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1

The Genetic Basis of a Rare Flower Color Polymorphism in Mimulus lewisii Provides Insight into the Repeatability of Evolution  

PubMed Central

A long-standing question in evolutionary biology asks whether the genetic changes contributing to phenotypic evolution are predictable. Here, we identify a genetic change associated with segregating variation in flower color within a population of Mimulus lewisii. To determine whether these types of changes are predictable, we combined this information with data from other species to investigate whether the spectrum of mutations affecting flower color transitions differs based on the evolutionary time-scale since divergence. We used classic genetic techniques, along with gene expression and population genetic approaches, to identify the putative, loss-of-function mutation that generates rare, white flowers instead of the common, pink color in M. lewisii. We found that a frameshift mutation in an anthocyanin pathway gene is responsible for the white-flowered polymorphism found in this population of M. lewisii. Comparison of our results with data from other species reveals a broader spectrum of flower color mutations segregating within populations relative to those that fix between populations. These results suggest that the genetic basis of fixed differences in flower color may be predictable, but that for segregating variation is not.

Nutter, Laura I.; Cross, Kaitlyn A.

2013-01-01

2

Free radical scavenging activity of Achillea alexandri-regis extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antioxidative potential of Achillea alexandri-regis has been studied by measuring the influence of herb extracts on hydroxyl and superoxide radicals' quantity in different in vitro systems. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in all tested biological system (liver homogenate, hemolyzed blood, serum and postmitochondrial liver fraction), whereas butanol extract reduced hydroxyl radicals significantly only in the

T. Kundakovi?; N. Mimica Duki?; N. Kova?evi?

2005-01-01

3

Antioxidant and free radical scavenging potential of Achillea santolina extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antioxidative activities of hydroalcoholic extract of Achillea santolina were investigated employing various established in vitro systems including total antioxidant activity in linoleic acid emulsion system, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), superoxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing power, and inhibitory effect on protein oxidation as well as the inhibition of Fe2+\\/ascorbate induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate. Total phenolic and flavonoid content

Amin Ardestani; Razieh Yazdanparast

2007-01-01

4

Experimental diabetes treated with Achillea santolina: Effect on pancreatic oxidative parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxidative stress is produced under diabetic condition and is likely involved in progression of pancreatic damage found in diabetes. In the present study, we examined possible protective effect of Achillea santolina L. (Compositae) against pancreatic damage in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated diabetic rats. Achillea santolina extract (ASE) is used by the traditional healers in many part of Iraq, as a hypoglycaemic agent.

Razieh Yazdanparast; Amin Ardestani; Shirin Jamshidi

2007-01-01

5

Composition and antimicrobial activity of Achillea distans essential oil.  

PubMed

The essential oil of Achillea distans W. et K. flower heads was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Altogether 43 components in concentrations more than 0.1% were identified representing 93.5% of the oil composition. The main constituents were 1,8-cineole (16.8%), trans-thujone (9.8%), sabinene (8.2%), borneol (7.5%), beta-pinene (6.5%), and camphor (5.8%). The oil showed moderate activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, and weak activity against Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:21815436

Konakchiev, Angel; Todorova, Milka; Mikhova, Bozhanka; Vitkova, Antonina; Najdenski, Hristo

2011-06-01

6

In Vitro Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activity of Ethanol Extract of Three Hypericum and Three Achillea Species From Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was conducted to determine the antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant activity of the ethanol extract of Hypericum scabrum L (HSm), Hypericum lysimachioides var. lysimachioides (HL), and Hypericum retusum Aucher (HR) and ethanol extracts of Achillea aleppica D.C. subsp. aleppica (AA), Achillea aleppica D.C. subsp. zederbaueri (Hayek) Hub.-Mor (AZ), and Achillea biebersteinii Afan. (AB). The antioxidant properties of extracts

Deniz Bar??; Murat K?z?l; Çetin Aytekin; Göksel K?z?l; Murat Yavuz; Bircan Çeken; A. Selçuk Ertekin

2011-01-01

7

A review on phytochemistry and medicinal properties of the genus Achillea  

PubMed Central

Achillea L. (Compositae or Asteraceae) is a widely distributed medicinal plant throughout the world and has been used since ancient time. Popular indications of the several species of this genus include treatment of wounds, bleedings, headache, inflammation, pains, spasmodic diseases, flatulence and dyspepsia. Phytochemical investigations of Achillea species have revealed that many components from this genus are highly bioactive. There are many reports on the mentioned folk and traditional effects. Although, the medicinal properties of Achillea plants are recognized worldwide, there are only one review article mainly about the structures of the phytochemical constituents of Achillea. The present paper reviews the medicinal properties of various species of Achillea, which have been examined on the basis of the scientific in vitro, in vivo or clinical evaluations. Various effects of these plants may be due to the presence of a broad range of secondary active metabolites such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, coumarins, terpenoids (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes) and sterols which have been frequently reported from Achillea species.

Saeidnia, S.; Gohari, AR.; Mokhber-Dezfuli, N.; Kiuchi, F.

2011-01-01

8

Cytotoxic and antioxidant activity of Achillea alexandri-regis.  

PubMed

The cytotoxicity and antioxidant properties of herb extracts of Achillea alexandri-regis were studied. Combined chloroform and ethylacetate extracts exhibited a pronounced cytotoxic effect against HeLa cancer cells (IC50 = 25.92 +/- 4.96 microg/ml), and lower cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells (IC50 = 48.59 +/- 18.31 microg/ml). The methanol extract was found to be a moderately cytotoxic in vitro agent against HeLa and K562 cells. No suppressive activity was detected on non-malignant peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The antioxidant activity of the methanol extract was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging. The methanol extract of A. alexandri-regis showed concentration dependent DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 = 36.14 +/- 0.05 microg/ml. PMID:15881617

Kundakovi?, T; Stanojkovi?, T; Jurani?, Z; Kovacevi?, N

2005-04-01

9

Essential oil composition of Achillea clusiana from Bulgaria.  

PubMed

The essential oil compositon of Achillea clusiana Tausch from Bulgaria has been studied by GC and GC/MS. Fifty-four components were registered, representing 92.5% of the oil. The oil was characterized by the presence of oxygenated mono- and sesquiterpenoids. The main components were beta-thujone (17.2%), 1,8-cineole (11.2%), camphor (11.1%) and alpha-thujone (7.8%). Farnesol (3.1%), nerolidol (2.7%) and oxygenated nerolidol derivatives (cabreuva oxides A-D, isohumbertiols A-D, bejarol and 7-hydroxy-6,7-dihydro-5,6E-dehydronerolidol) were the main sesquiterpenoids in the oil. PMID:20184037

Trendafilova, Antoaneta; Todorova, Milka; Vitkova, Antonina

2010-01-01

10

The Volatile Compounds and Bioactivity of Achillea sieheana Stapf. (Asteraceae)  

PubMed Central

The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and methanolic extract of Achillea sieheana Staf. (Asteraceae) were investigated in this study. The chemical composition of the essential oil isolated by hydro-distillation from the aerial parts of A. sieheana was analyzed by GC–MS. Camphor (43.36%), Artemisia ketone (25.95%), 1.8-cineole (6.29%) and camphene (4.77%) were the main components in the essential oil. Their antioxidant activities were also evaluated using phosphomolybdenum, ?-carotene bleaching and 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assays. A. sieheana methanolic extract showed an effective DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 87.04 ?g/mL). The extract had also a high reducing effect (71.08%) on the oxidation of ?-carotene. In addition to evaluating the antioxidant activity of this plant, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents were measured in the extract. The antimicrobial activities of the methanolic extract and the oil were also tested against 13 bacteria and two yeasts. The results showed that both had strong antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms.

Albayrak, Sevil

2013-01-01

11

Acute toxicity and antispasmodic activities of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch.  

PubMed

Since Achillea wilhelmsii is used as antispasmodic in traditional medicine, we conducted our current work to investigate its rationale on scientific grounds. Acute toxicity studies of crude methanol extract of Achillea wilhelmsii (Aw. CMeOH) is also performed. Effect of Aw. CMeOH and its fractions were tested on isolated sections of rabbits' jejunum at test concentrations 0.01, 0.03, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10mg/ml. The test extracts, in similar concentrations, were also tested on KCl-induced contractions. Calcium chloride curves were constructed for those fractions which relaxed KCl induced contractions in the absence and presence of the test samples to investigate its possible mode of action through calcium channels. Aw. CMeOH tested positive for flavonoids, saponins, tannins, glycosides, terpenoids, sterols, phenols, carbohydrates and proteins. LD(50) for acute toxicity studies is 2707±12.6 mg/kg. Mean EC(50) values for Aw. CMeOH on spontaneous and KCl-induced contractions are 3.41±0.18 (2.56-3.8, n=6) and 0.68±0.05 (0.6-0.85, n=6) mg/ml, respectively. Respective EC(50) values for n-hexane fraction on spontaneous and KCl-induced contractions are 3.06±0.08 (2.8-3.3, n=6) and 1.68±0.8 (1.4-1.9, n=6) mg/ml, respectively. Corresponding EC(50) (mg/ml) values for chloroformic, ethylacetate and aqueous fractions of Achillea wilhelmsii on spontaneous rabbits' jejunum preparations are 4.8±0.2 (4.41-5.63, n=6), 5.07±0.15 (4.7-5.58, n=6) and 5.2±0.13 (4.91-5.64, n=4), respectively. Constructing calcium chloride curves, in the presence of 0.1 mg/ml of Aw. CMeOH, mean EC(50) value (log molar [Ca(++)]) is-1.98±0.03 (-1.89-2.05, n=6) vs. control EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)])-2.41±0.02 (-2.32-2.44, n=6). Mean EC(50) value (log molar [Ca(++)]) for 0.3 mg/ml n-hexane fraction is-1.76±0.05 (-1.70 -1.93, n=6) vs. control EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) value-2.18±0.07 (-2.0-2.46, n=6). While in the presence of chloroformic fraction (3 mg/ml), mean EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) value is -2.4±0.1 (-2.78 -2.9, n=6) vs. control EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) value-2.70±0.05 (-2.5-2.8, n=6). Mean EC(50) value (log molar [Ca(++)]) for ethyl acetate fraction (1 mg/ml) is-1.94±0.07 (-1.75-2.05, n=6) vs. control EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) value-2.69±0.04 (-2.57-2.79, n=6). Mean EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) value for residual aqueous fraction (3 mg/ml) is-1.8±0.3 (-1.71-1.84, n=6) vs. control EC(50) (log molar [Ca(++)]) -2.6±0.04 (-2.59-2.76, n=6). Whereas, the verapamil (0.1µM) EC(50) value (log molar [Ca(++)]) is-1.7±0.1 (-1.6-1.8, n=6) vs. control EC(50) value (log molar [Ca(++)])- 2.4±0.09 (-2.3-2.47, n=6). The present research work confirms that the intestinal relaxation effect of Achillea wilhelmsii is supporting its traditional use as antispasmodic. The plant species can be a source for calcium antagonist(s), which can preferably be isolated from n-hexane fraction. PMID:24577920

Ali, Niaz; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Ahmed, Ghayour; Shah, Ismail; Shoaib, Mohammad; Junaid, Muhammad; Ali, Waqar

2014-03-01

12

Context dependence in foraging behaviour of Achillea millefolium.  

PubMed

Context-dependent foraging behaviour is acknowledged and well documented for a diversity of animals and conditions. The contextual determinants of plant foraging behaviour, however, are poorly understood. Plant roots encounter patchy distributions of nutrients and soil fungi. Both of these features affect root form and function, but how they interact to affect foraging behaviour is unknown. We extend the use of the marginal value theorem to make predictions about the foraging behaviour of roots, and test our predictions by manipulating soil resource distribution and inoculation by soil fungi. We measured plant movement as both distance roots travelled and time taken to grow through nutrient patches of varied quality. To do this, we grew Achillea millefolium in the centers of modified pots with a high-nutrient patch and a low-nutrient patch on either side of the plant (heterogeneous) or patch-free conditions (homogeneous). Fungal inoculation, but not resource distribution, altered the time it took roots to reach nutrient patches. When in nutrient patches, root growth decreased relative to homogeneous soils. However, this change in foraging behaviour was not contingent upon patch quality or fungal inoculation. Root system breadth was larger in homogeneous than in heterogeneous soils, until measures were influenced by pot edges. Overall, we find that root foraging behaviour is modified by resource heterogeneity but not fungal inoculation. We find support for predictions of the marginal value theorem that organisms travel faster through low-quality than through high-quality environments, with the caveat that roots respond to nutrient patches per se rather than the quality of those patches. PMID:22622873

Karst, Justine D; Belter, Pamela R; Bennett, Jonathan A; Cahill, James F

2012-12-01

13

Antioxidant and cytoprotective properties of infusions from leaves and inflorescences of Achillea collina Becker ex Rchb.  

PubMed

Plants are the main source of molecules with antioxidant and radical scavenging properties that aid the natural defence systems of cells and may be involved in the preservation of human health, particularly preventing all the physiopathological conditions where oxidative damage is a hallmark. Achillea collina Becker ex Rchb. is a medicinal plant of the Achillea millefolium aggregate (yarrow) traditionally used, particularly in mountain areas, as an infusion or alcohol extract for its digestive, antiinflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and wound healing properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant capacity and cytoprotective activity against oxidative stress of infusions obtained from the leaves and inflorescences of Achillea collina Becker ex Rchb., assessed by chemical (free radical scavenging activity by DPPH and Folin Ciocalteu assay) and biological assays (in vitro model of cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation in PC12 cells line). Infusions of leaves had the highest antioxidant properties and cytoprotective activity. The antioxidant capacity was significantly correlated with the total phenolic content but not with the cytoprotective profile. Achillea collina Becker ex Rchb. has good antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, suggesting further investigations on its chemical composition and potential health value, particularly for traditionally prepared infusions of leaves. PMID:19067389

Giorgi, Annamaria; Bombelli, Raffaella; Luini, Alessandra; Speranza, Giovanna; Cosentino, Marco; Lecchini, Sergio; Cocucci, Maurizio

2009-04-01

14

Essential oil content and composition of Achillea biebersteinii Afan. in different plant parts and phenological stages  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the essential oil content and composition of Achillea biebersteinii Afan. at different phenological stages including vegetative, floral budding, full flowering (leaves, stems and flowers) and fruit set were studied by means of gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography–mass spectometry (GC–MS). All oil samples from different plant parts and phenological stages were mostly made up of monoterpenoid compounds

Seyed Fazel Mirahmadi; Fatemeh Sefidkon; Mohammad Reza Hassandokht; Mohammad Esmail Hassani

2012-01-01

15

Antiulcerogenic activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Achillea millefolium L.: Involvement of the antioxidant system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Achillea millefolium L. is a member of the Asteraceae family that is commonly referred to as “yarrow” and has been used in folk medicine against several disturbances including skin inflammations, spasmodic and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as hepato-biliary complaints.

Francine Bittencourt Potrich; Alexandra Allemand; Luísa Mota da Silva; Ana Cristina dos Santos; Cristiane Hatsuko Baggio; Cristina Setim Freitas; Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno Mendes; Eunice Andre; Maria Fernanda de Paula Werner; Maria Consuelo Andrade Marques

2010-01-01

16

Immunomodulatory activity of aqueous extract of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch in mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunomodulatory activity of aqueous extract of Achillea wilhelmsii (25, 50 and 100 mg\\/kg body weight for 5 days) was evaluated on body weight, relative organ weight, delayed type of hypersensitivity (DTH) response and haemagglutination titre (HT) in female Swiss albino mice. No significant body weight gain differences were recorded in various groups of animals. Significant increase in relative organ weight

Fariba Sharififar; Shirin Pournourmohammadi; Moslem Arabnejad

17

Chemical composition of the essential oil of Achillea umbellata growing in Greece.  

PubMed

The essential oil of the aerial parts of the endemic Achillea umbellata (Compositae) was obtained by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sixty-six constituents were identified. The major constituents of the oil were beta-thujone (62.8%) and camphor (8.7%). PMID:19235027

Tzakou, Olga; Loukis, Anargyros

2009-01-01

18

Anti-Neuroinflammatory effects of the extract of Achillea fragrantissima  

PubMed Central

Background The neuroinflammatory process plays a central role in the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and involves the activation of brain microglial cells. During the neuroinflammatory process, microglial cells release proinflammatory mediators such as cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In the present study, extracts from 66 different desert plants were tested for their effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - induced production of NO by primary microglial cells. The extract of Achillea fragrantissima (Af), which is a desert plant that has been used for many years in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases, was the most efficient extract, and was further studied for additional anti-neuroinflammatory effects in these cells. Methods In the present study, the ethanolic extract prepared from Af was tested for its anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated primary cultures of brain microglial cells. The levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) secreted by the cells were determined by reverse transcriptase-PCR and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. NO levels secreted by the activate cells were measured using Griess reagent, ROS levels were measured by 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA), MMP-9 activity was measured using gel zymography, and the protein levels of the proinflammatory enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were measured by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was assessed using Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the media conditioned by the cells or by the crystal violet cell staining. Results We have found that out of the 66 desert plants tested, the extract of Af was the most efficient extract and inhibited ~70% of the NO produced by the LPS-activated microglial cells, without affecting cell viability. In addition, this extract inhibited the LPS - elicited expression of the proinflammatory mediators IL-1?, TNF?, MMP-9, COX-2 and iNOS in these cells. Conclusions Thus, phytochemicals present in the Af extract could be beneficial in preventing/treating neurodegenerative diseases in which neuroinflammation is part of the pathophysiology.

