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Sample records for achilles tendon surgery

  1. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007643.htm Achilles tendon repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your Achilles tendon joins your calf muscle to your heel. You can tear your Achilles tendon if you land hard on your heel during sports, from a ...

  2. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  3. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  4. Comparison of Semi-Invasive "Internal Splinting" and Open Suturing Techniques in Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Memisoglu, Kaya; Aydin, Adem; Atmaca, Halil; Baran, Tuncay; Odabas Ozgur, Bahar; Ozgur, Turgay; Kantar, Cengizhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the semi-invasive "internal splinting" (SIIS) method for repair of Achilles tendon rupture relative to open repair with Krakow sutures. Efficacy was evaluated based on the clinical and functional outcomes, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, isokinetic results, and surgical complication rates. Functional measurements included the Thermann and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle scores, bilateral ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the bilateral length and thickness of each Achilles tendon. The isokinetic outcomes were evaluated using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Of the 45 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 24 were treated by SIIS and 21 by the open Krackow suture technique. The mean follow-up time for all patients was 43.7 (range 6 to 116) months. In the SIIS group, patients returned to normal daily activities after 7.2 (range 6 to 8) weeks compared with 14.3 (range 12 to 15) weeks in the open surgery group. The AOFAS ankle scores were 93.5 (range 82 to 100) points in the open repair group and 96.2 (range 86 to 100) points in the SIIS group. The Thermann scores were 80.4 (range 53 to 91) points for the open repair group and 87.9 (range 81 to 100) points for the SIIS method. The mean Achilles length on the operated side measured using magnetic resonance imaging was 175.06 (range 110 to 224) mm and 177.76 (range 149 to 214) mm for the open surgery and SIIS groups, respectively. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after SIIS surgery, although this defect had completely resolved within 12 months. SIIS yielded better outcomes relative to the open surgery group according to the isokinetic measurements. Taken together, these data indicate the SIIS method for Achilles tendon ruptures performed better in terms of both functional and objective outcomes

  5. [Diseases of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, H R

    1986-01-01

    In this report diseases of the Achilles tendon are discussed. First an anatomical survey of this region is presented including anatomical variations together with the results of the author's own investigations on corpses. Certain positions and insertions of the plantaris tendon with respect to the Achilles tendon may have pathological influence. Pathological aspects are discussed after a review of the physiology of the Achilles tendon, including functional and tensile tests. The clinical picture changes according to the location of the pathological disorder--tendon, paratenon, insertion and bursae--and whether the disease is acute or chronic. There are various reasons for degenerative changes in the tendon, which can even lead to rupture. Surgical and non-surgical treatment and their indications are presented. In conclusion treatment methods and their results for 36 cases are given. PMID:3087066

  6. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  7. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  8. Granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with nonabsorbable suture

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Seker, Ali; Uysal, Mehmet Ali; Uzun, Metin; Malkoc, Melih

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Several complications can be observed after Achilles tendon repairs. In this study we aimed to report granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with Ethibond (Ethicon INC, Somerville, New Jersey) suture. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31 year-old man operated for Achilles tendon rupture. The Ethibond suture was used for primary repair. The patient attended to polyclinic with the complaints of swelling and discharge around the operation site four months after operation. A mass around distal portion of the Achilles tendon was detected. The granulomatous tissue was excised. Inside the mass Ethibond suture was detected. On histopathologic examination, typical findings of the foreign body reaction were observed. No microorganism was cultivated in the tissue culture. The patient has no complaint on the twelfth month control after surgery. DISCUSSION The results of primary repair of Achilles tendon are good but several complications were reported. In tendon repairs generally nonabsorbable sutures are used. The Ethibond is nonabsorbable, braided suture. In the literature, granuloma formations secondary to the suture materials such as polygylactine and braided polyethylen–polyester after Achilles tendon repair were reported but granuloma secondary to the Ethibond is very rare. CONCLUSION Although Ethibond suture is a strong and safe material for Achilles tendon repairs it may cause soft tissue problems such as granuloma. PMID:25212905

  9. Minimally Invasive Approach to Achilles Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Doyle, Matthew D; Todd, Nicholas W; Rush, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for Achilles tendon pathology; however, no overwhelming consensus has been reached for surgical treatment. Open repair using a central or paramedian incision allows excellent visualization for end-to-end anastomosis in the case of a complete rupture and detachment and reattachment for insertional pathologies. Postoperative wound dehiscence and infection in the Achilles tendon have considerable deleterious effects on overall functional recovery and outcome and sometimes require plastic surgery techniques to achieve coverage. With the aim of avoiding such complications, foot and ankle surgeons have studied less invasive techniques for repair. We describe a percutaneous approach to Achilles tendinopathy using a modification of the Bunnell suture weave technique combined with the use of interference screws. No direct end-to-end repair of the tendon is performed, rather, the proximal stump is brought in direct proximity of the distal stump, preventing overlengthening and proximal stump retraction. This technique also reduces the suture creep often seen with end-to-end tendon repair by providing a direct, rigid suture to bone interface. We have used the new technique to minimize dissection and exposure while restoring function and accelerating recovery postoperatively. PMID:26385574

  10. Achilles Tendon Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... after periods of rest, then improves somewhat with motion but later worsens with increased activity. Tenderness, or ... foot and ankle and evaluate the range of motion and condition of the tendon. The extent of ...

