequency Comb-Referenced Spectroscopy in the ν1 + ν3 Region of Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cich, Matthew J.; Forthomme, Damien; Hall, Gregory E.; Mcraven, Christopher P.; Sears, Trevor J.; Twagirayezu, Sylvestre

    2014-06-01

    class="MsoNormal">By using saturation dip absorption spectroscopy with an extended cavity diode laser locked to a frequency comb, we have measured the rest frequencies of transitions in the ν4 = 1 and ν5 = 1 hot bands in the ν1 + ν3 combination band of acetylene. The measured line frequencies are accurate to approximately 20 kHz i.e. approximately one part in 1011. Positions of the hot-band lines quoted in the HITRAN database, which are derived from the analysis of high-resolution FTIR spectra, are of the order of 10's of MHz in error. These measurements were undertaken because pressure broadened lineshape measurements of rotational lines in the combination band indicated that weak underlying hot band features were not correctly accounted for on the basis of their previously reported positions. As a result, measured line profiles in the band could not be accurately fit leading to errors of up to 1% in acetylene concentrations derived from the measurements. In addition, the pressure broadened P(11) line in the ν1 + ν3 combination band has been studied as a function of varying concentration of the absorber in nitrogen. Mixture concentrations of 1, 5 and 10% at 296 K and pressures between a few Torr and one atmosphere were made and the measurements analyzed using two different speeddependent broadening models. These experiments are designed to test the additivity of contributions to pressure broadening and shift in speed-dependent line-shape modeling, i.e. whether the lineshape parameters follow partial pressure weighting in the binary mixtures. P(11) is relatively isolated with respect to underlying hot band transitions and neighboring transitions of the same band, but it was found that the accurate positions of underlying hot-band transitions were crucial to the successful modeling of the observed line shapes, even though these lines are typically 100-1000 times weaker than P(11) itself and are many Doppler line widths removed from the line center

  17. Quantum Chemical Evaluation of the Astrochemical Significance of Reactions between S Atom and Acetylene or Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Addition-elimination reactions of S atom in its P-3 ground state with acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4) were characterized with both molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations employing correlation consistent basis sets in order to assess the likelihood either reaction might play a general role in astrochemistry or a specific role in the formation of S2 (X (sup 3 SIGMA (sub g) (sup -)) via a mechanism proposed by Saxena and Misra (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 1995, 272, 89). The acetylene and ethylene reactions proceed through C2H2S ((sup 3)A")) and C2H4S ((sup 3)A")) intermediates, respectively, to yield HCCS ((sup 2)II)) and C2H3S ((sup 2)A')). Substantial barriers were found in the exit channels for every combination of method and basis set considered in this work, which effectively precludes hydrogen elimination pathways for both S + C2H2 and S + C2H4 in the ultracold interstellar medium where only very modest barriers can be surmounted and processes without barriers tend to predominate. However, if one or both intermediates is formed and stabilized efficiently under cometary or dense interstellar cloud conditions, they could serve as temporary reservoirs for S atom and participate in reactions such as S + C2H2S (right arrow) S2 = C2H2 or S + C2H4S (right arrow) S2 + C2H4. For formation and stabilization to be efficient, the reaction must possess a barrier height small enough to be surmountable at low temperatures yet large enough to prevent redissociation to reactants. Barrier heights computed with B3LYP and large basis sets are very low, but more rigorous QCISD(T) and RCCSD(T) results indicate that the barrier heights are closer to 3-4 kcal/mol. The calculations therefore indicate that S + C2H2 or S + C2H4 could contribute to the formation of S2 in comets and may serve as a means to gauge coma temperature. The energetics of the ethylene reaction are more favorable.

  18. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  19. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  20. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  1. A geochemical model of non-ideal solutions in the methane-ethane-propane-nitrogen-acetylene system on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-08-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has an atmosphere and surface that are rich in organic compounds. Liquid hydrocarbons exist on the surface, most famously as lakes. Photochemical reactions produce solid organics in Titan's atmosphere, and these materials settle or snow onto the surface. At the surface, liquids can interact with solids, and geochemical processes can occur. The consequences of these processes can be explored using a thermodynamic model to calculate the solubilities of gases and solids in liquid hydrocarbons at cryogenic temperatures. The van Laar model developed in this study was parameterized using experimental phase equilibrium data, and accurately represents the data for the CH4-C2H6-C3H8-N2-C2H2 chemical system from 90 to 110 K. The model generally gives more accurate results than existing models. The model also features a suitable balance between accuracy and simplicity, and can serve as a foundation for studies of fluvial geochemistry on Titan because it can be extended to any number of components while maintaining thermodynamic consistency. Application of the model to Titan reveals that the equilibrium composition of surface liquids depends on the abundance of methane gas in the local atmosphere, consistent with prior studies. The concentration of molecular nitrogen in Titan's lakes varies inversely with the ethane content of the lakes. The model indicates that solid acetylene should be quite soluble in surface liquids, which implies that acetylene-rich sedimentary rocks would be susceptible to chemical erosion, and acetylene evaporites may form on Titan. The geochemical character of acetylene in liquid hydrocarbons on Titan appears to be intermediate to those of calcite and gypsum in surface waters on Earth. Specific recommendations are given of observational, experimental, and theoretical work that will lead to significant advancements in our knowledge of geochemical processes on Titan. This paper represents the beginning of a new kind of

  2. Unsteady behavior of locally strained diffusion flames affected by curvature and preferential diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Takagi, Toshimi

    1999-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies are made of transient H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}--air counterflow diffusion flames unsteadily strained by an impinging micro jet. Two-dimensional temperature measurements by laser Rayleigh scattering method and numerical computations taking into account detailed chemical kinetics are conducted paying attention to transient local extinction and reignition in relation to the unsteadiness, flame curvature and preferential diffusion effects. The results are as follows. (1) Transient local flame extinction is observed where the micro jet impinges. But, the transient flame can survive instantaneously in spite of quite high stretch rate where the steady flame cannot exist. (2) Reignition is observed after the local extinction due to the micro air jet impingement. The temperature after reignition becomes significantly higher than that of the original flame. This high temperature is induced by the concentration of H{sub 2} species due to the preferential diffusion in relation to the concave curvature. The predicted behaviors of the local transient extinction and reignition are well confirmed by the experiments. (3) The reignition is induced after the formation of combustible premixed gas mixture and the consequent flame propagation. (4) The reignition is hardly observed after the extinction by micro fuel jet impingement. This is due to the dilution of H{sub 2} species induced by the preferential diffusion in relation to the convex curvature. (5) The maximum flame temperature cannot be rationalized by the stretch rate but changes widely depending on the unsteadiness and the flame curvature in relation with preferential diffusion.