2011-01-01

19

Final report on the safety assessment of Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) Extract.  

PubMed

Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium) Extract is an extract of the yarrow plant, Achillea millefolium, supplied in polypropylene glycol, which is reported to function as a "biological additive" in cosmetic products. Sesquiterpene lactones, polyacetylenes, simple coumarins, and flavonoids have been identified among the many components of A. millefolium. Yarrow Extract was reportedly used in 65 cosmetic formulations. Historically, Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium) Extract was reported to be used at concentrations of < or =25%, but recent data indicate that this ingredient is supplied with actual Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium) Extract content of 2% to 25% and used at concentrations of 0.5% to 10%. Only limited toxicity data were available. Guinea pigs were sensitized to crude extracts of the whole plant and the flowers of A. millefolium. A. millefolium tea was weakly genotoxic in a somatic mutation and recombination test using Drosophila melanogaster. In clinical testing, product formulations containing 0.1% to 0.5% of ingredient that actually contained 2% of Yarrow Extract were generally not irritating. In provocative testing, patients reacted to a Compositae mix that contained yarrow, as well as to yarrow itself. Also in clinical testing, a formulation containing 0.1% Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium) Extract (2% Yarrow in propylene glycol and water) was not a sensitizer in a maximization test and alcoholic extracts of dried leaves and stalks of A. millefolium did not produce a phototoxic response. These data were not considered sufficient to support the safety of this ingredient in cosmetics. The types of data (all testing is to be performed on cosmetic-grade ingredients) still required include (1) ultraviolet (UV) absorption data, if absorption occurs in the UVA or UVB range, photosensitization data are needed; (2) gross pathology and histopathology in skin and other major organ systems associated with repeated exposures; (3) reproductive and developmental toxicity data; (4) two genotoxicity studies, one using a mammalian system, if positive, a 2-year dermal carcinogenicity assay performed using National Toxicology Program (NTP) methods may be needed; and (5) clinical sensitization testing at maximum concentration of use. In the absence of these data, it was concluded that the available data are insufficient to support the safety of Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium) Extract for use in cosmetic products. PMID:11558643

2001-01-01

20

Cytological investigations and new chromosome number reports in yarrow (Achillea millefolium Linnaeus, 1753) accessions from Iran  

PubMed Central

Abstract In this study, a new chromosome number for Iranian yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.) accessions was reported. Cytological analyses on four Achillea millefolium accessions, indicated that two accessions were diploids (2n=2x=18) and two tetraploids (2n=4x=36). Cluster analysis based on chromosomal characteristics and karyotype asymmetry, categorized the four accessions separated into two groups. In terms of the Stebbins’ system, the karyotype of diploid accessions grouped in 2A class. The average value of the total form percentage (TF%) in the group one (diploid accessions) and two (tetraploid accessions) were 40.85 and 41.15, respectively. The group one had the highest mean value for the symmetry index (S%=57.5). Consequently, it can be inferred that diploids belonging to the group one are the earlier evolutionary forms.

Afshari, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Akbari, Mohammad; Farajpour, Mostafa

2013-01-01

21

Essential oil composition and in vitro biological activity of Achillea millefolium L. extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Achillea genus is one of the widely used genera to treat various medical ailments. In this study, gas chromatography (GS) and Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) were used to determine the essential oil composition of the A. millefolium L. Human skin fi broblasts (HSF) viability based on spectrophotometrical 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Neutral Red (NR) methods and morphological analysis was

Roman Paduch; Magdalena Nowak-Kryska; Piotr Niedziela; Martyna Kandefer-Szersze?

22

Essential oils from hairy root cultures and from plant roots of Achillea millefolium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essential oils isolated from roots of two Achillea millefolium populations (BGL and CGA) and from two hairy root cultures (A4 and LBA) derived from one of these were analysed by GC and GC–mass spectrometry. The essential oils from the plant roots were obtained in a yield of 0.10% (BGL) and 0.05% (CGA) (v\\/w), whereas that of both hairy root

P. M. L Lourenço; A. C Figueiredo; J. G Barroso; L. G Pedro; M. M Oliveira; S. G Deans; J. J. C Scheffer

1999-01-01

23

Choleretic effects of yarrow ( Achillea millefolium s.l.) in the isolated perfused rat liver  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different species from the Achillea millefolium aggregate are used against gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary disorders in traditional European medicine. In this work, a fraction enriched in dicaffeoylquinic acids (DCCAs) and luteolin-7-O-?-d-glucuronide was investigated on its choleretic effect in the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) compared to cynarin (1,3-DCCA), the main choleretic compound of Cynara scolymus L. A fraction containing 3,4-, 3,5-

B. Benedek; N. Geisz; W. Jäger; T. Thalhammer; B. Kopp

2006-01-01

24

Determination of Carbonic Anhydrase and Level of Zn2+ in the Yarrow (Achillea Millefolium)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The carbonic anhydrase (CA: Carbonate hydrolyase: E.C.4.2.1.1) content from the leaves and flowers of mature yarrow (Achillea millefolium), a plant believed to possess healing qualities, was purified and characterized. The purification levels were 35.58 fold in the leaves and 40.21 fold in the flowers. The optimum temperatures were 25 o C and 40 o C for the leaves and flowers,

NAZAN DEMIR

25

Anti-inflammatory activity of Achillea and Ruscus topical gel on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats.  

PubMed

The anti-inflammatory activity of Achillea and Ruscus extracts was studied in comparison with diclofenac sodium topical gel (diclosal Emulgel), using the carrageenan induced paw edema model in Albino rats. Gel formulation was prepared containing 6% of each extract in gel base, namely sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC). The kinetics of drug release from the prepared formulation was studied separately in each case. Results showed that the release follows the Higuchi square root equation. The pharmacological screening revealed that the percent reduction of edema for Achillea extract and Ruscus extract were 48.1% and 18.8%, respectively, while diclosal Emulgel produced 47% reduction of edema. PMID:17203864

Maswadeh, Hamzah M; Semreen, Mohammad H; Naddaf, Ahmad R

2006-01-01

26

Flavonoid characterization and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from Achillea ligustica All  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethanolic extracts of Achillea ligustica All. (Asteraceae) flowering tops were evaluated. High-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry was used for the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds. 6-Hydroxykaempferol-3,6,4?-trimethyl ether, apigenin-6-C-glucoside-8-C-arabinoside, luteolin, and apigenin were the most abundant flavonoids. For the first time C-glycosylflavones were detected in A. ligustica with apigenin-6-C-glucoside-8-C-arabinoside being the most representative. The radical scavenging activity of the extracts

Carlo Ignazio Giovanni Tuberoso; Paola Montoro; Sonia Piacente; Giulia Corona; Monica Deiana; Maria Assunta Dessì; Cosimo Pizza; Paolo Cabras

2009-01-01

27

Achillea millefolium L. s.l. herb extract: Antioxidant activity and effect on the rat heart mitochondrial functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An extract of Achillea millefolium herb (YE) was investigated for antioxidant activity using chemical and biological assays. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of some major phenolics was carried out by HPLC. An on-line HPLC-DPPH assay showed that YE possesses significant antiradical activity which is due to the presence of active components amongst phenolic compounds. Furthermore, direct effects of YE and a

Sonata Trumbeckaite; Raimondas Benetis; Lina Bumblauskiene; Deividas Burdulis; Valdimaras Janulis; Adolfas Toleikis; Pranas Viškelis; Valdas Jakštas

2011-01-01

28

Development of an RP?HPLC Method for the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds in Achillea millefolium L  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several major phenolic constituents present in yarrow (Achillea millefolium L. s.l.) were determined for a homogenized plant sample. In order to optimize the conditions for sample preparation of the botanical matrix two different solvent extraction methods (maceration and ultrasonic agitation) were assayed. The preliminary maceration studies were performed to determine the influence of extracting solvents on the recovery of phenolics

Raimondas Benetis; Jolita Radušien?; Valdas Jakštas; Valdimaras Janulis; Faustas Malinauskas

2008-01-01

29

Distribution and chemical polymorphism of the essential oils of Achillea cartilaginea growing wild in Lithuania.  

PubMed

The essential oils from 14 Achillea cartilaginea samples (leaves and flowers) collected from natural habitats in Lithuania were analysed by GC-MS. In total, 97 compounds were identified, 69 of which have not been reported previously in this species. In general, the essential oils of A. cartilaginea were rich in oxygenated monoterpenes. Remarkable chemical polymorphism was observed within the population of A. cartilaginea in Lithuania. It was observed that 1,8-cineole, camphor, cis-chrysanthenol, ?-thujone, sabinol, chrysanthenone, terpinen-4-ol, bornyl acetate and ?-sesquiphellandrene were the major constituents in the oils of the analysed plants. Hierarchical cluster analysis, which was based on the 19 major components exceeding 5% in the total oil, indicates the presence of several main chemical groups in the analysed plant populations. PMID:22011043

Gudaityt?, O; Venskutonis, P R; Maždžierien?, R

2012-01-01

30

Evaluation of the Wound Healing Potential of Achillea biebersteinii Afan. (Asteraceae) by In Vivo Excision and Incision Models.  

PubMed

Achillea species are widely used for diarrhea, abdominal pain, stomachache and healing of wounds in folk medicine. To evaluate the wound healing activity of the plant, extracts were prepared with different solvents; hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively from the roots of Achillea biebersteinii. Linear incision by using tensiometer and circular excision wound models were employed on mice and rats. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with the standard skin ointment Madecassol. The n-hexane extract treated groups of animals showed 84.2% contraction, which was close to contraction value of the reference drug Madecassol (100%). On the other hand the same extract on incision wound model demonstrated a significant increase (40.1%) in wound tensile strength as compared to other groups. The results of histoptological examination supported the outcome of linear incision and circular excision wound models as well. The experimental data demonstrated that A. biebersteinii displayed remarkable wound healing activity. PMID:19546149

Akkol, Esra Küpeli; Koca, Ufuk; Pesin, Ipek; Yilmazer, Demet

2011-01-01

31

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and methanol extracts of Achillea millefolium subsp. millefolium Afan. (Asteraceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and methanol extracts of Achillea millefolium subsp. millefolium Afan. (Asteraceae) were investigated. GC-MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 36 compounds constituting 90.8% of the total oil. Eucalyptol, camphor, ?-terpineol, ?-pinene, and borneol were the principal components comprising 60.7% of the oil. The oil strongly

Ferda Candan; Mehmet Unlu; Bekta? Tepe; Dimitra Daferera; Moschos Polissiou; Atalay Sökmen; H. A?k?n Akpulat

2003-01-01

32

Polyphenolic composition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities for two Romanian subspecies of Achillea distans Waldst. et Kit. ex Willd.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to study the chemical composition, antioxidant and antibacterial properties of Achillea distans Waldst. et Kit. subsp. distans and Achillea distans Waldst. et Kit. subsp. alpina Rochel, from the Rodna Mountains (Romania). The identification and quantification of major phenolic compounds was performed by a HPLC-MS method. The total polyphenolic and flavonoid content was determined spectrophotometrically. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using the DPPH bleaching method, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (TEAC), hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX) assay, and an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy method. A data indicated that A. distans subsp. alpina extract has more antioxidant activity than A. distans subsp. distans extract. Luteolin, apigenin, quercetin, caffeic and chlorogenic acids were present in the two extracts of A. distans, but in different amounts. Three flavonoids were detected only in A. distans subsp. alpina. The polyphenol-richer A. distans subsp. alpina extract showed a higher antioxidant activity than A. distans subsp. distans extract. A. distans subsp. distans extract showed inhibitory activity for Gram-positive bacteria, as evaluated with four species. The quantitative and qualitative differences between the two subspecies of Achillea distans could be used as a potential taxonomic marker in order to distinguish the species. PMID:23887715

Benedec, Daniela; Vlase, Laurian; Oniga, Ilioara; Mot, Augustin C; Damian, Grigore; Hanganu, Daniela; Duma, Mihaela; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

2013-01-01

33

Flavonoid characterization and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from Achillea ligustica All.  

PubMed

Ethanolic extracts of Achillea ligustica All. (Asteraceae) flowering tops were evaluated. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry was used for the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds. 6-Hydroxykaempferol-3,6,4'-trimethyl ether, apigenin-6-C-glucoside-8-C-arabinoside, luteolin, and apigenin were the most abundant flavonoids. For the first time C-glycosylflavones were detected in A. ligustica with apigenin-6-C-glucoside-8-C-arabinoside being the most representative. The radical scavenging activity of the extracts was determined by DPPH test and ranged between 4.18 and 12.3 mM. The ability of these extracts to inhibit non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation was studied using the simple in vitro system of linoleic acid oxidation: five of the nine extracts exerted a protective effect at the lower amount tested (5 microg). Protection on CaCo-2 intestinal cells against TBH-induced toxicity was also investigated: the results showed that two of the extracts tested in this cell system had the ability to protect against oxidative stress induced by TBH starting from concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml. PMID:19570644

Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Montoro, Paola; Piacente, Sonia; Corona, Giulia; Deiana, Monica; Dessì, Maria Assunta; Pizza, Cosimo; Cabras, Paolo

2009-10-15

34

Chemical composition and antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antifungal activities of the essential oil of Achillea ligustica all.  

PubMed

The chemical composition of the essential oil from flowering tops of Achillea ligustica All. was studied. Samples were collected in different localities of Sardinia (Italy) and hydrodistilled both with Clevenger-type and with simultaneous distillation-extraction apparatus. The yields ranged between 0.88 +/- 0.06 and 0.43 +/- 0.02% (vol/dry wt). The essential oils were analyzed by GC-MS, and a total of 96 components were detected. From a qualitative point of view, irrelevant differences between samples were observed. Strong chemical variability depending on the origin of the samples was observed. The major compounds found were santolina alcohol (6.7-21.8%, for the first time detected in A. ligustica), borneol (3.4-20.8%), sabinol (2.1-15.5%), trans-sabinyl acetate (0.9-17.6%), alpha-thujone (0.4-25.8%), and, among sesquiterpenes, viridiflorol (0.7-3.6%). No significant differences were detected between essential oils extracted by hydrodistillation and simultaneous distillation-extraction with CH2Cl2 and n-hexane. Antioxidant activity as DPPH radical scavenging activity was expressed in TEAC and ranged between 0.40 and 0.88 mmol/L. The antimicrobial and antifungal activities were investigated on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Penicillium commune, Fusarium oxysporum, Rizoctonia solani, and Aspergillus flavus, showing low activity. PMID:16366708

Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Kowalczyk, Adam; Coroneo, Valentina; Russo, Maria Teresa; Dessì, Sandro; Cabras, Paolo

2005-12-28

35

Antimutagenic Effect of Medicinal Plants Achillea millefolium and Bauhinia forficata In Vivo  

PubMed Central

The investigation of traditionally used medicinal plants is valuable both as a source of potential chemotherapeutic drugs and as a measure of safety for the continued use of these medicinal plants. Achillea millefolium L. (AM) is an ancient remedial herb native to Europe that is used to treat wounds, gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary disorders, inflammation, headaches, and pain. Bauhinia forficata Link (BF), an Asiatic plant, is one of the most commonly used plants in folk medicine against diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic and antimutagenic potential of aqueous extracts of AM and BF on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats treated in vivo. These plant extracts possess considerable antioxidant activity due to the presence of flavonoids and phenolic compounds. These compounds were determinants to noncytotoxic and antimutagenic/protective action of these plants, that reduced statistically the percentage of chromosomal alterations induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide in simultaneous (AM, 68%; BF, 91%), pre- (AM, 68%; BF, 71%), and post-treatment (AM, 67%; BF, 95%). Therefore, the results of this study indicate that extracts of A. millefolium and B. forficata have antimutagenic potential and that their consumption can benefit the health of those using them as an alternative therapy.

de Almeida, Igor Vivian; Coelho, Ana Carolina; Balbi, Thiago Jose; Dusman Tonin, Lilian Tatiani; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta

2013-01-01

36

Antimicrobial efficacy of Achillea ligustica All. (Asteraceae) essential oils against reference and isolated oral microorganisms.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of Achillea ligustica essential oils against several oral microorganisms in comparison with a commercial essential oil-containing mouthrinse (Listerine(®)) and clove oil (containing 89% eugenol). The inhibition efficacy of A. ligustica essential oils alone and in combination with Listerine(®) was evaluated by the micro-dilution method. The most susceptible microorganisms were Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Candida albicans. The efficacy was similar to that of the clove oil. The antiseptic mouthwash Listerine(®) did not exert a strong inhibition on microbial strains tested, whereas its effectiveness increased significantly when essential oil was added. The study provides additional evidence for the in vitro inhibitory activity of A. ligustica essential oils on several pathogens, suggesting their usefulness in mouthrinse formulations as an adjunct to mechanical oral hygiene regimens. Essential oil-containing mouthrinses can be beneficial, safe components of daily oral health routines, representing an efficient and without side effect alternative to prevent and control oral infections. PMID:22253099

Cecchini, Cinzia; Silvi, Stefania; Cresci, Alberto; Piciotti, Andrea; Caprioli, Giovanni; Papa, Fabrizio; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro; Maggi, Filippo

2012-01-01

37

Antimutagenic Effect of Medicinal Plants Achillea millefolium and Bauhinia forficata In Vivo.  

PubMed

The investigation of traditionally used medicinal plants is valuable both as a source of potential chemotherapeutic drugs and as a measure of safety for the continued use of these medicinal plants. Achillea millefolium L. (AM) is an ancient remedial herb native to Europe that is used to treat wounds, gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary disorders, inflammation, headaches, and pain. Bauhinia forficata Link (BF), an Asiatic plant, is one of the most commonly used plants in folk medicine against diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic and antimutagenic potential of aqueous extracts of AM and BF on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats treated in vivo. These plant extracts possess considerable antioxidant activity due to the presence of flavonoids and phenolic compounds. These compounds were determinants to noncytotoxic and antimutagenic/protective action of these plants, that reduced statistically the percentage of chromosomal alterations induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide in simultaneous (AM, 68%; BF, 91%), pre- (AM, 68%; BF, 71%), and post-treatment (AM, 67%; BF, 95%). Therefore, the results of this study indicate that extracts of A. millefolium and B. forficata have antimutagenic potential and that their consumption can benefit the health of those using them as an alternative therapy. PMID:24459532

Düsman, Elisângela; de Almeida, Igor Vivian; Coelho, Ana Carolina; Balbi, Thiago José; Düsman Tonin, Lilian Tatiani; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta

2013-01-01

38

Composition at different development stages of the essential oil of four Achillea species grown in Iran.  

PubMed

Four Achillea species, A. millefolium, A. nobilis, A. eriophora and A. biebersteinii, were grown in small field plots in Iran and harvested at four developmental stages: vegetative, at the appearance of the first flower heads, at full flowering, and at late flowering. The composition of the main volatile compounds in dichloromethane extracts and the essential oil obtained by microdistillation was established by GC/MS and GC. 1,8-Cineole (27-41%) was the main compound in the oils from A. millefolium and A. biebersteinii. These two species reached the highest amount of volatile compounds at the full blooming stage. alpha-Thujone was the main compound in A. nobilis oil (25-64%). Fully blooming plants of this species also had a high proportion of artemisia ketone (up to 40%) in the oil. The main oil compounds of A. eriophora were camphor (about 35%) and 1,8-cineol (about 30%). This species produces only a small number of flower heads and the composition of the essential oil did not change during development. PMID:20334145

Azizi, Majid; Chizzola, Remigius; Ghani, Askar; Oroojalian, Fatemeh

2010-02-01

39

Antiprotozoal activity of Achillea ptarmica (Asteraceae) and its main alkamide constituents.  

PubMed

In the course of our ongoing screening of plants of the family Asteraceae for antiprotozoal activity, a CH2Cl2-extract from the flowering aerial parts of Achillea ptarmica L. (sneezewort yarrow) was found to be active in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 = 0.67 µg/mL) and Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 = 6.6 ?g/mL). Bioassay guided fractionation led to the isolation and identification of five alkamides from the most active fractions. Pellitorine and 8,9-Z-dehyropellitorine are the main components of the extract. Beside these olefinic acid amides, four alkamides with diene-diyne structures were isolated. All alkamides were tested for antiprotozoal activity in vitro. Pellitorine was the most active compound so far within this study against P. falciparum (IC50 = 3.3 µg/mL), while 8,9-Z-dehydropellitorine was most active against T. b. rhodesiense (IC50 = 2.0 µg/mL). The activity of pure pellitorine against Plasmodium is higher than that of the crude extract and thus explains the activity of the latter. None of the isolated alkamides, however, was as active against T. b. rhodesiense as the crude extract whose antitrypanosomal activity must therfore be due to a synergistic effect of the isolated compounds or to more active yet to be identified constituents. PMID:24853616

Althaus, Julia B; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

2014-01-01

40

A new ?-glucosidase inhibitor from Achillea fragrantissima (Forssk.) Sch. Bip. growing in Egypt.  

PubMed

?-Glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) represent a class of oral antidiabetic drugs that delay the absorption of ingested carbohydrates, reducing the postprandial glucose and insulin peaks to reach normoglycaemia. In this study, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Achillea fragrantissima (Forssk.) Sch. Bip. growing in Egypt led to the isolation of a new potent AGI; acacetin-6-C-(6?-acetyl-?-d-glucopyranoside)-8-C-?-l-arabinopyranoside (5) alongside with four known compounds: chondrillasterol (1), quercetin-3,6,7-trimethyl ether (chrysosplenol-D) (2), isovitexin-4'-methyl ether (3) and isovitexin (4). The structure of the new compound (5) was elucidated on the basis of its spectral data, including HR-FAB-MS, UV, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC. The new compound (5) exhibited the most significant ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50 1.5 ± 0.09 ?g/mL). Under the assay conditions, all the tested compounds were more potent than the positive control acarbose (IC50 224 ± 2.31 ?g/mL). PMID:24666348

Ezzat, Shahira M; Salama, Maha M

2014-06-01

41

Misidentification of tansy, Tanacetum macrophyllum, as yarrow, Achillea grandifolia: a health risk or benefit?  

PubMed

Tansy, Tanacetum macrophyllum (Waldst. & Kit.) Sch. Bip., is often misidentified by herb collectors as yarrow, Achillea grandifolia Friv. With the former, cases of poisoning induced by its ingestion are well documented, but the latter is widely used for ethnopharmacological purposes. The aim of this study was to estimate, based on the volatile metabolite profiles of the two species, the potential health risk connected with their misidentification. GC and GC-MS analysis of the essential oils hydrodistilled using a Clevenger-type apparatus from A. grandifolia, T. macrophyllum, and two plant samples (reputedly of A. grandifolia, but in fact mixtures of A. grandifolia and T. macrophyllum) obtained from a local market, resulted in the identification of 215 different compounds. The main constituents of A. grandifolia oil were ascaridole (15.5%), alpha-thujone (7.5%), camphor (15.6%), borneol (5.2%) and (Z)-jasmone (6.4%), and of T. macrophyllum oil, 1,8-cineole (8.6%), camphor (6.4%), borneol (9.1%), isobornyl acetate (9.5%), copaborneol (4.2%) and gamma-eudesmol (6.2%). The compositions of the oils extracted from the samples obtained from the market were intermediate to those of A. grandifolia and T. macrophyllum. Significant differences in the corresponding volatile profiles and the literature data concerning the known activities of the pure constituents of the oils, suggested that the pharmacological action of the investigated species (or their unintentional mixtures) would be notably different. It seems, however, that misidentification of T. macrophyllum as A. grandifolia does not represent a health risk and that the absence of the toxic alpha-thujone from T. macrophyllum oil may in fact be regarded as a benefit. PMID:20184036

Radulovi?, Niko S; Blagojevi?, Polina D; Skropeta, Danielle; Zarubica, Aleksandra R; Zlatkovi?, Bojan K; Pali?, Radosav M

2010-01-01

42

Mechanism of vasorelaxation induced by Achillea wilhelmsii in rat isolated thoracic aorta  

PubMed Central

Background: Achillea wilhelmsii (A. wilhelmsii) is used in Iraninan folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension; also, in previous reports, the hypotensive and antihypertensive effects of this plant have been indicated. The aim of the present study is to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of the hydroalcholic extract of A. wilhelmsii and its underlying mechanisms in isolated rat aorta. Materials and Methods: The effect of the hydroalcholic A. wilhelmsii extract was tested on the contractile response of Wistar rat aorta induced by potassium chloride (KCl) and phenylephrine (PE) using a pressure transducer that is connected to the PowerLab. Results: The cumulative concentrations of A. wilhelmsii (0.5-8 mg/ml) induced a vasorelaxation both in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortas precontracted by high K+ (6 × 10?2 M) or 10?6 M PE. A. wilhelmsii, at a concentration of 4 mg/ml, reduced Ca2+-induced contraction (P < 0.001 vs. control) after PE or KCl had generated a stable contraction in the Ca2+-free solution. Furthermore, after incubation with diltiazem, the vasorelaxant effect of A. wilhelmsii reduced in the endothelium-denuded aortas precontracted by PE or KCl (P < 0.001 vs. control). In contrast, A. wilhelmsii-induced relaxation was not affected by glibenclamide, BaCl2, ruthenium red, methylene blue, or heparin. Conclusions: The results showed that A. wilhelmsii had a vasorelaxation effect, which was not endothelium-dependent. The relaxation was mediated by inhibition of extracellular Ca2+ influx through voltage- and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels (VDDCs and ROCCs) in vascular smooth muscle cells.

Niazmand, Saeed; Harandizadeh, Fatemeh; Mahmoudabady, Maryam; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Hasanzadeh, Mehdi; Fereidouni, Elahe

2014-01-01

43

Chemical composition and biological activity of the volatile extracts of Achillea millefolium.  

PubMed

In this study, flowering aerial parts of wild Achillea millefolium growing on the Mediterranean coast (Sardinia Island, Italy) and on the Atlantic coast (Portugal- Serra de Montemuro) were used as a matrix for supercritical extraction of volatile oil with CO2 (SFE). The collected extracts were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS methods and their composition were compared with that of the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation. A strong chemical variability in essential oils depending on the origin of the samples was observed. The results showed the presence of two type oils. The Italian volatile extracts (SFE and essential oil) are predominantly composed by alpha-asarone (25.6-33.3%, in the SFE extract and in the HD oil, respectively), beta-bisabolene (27.3-16.6%) and alpha-pinene (10.0-17.0%); whereas the main components of the Portuguese extracts are trans-thujone (31.4-29.0%), trans-crhysanthenyl acetate (19.8-15.8%) and beta-pinene (1.2-11.1%). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were used to evaluate the antifungal activity of the oils against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. guillermondii, C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, T. mentagrophytes var. interdigitale, T. verrucosum, Microsporum canis, M. gypseum, Epidermophyton floccosum, Aspergillus niger, A. fumigatus and A. flavus. The oils showed the highest activity against dermatophyte strains, with MIC values ranging from 0.32-1.25 microL mL(-1). PMID:22164800

Falconieri, Danilo; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Marongiu, Bruno; Gonçalves, Maria J; Cabral, Célia; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Ligia

2011-10-01

44

The protective effects of Achillea L. species native in Turkey against H 2O 2-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and leucocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of infusions prepared from 15 Achillea (Asteraceae) species against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and leucocytes used in traditional Turkish medicine. CAT, SOD and GPx activities, effects of LPO and GSH levels of the infusions on erythrocytes and leucocytes were assessed. The results indicated that all infusions

Sibel Konyalioglu; Canan Karamenderes

2005-01-01

45

Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products?-?part 1: Achillea millefolium-Curcuma longa.  

PubMed

This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 1: Achillea millefolium L.-Curcuma longa L. PMID:24621152

Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Minciullo, Paola L; Caputi, Achille P; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

2014-07-01

46

Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and methanol extracts of Achillea millefolium subsp. millefolium Afan. (Asteraceae).  

PubMed

The in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and methanol extracts of Achillea millefolium subsp. millefolium Afan. (Asteraceae) were investigated. GC-MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 36 compounds constituting 90.8% of the total oil. Eucalyptol, camphor, alpha-terpineol, beta-pinene, and borneol were the principal components comprising 60.7% of the oil. The oil strongly reduced the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical (IC(50)=1.56 micro g/ml) and exhibited hydroxyl radical scavenging effect in the Fe(3+)-EDTA-H(2)O(2) deoxyribose system (IC(50)=2.7 micro g/ml). It also inhibited the nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation of rat liver homogenate (IC(50)=13.5 micro g/ml). The polar phase of the extract showed antioxidant activity. The oil showed antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Clostridium perfringens, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Acinetobacter lwoffii and Candida krusei while water-insoluble parts of the methanolic extracts exhibited slight or no activity. This study confirms that the essential oil of Achillea millefolium possesses antioxidant and antimicrobial properties in vitro. PMID:12860311

Candan, Ferda; Unlu, Mehmet; Tepe, Bekta?; Daferera, Dimitra; Polissiou, Moschos; Sökmen, Atalay; Akpulat, H A?kin

2003-08-01

47

Composition and biological activity of essential oil of Achillea ligustica All. (Asteraceae) naturalized in central Italy: Ideal candidate for anti-cariogenic formulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Essential oil from flowers (FL) and vegetative parts (VP) of Achillea ligustica (Asteraceae), naturalized after cultivation in central Italy, was investigated by GC–FID and GC–MS. The most abundant components were linalool, viridiflorol, ?-pinene, 1,8-cineole and terpinen-4-ol. The antioxidant assays (DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays, and ?-carotene bleaching test) demonstrated a moderate activity of essential oils. The antimicrobial activity was

Filippo Maggi; Massimo Bramucci; Cinzia Cecchini; Maria M. Coman; Alberto Cresci; Gloria Cristalli; Giulio Lupidi; Fabrizio Papa; Luana Quassinti; Gianni Sagratini; Sauro Vittori

2009-01-01

48

Chemical composition of wild and commercial Achillea millefolium L. and bioactivity of the methanolic extract, infusion and decoction.  

PubMed

Medicinal plants used in folk medicine are being increasingly studied and used on pharmaceutical, food and nutraceutical fields. Herein, wild and commercial samples of Achillea millefolium L. (yarrow) were chemically characterized with respect to their macronutrients, free sugars, organic acids, fatty acids and tocopherols. Furthermore, in vitro antioxidant properties (free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) and antitumour potential (against breast, lung, cervical and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) of their methanolic extract, infusion and decoction (the most consumed forms) was evaluated and compared to the corresponding phenolic profile obtained by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Data obtained showed that the chemical profiles of wild and commercial samples, and also their methanolic extract, infusion and decoction were similar, varying only in the quantities found. Commercial yarrow have higher content of fat and saturated fatty acids, proteins, ash, energy value, sugars and flavonoids, while the wild sample revealed higher levels of carbohydrates, organic acids, unsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols and phenolic acids. The heterogeneity among the antioxidant and antitumour results of the samples and some low correlations with total phenolic compounds indicates that specific compounds, rather than the totality of them, are involved in the bioactive properties of samples. PMID:23993599

Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Pereira, Eliana; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Alves, Rita C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

2013-12-15

49

Volatile Constituents of Achillea ligustica All. by HS-SPME\\/GC\\/GC-MS. Comparison with Essential Oils Obtained by Hydrodistillation from Corsica and Sardinia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volatile components extracted from the headspace (HS) of Achillea ligustica All. samples and their separated organs using solid phase microextraction (SPME) were investigated by gas chromatography\\u000a and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fiftyseven compounds were identified, the main components were camphor (14.2–29.8%),\\u000a artemisia ketone (0.3–26.7%), santolina alcohol (0.5–9.4%), camphene (3.0–9.0%) and trans-sabinyl acetate (1.6–5.5%). Moreover,\\u000a the chemical composition of Corsican and

Alain Muselli; Marta Pau; Jean-Marie Desjobert; Marcia Foddai; Marianna Usai; Jean Costa

2009-01-01

50

Antioxidant effect of Achillea wilhelmsii extract on pentylenetetrazole (seizure model)-induced oxidative brain damage in Wistar rats.  

PubMed

An important role for oxidative stress both as a consequence and as a cause of epileptic seizures has been suggested. Since Achillea wilhelmsii (A. wilhelmsii) has been considered to have the antioxidant effects as well as central nervous system depressant properties, the anti-seizure effects of the plant extract in addition to its effects on brain tissues oxidative damage were investigated in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures model. Male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: (1) Control, (2) PTZ, (3-5) A. wilhelmsii extract groups (AWE). The animals in groups 2-5 were treated with saline or AWE (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg) before single injection of PTZ (90 mg/kg). Latency to first minimal clonic seizure (MCS) and the first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded. The brain tissues were then removed for biochemical measurements. MCS latencies in extract treated groups were not different from PTZ group. The animals treated by 200 mg/kg of AWE had a significant higher GTCS latency in comparison with PTZ group (P < 0.001). The MDA levels in PTZ group were significantly higher and the total thiol concentrations were lower than control animals. Pretreatment with all 3 doses of the extract resulted in a significant reduction in the MDA levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001) and a significant elevation in total thiol concentration, as compared with PTZ group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The present study showed that the hydroalcoholic extract of A. wilhelmsii possesses an antioxidant effect in the brain in PTZ induced seizure model. PMID:24968581

Hosseini, Mahmoud; Harandizadeh, Fatemeh; Niazamand, Saeed; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Mahmoudabady, Maryam

2013-01-01

51

Nuclear and plastid haplotypes suggest rapid diploid and polyploid speciation in the N Hemisphere Achillea millefolium complex (Asteraceae)  

PubMed Central

Background Species complexes or aggregates consist of a set of closely related species often of different ploidy levels, whose relationships are difficult to reconstruct. The N Hemisphere Achillea millefolium aggregate exhibits complex morphological and genetic variation and a broad ecological amplitude. To understand its evolutionary history, we study sequence variation at two nuclear genes and three plastid loci across the natural distribution of this species complex and compare the patterns of such variations to the species tree inferred earlier from AFLP data. Results Among the diploid species of A. millefolium agg., gene trees of the two nuclear loci, ncpGS and SBP, and the combined plastid fragments are incongruent with each other and with the AFLP tree likely due to incomplete lineage sorting or secondary introgression. In spite of the large distributional range, no isolation by distance is found. Furthermore, there is evidence for intragenic recombination in the ncpGS gene. An analysis using a probabilistic model for population demographic history indicates large ancestral effective population sizes and short intervals between speciation events. Such a scenario explains the incongruence of the gene trees and species tree we observe. The relationships are particularly complex in the polyploid members of A. millefolium agg. Conclusions The present study indicates that the diploid members of A. millefolium agg. share a large part of their molecular genetic variation. The findings of little lineage sorting and lack of isolation by distance is likely due to short intervals between speciation events and close proximity of ancestral populations. While previous AFLP data provide species trees congruent with earlier morphological classification and phylogeographic considerations, the present sequence data are not suited to recover the relationships of diploid species in A. millefolium agg. For the polyploid taxa many hybrid links and introgression from the diploids are suggested.