  3. Jets generated by a sphere moving vertically in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Okino, Shinya; Nakamura, Shota; Akiyama, Shinsaku

    2013-11-01

    Unsteady development of buoyant jets generated by a sphere moving vertically at constant speeds in stratified fluids is investigated. Initially, the sphere simply drags light upper fluids or isopycnal surfaces as it goes down, as long as the molecular diffusion of density is negligible. In the succeeding period, molecular diffusion of density in the boundary layer on the sphere surface becomes increasingly significant, especially in the lower hemisphere. Then, the density is no longer conserved and a vertical jet starts from the rear/upper stagnation point of the sphere, since the fluid particle of altered but small density tends to go back to its original height. Strength and radius of those jets depend significantly on stratification (Froude number), as well as the Reynolds number and the Schmidt number. These mechanisms are investigated by numerical simulations and measurements by laser induced fluorescence (LIF).

  4. Experimental study of a vertical jet in a vegetated crossflow.

    PubMed

    Ben Meftah, Mouldi; De Serio, Francesca; Malcangio, Daniela; Mossa, Michele; Petrillo, Antonio Felice

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have long been used as receiving environments of wastewater discharges. Effluent discharge in a receiving water body via single jet or multiport diffuser, reflects a number of complex phenomena, affecting the ecosystem services. Discharge systems need to be designed to minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, a good knowledge of the interaction between effluents, discharge systems and receiving environments is required to promote best environmental management practice. This paper reports innovative 3D flow velocity measurements of a jet discharged into an obstructed crossflow, simulating natural vegetated channel flows for which correct environmental management still lacks in literature. In recent years, numerous experimental and numerical studies have been conducted on vegetated channels, on the one hand, and on turbulent jets discharged into unvegetated crossflows, on the other hand. Despite these studies, however, there is a lack of information regarding jets discharged into vegetated crossflow. The present study aims at obtaining a more thorough understanding of the interaction between a turbulent jet and an obstructed crossflow. In order to achieve such an objective, a series of laboratory experiments was carried out in the Department of Civil, Environmental, Building Engineering and Chemistry of the Technical University of Bari - Italy. The physical model consists of a vertical jet discharged into a crossflow, obstructed by an array of vertical, rigid, circular and threaded steel cylinders. Analysis of the measured flow velocities shows that the array of emergent rigid vegetation significantly affects the jet and the ambient flow structures. It reduces the mean channel velocity, allowing the jet to penetrate higher into the crossflow. It significantly increases the transversal flow motion, promoting a major lateral spreading of the jet within the crossflow. Due to the vegetation array effects, the jet undergoes notable variations in its

  5. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  6. Silicon carbide-derived carbon nanocomposite as a substitute for mercury in the catalytic hydrochlorination of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyun; Pan, Xiulian; Yu, Liang; Ren, Pengju; Wu, Xing; Sun, Litao; Jiao, Feng; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-04-01

    Acetylene hydrochlorination is an important coal-based technology for the industrial production of vinyl chloride, however it is plagued by the toxicity of the mercury chloride catalyst. Therefore extensive efforts have been made to explore alternative catalysts with various metals. Here we report that a nanocomposite of nitrogen-doped carbon derived from silicon carbide activates acetylene directly for hydrochlorination in the absence of additional metal species. The catalyst delivers stable performance during a 150 hour test with acetylene conversion reaching 80% and vinyl chloride selectivity over 98% at 200 °C. Experimental studies and theoretical simulations reveal that the carbon atoms bonded with pyrrolic nitrogen atoms are the active sites. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that such a nanocomposite is a potential substitute for mercury while further work is still necessary to bring this to the industrial stage. Furthermore, the finding also provides guidance for design of carbon-based catalysts for activation of other alkynes.

  7. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  8. Study of acetylene poisoning of Pt cathode on proton exchange membrane fuel cell spatial performance using a segmented cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Acetylene is a welding fuel and precursor for organic synthesis, which requires considering it to be a possible air pollutant. In this work, the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell exposed to 300 ppm C2H2 and different operating currents was studied with a segmented cell system. The injection of C2H2 resulted in a cell performance decrease and redistribution of segments' currents depending on the operating conditions. Performance loss was 20-50 mV at 0.1-0.2 A cm-2 and was accompanied by a rapid redistribution of localized currents. Acetylene exposure at 0.4-1.0 A cm-2 led to a sharp voltage decrease to 0.07-0.13 V and significant changes in current distribution during a transition period, when the cell reached a voltage of 0.55-0.6 V. A recovery of the cell voltage was observed after stopping the C2H2 injection. Spatial electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data showed different segments' behavior at low and high currents. It was assumed that acetylene oxidation occurs at high cell voltage, while it reduces at low cell potential. A detailed analysis of the current density distribution, its correlation with EIS data and possible C2H2 oxidation/reduction mechanisms are presented and discussed.

  9. Structure and Function of the Unusual Tungsten Enzymes Acetylene Hydratase and Class II Benzoyl-Coenzyme A Reductase.

    PubMed

    Boll, Matthias; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M H; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In biology, tungsten (W) is exclusively found in microbial enzymes bound to a bis-pyranopterin cofactor (bis-WPT). Previously known W enzymes catalyze redox oxo/hydroxyl transfer reactions by directly coordinating their substrates or products to the metal. They comprise the W-containing formate/formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases belonging to the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) family and the aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) families, which form a separate enzyme family within the Mo/W enzymes. In the last decade, initial insights into the structure and function of two unprecedented W enzymes were obtained: the acetaldehyde forming acetylene hydratase (ACH) belongs to the DMSOR and the class II benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase (BCR) to the AOR family. The latter catalyzes the reductive dearomatization of benzoyl-CoA to a cyclic diene. Both are key enzymes in the degradation of acetylene (ACH) or aromatic compounds (BCR) in strictly anaerobic bacteria. They are unusual in either catalyzing a nonredox reaction (ACH) or a redox reaction without coordinating the substrate or product to the metal (BCR). In organic chemical synthesis, analogous reactions require totally nonphysiological conditions depending on Hg2+ (acetylene hydration) or alkali metals (benzene ring reduction). The structural insights obtained pave the way for biological or biomimetic approaches to basic reactions in organic chemistry. PMID:26959374