2012-01-01

52

Effect of aqueous extract of Achillea millefolium on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice  

PubMed Central

Objective: Achillea millefolium (A. millefolium) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory remedy in traditional and herbal medicine. In this study, we investigated the effect of an aqueous extract from A. millefolium on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and on the serum cytokine levels in C57BL/6 mice. Materials and Methods: EAE was induced in 63 C57BL/6 mice weighing 20-25 g (8 weeks old). Following immunization, the treatment protocol was initiated by using different doses of an aqueous extract from A. millefolium (1, 5, and 10 mg/mouse/day). Histopathologic assessments were performed by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and luxol fast blue (LFB) staining. Behavioral disabilities were recorded by a camera. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-? were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: On average, mice developed classical behavioral disabilities of EAE, 13.2 ± 1.9 days following immunization. Treatment of mice with A. millefolium led to delay the appearance of behavioral disabilities along with reduced severity of the behavioral disabilities. Treatment with A. millefolium prevented weight loss and increased serum levels of TGF-? in immunized mice with MOG35-55. EAE-induced mice, which were treated with A. millefolium, had less cerebral infiltration of inflammatory cells. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that treatment with aqueous extract of A. millefolium may attenuate disease severity, inflammatory responses, and demyelinating lesions in EAE-induced mice. In addition, following treatment with A. millefolium, serum levels of TGF-?were increased in EAE-induced mice.

Vazirinejad, Reza; Ayoobi, Fateme; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Eftekharian, Mohammad M.; Darekordi, Ali; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Taghavi, Mohammad Mohsen; Ahmadabadi, Behzad Nasiri; Kennedy, Derek; Shamsizadeh, Ali

2014-01-01

53

Chemical composition and free radical scavenging activity of the essential oil of Achillea ligustica growing wild in Lipari (Aeolian Islands, Sicily).  

PubMed

In the present study the chemical composition of the essential oils from aerial parts and flowers of Achillea ligustica All., collected in Lipari (Aeolian Islands) was evaluated by GC and GC-MS. (Z)-Chrysanthenyl acetate was the most abundant component of both oils (29.6% in A1 and 27.8% in F1), followed by viridiflorol (16.8% in A1 and 21.6% in F1), bornyl acetate (8.7% in A1 and 11.6% in F1) and 1,8-cineole (7.4% in A1 and 9.3% in F1). A comparison was made of the composition of the different populations studied so far. Futhermore, the free radical scavenging activity of the oil was determined by DPPH and ABTS methods. PMID:24427958

Rouis, Zyed; Maggio, Antonella; Venditti, Alessandro; Bruno, Maurizio; Senatore, Felice

2013-11-01

54

Investigation of the spasmolytic activity of the flavonoid fraction of Achillea millefolium s.l. on isolated guinea-pig ilea.  

PubMed

The spasmolytic activity of a flavonoid fraction of a commercial sample of yarrow (Achillea millefolium s.l.), its main flavonoids as well as quercetin and two flavonoid metabolites were investigated on isolated terminal guinea-pig ilea. The aglycones quercetin, luteolin and apigenin exhibited the highest antispasmodic activities with IC50 values of 7.8 micromol/L, 9.8 micromol/L and 12.5 micromol/L, respectively. Rutin and the flavonoid metabolites homoprotocatechuic acid and homovanillic acid showed no significant effects on contractility of the terminal ilea. From the results on the spasmolytic activity of the flavonoid fraction, the glycosides and the respective aglycones it is concluded that in tea prepared from yarrow the concentration of the flavonoids is high enough to exert a spasmolytic effect in the gut, which is mainly caused by blockade of the calcium inward current, but additionally also by mediator-antagonistic effects. PMID:17009839

Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Marchart, Elke; Rawnduzi, Pakiza; Engel, Nicole; Benedek, Birgit; Kopp, Brigitte

2006-01-01

55

Achillea millefolium L. Essential Oil Inhibits LPS-Induced Oxidative Stress and Nitric Oxide Production in RAW 264.7 Macrophages  

PubMed Central

Achillea millefolium L. is a member of the Asteraceae family and has been used in folk medicine in many countries. In this study, 19 compounds in A. millefolium essential oil (AM-EO) have been identified; the major components are artemisia ketone (14.92%), camphor (11.64%), linalyl acetate (11.51%) and 1,8-cineole (10.15%). AM-EO can suppress the inflammatory responses of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages, including decreased levels of cellular nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion production, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) concentration. This antioxidant activity is not a result of increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, but rather occurs as a result of the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, thus reducing the inflammatory response. Therefore, AM-EO can be utilized in many applications, including the treatment of inflammatory diseases in the future.

Chou, Su-Tze; Peng, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Jaw-Cherng; Lin, Chih-Chien; Shih, Ying

2013-01-01

56

Chemical composition, antioxidant and antibacterial properties of Achillea collina Becker ex Heimerl s.l. and A. pannonica Scheele essential oils.  

PubMed

The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of two Achillea millefolium (Adanson) Koch s.l species essential oils (A. collina Becker ex Heimerl s.l. and A. pannonica Scheele, Asteraceae) originating from the Golija and Radan mountains (Serbia) were investigated. The chemical profiles of the essential oils were evaluated by GC-MS. Antioxidant activity was assessed as free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) towards 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radicals, together with effects on lipid peroxidation (LP). Antibacterial activity was examined on 21 bacterial strains. Based on the chemical composition of the essential oil, A. collina s.l. from Mount Golija was classified as a chamazulene chemotype (tetraploid). The high percentage of oxygenated monoterpenes and absence of azulene in the essential oil obtained from A. pannonica from Radan pointing that this population is octaploid. Essential oil of A. pannonica expressed stronger antimicrobial activity on almost all tested bacteria. Furthermore, this essential oil expressed higher scavenging effects on DPPH radical (IC(50) = 0.52 comparing to 0.62 mug/mL). Only in the LP evaluation, essential oil of A. collina s.l. from Golija exhibited stronger antioxidant activity (IC(50) = 0.75 comparing to 2.12 mug/mL). PMID:18830141

Bozin, Biljana; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Bogavac, Mirjana; Suvajdzic, Ljiljana; Simin, Natasa; Samojlik, Isidora; Couladis, Maria

2008-01-01

57

Insecticide Activity of Essential Oils of Mentha longifolia, Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Achillea wilhelmsii Against Two Stored Product Pests, the Flour Beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and the Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus  

PubMed Central

Essential oils extracted from the foliage of Mentha longifolia (L.) (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) and Pulicaria gnaphalodes Ventenat (Asterales: Asteraceae), and flowers of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch (Asterales: Asteraceae) were tested in the laboratory for volatile toxicity against two storedproduct insects, the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). The chemical composition of the isolated oils was examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. InM longifolia, the major compounds were piperitenon (43.9%), tripal (14.3%), oxathiane (9.3%), piperiton oxide (5.9%), and d-limonene (4.3%). In P. gnaphalodes, the major compounds were chrysanthenyl acetate (22.38%), 2L -4L-dihydroxy eicosane (18.5%), verbenol (16.59%), dehydroaromadendrene (12.54%), ?-pinen (6.43%), and 1,8 cineol (5.6%). In A. wilhelmsii, the major compounds were 1,8 cineole (13.03%), caranol (8.26%), alpha pinene (6%), farnesyl acetate (6%), and p-cymene (6%). C maculatus was more susceptible to the tested plant products than T castaneum. The oils of the three plants displayed the same insecticidal activity against C. maculatus based on LC50 values (between 1.54µl/L air in P. gnaphalodes, and 2.65 µl/L air in A. wilhelmsii). While the oils of A. wilhelmsii and M. longifolia showed the same strong insecticidal activity against T. castaneum (LC50 = 10.02 and 13.05 µl/L air, respectively), the oil of P. gnaphalodes revealed poor activity against the insect (LC50 = 297.9 µl/L air). These results suggested that essential oils from the tested plants could be used as potential control agents for stored-product insects.

Khani, Abbas; Asghari, Javad

2012-01-01

58

Insecticide activity of essential oils of Mentha longifolia, Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Achillea wilhelmsii against two stored product pests, the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus.  

PubMed

Essential oils extracted from the foliage of Mentha longifolia (L.) (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) and Pulicaria gnaphalodes Ventenat (Asterales: Asteraceae), and flowers of Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch (Asterales: Asteraceae) were tested in the laboratory for volatile toxicity against two storedproduct insects, the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). The chemical composition of the isolated oils was examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. InM longifolia, the major compounds were piperitenon (43.9%), tripal (14.3%), oxathiane (9.3%), piperiton oxide (5.9%), and d-limonene (4.3%). In P. gnaphalodes, the major compounds were chrysanthenyl acetate (22.38%), 2L -4L-dihydroxy eicosane (18.5%), verbenol (16.59%), dehydroaromadendrene (12.54%), ?-pinen (6.43%), and 1,8 cineol (5.6%). In A. wilhelmsii, the major compounds were 1,8 cineole (13.03%), caranol (8.26%), alpha pinene (6%), farnesyl acetate (6%), and p-cymene (6%). C maculatus was more susceptible to the tested plant products than T castaneum. The oils of the three plants displayed the same insecticidal activity against C. maculatus based on LC(50) values (between 1.54µl/L air in P. gnaphalodes, and 2.65 µl/L air in A. wilhelmsii). While the oils of A. wilhelmsii and M. longifolia showed the same strong insecticidal activity against T. castaneum (LC(50) = 10.02 and 13.05 µl/L air, respectively), the oil of P. gnaphalodes revealed poor activity against the insect (LC(50) = 297.9 µl/L air). These results suggested that essential oils from the tested plants could be used as potential control agents for stored-product insects. PMID:23413994

Khani, Abbas; Asghari, Javad

2012-01-01

59

The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and methanol extracts of Achillea biebersteini Afan. (Asteraceae).  

PubMed

The essential oil and methanol extracts from A. biebersteinii Afan. (Asteraceae) were evaluated for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities in vitro. The oil showed stronger antimicrobial activity than the extracts. Their antioxidant features were also evaluated using diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), inhibition of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and inhibition of the lipid peroxidation assays. Particularly, polar subfraction of the methanol extract showed antioxidant activity. The GC-MS analysis of the oil has resulted in the identification of 23 components; piperitone, eucalyptol, camphor, chrysanthenone and borneol were the main components. Antimicrobial activity tests carried out with the fractions of the oil showed that the activity was mainly observed in those containing eucalyptol and camphor, in particular, followed by borneol and piperitone. PMID:15287068

Sökmen, Atalay; Sökmen, Münevver; Daferera, Dimitra; Polissiou, Moschos; Candan, Ferda; Unlü, Mehmet; Akpulat, H A?kin

2004-06-01

60

Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Achillea nobilis L. subsp. sipylea and subsp. neilreichii  

Microsoft Academic Search

plant materials are not known in some studies. The present study was carried out for the first time to determine the chemical composition of the essential oils of A. nobilis subsp. sipylea and A. nobilis subsp. neilreichii collected from Turkey, and their antimicrobial activities were tested against eight Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria strains and Candida albicans. The percentage

C. Karamenderes; N. U. Karabay Yavasoglu; U. Zeybek

2007-01-01

61

The 'Appar' Flax Release: Origin, Distinguishing Characteristics, And Use; And A Native Alternative  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes information on the taxonomy of 'Appar', a perennial blue flax cultivar (Linum perenne L. [Linaceae]), and characteristics that distinguish it from native Lewis flax (Linum lewisii Pursh [Linaceae]). 'Appar' apparently originated as a European flax that escaped from garden cultivation. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis places 'Appar' with other collections of European Linum perenne and separates

Rosemary L Pendleton; Stanley G Kitchen; E Durant McArthur; Joann E Mudge

2008-01-01

62

Quantitative trait loci affecting differences in floral morphology between two species of monkeyflower (Mimulus).  

PubMed Central

Conspicuous differences in floral morphology are partly responsible for reproductive isolation between two sympatric species of monkeyflower because of their effect on visitation of the flowers by different pollinators. Mimulus lewisii flowers are visited primarily by bumblebees, whereas M. cardinalis flowers are visited mostly by hummingbirds. The genetic control of 12 morphological differences between the flowers of M. lewisii and M. cardinalis was explored in a large linkage mapping population of F2 plants n = 465 to provide an accurate estimate of the number and magnitude of effect of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing each character. Between one and six QTLs were identified for each trait. Most (9/12) traits appear to be controlled in part by at least one major QTL explaining >/=25% of the total phenotypic variance. This implies that either single genes of individually large effect or linked clusters of genes with a large cumulative effect can play a role in the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation.

Bradshaw, H D; Otto, K G; Frewen, B E; McKay, J K; Schemske, D W

1998-01-01

63

Comparative study of the membrane-permeabilizing activities of mastoparans and related histamine-releasing agents in bacteria, erythrocytes, and mast cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The membrane-permeabilizing activities of mastoparans and related histamine-releasing agents were compared through measurements of K+ efflux from bacteria, erythrocytes, and mast cells. Changes in bacterial cell viability, hemolysis, and histamine release, as well as in the shape of erythrocytes were also investigated. The compounds tested were mastoparans (HR1, a mastoparan from Polistes jadwagae, and a mastoparan from Vespula lewisii), granuliberin

Satoshi Nakao; Keiko Komagoe; Tsuyoshi Inoue; Takashi Katsu

2011-01-01

64

ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES AND TOTAL PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS AMOUNT OF SOME ASTERACEAE SPECIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antioxidant and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, reducing pow- ers and the amount of total phenolic compounds of some medicinal Asteraceae species used in folk med- icine in Eastern Anatolia were studied. These species are Achillea biebersteinii, Achillea wilhelmsii, Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia austriaca, Cichorium intybus, Helichrysum arenarium subsp. rubicun- dum, Tripleurospermum oreades var. oreades. The highest antioxidant activity is shown

Ufuk Özgen; Ahmet Mavi; Zeynep Terzi; Maksut Coflkun

2004-01-01

65

Comparative linkage maps suggest that fission, not polyploidy, underlies near-doubling of chromosome number within monkeyflowers (Mimulus; Phrymaceae).  

PubMed

Changes in chromosome number and structure are important contributors to adaptation, speciation and macroevolution. In flowering plants, polyploidy and subsequent reductions in chromosome number by fusion are major sources of chromosomal evolution, but chromosome number increase by fission has been relatively unexplored. Here, we use comparative linkage mapping with gene-based markers to reconstruct chromosomal synteny within the model flowering plant genus Mimulus (monkeyflowers). Two sections of the genus with haploid numbers ?14 have been inferred to be relatively recent polyploids because they are phylogenetically nested within numerous taxa with low base numbers (n=8-10). We combined multiple data sets to build integrated genetic maps of the M. guttatus species complex (section Simiolus, n=14) and the M. lewisii group (section Erythranthe; n=8), and then aligned the two integrated maps using >100 shared markers. We observed strong segmental synteny between M. lewisii and M. guttatus maps, with essentially 1-to-1 correspondence across each of 16 chromosomal blocks. Assuming that the M. lewisii (and widespread) base number of 8 is ancestral, reconstruction of 14 M. guttatus chromosomes requires at least eight fission events (likely shared by Simiolus and sister section Paradanthus (n=16)), plus two fusion events. This apparent burst of fission in the yellow monkeyflower lineages raises new questions about mechanisms and consequences of chromosomal fission in plants. Our comparative maps also provide insight into the origins of a chromosome exhibiting centromere-associated female meiotic drive and create a framework for transferring M. guttatus genome resources across the entire genus. PMID:24398885

Fishman, L; Willis, J H; Wu, C A; Lee, Y-W

2014-05-01

66

Synthesis and antiprotozoal activity of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-thioxopyrimidine analogs of combretastatin A-4  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighteen 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-thioxopyrimidine analogs (5a–j, 6a–e, and 7a–c) of combretastatin A-4 were synthesized with the objective of discovering compounds capable of controlling the growth of\\u000a Trypanosoma lewisii, Leishmania tarantole, Plasmodium falciparum, and Giardia lamblia. Even though the target compounds demonstrated differential cytotoxicity against mammalian cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 0.5 to >100 ?M, the range of activity against Trypanosoma, Leishmania, and Plasmodium, and to

Dereje DestaRobert; Robert Sjoholm; Lauren Lee; Megan Lee; Kristin Dittenhafer; Sarah Canche; Balaji Babu; Sameer Chavda; Christie Dewar; Stephanie Yanow; Aaron A. Best; Moses Lee

2011-01-01

67

Uptake of 2,4-D in higher plants from artificial rain  

SciTech Connect

Sinapis alba L., Lapsana communis L., Achillea millefolium L., Brassica napus L., Lactuca sativa L., and Lycopersicum esculentum L. were exposed to 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2-/sup 14/C)acetic acid (2,4-D) at 10 micrograms liter-1 in artificial rain, pH 6.5 and 3.3. The 2,4-D was absorbed in all species tested. Concentrations of parent 2,4-D appeared at the highest level in Achillea (0.1 mg kg-1 dry wt), and at zero level in Lycopersicum. Twenty-one daily treatments at pH 6.5 for 30-min periods increased dry-matter concentrations in the leaves of Achillea and decreased those in Brassica. No change in dry-matter concentration was observed in the leaves of Brassica by seven daily treatments for 30-min periods at pH 3.3.

Lokke, H.

1984-02-01

68

Genetic dissection of a major anthocyanin QTL contributing to pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation between sister species of Mimulus.  