  10. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  11. Flow Analysis for Single and Multi-Nozzle Jet Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Yukitaka; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Shakouchi, Toshihiko

    Jet pumps, driven by a Primary-Loop Recirculation (PLR) Pump, have been widely used in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants to recirculate the reactor core coolant. A jet pump consists of a driving nozzle, a bell-mouth, a throat and a diffuser. The improvement of the jet pump efficiency for BWR plants brings an economic advantage because it reduces the operating power cost of the PLR pump. In order to improve the efficiency of the BWR jet pump, a 1/5 scale jet pump test loop for BWR plant was used and intensive tests were conducted focusing on the types of driving nozzles and shapes of the throat. These test data were used for CFD flow analysis code verification. The analytical data showed good agreement with the test results. After the analytical model verification, improvement of jet pump efficiency was conducted. It was shown by the CFD analysis that the peak efficiency of the improved jet pump will be 36% with the tapered throat.

  12. Analysis of a dusty wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin; Roberts, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is given for the entrainment of dust into a turbulent radial wall jet. Equations are solved based on incompressible flow of a radial wall jet into which dust is entrained from the wall and transported by turbulent diffusion and convection throughout the flow. It is shown that the resulting concentration of dust particles in the flow depends on the difference between the applied shear stress at the surface and the maximum level of shear stress that the surface can withstand (varies as rho(sub d)a(sub g)D) i.e., the pressure due to the weight of a single layer of dust. The analysis is expected to have application to the downflow that results from helicopter and VTOL aircraft.

  13. Splitting of Forced Elliptic Jets and Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, J.; Carlton, J.; Schwieterman, M.; Davis, E.; Bradley, E.; Linne, M.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluid dynamics in the interaction of large scale, three-dimensional vortex structures and transitional diffusion flames in a microgravity environment. The vortex structures are used to provide a known perturbation of the type used in passive and active shear layer control techniques. 'Passive techniques' refers to manipulation of the system geometry to influence the three dimensional dynamics of vortex structures, and 'active' refers to any technique which adds energy (acoustic or kinetic) to the flow to influence the shear layer vortex dynamics. In this work the passive forcing is provided by an elliptic jet cross-section, and the active forcing is incorporated by perturbing the jet velocity using a loudspeaker in the plenum section.

  14. Flame deformation and entrainment associated with an isothermal transverse fuel jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, D. W.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical model of an incompressible, isothermal reacting jet in crossflow. The model represents the flow in the jet cross-section by a counter rotating vortex pair, a flow structure that has been observed to dominate the jet behavior. The reaction surface surrounding the fuel jet is represented as a composite of strained diffusion flames that are stretched and deformed by the vortex pair flow. The results shed new light on the interaction between the vortex pair circulation and flame structure evolution and their relation to the concept of entrainment.

  15. The Fourier transform absorption spectrum of acetylene between 8280 and 8700 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulin, O. M.; Vander Auwera, J.; Campargue, A.

    2016-07-01

    High resolution (0.011 cm-1) room temperature (295 K) Fourier transform absorption spectra (FTS) of acetylene have been analyzed in the 8280-8700 cm-1 range dominated by the ν1+ν2+ν3 band at 8512 cm-1. Line positions and intensities were retrieved from FTS spectra recorded at 3.84 and 56.6 hPa. As a result, a list of 1001 lines was constructed with intensities ranging between about 2×10-26 and 10-22 cm/molecule. Comparison with accurate predictions provided by a global effective operator model led to the assignment of 629 12C2H2 lines. In addition, 114 lines of the 13C12CH2 isotopologue were assigned using information available in the literature. The 12C2H2 lines belong to thirteen bands, nine of which being newly reported. The 13C12CH2 lines belong to three bands, the intensities of which being reported for the first time. Spectroscopic parameters of the 12C2H2 upper vibrational levels were derived from band-by-band analyses of the line positions (typical rms are on the order of 0.002 cm-1). Three of the analyzed bands were found to be affected by rovibrational perturbations, which are discussed in the frame of a global effective Hamiltonian. The obtained line parameters are compared with those of the two bands included in the HITRAN 2012 database.

  16. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Baines, K. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  17. Influence of nanoparticle formation on discharge properties in argon-acetylene capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th.; Hinz, A. M.; Faupel, F.; Strunskus, T.; Kersten, H.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution presents experimental results regarding the influence of nanoparticle formation in capacitively coupled radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon-acetylene plasmas. The discharge is studied using non-invasive 160 GHz Gaussian beam microwave interferometry and optical emission spectroscopy. Particularly, the temporal behavior of the electron density from microwave interferometry is analyzed and compared with the changing plasma emission and self-bias voltage caused by nanoparticle formation. The periodic particle formation with a cycle duration between 30 s and 140 s starts with an electron density drop over more than one order of magnitude below the detection limit (8 × 1014 m-3). The electron density reduction is the result of electron attachment processes due to negative ions and nanoparticle formation. The onset time constant of nanoparticle formation is five times faster compared to the expulsion of the particles from the plasma due to multi-disperse size distribution. Moreover, the intensity of the argon transition lines increases and implies a rising effective electron temperature. The cycle duration of the particle formation is affected by the total gas flow rate and exhibits an inverse proportionality to the square of the total gas flow rate. The variation in the total gas flow rate influences the force balance, which determines the confinement time of the nanoparticles. As a further result, the cycle duration is dependent on the axial position of the powered electrode, which also corresponds to different distances relative to the fixed optical axis of the microwave interferometer.

  18. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) associated with roots of winter wheat and sorghum in Nebraska.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, W L; Chakrabarty, K; Klucas, R V; Vidaver, A K

    1978-01-01

    Root segments and root-soil cores (6.5-cm diameter) from fields and nurseries of winter wheat and sorghum were tested for N2 fixation by using the acetylene reduction assay. Wheat samples (approximately 1,200) from 109 sites generally had low or no activity (0 to 3.1 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per g [dry weight] of root segments), even after 24 h of incubation. However, a commercial field of Scout 66, located in western Nebraska, exhibited appreciable activity (290 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per g [dry weight] of root segments). Of 400 sorghum lines and crosses, grain sorghums (i.e., CK-60A, Wheatland A, B517, and NP-16) generally exhibited higher nitrogenase activity than forage sorghums or winter wheats. CK-60A, a male sterile grain sorghum, was sampled at four locations and had the most consistent activity of 24 to 1,100 nmol of C2H4 produced per h per core. The maximum rate extrapolated to 2.5 g of N per hectare per day. Numerous N2-fixing bacterial isolates were obtained from wheat and sorghum roots that exhibited high nitrogenase activity. Most isolates were members of the Enterobacteriacae, i.e., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Erwinia herbicola. PMID:623458

  19. Diameter control of carbon nanotubes using argon-acetylene mixture and their application as IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Rana Arslan; Afrin, Rahat; Manzoor, Umair; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Islam, Mohammad; Amin, Muhammad T.; Alazba, Abdulrahman A.

    2015-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown via pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition technique and explored for their infrared sensing behavior. CNT synthesis was carried out over cobalt zinc ferrite (Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) catalyst nanoparticles under different gas flow conditions to control outside diameter of the nanotubes. It was found that a progressive decrease in the carbon precursor gas (acetylene in this case) from 5:1 to 9:1 (v/v) causes reduction of average CNT diameter from 85 nm to 635 nm. Growth conditions involving higher temperatures yield nanotubes/nanofibers with outer diameter of >500 nm, presumably due to surface aggregation of nanoparticles or increased flux of carbonaceous species at the catalyst surface or both. Current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes depending on the CNT diameter, revealed linear or nonlinear behavior. When incorporated as sensing layer, the sensitivity of ˜5.3 was noticed with response time of ˜4.1 s. It is believed that IR sensing characteristics of such CNT-based detectors can be further enhanced through post-synthesis purification and chemical functionalization treatments.

  20. Dipolar Bent and Linear Acetylenes Substituted by Cationic Quinolinium and Anionic Benzoates. Formation of Mesomeric Betaines.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andreas; Batsyts, Sviatoslav; Smeyanov, Alexey; Freese, Tyll; Hübner, Eike G; Nieger, Martin

    2016-05-20

    3-Ethynylquinoline was subjected to a Sonogashira-Hagihara reaction with methyl 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoates, respectively, and then N-methylated to give 3-[((methoxycarbonyl)phenyl)ethynyl]-1-methylquinolinium salts (two X-ray analyses). On saponification of the 3- and 4-substituted benzoates, the mesomeric betaines 3- and 4-[(1-methylquinolinium-3-yl)ethynyl]benzoates were formed. By contrast, the 2-benzoate derivative gave either the corresponding (1-oxo-1H-isochromen-3-yl)quinolinium derivative or the mesomeric betaine 2-(1-methylquinolinium-3-yl)-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-ide depending on the reaction conditions. A DFT calculation predicts a transoid conformation of the acetylene bond in the intermediate 2-[(1-methylquinolinium-3-yl)ethynyl]benzoate which is due to a strong hydrogen bond between the carboxylate group and 2H of the quinolinium ring, in addition to a 1,5-interaction between the carboxylate group and the CC triple bond. The bond angles of the transoid CC triple bond were calculated to be 211.6° and -175.1° in vacuo. The corresponding linear triple bond is 50.4 kJ/mol less stable in vacuo according to the calculation, and the N-heterocyclic carbene quinoline-2-ylidene is not formed as a tautomer. PMID:27088664

  1. Nitrogen fixation (Acetylene Reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for nitrogen fixing capacity on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi rye, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation were also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the south. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi rye in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greehouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 7 tables.

  2. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for their ability to fix nitrogen on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi ryegrass, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation was also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the South. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi ryegrass in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greenhouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 11 references, 7 tables.

  3. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiters Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Robert W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3 ) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2 ). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  4. Time- and Isomer-Resolved Measurements of Sequential Addition of Acetylene to the Propargyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Savee, John D; Selby, Talitha M; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L

    2015-10-15

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equation calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. This work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene. PMID:26722791

  5. Ion enhanced deposition by dual titanium and acetylene plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Tian, X. B.; Chu, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) offers a non-line-of-sight fabrication method for various types of thin films on steels to improve the surface properties. In this work, titanium films were first deposited on 9Cr18 (AISI440) stainless bearing steel by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIII-D) using a titanium vacuum arc plasma source. Afterwards, carbon implantation and carbon film deposition were performed by acetylene (C2H2) plasma immersion ion implantation. Multiple-layered structures with superior properties were produced by conducting Ti MePIII-D + C2H2 PIII successively. The composition and structure of the films were investigated employing Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the mixing for Ti and C atoms is much better when the target bias is higher during Ti MePIII-D. A top diamond-like carbon layer and a titanium oxycarbide layer are formed on the 9Cr18 steel surface. The wear test results indicate that this dual PIII-D method can significantly enhance the wear properties and decrease the surface friction coefficient of 9Cr18 steel.

  6. Theoretical and practical limitations of the acetylene inhibition technique to determine total denitrification losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Conen, F.; Flechard, C. R.; Neftel, A.

    2012-10-01

    The loss of N2 from intensively managed agro-ecosystems is an important part of the N budget. Flux monitoring of N2 emissions at the field scale, e.g., by eddy correlation or aerodynamic gradient method, is impossible due to the large atmospheric N2 background (78%). The acetylene (C2H2) inhibition technique (AIT) is a rather simple and frequently used, albeit imperfect, method to determine N2 losses from intact soil cores. In principle, AIT allows an estimation of total denitrification at high temporal resolution and on small spatial scales, with limited workload and costs involved. To investigate its potential and limitations, a laboratory system with two different detection systems (photoacoustic IR spectroscopy and gas chromatography) is presented, which allowed simultaneous measurements of up to 7 intact soil cores in air-tight glass tubes in a temperature controlled cabinet (adjusted to field conditions) with automated C2H2 injection. A survey of total denitrification losses (N2 + N2O) over 1.5 yr in soil cores from an intensively managed, cut grassland system in central Switzerland supports previous reports on severe limitations of the AIT, which precluded reliable estimates of total denitrification losses. Further, the unavoidable sampling and transfer of soil samples to the laboratory causes unpredictable deviations from the denitrification activity in the field.