PubMed

Prezygotic barriers play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, which is a prerequisite for speciation. However, despite considerable progress in identifying genes and mutations responsible for postzygotic isolation, little is known about the genetic and molecular basis underlying prezygotic barriers. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii and the hummingbird-pollinated M. cardinalis represent a classic example of pollinator-mediated prezygotic isolation between two sister species in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute to pollinator discrimination between the two species in nature. Through fine-scale genetic mapping, site-directed mutagenesis, and transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that a single-repeat R3 MYB repressor, ROSE INTENSITY1 (ROI1), is the causal gene underlying a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the largest effect on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic difference between M. lewisii and M. cardinalis. Together with the genomic resources and stable transgenic tools developed here, these results suggest that Mimulus is an excellent platform for studying the genetics of pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation and the molecular basis of morphological evolution at the most fundamental level-gene by gene, mutation by mutation. PMID:23335333

Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M; Young, Riane C; Christensen, Brian J; Bradshaw, Harvey D

2013-05-01

69

Genetic Dissection of a Major Anthocyanin QTL Contributing to Pollinator-Mediated Reproductive Isolation Between Sister Species of Mimulus  

PubMed Central

Prezygotic barriers play a major role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, which is a prerequisite for speciation. However, despite considerable progress in identifying genes and mutations responsible for postzygotic isolation, little is known about the genetic and molecular basis underlying prezygotic barriers. The bumblebee-pollinated Mimulus lewisii and the hummingbird-pollinated M. cardinalis represent a classic example of pollinator-mediated prezygotic isolation between two sister species in sympatry. Flower color differences resulting from both carotenoid and anthocyanin pigments contribute to pollinator discrimination between the two species in nature. Through fine-scale genetic mapping, site-directed mutagenesis, and transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that a single-repeat R3 MYB repressor, ROSE INTENSITY1 (ROI1), is the causal gene underlying a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the largest effect on anthocyanin concentration and that cis-regulatory change rather than coding DNA mutations cause the allelic difference between M. lewisii and M. cardinalis. Together with the genomic resources and stable transgenic tools developed here, these results suggest that Mimulus is an excellent platform for studying the genetics of pollinator-mediated reproductive isolation and the molecular basis of morphological evolution at the most fundamental level—gene by gene, mutation by mutation.

Yuan, Yao-Wu; Sagawa, Janelle M.; Young, Riane C.; Christensen, Brian J.; Bradshaw, Harvey D.

2013-01-01

70

Evaluation of the antioxidants activities of four Slovene medicinal plant species by traditional and novel biosensory assays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the antioxidant activity of methanolic and water extracts of Slovene accessions of four medicinal plant species (Salvia officinalis, Achillea millefolium, Origanum vulgare subsp. vulgare and Gentiana lutea). Their free radical-scavenging activity against the DPPH· free radical was studied with a spectrophotometric assay, while their biological activity with the help of a laboratory-made biosensor based on immobilized fibroblast cells

Spiridon Kintzios; Katerina Papageorgiou; Iakovos Yiakoumettis; Dea Bari?evi?; Anita Kušar

2010-01-01

71

Antibacterial activity of plant extracts and phytochemicals on antibiotic-resistant bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antimicrobial activity of plant extracts and phytochemicals was evaluated with antibiotic susceptible and resistant microorganisms. In addition, the possible synergistic effects when associated with antibiotics were studied. Extracts from the following plants were utilized: Achillea millifolium (yarrow), Caryophyllus aromaticus (clove), Melissa offficinalis (lemon-balm), Ocimun basilucum (basil), Psidium guajava (guava), Punica granatum (pomegranate), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Salvia officinalis (sage), Syzygyum

Gislene G. F. Nascimento; Juliana Locatelli; Paulo C. Freitas; Giuliana L. Silva

2000-01-01

72

Ethephon influences flowering, height, and branching of several herbaceous perennials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effects of ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) were determined on flowering, plant height, and branching of Achillea millefolium L. ‘Weser River Sandstone’, Coreopsis verticillata L. ‘Moonbeam’, Echinacea purpurea Moench ‘Bravado’, Leucanthemum×superbum Bergmans ex. J. Ingram ‘Thomas Killen’, Liatris spicata Willd. ‘Kobold’, Monarda didyma L. ‘Blue Stocking’, Phlox paniculata L. ‘Mt. Fuji’, and Physostegia virginiana Bentham ‘Summer Snow’. Spraying ethephon three times at

Takahiro Hayashi; Royal D Heins; Arthur C Cameron; William H Carlson

2001-01-01

73

EFEITO DE EXTRATOS AQUOSOS DE PLANTAS NA OVIPOSIÇÃO DA TRAÇA-DAS-CRUCÍFERAS, EM COUVE (1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESUMO Avaliou-se o efeito de extratos aquosos de Achillea millefolium L. (folhas), Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (folhas), Bidens pilosa L. (folhas, frutos e ramos), Bougainvillea glabra Choisy (folhas), Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (folhas, frutos e ramos), Datura suaveolens Humb & Bonpl. ex. Willd (folhas), Enterolobium contortisilliquum (Vell.) Morong (frutos), Mentha crispa L. (folhas e ramos), Nicotiana tabacum L. (folhas), Piper nigrum

CESAR AUGUSTO; MANFRÉ MEDEIROS; ARLINDO LEAL

2005-01-01

74

DETERMINATION OF Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd AND Se CONTENT IN MEDICAL PLANTS BY X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS AND GALVANOSTATIC STRIPPING CHRONOPOTENTIOMETRIC ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contents of selected metals (Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd and Se) in five species of medical plants (Melissa officinalis L., Agrimonia eupatoria L., Hypericum perforatum L., Salvia officinalis L. and Achillea millefolium L.) collected during the year 2006 in one Slovak locality, the region of Nitra, were studied in this work. The study was realized by the determination of the

Tomus LV

2008-01-01

75

The niche, limits to species' distributions, and spatiotemporal variation in demography across the elevation ranges of two monkeyflowers.  

PubMed

Understanding the processes that create and maintain species' geographic range limits has implications for many questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. Many expectations for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations at the range margin rest on the concordance of geographic limits and the limits of a species' ecological niche. If range limits are coincident with niche limits, then marginal populations should have lower and/or more variable vital rates and population growth rates than central populations. Using data from 8 annual censuses of marked individuals, I investigated the demography of Mimulus cardinalis and Mimulus lewisii across the species' elevation ranges. Central and marginal populations exhibited striking demographic differences, but only for one species were differences in expected directions. Marginal populations from the M. lewisii lower elevation range limit had lower and more variable survival than central populations and appeared to be demographic sinks. In contrast, marginal populations from the M. cardinalis upper elevation limit had higher fecundity and higher population growth rates than central populations. Although the species differed with respect to central-marginal patterns, they were concordant with respect to elevation; that is, both species had higher fitness in higher reaches of their examined ranges. Potential explanations for these patterns include source-sink dynamics, with asymmetrical gene flow mediated by river currents, and climate change, with recent warming shifting the species' climatic envelopes to higher elevations. Hence, assessment of spatiotemporal variation in both demography and dispersal is necessary to fully understand the relationship between the niche and species' distributions. PMID:19805178

Angert, Amy L

2009-11-17

76

Botanical and zoological remains from an early medieval grave at Tsitsamuri, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multidisciplinary analysis of pollen, seeds, mites and molluscs from organic remains in the Tsitsamuri burial (4th–6th century\\u000a a.d.) provides strong evidence of the season of internment. The presence of Trifolium campestre flowers, abundant Achillea-type pollen, ripe seeds from various early summer flowering plants, remains of Acari mites and immature Helicella derbentina mollusc shells indicate that the burial took place

Eliso Kvavadze; Luara Rukhadze; Vakhtang Nikolaishvili; Levan Mumladze

2008-01-01

77

The flavonoid Casticin has multiple mechanisms of tumor cytotoxicity action  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the mechanism of anti-tumor activity of the flavonoid Casticin, derived from Achillea millefolium. Casticin anti-tumor activity results in cell growth arrest in G2\\/M and in apoptotic death. As a tubulin-binding agent (TBA), Casticin induces p21, which in turn inhibits Cdk1. Moreover, Casticin appears to down regulate cyclin A. These observations could explain Casticin-induced G2\\/M arrest. Following Casticin exposure,

Khadidja Haïdara; Lolita Zamir; Qui-Wen Shi; Gerald Batist

2006-01-01

78

Microfungi on compositae in the Ruhr Basin.  

PubMed

Forty-three microfungi have been observed on thirty species of the Compositae occurring in several locations in the Ruhr Basin in North Rhine-Westphalia. Many fungi belong to the Ascomycetes (Erysiphales, Diaporthales, Dothideales, Leotiales and Pleosporales) and to the Deuteromycetes (Melanconiales, Moniliales and Sphaeropsidales). Other fungi wich were found in our investigation belong to the Basidiomycetes (Uredinales) and to the Oomycetes (Peronosporales). Some recorded microfungi have been discovered on new hosts in North Rhine-Westphalia and also in Germany for the first time. New for North Rhine-Westphalia are Ascochyta spec. Libert on Matricaria recutita L., Phoma exigua var. linicola (Naumov & Vassilevski) Maas on Tripleurospermum maritimum (L.) W. D. J. Koch, Phomopsis achillea (Sacc.) Höhn. on Achillea ageratum L., Diaporthe aff. arctii (Lasch) Nitschke on Solidago canadensis L. and on Achillea ageratum L., Lophiostoma caulium (Fr.) Ces. & De Not. on Anthemis tinctoria L. and Ophiobolus fructicum (Rob. ex Desm.) on Serratula tinctoria L. New for Germany are Ophiobolus cirsii (P. Karst.) Sacc. on Cichorium intybus L., Phomopsis cirsii Grove on Cirsium vulgare (Savi) Ten., Pleospora kansensis J. P. Ellis & M. B. Ellis and Pleospora phaeocomoides cf. var. infectoria on Centaurea jacea L. PMID:12701426

Ale-Agha, N; Feige, G B; Dachowski, M

2002-01-01

79

The effect of hydro alcoholic extract of seven plants on cariogenic bacteria-an in vitro evaluation.  

PubMed

Aim: To compare the antibacterial effect of hydro alcoholic extract of Salvia officinalis, Pimpinella anisum, Satureja hortensis, Rhus coriaria, Carum copticum, Mentha longifolia, Achillea millefolium against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Actinomyces viscosus through two in vitro methods. Methods: In this experimental study, hydro-alcoholic extracts have been prepared from the shoot of Salvia officinalis, Satureja hortensis, Mentha longifolia and Achillea millefolium, the seed of Pimpinella anisum and Carum copticum and the fruit of Rhus coriaria with maceration method. Their antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Actinomyces viscosus have been evaluated with broth macrodilution and agar diffusion methods. Results: In Broth macrodilution method MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration) of Pimpinella anisum, Salvia officinalis, Mentha longifolia, Achillea millefolium, Satureja hortensis, Carum copticum and Rhus coriaria for Streptococcus mutans were respectively 12.5, 6.25, 12.5, 50, 50, 12.5 and 50 ?g/ml, for Lactobacillus rhamnosus 12.5, 1.56, 3.12, 12.5, 6.25, 6.25 and 6.25 ?g/ml and for Actinomyces viscosus 50, 12.5, 100, 50, 100, 25 and 25 ?g/ml. In Agar diffusion method Pimpinella anisum, Salvia officinalis and Rhus coriaria against Streptococcus mutans, Pimpinella anisum, Carum copticum and Rhus coriaria against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Mentha longifolia, Rhus coriaria and Carum copticum against Actinomyces viscosus had antibacterial effects. Conclusion: All seven extracts had growth inhibitory effects on all three bacteria. Salvia officinalis had the greatest inhibitory effect on growth of all three bacteria. All of the extracts except Carum copticum had bactericidal effect in the range of concentration. By agar diffusion method Rhus coriaria had antibacterial effect against all three cariogenic bacteria. PMID:24984654

Kermanshah, Hamid; Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat Hashemi; Arami, Sakine; Kamalinegad, Mohammad; Karimi, Mehrdad; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Jabalameli, Fereshte; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

2014-06-01

80

Medicinal plants in a Middle Paleolithic grave Shanidar IV?  

PubMed

This paper deals with phytopharmacological evaluation of the therapeutic potential of the plants found in the Neanderthal grave of a Shanidar IV individual (Iraq), where the palynological analysis of some other authors discovered the following flowers: Achillea-type, Centaurea solstitialis, Senecio-type, Muscari-type, Ephedra altissima, Althea-type. The purpose of our theoretical analysis was to evaluate the objective healing activity of the flowers. The result of the research revealed that Shanidar IV flowers possess considerable therapeutic effects with marked medical activity, which could be an intentional reason for the selection of the flowers in Middle Paleolithic Shanidar Neanderthals. PMID:1548898

Lietava, J

1992-01-01

81

Plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Israel.  

PubMed

In an extensive ethnobotanical survey (130 informants) of the medicinal plants of Israel, 16 species were found to be used for hypoglycaemic treatments. The list includes Achillea fragrantissima (Forssk.) Sch.-Bip, Ammi visnaga (L.) Lam, Atriplex halimus L., Capparis spinosa L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Cleome droserifolia (Forssk.) Del., Eryngium creticum Lam., Inula viscosa (L.) Ait., Matricaria aurea (Loefl.) Sch.-Bip, Origanum syriaca L., Paronychia argentea Lam, Prosopis farcta (Banks et Sol.) Macbride, Salvia fruticosa Mill., Sarcopoterium spinosum (L.) Sp., and Teucrium polium L.; eight of them (marked with an asterisk) are first recorded here as used for this purpose. PMID:3613607

Yaniv, Z; Dafni, A; Friedman, J; Palevitch, D

1987-01-01

82

Wasp Mastoparans Follow the Same Mechanism as the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10†  

PubMed Central

We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes, in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with, and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of 7 residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data, and are useful for understanding peptide behavior.

Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

2009-01-01

83

Hybridization and cytonuclear associations among native westslope cutthroat trout, introduced rainbow trout, and their hybrids within the Stehekin River drainage, North Cascades National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Historic introductions of nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss into the native habitats of cutthroat trout O. clarkii have impacted cutthroat trout populations through introgressive hybridization, creating challenges and concerns for cutthroat trout conservation. We examined the effects of rainbow trout introductions on the native westslope cutthroat trout O. c. lewisii within the Stehekin River drainage, North Cascades National Park, Washington, by analyzing 1,763 salmonid DNA samples from 18 locations with nine diagnostic nuclear DNA markers and one diagnostic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. Pure westslope cutthroat trout populations only occurred above upstream migration barriers in the Stehekin River and Park Creek. Two categories of rainbow trout admixture were observed: (1) less than 10% within the Stehekin River drainage above the Bridge Creek confluence and the middle and upper Bridge Creek drainage and (2) greater than 30% within the Stehekin River below the Bridge Creek confluence and in lower Bridge Creek. Hybrid indices and multilocus genotypes revealed an absence of rainbow trout and reduced hybrid diversity within the Stehekin River above the Bridge Creek confluence relative to hybrid diversity in the Stehekin River below the confluence and within lower Bridge Creek. Cytonuclear disequilibrium statistics revealed assortative mating between westslope cutthroat and rainbow trout but not among hybrids within the same locations. This suggests that a randomly mating hybrid swarm does not currently exist. However, continual migration of parental genotypes into the study location could also create significant cytonuclear disequilibria. The Stehekin River represents a novel and unique example of a dynamic hybridization zone where the invasion of rainbow trout alleles into the Stehekin River westslope cutthroat trout population above the Bridge Creek confluence appears to be impeded, suggesting that divergent ecological or evolutionary mechanisms promote the population structure within the Stehekin River drainage, depending upon location.

Ostberg, C. O.; Rodriguez, R. J.

2006-01-01

84

An annotated list of aquatic insects of Fort Sill, Oklahoma, excluding diptera with notes on several new state records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Qualitative collections of aquatic insects were made at Fort Sill, Lawton, Oklahoma, between 2002 and 2004. Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, Odonata, Coleoptera, aquatic Heteroptera, Neuroptera, and Megaloptera were targeted. Additional records are included from a survey that took place in 1999. More than 11,000 specimens from more than 290 collections were examined. Based on the current understanding of aquatic insect systematics, 276 taxa distributed over 8 orders, 46 families, and 141 genera were identified. Twenty-three of the 276 taxa, Plauditus texanus Wiersema, Tricorythodes allectus (Needham), Palmacorixa nana walleyi Hungerford, Climacia chapini Partin and Gurney, Oxyethira forcipata Mosely, Oxyethira janella Denning, Triaenodes helo Milne, Ylodes frontalis (Banks), Acilius fraternus Harris, Coptotomus loticus Hilsenhoff, Coptotomus venustus (Say), Desmopachria dispersa Crotch, Graphoderus liberus (Say), Hydrovatus pustulatus (Melsheimer), Hygrotus acaroides (LeConte), Liodessus flavicollis (LeConte), Uvarus texanus (Sharp), Gyrinus woodruffi Fall, Haliplus fasciatus Aube, Haliplus lewisii Crotch, Haliplus tortilipenis Brigham & Sanderson, Chaetarthria bicolor Sharp, Epimetopus costatus complex, and Hydrochus simplex LeConte are reported from Oklahoma for the first time. The three most diverse orders included Coleoptera (86 species), Odonata (67 species) and Trichoptera (59 species), and the remaining taxa were distributed among Heteroptera, (30 species), Ephemeroptera (21 species), Plecoptera (6 species), Megaloptera (4 species), and Neuroptera (3 species). Based on previous published records, many of the species collected during this study were expected to be found at Fort Sill; however, 276 taxa of aquatic insects identified from such a small geographic area is noteworthy, especially when considering local climatic conditions and the relatively small size of Fort Sill (38,300 ha). Despite agricultural practices in Oklahoma, the dust bowl days, and the development of water-based recreation at Fort Sill, a high percentage of the total known aquatic insect fauna of Oklahoma can be found in a small geographic area. ?? 2006 Kansas Entomological Society.