  7. Stereoselective inhibition of muscarinic receptor subtypes by the enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol and acetylenic analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Feifel, R.; Wagner-Röder, M.; Strohmann, C.; Tacke, R.; Waelbroeck, M.; Christophe, J.; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. The affinities of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol (1) and its acetylenic analogues hexbutinol (2), hexbutinol methiodide (3) and p-fluoro-hexbutinol (4) (stereochemical purity greater than 99.8%) for muscarinic receptors in rabbit vas deferens (M1), guinea-pig atria (M2) and guinea-pig ileum (M3) were measured by dose-ratio experiments. 2. The (R)-enantiomers consistently showed higher affinities than the (S)-isomers. The stereoselectivity ratios [(R)/(S)] were greatest with the enantiomers of 1 (vas deferens: 550; ileum: 191; atria: 17) and least with those of the p-Fluoro-analogue 4 (vas deferens: 34; ileum: 8.5; atria: 1.7). 3. The enantiomeric potency ratios for compounds 1-4 were highest in rabbit vas deferens, intermediate in guinea-pig ileum and much less in guinea-pig atria. Thus, these ratios may serve as a predictor of muscarinic receptor subtype identity. 4. (S)-p-Fluoro-hexbutinol [(S)-4] showed a novel receptor selectivity profile with preference for M3 receptors: M3 greater than M2 greater than or equal to M1. 5. These results do not conform to Pfeiffer's rule that activity differences between enantiomers are greater with more potent compounds. PMID:2331578

  8. Global modeling of vibration-rotation spectra of the acetylene molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulin, O. M.; Perevalov, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The global modeling of both line positions and intensities of the acetylene molecule in the 50-9900 cm-1 region has been performed using the effective operators approach. The parameters of the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian have been fitted to the line positions collected from the literature. The used polyad model of effective Hamiltonian takes into account the centrifugal distortion, rotational and vibrational ℓ-doubling terms and both anharmonic and Coriolis resonance interaction operators arising due to the approximate relations between the harmonic frequencies: ω1≈ω3≈5ω4≈5ω5 and ω2≈3ω4≈3ω5. The dimensionless weighted standard deviation of the fit is 2.8. The fitted set of 237 effective Hamiltonian parameters allowed reproducing 24,991 measured line positions of 494 bands with a root mean squares deviation 0.0037 cm-1. The eigenfunctions of the effective Hamiltonian corresponding to the fitted set of parameters were used to fit the observed line intensities collected from the literature for 15 series of transitions: ΔP = 0-13,15, where P=5V1+5V3 +3V2+V4+V5 is the polyad number (Vi are the principal vibrational quantum numbers). The fitted sets of the effective dipole moment parameters reproduce the observed line intensities within their experimental uncertainties 2-20%.

  9. Theoretical investigation of alignment-dependent intense-field fragmentation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Kitzler, Markus; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the alignment-dependent dissociative and nondissociative ionization of acetylene, C2H2 . Numerical models describing the yield of the singly and doubly charged ions (C2H2+,C2H22 +) and several fragmentation and isomerization channels (C2H++H+ ,CH++CH+ ,CH2++C+ ) as a function of the relative alignment angle between the laser polarization axis and the molecular axis are presented. We apply and compare two different approaches. The first is based on time-dependent density functional theory. The second is a quasi-single-particle approach using the Dyson orbitals. We find good agreement between the results of both methods. A comparison of our theoretical predictions with experimental data allows us to show that the alignment-dependent yield of most reaction channels is described to high accuracy assuming sequential ionization. However, for some of the fragmentation channels, namely, CH++CH+ and C2H++H+ , we find non-negligible influence of recollisional ionization.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of graphenated carbon nanotubes on IONPs using acetylene by chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchudan, Raji; Perumal, Suguna; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Lee, Yong Rok

    2015-11-01

    The graphenated carbon nanotubes (G-CNTs) were synthesized on monodisperse spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) using acetylene as carbon precursor by simple chemical vapor deposition method. The reaction parameters such as temperature and flow of carbon source were optimized in order to achieve G-CNTs with excellent quality and quantity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly illustrated that the graphene flakes are forming along the whole length on CNTs. The degree of graphitization was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The intensity of D to G value was less than one which confirms the obtained G-CNTs have high degree of graphitization. The optimum reaction temperature for the IONPs to form metallic clusters which in turn lead to the formation of G-CNTs with high carbon deposition yield is at 900 °C. The TEM shows the CNTs diameter is 50 nm with foiled graphene flakes of diameter around 70 nm. Our results advocate for IONPs as a promising catalytic template for quantitative and qualitative productivity of nanohybrid G-CNTs. The produced G-CNTs with high degree of graphitization might be an ideal candidate for nanoelectronic application like super capacitors and so on.

  11. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  12. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  13. Seasonal variations of temperature, acetylene and ethane in Saturn's atmosphere from 2005 to 2010, as observed by Cassini-CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Moses, J. I.; Greathouse, T. K.; Friedson, A. J.; Hesman, B.; Hurley, J.; Merlet, C.

    2013-07-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) are by-products of complex photochemistry in the stratosphere of Saturn. Both hydrocarbons are important to the thermal balance of Saturn's stratosphere and serve as tracers of vertical motion in the lower stratosphere. Earlier studies of Saturn's hydrocarbons using Cassini-CIRS observations have provided only a snapshot of their behaviour. Following the vernal equinox in August 2009, Saturn's northern and southern hemispheres have entered spring and autumn, respectively, however the response of Saturn's hydrocarbons to this seasonal shift remains to be determined. In this paper, we investigate how the thermal structure and concentrations of acetylene and ethane have evolved with the changing season on Saturn. We retrieve the vertical temperature profiles and acetylene and ethane volume mixing ratios from Δν˜=15.5cm-1 Cassini-CIRS observations. In comparing 2005 (solar longitude, Ls ˜ 308°), 2009 (Ls ˜ 3°) and 2010 (Ls ˜ 15°) results, we observe the disappearance of Saturn's warm southern polar hood with cooling of up to 17.1 K ± 0.8 K at 1.1 mbar at high-southern latitudes. Comparison of the derived temperature trend in this region with a radiative climate model (Section 4 of Fletcher et al., 2010 and Greathouse et al. (2013, in preparation)) indicates that this cooling is radiative although dynamical changes in this region cannot be ruled out. We observe a 21 ± 12% enrichment of acetylene and a 29 ± 11% enrichment of ethane at 25°N from 2005 to 2009, suggesting downwelling at this latitude. At 15°S, both acetylene and ethane exhibit a decrease in concentration of 6 ± 11% and 17 ± 9% from 2005 to 2010, respectively, which suggests upwelling at this latitude (though a statistically significant change is only exhibited by ethane). These implied vertical motions at 15°S and 25°N are consistent with a recently-developed global circulation model of Saturn's tropopause and stratosphere(Friedson and Moses, 2012), which

  14. Conditions for a split diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    An unusual phenomenon has been observed in a methane jet diffusion flame subjected to axial acoustic forcing. At specific excitation frequencies and amplitudes, the driven flame splits into a central jet and one or two side jets. The splitting is accompanied by a partial detachment of the flame from the nozzle exit, a shortening of the flame by a factor of 2, and a change from the common yellow color of soot radiation to a clear blue flame. Such a phenomenon may be useful for the control of soot production or product species. The splitting is intermittent in time, bifurcating between the split flame and an ordinary single jet diffusion flame. The experiment consists of an unconfined axisymmetric methane jet formed by a short length of 0.4 cm diameter pipe. The pipe is connected to a large plenum surrounding a bass reflex loudspeaker enclosure that provides the excitation. Conditions producing split and bifurcated flames are presented. The drive frequencies required to cause bifurcation correspond to the first two peaks in the system`s frequency response curve. Bifurcating behavior was observed at a wide range of flow rates, ranging from very small flames of Reynolds number 240 up to turbulent lift-off, at Re = 1,000, based on the inner pipe diameter. It was not sensitive to nozzle length, but the details of the nozzle tip, such as orifice or pipe geometry, can affect the frequency range.

  15. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  16. Intramolecular competition between n-pair and π-pair hydrogen bonding: Microwave spectrum and internal dynamics of the pyridine-acetylene hydrogen-bonded complex.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca B; Dewberry, Christopher T; Coulston, Emma; Cole, George C; Legon, Anthony C; Tew, David P; Leopold, Kenneth R

    2015-09-14

    a-type rotational spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex formed from pyridine and acetylene are reported. Rotational and (14)N hyperfine constants indicate that the complex is planar with an acetylenic hydrogen directed toward the nitrogen. However, unlike the complexes of pyridine with HCl and HBr, the acetylene moiety in HCCH-NC5H5 does not lie along the symmetry axis of the nitrogen lone pair, but rather, forms an average angle of 46° with the C2 axis of the pyridine. The a-type spectra of HCCH-NC5H5 and DCCD-NC5H5 are doubled, suggesting the existence of a low lying pair of tunneling states. This doubling persists in the spectra of HCCD-NC5H5, DCCH-NC5H5, indicating that the underlying motion does not involve interchange of the two hydrogens of the acetylene. Single (13)C substitution in either the ortho- or meta-position of the pyridine eliminates the doubling and gives rise to separate sets of spectra that are well predicted by a bent geometry with the (13)C on either the same side ("inner") or the opposite side ("outer") as the acetylene. High level ab initio calculations are presented which indicate a binding energy of 1.2 kcal/mol and a potential energy barrier of 44 cm(-1) in the C2v configuration. Taken together, these results reveal a complex with a bent hydrogen bond and large amplitude rocking of the acetylene moiety. It is likely that the bent equilibrium structure arises from a competition between a weak hydrogen bond to the nitrogen (an n-pair hydrogen bond) and a secondary interaction between the ortho-hydrogens of the pyridine and the π electron density of the acetylene. PMID:26374037

  17. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  18. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  19. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  20. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  1. Modeling of pulverulent ceramic jets with CALE: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.; Maxwell, D.

    1992-12-31

    The intent of this work is to provide an accurate, predictive description of the formation and evolution of pulverulent (consisting of finely divided grains) ceramic jets. The present phase of this effort is devoted to validation and optimization of the intact and powder ceramic material models by comparison of calculated model performance with experimental data. Physically reasonable parameters were chosen for the model which was optimized by comparison of the calculated results with experimental flash X-ray density data. Optimization parameters included jet tip velocity, jet density distributions, jet radius, and penetration depth. The optimized jets were tested in configurations similar to those of experiment and reproduced the data adequately. Jet formation from intact ceramic liners is a complicated physical process which is not yet completely understood. Models have been developed to describe this process at the level of current understanding. The models account for such processes as fracture of the solid ceramic by the high explosive detonation shock front, loss of yield strength as the resulting pulverized ceramic is decompressed and flows into the jet, dilatation and expansion of the pulverized ceramic as jet formation proceeds, and entrainment of air into the voids between the grains of the pulverized ceramic as the jet stretches and expands. The description of the behavior of ceramics under shock loading consists of four models (equation of state model, dilatancy model, air diffusion model, and strength model) which are incorporated into a special version of LLNL`s CALE, a C-language-based, two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode that is portable to Unix systems. Despite the interdependence of the model components, it is possible to determine reasonable values for the model parameters which allow quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data. These are briefly described and compared to the results of CALE simulations.

  2. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  3. Viscous linear stability of axisymmetric low-density jets: Parameters influencing absolute instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Hallberg, M. P.; Strykowski, P. J.

    2010-02-01

    Viscous linear stability calculations are presented for model low-density axisymmetric jet flows. Absolute growth transitions for the jet column mode are mapped out in a parametric space including velocity ratio, density ratio, Reynolds number, momentum thickness, and subtle differences between velocity and density profiles. Strictly speaking, the profiles used in most jet stability studies to date are only applicable to unity Prandtl numbers and zero pressure gradient flows—the present work relaxes this requirement. Results reveal how subtle differences between the velocity and density profiles generally used in jet stability theory can dramatically alter the absolute growth rate of the jet column mode in these low-density flows. The results suggest heating/cooling or mass diffusion at the outer nozzle surface can suppress absolute instability and potentially global instability in low-density jets.