Zuellig, R. E.; Kondratieff, B. C.; Schmidt, J. P.; Durfee, R. S.; Ruiter, D. E.; Prather, I. E.

2006-01-01

85

Medicinal plants used in Kirklareli Province (Turkey).  

PubMed

In this paper, 126 traditional medicinal plants from Kirklareli Province in Turkey have been reported. One hundred and twenty six plant species belonging to 54 families and among them 100 species were wild and 26 species were cultivated plants. Most used families were Rosaceae, Labiatae, Compositae and the most used plants were Cotinus coggyria, Sambucus ebulus, Achillea millefolium subsp. pannonica, Hypericum perforatum, Matricaria chamomilla var. recutita, Melissa officinalis subsp. officinalis, Juglans regia, Thymus longicaulis subsp. longicaulis var. subisophyllus, Malva sylvestris, Urtica dioica, Plantago lanceolata, Rosa canina, Ecballium elaterium, Artemisia absinthium, Viscum album subsp. album, Papaver rhoeas, Helleborus orientalis, Cydonia oblonga, Prunus spinosa subsp. dasyphylla, Rubus discolor, Sorbus domestica. A total of 143 medicinal uses were obtained. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of wounds (25.3%), cold and influenza (24.6%), stomach (20%), cough (19%), kidney ailments (18.2%), diabetes (13.4%). PMID:17257791

Kültür, Sükran

2007-05-01

86

Aqueous Extracts of Some Medicinal Plants are as Toxic as Lmidacloprid to the Sweet Potato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci  

PubMed Central

Aqueous extracts of nine plants, known to have medicinal activity, were tested for their toxicity against the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Genn. (Homoptera: Aleurodidae) compared to the toxicity of the insecticide, Imidacloprid. Extracts of Lepidiuim sativum L. (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) killed 71 % of early stage nymphs, which was not significantly different from mortality caused by Imidacloprid. Treatment of pupae with three plant extracts, L. sativum, Achillea biebersteinii L. (Asterales: Asteraceae), or Retama raetam (Forssk.) Webb and Berthel (Fabales: Fabaceae) prevented adult development, and treatment with R. raetam extract killed adults, at levels that were not significantly different from Imidacloprid. None of the other plants showed significant toxicity. However extracts of four plants, Pimpinella anisum L. (Apiales: Apiaceae), Galium longifolium (Sibth. and SM.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), R. raetam and Ballota undulata Bentham (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) had a repellent effect.

Ateyyat, Mazen A.; Al-Mazra'awi, Mohammad; Abu-Rjai, Talal; Shatnawi, Mohamad A.

2009-01-01

87

California Wildflowers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Academy of Sciences's (CAS) Botany Department hosts this interesting and beautiful site on California's wildflowers. Spectacular color photographs of over 125 species of wildflowers serve as illustrations to this electronic field guide. Users may browse species by flower color (white through brown), common name (Alpine Lily to Yerba Mansa), latin name (Achillea millefolium to Zigadenus fremontii), or family name (Alismataceae through Violaceae). Additionally, floristic regions are provided in a color-coded map of California. For each species, the taxonomic identity (common, Latin, and family names), a description, photographs, and distribution information are provided. Educators and students of botany will find this site particularly useful; others will want to go see California in bloom.

88

Investigation on bioavailability of some essential and toxic elements in medicinal herbs.  

PubMed

Trace and major elements were determined in medicinal herbs (Cynara scolymus, Matricaria chamomilla, Artemisia absinthium L., Achillea millefolium, and Inula britannica) as well as in rhizosphere soil samples. Based on the results obtained after microwave-acid-assisted digestion (nitric acid + hydrogen peroxide) and single-step extraction (ammonium acetate), the real and potential acidity and redox potential of the soils, uptake, mobility, and bioavailability of potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, copper, zinc, nickel, chromium, lead, and cadmium are discussed. By calculating the bioconcentration factors and their deviation from the recommended values, elevated concentrations, were explained in terms of contamination and pollution. The concentrations measured in both plants and soil samples were below maximum allowable concentration ranges considered for the European Union. PMID:18408895

Razi?, Slavica; Dogo, Svetlana; Slavkovi?, Latinka

2008-07-01

89

Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by extracts and constituents from Angelica archangelica and Geranium sylvaticum.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of several Icelandic medicinal herbs. Ethanolic extracts of Angelica archangelica seeds and the aerial parts of Geranium sylvaticum proved effective, with IC50 values of 2.20 mg/ml and 3.56 mg/ml, respectively. The activity of imperatorin and xanthotoxin from A. archangelica was measured. Xanthotoxin proved much more potent than imperatorin, with an IC50 value of 155 microg/ml (0.72 mM) but that for imperatorin was above 274 microg/ml (1.01 mM). However, furanocoumarins seem to have a minor part in the total activity of this extract. Synergistic interaction was observed between the extracts of A. archangelica and G. sylvaticum. Several medicinal herbs (Achillea millefolium, Filipendula ulmaria, Thymus praecox and Matricaria maritima) did not show AChE inhibitory activity. PMID:18069242

Sigurdsson, Steinthor; Gudbjarnason, Sigmundur

2007-01-01

90

Identification, Characterization, and Palynology of High-Valued Medicinal Plants  

PubMed Central

High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time.

Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

2013-01-01

91

Identification, characterization, and palynology of high-valued medicinal plants.  

PubMed

High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time. PMID:23844389

Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

2013-01-01

92

Cytotoxicity, mode of action and antibacterial activities of selected Saudi Arabian medicinal plants  

PubMed Central

Background The flora of Saudi Arabia is one of the richest biodiversity areas in the Arabian Peninsula and comprises very important genetic resources of crop and medicinal plants. The present study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity and the antibacterial activities of the organic extracts from twenty six Saudi Arabian medicinal plants. The study was also extended to the investigation of the effects of the extracts from the four best plants, Ononis serrata (SY160), Haplophyllum tuberculatum (SY177), Pulicaria crispa (SY179), and Achillea beiberstenii (SY-200) on cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, caspases activities and mitochondrial function in leukemia CCRF-CEM cell line. Methods A resazurin assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity of the extracts on a panel of human cancer cell lines whilst the microbroth dilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the samples against twelve bacterial strains belonging to four species, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results The best activity on leukemia cell lines were recorded with SY177 (IC50 of 9.94 ?g/mL) and SY179 (IC50 of 1.81 ?g/mL) against CCRF-CEM as well as Ach-b (IC50 of 9.30 ?g/mL) and SY160 (IC50 of 5.06 ?g/mL) against HL60 cells. The extracts from SY177 and SY179 were also toxic against the seven solid cancer cell lines studied with the highest IC50 values of 31.64 ?g/mL (SY177 against Hep-G2 cells). SY177 and Ach-b induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phases whilst SY160 and SY179 induced arrest in G0/G1 phase. All the four plant extracts induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells with the alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In the antibacterial assays, only Ach-b displayed moderate antibacterial activities against E. coli and E. aerogenes ATCC strains (MIC of 256 ?g/mL), AG100ATeT and K. pneumoniae ATCC strains (MIC of 128 ?g/mL). Conclusions Finally, the results of the present investigation provided supportive data for the possible use of some Saudi Arabian plants investigated herein, and mostly Haplophyllum tuberculatum, Pulicaria crispa, Ononis serrata and Achillea beiberstenii in the control of cancer diseases.

2013-01-01

93

Polyploidy and ecological adaptation in wild yarrow  

PubMed Central

Chromosome evolution in flowering plants is often punctuated by polyploidy, genome duplication events that fundamentally alter DNA content, chromosome number, and gene dosage. Polyploidy confers postzygotic reproductive isolation and is thought to drive ecological divergence and range expansion. The adaptive value of polyploidy, however, remains uncertain; ecologists have traditionally relied on observational methods that cannot distinguish effects of polyploidy per se from genic differences that accumulate after genome duplication. Here I use an experimental approach to test how polyploidy mediates ecological divergence in Achillea borealis (Asteraceae), a widespread tetraploid plant with localized hexaploid populations. In coastal California, tetraploids and hexaploids occupy mesic grassland and xeric dune habitats, respectively. Using field transplant experiments with wild-collected plants, I show that hexaploids have a fivefold fitness advantage over tetraploids in dune habitats. Parallel experiments with neohexaploids—first-generation mutants screened from a tetraploid genetic background—reveal that a 70% fitness advantage is achieved via genome duplication per se. These results suggest that genome duplication transforms features of A. borealis in a manner that confers adaptation to a novel environment.

Ramsey, Justin

2011-01-01

94

Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal herbs in Jordan, the Ajloun Heights region.  

PubMed

The study of local knowledge about natural resources is becoming increasingly important in defining strategies and actions for conservation of medicinal plants. This study therefore sought to collect information from local population concerning the use of Ajloun Heights region medicinal plants; identify the most important species used; determine the relative importance of the species surveyed and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) in relation to medicinal plant use. Data collection relied predominantly on qualitative tools to record the interviewee's personal information and topics related to the medicinal use of specific plants. Our results revealed that 46 plant species grown in the study region are still in use in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Achillea falcata, Matricaria aurea, Majorana syriaca, Allium sativum and Allium cepa. The use of moderately unsafe or toxic plants was noted to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the locals. These plants include Ecballium elaterium, Euphorbia hierosolymitana, Mandragora autumnalis and Citrullus colocynthis. Kidney problems scored the highest ICF while Crocus hyemalis was the plant of highest use value. Searching the literature evidenced some concordance with the solicited plant uses mentioned by the informants. PMID:17097250

Aburjai, Talal; Hudaib, Mohammad; Tayyem, Rabab; Yousef, Mohammed; Qishawi, Maher

2007-03-21

95

Determination of the hydroxycinnamate profile of 12 members of the Asteraceae family.  

PubMed

The hydroxycinnamates of the leaves of 12 plants of the Astreraceae family, Achillea millefolium, Arnica montana, Artemesia dracunculus, Cichorium intybus, Cnicus benedictus, Cynara scolymus, Echinops humilis, Inula helenium, Lactuca sativa, Petasites hybridus, Solidago virgaurea, and Tanacetum parthenium were investigated qualitatively by LC-MS(n). Thirty-nine chlorogenic acids were detected and all characterized to regioisomeric level on the basis of their fragmentation pattern in the tandem MS spectra, most of them for the first time from these sources with two of them previously not reported in nature. Both chlorogenic acids based on trans and cis-cinnamic acid substituents were identified. Assignment to the level of individual regioisomers was possible for seven caffeoylquinic acids (1-7), 11 dicaffeoylquinic acids (17-27), six feruloylquinic acids (9-14), two p-coumaroylquinic acids (15-16), two caffeoyl-feruloylquinic acids (28 and 29), four caffeoyl-p-coumaroylquinic acids (30-33), three dicaffeoyl-succinoylquinic acids (34-36), two dicaffeoyl-methoxyoxaloylquinic acids (37 and 38), and one tricaffeoylquinic acid (39). Furthermore, one caffeoylshikimic acid (40), one caffeoyltartaric acid (41), three dicaffeoyltartaric acids (42-44), and three caffeoyl-feruloyltartaric acids (45-47) were detected and shown to possess characteristic tandem MS spectra and were tentatively assigned on the basis of their retention time and previously developed hierarchical keys. PMID:21453943

Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kiprotich, Joseph; Kuhnert, Nikolai

2011-06-01

96

A population genetic model to infer allotetraploid speciation and long-term evolution applied to two yarrow species.  

PubMed

Allotetraploid speciation, that is, the generation of a hybrid tetraploid species from two diploid species, and the long-term evolution of tetraploid populations and species are important in plants. We developed a population genetic model to infer population genetic parameters of tetraploid populations from data of the progenitor and descendant species. Two yarrow species, Achillea alpina-4x and A. wilsoniana-4x, arose by allotetraploidization from the diploid progenitors, A. acuminata-2x and A. asiatica-2x. Yet, the population genetic process has not been studied in detail. We applied the model to sequences of three nuclear genes in populations of the four yarrow species and compared their pattern of variability with that in four plastid regions. The plastid data indicated that the two tetraploid species probably originated from multiple independent allopolyploidization events and have accumulated many mutations since. With the nuclear data, we found a low rate of homeologous recombination or gene conversion and a reduction in diversity relative to the level of both diploid species combined. The present analysis with a novel probabilistic model suggests a genetic bottleneck during tetraploid speciation, that the two tetraploid species have a long evolutionary history, and that they have a small amount of genetic exchange between the homeologous genomes. PMID:23574432

Guo, Yan-Ping; Tong, Xiao-Yuan; Wang, Lan-Wei; Vogl, Claus

2013-07-01

97

Anyone for an aperitif? Yes, but only a Braulio DOC with its certified proteome.  

PubMed

The trace proteome of a Braulio aperitif (a 21% alcohol beverage, named after a mountain in the Val di Stelvio, Italy) has been investigated via capture with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL, ProteoMiner). This aperitif is made with an infusion of 13 mountain herbs and berries, among which four are officially indicated in the label: Achillea moschata, juniper (Juniperus communis subsp. alpina) berries, absinthe (Artemisia absinthium) and gentian (Gentiana alpina) roots. Via capture with CPLLs at pH 7.0 and 2.2 we were able to identify 29 unique gene products, among which the PR5 (parasite resistance) allergen Jun r 3.2, a 25kDa species from Juniperus rigida. Due to the paucity of data on these alpine herbs, it was difficult to attribute these proteins to the specific plant extracts presumably present in this beverage; however most of the species identified indeed belong to alpine herbs and plants, living in a habitat between 1000 and 2000m of elevation. Most of them are enzymes, spanning a Mr range from 10 to 65kDa. It is hoped that such a proteomic signature should help tracking counterfeited products sold on the market. PMID:22554908

Fasoli, Elisa; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Citterio, Attilio; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

2012-06-18

98

Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA  

PubMed Central

Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory.

Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

2012-01-01

99

Growth and Landscape Performance of Ten Herbaceous Species in Response to Saline Water Irrigation.  

PubMed

Ten herbaceous perennials and groundcovers were grown in raised beds from June to September in a dry, hot desert environment and micro-spray drip irrigated with synthesized saline solutions at electrical conductivity of 0.8 (tap water), 3.2, or 5.4 dS/m. Plant height and two perpendicular widths were recorded monthly to calculate the growth index. Landscape performance was assessed monthly by visual scores. Salinity did not affect the visual scores in Achillea millefolium L., Gaillardia aristata Pursh, Lantana x hybrida 'New Gold', Lonicera japonica Thunb. 'Halliana', and Rosmarinus officinalis L. 'Huntington Carpet' throughout the experiment. Glandularia canadensis (L.) Nutt. 'Homestead Purple' performed better than Glandularia x hybrida (Grönland & Rümpler) G. L. Nesom & Pruski. Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Brig. had lower visual scores at 5.4 dS/m compared to the control and 3.2 dS/m. Most plants of Rudbeckia hirta L. did not survive when irrigated at 3.2 dS/m or 5.4 dS/m. Shoot biomass of A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, R. officinalis, and V. macdougalii was not influenced by the salinity of irrigation water. Therefore, A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, and R. officinalis can be irrigated with non-potable water at salinity up to 5.4 dS/m with little reduction in growth and aesthetic appearance. PMID:20585473

Niu, Genhua; Rodriguez, Denise S; Aguiniga, Lizzie

2007-01-01

100

Attraction of Culex pipiens pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) to flower volatiles.  

PubMed

Methylene chloride extracts of flowers from 4 plants (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L; ox-eye daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare Lamarck; Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis L.; and yarrow, Achillea millefolium L.) were tested in a dual-port olfactometer for attractiveness to female northern house mosquitoes, Culex pipiens pipiens L. Fifty milligrams of extract was used for each test, which was equivalent to the amount of extract from flowers of 0.58 common milkweed inflorescences, 1.75 ox-eye daisy flower heads, 0.33 Canada goldenrod plants, or 3.14 yarrow plants. Significantly more Cx. pipiens responded to the common milkweed flower extract than to a control. Ox-eye daisy, Canada goldenrod and yarrow flower extracts were not significantly attractive to this species. A headspace sample of the common milkweed extract was collected by solid phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The most abundant compounds in the headspace sample were 2-phenylethanol and benzyl alcohol. Analysis of the common milkweed extract and standards of 2-phenylethanol and benzyl alcohol by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection confirmed that these compounds were present in the extract. Cx. pipiens did not respond to synthetic blends of these 2 compounds when tested in a dual-port olfactometer. PMID:10467780

Mauer, D J; Rowley, W A

1999-07-01

101

Ethnobotanical study on traditional use of medicinal plants in South-Western Serbia, Zlatibor district.  