  4. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  5. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    In this photo of the C-140 JetStar on the Dryden Ramp, a subscale propeller has been fitted to the upper fuselage of the aircraft. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on the ramp at Dryden in Edwards, California. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the wings of airliners. The program also studied ways of reducing the collection of ice and insects on airliner wings.

  6. Acetylene-derived strong organic acceptors for planar and nonplanar push-pull chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kivala, Milan; Diederich, François

    2009-02-17

    Though investigated for decades, interest in push-pull chromophores (D-pi-A), strong electron donors (D) connected by pi-conjugating spacers to strong electron acceptors (A), continues to grow. Such chromophores are of substantial interest for optoelectronic devices such as waveguides. Also, strong donors and acceptors form bimolecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes and salts, some of which exhibit electrical conductivity and magnetic behavior. Furthermore, strong organic acceptors are increasingly explored as dopants in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells. This Account describes systematic efforts pursued over the past decade in our laboratory to generate new families of organic electron acceptors (A) and conjugate them via pi-spacers to electron donors (D) under formation of push-pull systems with intense intramolecular CT interactions and high third-order optical nonlinearities. First, we describe donor-acceptor-substituted tetraethynylethenes (TEEs). In these chromophores, the peripherally attached p-nitrophenyl acceptors and N,N-dimethylanilino donors behave as nearly independent redox centers. Acetylenic scaffolding using TEE building blocks produces large all-carbon sheets, such as perethynylated dehydroannulenes, expanded radialenes, and radiaannulenes with potent electron-acceptor properties. Arylated TEEs act as molecular switches allowing two-way photochemical interconversion that is not perturbed by thermal isomerization pathways. Upon sequential substitution of the acetylene moieties in TEEs, we formed another family of potent acceptors, the cyanoethynylethenes (CEEs). Donor-substituted CEEs are planar CT chromophores with very high third-order optical nonlinearities. Their high environmental stability allows for the formation of thin films by vapor-phase deposition. Through careful analysis of the physicochemical properties of CEEs, we established useful guidelines for evaluating and tuning the optical gap in

  7. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  8. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  9. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  10. Uptake of acetylene on cosmic dust and production of benzene in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; James, Alexander D.; Sánchez, Juan Diego Carrillo; Mangan, Thomas P.; Willacy, Karen; Poppe, Andrew R.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A low-temperature flow tube and ultra-high vacuum apparatus were used to explore the uptake and heterogeneous chemistry of acetylene (C2H2) on cosmic dust analogues over the temperature range encountered in Titan's atmosphere below 600 km. The uptake coefficient, γ, was measured at 181 K to be (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-4 and (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-4 for the uptake of C2H2 on Mg2SiO4, MgFeSiO4 and Fe2SiO4, respectively, indicating that γ is independent of Mg or Fe active sites. The uptake of C2H2 was also measured on SiO2 and SiC as analogues for meteoric smoke particles in Titan's atmosphere, but was found to be below the detection limit (γ < 6 × 10-8 and < 4 × 10-7, respectively). The rate of cyclo-trimerization of C2H2 to C6H6 was found to be 2.6 × 10-5 exp(-741/T) s-1, with an uncertainty ranging from ± 27 % at 115 K to ± 49 % at 181 K. A chemical ablation model was used to show that the bulk of cosmic dust particles (radius 0.02-10 μm) entering Titan's atmosphere do not ablate (< 1% mass loss through sputtering), thereby providing a significant surface for heterogeneous chemistry. A 1D model of dust sedimentation shows that the production of C6H6via uptake of C2H2 on cosmic dust, followed by cyclo-trimerization and desorption, is probably competitive with gas-phase production of C6H6 between 80 and 120 km.

  11. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Nitrogen-Broadened Acetylene Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, Franck; Martinez, Raul Z.; Bermejo, Dionisio; Ivanov, Sergey V.; Buzykin, Oleg G.; Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental nitrogen-broadening coefficients derived from Voigt profiles of isotropic Raman Q-lines measured in the 2 band of acetylene (C2H2) at 150 K and 298 K, and compare them to theoretical values obtained through calculations that were carried out specifically for this work. Namely, full classical calculations based on Gordon's approach, two kinds of semi-classical calculations based on Robert Bonamy method as well as full quantum dynamical calculations were performed. All the computations employed exactly the same ab initio potential energy surface for the C2H2N2 system which is, to our knowledge, the most realistic, accurate and up-to-date one. The resulting calculated collisional half-widths are in good agreement with the experimental ones only for the full classical and quantum dynamical methods. In addition, we have performed similar calculations for IR absorption lines and compared the results to bibliographic values. Results obtained with the full classical method are again in good agreement with the available room temperature experimental data. The quantum dynamical close-coupling calculations are too time consuming to provide a complete set of values and therefore have been performed only for the R(0) line of C2H2. The broadening coefficient obtained for this line at 173 K and 297 K also compares quite well with the available experimental data. The traditional Robert Bonamy semi-classical formalism, however, strongly overestimates the values of half-width for both Qand R-lines. The refined semi-classical Robert Bonamy method, first proposed for the calculations of pressure broadening coefficients of isotropic Raman lines, is also used for IR lines. By using this improved model that takes into account effects from line coupling, the calculated semi-classical widths are significantly reduced and closer to the measured ones.

  12. Concentration Dependence of Line Shapes in the ν_1 + ν_3 Band of Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cich, Matthew; Forthomme, Damien; Hall, Gregory; McRaven, C.; Sears, Trevor

    2014-06-01

    Using an extended cavity diode laser locked to a frequency comb, the line shape of the P(11) line in the ν_1 + ν_3 combination band of acetylene has been studied as a function of varying concentration of the absorber in nitrogen. Mixture concentrations of 1, 5 and 10% at 296 K and pressures between a few Torr and one atmosphere were made and the measurements analyzed using two different speed-dependent broadening models. These experiments are designed to test the additivity of contributions to pressure broadening and shift in speed-dependent line shape modeling, i.e. whether the lineshape parameters follow partial pressure weighting in the binary mixtures. P(11) is relatively isolated with respect to underlying hot band transitions and neighboring transitions of the same band, but it was found that the accurate positions of underlying hot band transitions were crucial to the successful modeling of the observed line shapes, even though these lines are typically 100-1000 times weaker than P(11) itself and are many Doppler line widths removed from the line center. Positions of the hot band lines quoted in the HITRAN database, which are derived from the analysis of high resolution FTIR spectra, are of the order of 10's of MHz in error. In parallel work, we have measured the positions of many of these lines by saturation dip spectroscopy. Progress in the analysis of the data and the new saturation dip line center measurements will be reported. [1] C. P. McRaven, et al. Paper RI05, 68th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, 2013 Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  13. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  14. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits. PMID:27369508