PubMed

Ethnopharmacological relevance: This paper provides significant ethnobotanical information on medicinal plant uses in the Zlatibor district, South-Western Serbia. Materials and methods: A survey was performed using questionnaires with 220 informants (mean age 47, 79% female, 21% male). In addition, the use value and the relative importance of species were determined and the informant consensus factor was calculated for the medicinal plants included in the study. Intended plants usage was compared with previous ethnobotanical literature, with reference to the neighboring areas of Zlatibor district. Results: The informants provided data for 69 medicinal plants belonging to 36 families. Rosaceae, Lamiaceae and Asteraceae were the predominant locally used families. The species with the highest use value were Mentha piperita, Matricaria chamomilla, Hypericum perforatum and Achillea millefolium. The most frequently reported medicinal uses were ones for treating gastrointestinal ailments, respiratory problems and skin diseases. Usually, the administration was primarily oral followed by topical applications. All different plant parts were utilized, however leaves were the most exploited parts of the plants. Conclusions: Folk medicine in South-Western Serbia, Zlatibor district is intended mainly as a mode of primary health care in healing of minor illnesses. The results indicate a slight reduction in the ethnobotanical and medical knowledge in this area, when compared with neighboring regions. PMID:23422337

Savikin, Katarina; Zduni?, Gordana; Menkovi?, Nebojša; Zivkovi?, Jelena; Cuji?, Nada; Tereš?enko, Milena; Bigovi?, Dubravka

2013-04-19

102

Quantification of Sesquiterpene Lactones in Asteraceae Plant Extracts: Evaluation of their Allergenic Potential  

PubMed Central

Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs), mainly those with an activated exocyclic methylene group, are important allergens in Asteraceae (Compositae) plants. As a screening tool, the Compositae mix, consisting of five Asteraceae plant extracts with allergenic potential (feverfew, tansy, arnica, yarrow, and German chamomile) is part of several national patch test baseline series. However, the SL content of the Compositae mix may vary due to the source material. Therefore, a simple spectrophotometric method for the quantitative measurement of SLs with the ?-methylene-?-butyrolactone moiety was developed, giving the percentage of allergenic compounds in plant extracts. The method has been validated and five Asteraceae extracts, namely feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), arnica (Arnica montana L.), yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L. Rauschert) that have been used in routine patch test screening were evaluated. A good correlation could be found between the results obtained using the proposed spectrophotometric method and the corresponding clinical results. Thus, the introduced method is a valuable tool for evaluating the allergenic potential and for the simple and efficient quality control of plant extracts with allergenic potential.

Salapovic, Helena; Geier, Johannes; Reznicek, Gottfried

2013-01-01

103

Quantification of Sesquiterpene Lactones in Asteraceae Plant Extracts: Evaluation of their Allergenic Potential.  

PubMed

Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs), mainly those with an activated exocyclic methylene group, are important allergens in Asteraceae (Compositae) plants. As a screening tool, the Compositae mix, consisting of five Asteraceae plant extracts with allergenic potential (feverfew, tansy, arnica, yarrow, and German chamomile) is part of several national patch test baseline series. However, the SL content of the Compositae mix may vary due to the source material. Therefore, a simple spectrophotometric method for the quantitative measurement of SLs with the ?-methylene-?-butyrolactone moiety was developed, giving the percentage of allergenic compounds in plant extracts. The method has been validated and five Asteraceae extracts, namely feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), arnica (Arnica montana L.), yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L. Rauschert) that have been used in routine patch test screening were evaluated. A good correlation could be found between the results obtained using the proposed spectrophotometric method and the corresponding clinical results. Thus, the introduced method is a valuable tool for evaluating the allergenic potential and for the simple and efficient quality control of plant extracts with allergenic potential. PMID:24106675

Salapovic, Helena; Geier, Johannes; Reznicek, Gottfried

2013-01-01

104

Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases.  

PubMed

Extracts of 13 Brazilian medicinal plants were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts. Of these, 10 plant extracts showed varied levels of antibacterial activity. Piper regnellii presented a good activity against Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, a moderate activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a weak activity against Escherichia coli. Punica granatum showed good activity on S. aureus and was inactive against the other standard strains. Eugenia uniflora presented moderate activity on both S. aureus and E. coli. Psidium guajava,Tanacetum vulgare, Arctium lappa, Mikania glomerata, Sambucus canadensis, Plantago major and Erythrina speciosa presented some degree of antibacterial activity. Spilanthes acmella, Lippia alba, and Achillea millefolium were considered inactive. Five of the plant extracts presented compounds with Rf values similar to the antibacterial compounds visible on bioautogram. Of these, three plants belong to the Asteraceae family. This may mean that the same compounds are responsible for the antibacterial activity in these plants. Anticandidal activity was detected in nine plant extracts (P. guajava, E. uniflora, P. granatum, A. lappa, T. vulgare, M. glomerata, L. alba, P. regnellii, and P. major). The results might explain the ethnobotanical use of the studied species for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:12471432

Holetz, Fabíola Barbiéri; Pessini, Greisiele Lorena; Sanches, Neviton Rogério; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias

2002-10-01

105

Guaianolides and volatile compounds in chamomile tea.  

PubMed

Chamomile (German Chamomile, Matricaria recutita L., Asteraceae) is one of the most popular medicinal plants in use as an herbal tea for food purposes and in folk medicine. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the volatile fraction of chamomile herbal tea were performed. Volatile constituents of the infusion were isolated by two different methods, namely hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE), and analysed by GC-MS. The relative proportions of particular chemical classes, present in the essential oil and volatile fractions of the infusion showed remarkable differences. The proportion of mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in the infusion, as compared to the essential oil, was significantly lower. Strikingly, the dichloromethane extract of the infusion contained a lower amount of bisabolol oxides and chamazulene, but higher amounts of spiroethers, sesquiterpene lactones and coumarins, as compared to the hydrodistillates of the herbal drug and the infusion. In addition to the previously known guaianolides matricarin and achillin, acetoxyachillin and leucodin (= desacetoxymatricarin), corresponding C-11 stereoisomers with various biological activities typically occurring in Achillea species, were identified in the dichloromethane extract of chamomile tea for the first time. PMID:22410959

Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

2012-06-01

106

Chamazulene carboxylic acid and matricin: a natural profen and its natural prodrug, identified through similarity to synthetic drug substances.  

PubMed

Chamazulene carboxylic acid (1) is a natural profen with anti-inflammatory activity and a degradation product of proazulenic sesquiterpene lactones, e.g., matricin. Both 1 and proazulenes occur in chamomile (Matricaria recutita), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), and a few other Asteraceae species. It was isolated in improved yields, characterized physicochemically, and found to be an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, but not of cyclooxygenase-1. It had anti-inflammatory activity in several animal models with local and systemic application. When human volunteers were given matricin orally, plasma levels of 1 were found to be in the micromolar range. Matricin was converted to 1 in artificial gastric fluid, but not in artificial intestinal fluid. Matricin and the yarrow proazulenes are proposed to be anti-inflammatory through conversion to 1. Intriguingly, the biological activity of the natural compound 1 was found because of its similarity to fully synthetic drug substances. This is the reverse process of the common lead function of natural compounds in drug discovery. PMID:16872141

Ramadan, Mai; Goeters, Susanne; Watzer, Bernhard; Krause, Eva; Lohmann, Klaus; Bauer, Rudolf; Hempel, Bernd; Imming, Peter

2006-07-01

107

The efficacy of Liv-52 on liver cirrhotic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled first approach.  

PubMed

Cirrhosis is the irreversible sequel of various disorders that damage liver cells permanently over time. Presently, the use of herbal medicines for prevention and control of chronic liver diseases is in the focus of attention for both the physicians and the patients; the reasons for such shift toward the use of herbals include the expensive cost of conventional drugs, adverse drug reactions, and their inefficacy. In the present study, the efficacy of herbal medicine Liv-52 (consisting of Mandur basma, Tamarix gallica and herbal extracts of Capparis spinosa, Cichorium intybus, Solanum nigrum, Terminalia arjuna and Achillea millefolium) on liver cirrhosis outcomes was compared with the placebo for 6 months in 36 cirrhotic patients referred to Tehran Hepatic Center. The outcome measures included child-pugh score, ascites, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total billirubin, albumin, prothrombin time, platelet and white blood cells counts. The indices were recorded in all patients before and after 6 months of drug or placebo treatment. The results demonstrated that the patients treated with Liv-52 for 6 months had significantly better child-pugh score, decreased ascites, decreased serum ALT and AST. In placebo administered patients all the clinical parameters recorded at beginning of the study were not significantly different than after 6 months. We conclude that Liv-52 possess hepatoprotective effect in cirrhotic patients. This protective effect of Liv-52 can be attributed to the diuretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and immunomodulating properties of the component herbs. PMID:16194047

Huseini, H Fallah; Alavian, S M; Heshmat, R; Heydari, M R; Abolmaali, K

2005-09-01

108

Medicinal plant extracts can variously modify biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Low concentrations of black tea and water extracts from medicinal plants Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Tilia cordata, Betula pendula and Zea mays stimulated biofilm formation in Escherichia coli BW25113 up to three times. Similar effect was observed for tannic acid and low concentrations of quercetin. In contrast, the extract from Urtica dioica reduced biofilm production. Pretreatment with plant extracts variously modified antibiotic effects on specific biofilm formation (SBF). Extract from V. vitis-idaea increased SBF, while the extracts from Achillea millefolium, Laminaria japonica and U. dioica considerably decreased SBF in the presence of ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and cefotaxime. Stimulatory effect of the extracts and pure polyphenols on biofilm formation was probably related to their prooxidant properties. The rpoS deletion did not affect SBF significantly, but stimulation of biofilm formation by the compounds tested was accompanied by inhibition of rpoS expression, suggesting that a RpoS-independent signal transduction pathway was apparently used. PMID:24500005

Samoilova, Zoya; Muzyka, Nadezda; Lepekhina, Elena; Oktyabrsky, Oleg; Smirnova, Galina

2014-04-01

109

Evaluation of the antioxidants activities of four Slovene medicinal plant species by traditional and novel biosensory assays.  

PubMed

We investigated the antioxidant activity of methanolic and water extracts of Slovene accessions of four medicinal plant species (Salvia officinalis, Achillea millefolium, Origanum vulgare subsp. vulgare and Gentiana lutea). Their free radical-scavenging activity against the DPPH. free radical was studied with a spectrophotometric assay, while their biological activity with the help of a laboratory-made biosensor based on immobilized fibroblast cells (assay duration: 3 min). The observed antioxidant activity of the extracts from the four investigated medicinal plant species was dependent on both the solvent used for extraction and the assay method (conventional or biosensor-based). Independently from the assay method and the solvent used for extraction, the lowest scavenging activity was observed in root extracts of G. lutea. Treatment of the immobilized cells with the plant extracts resulted in an increase of the cell membrane potential (membrane hyperpolarization), possibly due to the reduction of membrane damage due to oxidation. The novel cell biosensor could be utilized as a rapid, high throughput tool for screening the antioxidant properties of plant-derived compounds. PMID:20541883

Kintzios, Spiridon; Papageorgiou, Katerina; Yiakoumettis, Iakovos; Baricevic, Dea; Kusar, Anita

2010-11-01

110

Genotoxicity testing of different types of beverages in the Drosophila wing Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test.  

PubMed

Five wines and one brandy of Spanish origin as well as three herbal teas and ordinary black tea were tested for genotoxicity in the wing Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) which makes use of the two recessive wing cell markers multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr3) on the left arm of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster. 3-day-old larvae trans-heterozygous for these two markers were fed the beverages at different concentrations and for different feeding periods using Drosophila instant medium. Somatic mutations or mitotic recombinations induced in the cells of the wing imaginal discs give rise to mutant single or twin spots on the wing blade of the emerging adult flies showing either the mwh phenotype or/and the flr phenotype. One of the red wines showed a clear genotoxic activity that was not due to its ethanol content. Two herbal teas (Urtica dioica, Achillea millefolium) and black tea (Camellia sinensis) proved to be weakly genotoxic as well. Furthermore, it was shown that quercetin and rutin, two flavonols present in beverages of plant origin, also exhibited weak genotoxic activity in the somatic cells of Drosophila. These results demonstrate that Drosophila in vivo somatic assays can detect the genotoxicity of complex mixtures such as beverages. In particular, it is possible to administer these test materials in the same form as that in which they are normally consumed. PMID:8206441

Graf, U; Moraga, A A; Castro, R; Díaz Carrillo, E

1994-05-01

111

Role of Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and its secondary hosts in plum pox virus propagation.  

PubMed

Plum pox virus (family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, PPV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of plants in the genus Prunus, particularly Prunus persica L. The role of the Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as a vector of PPV-M, and its role in spreading PPV-M, was investigated. PPV-M-infected peach trees were used as inoculum sources, and transmission to 15 herbaceous species commonly present in and around peach orchards was evaluated. The presence of PPV-M in secondary hosts after aphid transmission was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests. The results indicate that Saponaria ocymoides L., Pisum sativum L., Trifolium repens L., Trifolium pratense L., Lepidium sativum L., Matricaria chamomilla L., Centaurea cyanus L., Bellis perennis L., Papaver rhoeas L., and Zinnia elegans L. became infected. Although Lupinus polyphyllus Lindley, Taraxacum officinale L., Achillea millefolium L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., and Linum rubrum L. did not become infected, they are hosts of M. persicae. Among the 10 positive species that were infected, the species most common in peach orchards, T. pratense, T. repens, B. perennis, and M. chamomilla, were used as source plants for the transmission studies to the peach tree. Our study reveals the ability of M. persicae to transmit PPV-M from herbaceous hosts to peach trees, describes PPV-M symptoms in herbaceous species, and discusses the role of M. persicae and its hosts as a source of PPV-M in peach orchards. PMID:17849850

Manachini, B; Casati, P; Cinanni, L; Bianco, P

2007-08-01

112

Mechanisms for success after long-term nutrient enrichment in a boreal forest understory.  

PubMed

Global levels of reactive nitrogen are predicted to rise in the coming decades as a result of increased deposition from the burning of fossil fuels and the large-scale conversion of nitrogen into a useable form for agriculture. Many plant communities respond strongly to increases in soil nitrogen, particularly in northern ecosystems where nitrogen levels are naturally very low. An experiment in northern Canada that was initiated in 1990 has been investigating the effects of long-term nutrient enrichment (fertilizer added annually) on a boreal forest understory community. We used this experiment to investigate why some species increase in abundance under nutrient enrichment whereas others decline. We focused on four species that differed in their responses to fertilization: Mertensia paniculata and Epilobium angustifolium increased in abundance, Achillea millefolium remained relatively constant and Festuca altaica declined. We hypothesized that the two species that were successful in the new high-nutrient, light-limited environment would be taller, have higher specific leaf area, change phenology by growing earlier in the season and be more morphologically plastic than their less successful counterparts. We compared plant height, specific leaf area, growth spurt date and allocation to leaves in plants grown in control and fertilized plots. We demonstrated that each of the two species that came to dominate fertilized plots has a different combination of traits and responses that likely gave them a competitive advantage; M. paniculata has the highest specific leaf area of the four species whereas E. angustifolium is tallest and exhibits morphological plasticity when fertilized by increasing biomass allocation to leaves. These results indicate that rather than one strategy determining success when nutrients become available, a variety of traits and responses may contribute to a species' ability to persist in a nutrient-enriched boreal forest understory. PMID:23573298

Grainger, Tess Nahanni; Turkington, Roy

2013-01-01

113

Water-extractable magnesium, manganese and copper in leaves and herbs of medicinal plants.  

PubMed

Since herbal teas, infusions and decoctions prepared from medicinal plants are popular remedies, it remains a topical question whether these herbal drugs can be treated as sources of essential elements for humans, who often use them in their everyday diet. Therefore, total and water-extractable contents of Mg, Mn and Cu were determined in 41 leaves originating from four botanical species of Plantago lanceolata, Arctostaphyllos uva-ursi, Rubus fruticosus and Betula sp., as well as in 33 samples of herbs represented by three species of Urtica dioica, Hypericum perforatum and Achillea millefolium. The highest level was determined in the case of Mg (in a range from 2.0 to 7.0 mg/g of dry mass [d.m.]), followed by Mn (from 50.0 to 1300.0 mg/kg d.m.), and lowest of all, Cu (from 3.5 to 19.5 mg/kg d.m.). Student's t-test showed that a statistically significant difference exists between samples originating from different plant species regarding the total content and water-extractable forms of Mg, Mn and Cu. By analysis of the relations between elements, it was observed that total level of Cu correlated with total levels of Mg and Mn, which indicates a synergistic interaction between the essential elements under study. With regard to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), the leaves of Rubus fruticosus contained the highest amounts of a water-extractable bioavailable form of Mn, which guarantees from 160 to 200% of the daily requirement of Mn for women and men, respectively. On the other hand, the extract obtained from Urticae folium gave water-extractable Mg in the amount of 76 mg/500 mL, which constitutes about 20% of daily requirement. The plant material richest in water-extractable Cu was Hyperici herba, containing 154.5 microg/500 mL, or 17% of DRI for both sexes. PMID:22574504

Konieczy?ski, Pawe?; Weso?owski, Marek

2012-01-01

114

Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.  

PubMed

Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use of specific plants. PMID:19429338

Al-Qura'n, S

2009-05-01

115

Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, Part 1: a review of preclinical studies.  

PubMed

Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. This article (part 1) reviews herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In part 2, we review herbal medicines for which there have been clinical investigations for anxiolytic activity. An open-ended, language-restricted (English) search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) using specific search criteria to identify herbal medicines that have been investigated for anxiolytic activity. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, from which 53 herbal medicines were included in the full review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed in part 2), with another 32 having solely preclinical studies (reviewed here in part 1). Preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity (without human clinical trials) was found for Albizia julibrissin, Sonchus oleraceus, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Stachys lavandulifolia, Cecropia glazioui, Magnolia spp., Eschscholzia californica, Erythrina spp., Annona spp., Rubus brasiliensis, Apocynum venetum, Nauclea latifolia, Equisetum arvense, Tilia spp., Securidaca longepedunculata, Achillea millefolium, Leea indica, Juncus effusus, Coriandrum sativum, Eurycoma longifolia, Turnera diffusa, Euphorbia hirta, Justicia spp., Crocus sativus, Aloysia polystachya, Albies pindrow, Casimiroa edulis, Davilla rugosa, Gastrodia elata, Sphaerathus indicus, Zizyphus jujuba and Panax ginseng. Common mechanisms of action for the majority of botanicals reviewed primarily involve GABA, either via direct receptor binding or ionic channel or cell membrane modulation; GABA transaminase or glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibition; a range of monoaminergic effects; and potential cannabinoid receptor modulation. Future research should focus on conducting human clinical trials on the plants reviewed with promising anxiolytic activity. PMID:23436255

Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

2013-03-01

116

Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extracts of selected Jordanian medicinal plants  

PubMed Central

Background: The search for novel xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors with a higher therapeutic activity and fewer side effects are desired not only to treat gout but also to combat various other diseases associated with the XO activity. At present, the potential of developing successful natural products for the management of XO-related diseases is still largely unexplored. In the present study, we have screened the methanolic extracts of various Jordanian medicinal plants for their XO inhibitory activities using an optimized protocol. Materials and Methods: The methanolic extracts of 23 medicinal plants, belonging to 12 families, were tested in vitro, at 200 ?g/ml concentrations, for their XO inhibitory potential. The dose-dependent inhibition profiles of the most active plants were further evaluated by estimating the IC50 values of their corresponding extracts. Results: Six plants were found most active (% inhibition more than 39%). These plants are Salvia spinosa L. (IC50 = 53.7 ?g/ml), Anthemis palestina Boiss. (168.0 ?g/ml), Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (199.5 ?g/ml), Achillea biebersteinii Afansiev (360.0 ?g/ml), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (650.0 ?g/ml), and Ginkgo biloba L. (595.8 ?g/ml). Moreover, four more plants, namely Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (28.7% inhibition), Helianthemum ledifolium (L.) Mill. (28.4%), Majorana syriaca (L.) Kostel. (25.1%), and Mentha spicata L. (22.5%) showed a XO inhibitory activity in the range of 22–30%. Conclusion: The study showed that many of the tested plant species are potential sources of natural XO inhibitors that can be developed, upon further investigation, into successful herbal drugs for treatment of gout and other XO-related disorders.

Hudaib, Mohammad M.; Tawaha, Khaled A.; Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Assaf, Areej M.; Issa, Ala Y.; Alali, Feras Q.; Aburjai, Talal A.; Bustanji, Yasser K.

2011-01-01

117

The role of mass spectrometry in medicinal plant research.  

PubMed

In phytochemical and chemotaxonomic research work mass spectrometry plays an outstandingly important role. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we established the chemotaxa of Tanacetum vulgare L. Chemotypes with essential oils containing 60-90% of artemisia ketone, carveol, dihydrocarvone, myrtenol, umbellulone, terpinen-4-ol, davanone, and Tagetes species containing various essential oils can be clearly distinguished by their spectra; we examined many variations of Tagetes erecta, T. lucida, T. minuta, T. patula and T. tenuifolia. We have identified alpha-beta-pinene-, 1,8-cineol-, linalool-, camphor-, nerol-, geraniol- and gamma-gurjonene as components of Achillea distans L. Injecting the essential oil direct from the oil-secreting organs of T. minuta plants we identified using GC/MS 6-10 and 16% eugenol from the involucral bract and hypsophyll, respectively, as well as beta-ocimene, dihydrotagetone, tagetone, Z- and E-ocimenones. In the course of studies on essential fatty acids Borago officinalis and Lappula squarrosa were selected from 70 species of the family Boraginaceae to obtain seed oil as a source of gamma-linolenic acid, and for the PG synthesis we isolated several grams of gamma-linolenic acid, as well as C18:4, i.e. octadecatetraenic acid, from L. squarrosa on the basis of the mass spectra. From the seed oil of Aquilegia vulgaris C18:3 (5) from the oil of Limnanthes dougloasii C20:1 (5) and from the seed oils of Delphinium consolida and of Tropaeolum species (T. majus, T. minus, T. peregrinum) C20:1 (11) fatty acids were identified on the basis of spectra. PMID:2962668

Héthelyi, E; Tétényi, P; Dabi, E; Dános, B

1987-11-01

118

The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.  

PubMed

Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

2010-12-01

119

Testing the root-priming of soil organic matter decomposition using the isotopic signature of fossil fuel CO2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plant roots provide various forms of soil labile carbon (i.e., rhizodeposition), which stimulate the growth of heterotrophic bacteria in the rhizosphere. This, in turn, provides a food source for phagotrophic protozoa and other bacterivores, whose carbon:nutrient ratios are generally higher than those of their food source. In order to maintain their stoichiometric composition, bacterivores release their extra nutrients into the rhizosphere, where they may be absorbed by plant roots. Thus, rhizodeposition should reduce carbon limitation, but increase nutrient demand, of the soil microbial biomass. We hypothesized that this shift towards nutrient deficiency would stimulate the production of microbial enzymes that depolymerise soil organic matter into microbial available forms. In other words, roots should stimulate the decomposition of soil organic matter. We report on experiment where we tested such a "root-priming" effect using 3 contrasting plant species (Achillea millefolium, Lolium perenne, Trifolium repens). An agricultural soil, with a delta-13C value of approximately -14 ‰ , was transferred into 30 pots and planted with seeds of each species. A ring was inserted in the middle of each pot, and no seeds were planted within the ring. Plants were grown in a growth chamber designed to deliver 13C-depleted air. The resulting plant biomass had a delta-13C value of approximately -52 ‰ . On 7 occasions during the growth trial, pots were sampled for the flux and delta-13C value of soil CO2. Using similar data from control pots without plants, we compared the expected vs. observed contributions of CO2 from roots and soil organic matter. Results from this study revealed a negative root-priming effect for all three species. We discuss the experimental conditions that could have led to this observation, as well as the novelty and potential of our experimental protocol.

Bradley, Robert; Paterson, Eric; Chapman, Steve; Thornton, Barry; Sim, Allan

2013-04-01

120

Relative densities of natural enemy and pest insects within California hedgerows.  

PubMed

Research on hedgerow design for supporting communities of natural enemies for biological control lags behind farmer innovation in California, where assemblages of perennial plant species have been used on crop field margins in the last decade. We compared natural enemy to pest ratios between fields with hedgerows and fields with weedy margins by sampling beneficial insects and key pests of vegetables on sticky cards. We used biweekly vacuum samples to measure the distribution of key insect taxa among native perennial plant species with respect to the timing and intensity of bloom. Sticky cards indicated a trend that field margins with hedgerows support a higher ratio of natural enemies to pests compared with weedy borders. Hedgerow plant species hosted different relative densities of a generally overlapping insect community, and the timing and intensity of bloom only explained a small proportion of the variation in insect abundance at plant species and among hedgerows, with the exception of Orius spp. on Achillea millefolium L. and Baccharis pilularis De Candolle. Indicator Species Analysis showed an affinity of parasitic wasps, especially in the super-family Chalcidoidea, for B. pilularis whether or not it was in flower. A. millefolium was attractive to predatory and herbivorous homopterans; Heteromeles arbutifolia (Lindley) Roemer and B. pilularis to Diabrotica undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Mannerheim; and Rhamnus californica Eschsch to Hemerobiidae. Perennial hedgerows can be designed through species selection to support particular beneficial insect taxa, but plant resources beyond floral availability may be critical in providing structural refuges, alternative prey, and other attractive qualities that are often overlooked. PMID:23905731

Gareau, Tara L Pisani; Letourneau, Deborah K; Shennan, Carol

2013-08-01

121

The Root Herbivore History of the Soil Affects the Productivity of a Grassland Plant Community and Determines Plant Response to New Root Herbivore Attack  

PubMed Central

Insect root herbivores can alter plant community structure by affecting the competitive ability of single plants. However, their effects can be modified by the soil environment. Root herbivory itself may induce changes in the soil biota community, and it has recently been shown that these changes can affect plant growth in a subsequent season or plant generation. However, so far it is not known whether these root herbivore history effects (i) are detectable at the plant community level and/or (ii) also determine plant species and plant community responses to new root herbivore attack. The present greenhouse study determined root herbivore history effects of click beetle larvae (Elateridae, Coleoptera, genus Agriotes) in a model grassland plant community consisting of six common species (Achillea millefolium, Plantago lanceolata, Taraxacum officinale, Holcus lanatus, Poa pratensis, Trifolium repens). Root herbivore history effects were generated in a first phase of the experiment by growing the plant community in soil with or without Agriotes larvae, and investigated in a second phase by growing it again in the soils that were either Agriotes trained or not. The root herbivore history of the soil affected plant community productivity (but not composition), with communities growing in root herbivore trained soil producing more biomass than those growing in untrained soil. Additionally, it influenced the response of certain plant species to new root herbivore attack. Effects may partly be explained by herbivore-induced shifts in the community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The root herbivore history of the soil proved to be a stronger driver of plant growth on the community level than an actual root herbivore attack which did not affect plant community parameters. History effects have to be taken into account when predicting the impact of root herbivores on grasslands.

Sonnemann, Ilja; Hempel, Stefan; Beutel, Maria; Hanauer, Nicola; Reidinger, Stefan; Wurst, Susanne

2013-01-01

122

Assessment of the water exchange between soil and groundwater in an Alpine valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The soil-water balance in temperate climates can be sensitively characterised by the water exchange between soil and groundwater. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the water table depth are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen, but these latter extimate is still a major challenge for hydrological applications. Aiming at contributing to better characterise the soil-water balance and the water exchange between soil and groundwater, at the local scale in an Alpine valley, a micrometeorological station was installed during summer 2012 at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex orography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The soil upper layers, lying on an anthropised loose rock, are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). The station is equipped with longwave and shortwave radiometers, a thermo-hygrometer, two rain-gauges, eddy correlation devices (Gill WindMaster sonic anemometer and Licor Li7500 gas analyser, sampling at 20Hz), a TDR with multiplexer apparatus and four probes at different depths, three soil-thermometers and a heat exchanger plate. Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the main soil hydraulic properties (i.e. hydraulic conductivity at saturation by means of infiltration tests and falling head permeameter, porosity, residual water content and water content at saturation, soil-water retention relationships, organic matter content and grain size distribution curve). Three different hypothesis to model the water exchange between soil-water and groundwater were introduced. They are (i) a null exchange rate which accounts for a shortage of precipitation and for representing the underlying soil as a capillary barrier, (ii) a pure percolation with unitary gradient of the total hydraulic potential and (iii) a percolation or water rise induced by an estimate of the local gradient on the basis of the measurements of water content. As the lateral fluxes were negligible due to the site orography, accounting for the measurement of rainfall, evapotranspiration and soil-water content, the closure of the water balance allowed to assess the effectiveness of the different hypotheses to estimate the exchange between soil-water and groundwater. The results shows that the water balance is not closed without estimating the water exchange between soil and groundwater, but assessing its value was found to be strongly sensitive to the accuracy of the adopted soil model and constitutive laws.

Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

2013-04-01

123

Legume presence increases photosynthesis and N concentrations of co-occurring non-fixers but does not modulate their responsiveness to carbon dioxide enrichment.  

PubMed

Legumes, with the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N), may help alleviate the N limitations thought to constrain plant community response to elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)). To address this issue we assessed: (1) the effects of the presence of the perennial grassland N(2 )fixer, Lupinus perennis, on biomass accumulation and plant N concentrations of nine-species plots of differing plant composition; (2) leaf-level physiology of co-occurring non-fixing species (Achillea millefolium, Agropyron repens, Koeleria cristata) in these assemblages with and without Lupinus; (3) the effects of elevated CO(2) on Lupinus growth and symbiotic N(2) fixation in both monoculture and the nine-species assemblages; and (4) whether assemblages containing Lupinus exhibit larger physiological and growth responses to elevated CO(2 )than those without. This study was part of a long-term grassland field experiment (BioCON) that controls atmospheric CO(2) at current ambient and elevated (560 micromol mol(-1)) concentrations using free-air CO(2) enrichment. Nine-species plots with Lupinus had 32% higher whole plot plant N concentrations and 26% higher total plant N pools than those without Lupinus, based on both above and below ground measurements. Co-occurring non-fixer leaf N concentrations increased 22% and mass-based net photosynthetic rates increased 41% in plots containing Lupinus compared to those without. With CO(2) enrichment, Lupinus monocultures accumulated 32% more biomass and increased the proportion of N derived from fixation from 44% to 57%. In nine-species assemblages, Lupinus N derived from fixation increased similarly from 43% to 54%. Although Lupinus presence enhanced photosynthetic rates and leaf N concentrations of co-occurring non-fixers, and increased overall plant N pools, Lupinus presence did not facilitate stronger photosynthetic responses of non-fixing species or larger growth responses of overall plant communities to elevated CO(2). Non-fixer leaf N concentrations declined similarly in response to elevated CO(2) with and without Lupinus present and the relationship between net photosynthesis and leaf N was not affected by Lupinus presence. Regardless of the presence or absence of Lupinus, CO(2) enrichment resulted in reduced leaf N concentrations and rates of net photosynthesis. PMID:12802677

Lee, Tali D; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G

2003-09-01

124

Water dynamics and groundwater contributions in a young mountain soil under different meteorological conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater contribution to the soil-water content and to the evapotranspiration is a major uncertainty to assess the water balance. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the depth of the water table are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen. Aiming at better understanding these processes at the local scale, a micrometeorological station, equipped with both traditional sensors, an eddy covariance (EC) apparatus with a 20Hz sonic anemometer and infrared CO2 and H2O gas analyser, and four multiplexed TDR probes, was installed at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, Italy, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex topography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The young, anthropised, soil upper layers are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the soil hydraulic properties. Particularly the soil-water retention relationships were measured by means of a low- and a high-pressure Richards' apparatus, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of each soil layer was estimated by 2-dimensional, axis-symmetrical, inverse modelling of field infiltration tests from single ring infiltrometer. The measurements were performed during Summer 2012 and Summer 2013. The groundwater exchange was numerically estimated both in wet (Summer 2012) and in dry meteorlogical conditions (Summer 2013). Evapotranspiration was assessed by means of Penman-Monteith method, which was found to be in the range between EC-estimated fluxes and an indirect estimate based on the Bowen ratio correction for Summer 2012. The two seasons are meteorologically very different and it results also in the soil-water regime. During Summer 2012, the weather was relatively wet, the soil did not reach very small water contents, so that precipitation was able to percolate towards the groundwater table and the groundwater table to meaningfully contribute to the evapotranspirative fluxes. Summer 2013 was instead much drier, precipitation was not able to meaningfully change the water content of the lowest soil layer and to percolate toward the water table. As a consequence of the very small water contents of the soil, also a very small water rise had place.

Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

2014-05-01

125

Effect of ethnomedicinal plants used in folklore medicine in Jordan as antibiotic resistant inhibitors on Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Background Escherichia coli occurs naturally in the human gut; however, certain strains that can cause infections, are becoming resistant to antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant E. coli that produce extended-spectrum ? lactamases (ESBLs), such as the CTX-M enzymes, have emerged within the community setting as an important cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bloodstream infections may be associated with these community-onsets. This is the first report testing the antibiotic resistance-modifying activity of nineteen Jordanian plants against multidrug-resistant E. coli. Methods The susceptibility of bacterial isolates to antibiotics was tested by determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using a broth microdilution method. Nineteen Jordanian plant extracts (Capparis spinosa L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Echinops polyceras Boiss., Gundelia tournefortii L, Varthemia iphionoides Boiss. & Blanche, Eruca sativa Mill., Euphorbia macroclada L., Hypericum trequetrifolium Turra, Achillea santolina L., Mentha longifolia Host, Origanum syriacum L., Phlomis brachydo(Boiss.) Zohary, Teucrium polium L., Anagyris foetida L., Trigonella foenum-graecum L., Thea sinensis L., Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Lepidium sativum L., Pimpinella anisum L.) were combined with antibiotics, from different classes, and the inhibitory effect of the combinations was estimated. Results Methanolic extracts of the plant materials enhanced the inhibitory effects of chloramphenicol, neomycin, doxycycline, cephalexin and nalidixic acid against both the standard strain and to a lesser extent the resistant strain of E. coli. Two edible plant extracts (Gundelia tournefortii L. and Pimpinella anisum L.) generally enhanced activity against resistant strain. Some of the plant extracts like Origanum syriacum L.(Labiateae), Trigonella foenum- graecum L.(Leguminosae), Euphorbia macroclada (Euphorbiaceae) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae) did not enhance the activity of amoxicillin against both standard and resistant E. coli. On the other hand combinations of amoxicillin with other plant extracts used showed variable effect between standard and resistant strains. Plant extracts like Anagyris foetida (Leguminosae) and Lepidium sativum (Umbelliferae) reduced the activity of amoxicillin against the standard strain but enhanced the activity against resistant strains. Three edible plants; Gundelia tournefortii L. (Compositae) Eruca sativa Mill. (Cruciferae), and Origanum syriacum L. (Labiateae), enhanced activity of clarithromycin against the resistant E. coli strain. Conclusion This study probably suggests possibility of concurrent use of these antibiotics and plant extracts in treating infections caused by E. coli or at least the concomitant administration may not impair the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotics.

2010-01-01