  15. Acetylene as an essential building block for prebiotic formation of pyrimidine bases on Titan.

    PubMed

    Jeilani, Yassin A; Fearce, Chelesa; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2015-10-01

    Prebiotic building blocks for the formation of biomolecules are important in understanding the abiotic origin of biomolecules. However, there is a limited choice of the building blocks as precursors for the biomolecules. Acetylene (HCCH) is found in Titan's atmosphere and is an abiotic-precursor of pyrimidine bases. HCCH reacts with urea to form both cytosine and uracil. The mechanisms for the formation of both cytosine and uracil were studied by density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. Ethynyl radicals (˙CCH) are relevant for the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere therefore both HCCH and ˙CCH were evaluated as carbon sources. The pathways, for both HCCH and ˙CCH, lead to intermediates with an unsaturated-group that facilitate the formation of the six-membered ring of the pyrimidine bases. The predicted structures for cytosine and uracil were compared with labeled cytosine and uracil that were formed from the reaction of DCCD with urea. The results suggest that cytosine is formed from HCCH while uracil is formed from ˙CCH. The mechanisms are energetically feasible and there is no conclusive evidence for the preferred pathway (HCCH or ˙CCH). The pathways were further extended for the formation of both uric acid and 8-oxoguanine from HCCH and urea, and demonstrate the utility of HCCH as a carbon source for diverse biomolecules. Biuret is identified as a precursor for the pyridimine bases, and it unifies the free radical pathways for the pyrimidine bases with those of triazines. The pathways are appropriate for the reducing atmosphere that creates both radicals and electrons due to ionizing radiation on Titan. The mechanisms are feasible for the extraterrestrial formation of the pyrimidine bases. PMID:26325173

  16. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  17. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  18. Inactivation of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by acetylene.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh D; Lin, Ya-Ping; Van Vuong, Quan; Nagababu, Penumaka; Chang, Brian T-A; Ng, Kok Yaoh; Chen, Chein-Hung; Han, Chau-Chung; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Li, Mai Suan; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2015-12-01

    Acetylene (HCCH) has a long history as a mechanism-based enzyme inhibitor and is considered an active-site probe of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here, we report how HCCH inactivates pMMO in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by using high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational simulation. High-resolution MALDI-TOF MS of intact pMMO complexes has allowed us to confirm that the enzyme oxidizes HCCH to the ketene (C2H2O) intermediate, which then forms an acetylation adduct with the transmembrane PmoC subunit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the peptides derived from in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein subunit identifies K196 of PmoC as the site of acetylation. No evidence is obtained for chemical modification of the PmoA or PmoB subunit. The inactivation of pMMO by a single adduct in the transmembrane PmoC domain is intriguing given the complexity of the structural fold of this large membrane-protein complex as well as the complicated roles played by the various metal cofactors in the enzyme catalysis. Computational studies suggest that the entry of hydrophobic substrates to, and migration of products from, the catalytic site of pMMO are controlled tightly within the transmembrane domain. Support of these conclusions is provided by parallel experiments with two related alkynes: propyne (CH3CCH) and trifluoropropyne (CF3CCH). Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings to the location of the catalytic site in pMMO. PMID:26275807

  19. The vanadium nitrogenase of Azotobacter chroococcum. Reduction of acetylene and ethylene to ethane.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, M J; Eady, R R; Eldridge, M E

    1988-01-01

    1. The vanadium (V-) nitrogenase of Azobacter chroococcum transfers up to 7.4% of the electrons used in acetylene (C2H2) reduction for the formation of ethane (C2H6). The apparent Km for C2H2 (6 kPa) is the same for either ethylene (C2H4) or ethane (C2H6) formation and much higher than the reported Km values for C2H2 reduction to C2H4 by molybdenum (Mo-) nitrogenases. Reduction of C2H2 in 2H2O yields predominantly [cis-2H2]ethylene. 2. The ratio of electron flux yielding C2H6 to that yielding C2H4 (the C2H6/C2H4 ratio) is increased by raising the ratio of Fe protein to VFe protein and by increasing the assay temperature up to at least 40 degrees C. pH values above 7.5 decrease the C2H6/C2H4 ratio. 3. C2H4 and C2H6 formation from C2H2 by V-nitrogenase are not inhibited by H2. CO inhibits both processes much less strongly than it inhibits C2H4 formation from C2H2 with Mo-nitrogenase. 4. Although V-nitrogenase also catalyses the slow CO-sensitive reduction of C2H4 to C2H6, free C2H4 is not an intermediate in C2H6 formation from C2H2. 5. Propyne (CH3C identical to CH) is not reduced by the V-nitrogenase. 6. Some implications of these results for the mechanism of C2H6 formation by the V-nitrogenase are discussed. PMID:3162672

  20. [Optimization on slow-release inhibition of biomethane and the kinetics model of diffusion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-jie; Zhao, Tian-tao; Zhao, You-cai; Deng, Yu-ping

    2010-07-01

    The diffusion mechanism of acetylene,which can inhibit the activity of methanogens, was studied. Paraffin wax and rosin were used as matrix of slow-release and calcium carbide was used as inhibition material. Based on the T. Higuchi equation and the characteristics of slow-release inhibitors, a mechanism model was derived. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients (De) can be acquired by this model. During the diffusion process, the reaction heat of calcium carbide and water could make acetylene gas expansion and caused the slow-release inhibitors expansion if the hardness of the slow-release inhibitors is inadequate. The hardness and compactness were enhanced and the effective diffusion coefficients reached 2.2849 x 10(-8) cm2/min (R2 = 0.9901) when the mass faction of rosin was 20% and the mass ratio of matrix to calcium carbide was 1/1. Hence,the mitigation the methane generation with municipal solid waste (MSW) can be achieved by the technology of slow-release inhibition. PMID:20825047