  11. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  12. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-12-15

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7-21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  13. Low recurrence rate after mini surgery outside the tendon combined with short rehabilitation in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a general opinion that a structured and specific rehabilitation is needed after treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy to minimize recurrence of the condition. There is sparse knowledge about the recurrence rates in large patient materials after specific treatments for midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Aim This study aimed to investigate the recurrence rates in a large number of patients with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy that had been surgically treated with the ultrasound (US) and Doppler (DP)-guided mini-surgical scraping technique. Postoperatively, a relatively simple rehabilitation protocol, including a range of movement exercises and gradually increased walking and biking before allowing free activity, was used. Materials and methods From a database, information about the recurrence rates after US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping, performed by a single surgeon on 519 tendons with US + DP-verified chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy, was obtained. Results Recurrence of painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy was found in 26 of 519 (5%) operated tendons, 13 from women and 13 from men. In 13 tendons, a close by located plantaris tendon was extirpated during the reoperation. Conclusion In this large material on patients treated with US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping for midportion Achilles tendinopathy, there were few recurrences, although only a simple and nonspecific rehabilitation protocol was used. PMID:27274323

  14. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of tissue properties for Achilles tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Tainsong; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques have recently been widely applied for the characterization of tissues. For example, they can be used for the quantification of Achilles tendon properties based on the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the speed of sound (SOS) when the ultrasound wave passes through the tissues. This study is to develop an integrated system to investigate the properties of Achilles tendons using QUS images from UBIS 5000 (DMS, Montpellier, France) and B-mode ultrasound images from HDI 5000 (ATL, Ultramark, USA). Subjects including young (32 females and 17 males; mean age: 23.7 ± 2.0) and middle-aged groups (8 female and 8 males; mean age: 47.3 ± 8.5 s) were recruited and tested for this study. Only subjects who did not exercise regularly and had no record of tendon injury were studied. The results show that the BUA is significantly higher for the young group (45.2 ± 1.6 dB MHz-1) than the middle-age group (40.5 ± 1.9 dB MHz-1), while the SOS is significantly lower for the young (1601.9 ± 11.2 ms-1) compared to the middle-aged (1624.1 ± 8.7 m s-1). On the other hand, the thicknesses of Achilles tendons for both groups (young: 4.31 ± 0.23 mm; middle age: 4.24 ± 0.23 mm) are very similar. For one patient who had an Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery, the thickness of the Achilles tendon increased from 4 mm to 4.33 mm after the surgery. In addition, the BUA increased by about 7.2% while the SOS decreased by about 0.6%. In conclusion, noninvasive ultrasonic assessment of Achilles tendons is useful for assisting clinical diagnosis and for the evaluation of a therapeutic regimen.

  15. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  16. Blood supply of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I M; Lagopoulos, M; McConnell, P; Soames, R W; Sefton, G K

    1998-09-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the most common sites of injury and rupture as a result of overuse. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of rupture could involve the pattern of its blood supply. With use of angiographic and histological techniques, the blood supply of the Achilles tendon was investigated in 12 human cadaveric specimens. Angiography confirmed Mayer's 1916 finding that the blood supply to the tendon is from three areas: the musculotendinous and osseotendinous junctions and the paratenon, with the posterior tibial artery providing the major contribution. However, qualitative and quantitative histological analyses in this study showed that the Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply throughout its length, as determined by the small number of blood vessels per cross-sectional area, which do not in general vary significantly along its length. In light of these findings, it is suggested that poor vascularity may prevent adequate tissue repair following trauma, leading to further weakening of the tendon. PMID:9820283

  17. Achilles tendon disorders in runners--a review.

    PubMed

    Smart, G W; Taunton, J E; Clement, D B

    1980-01-01

    The Achilles tendon and the classification, etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and management of Achilles tendon disorders in runners are reviewed. Due to the presence of a paratenon sheath, the classification of Achilles tendon disease should be revised. Several etiological mechanisms have been proposed in Achilles tendon disease. The authors recognize: faulty foot biomechanics; poor lower leg flexibility; poorly designed athletic footwear; training surfaces; training intensity; overuse through excessive mileage; inactivity; local steroid injections; rheumatic conditions; and indirect violence. An accurate, thorough differential diagnosis is essential when the athlete presents with an Achilles tendon disorder. Except in total rupture and in extensive partial rupture, the authors do not recommend cast immobilization in the treatment of Achilles tendon disease. When the athlete presents with total rupture of the Achilles tendon, the authors believe that surgical repair is the treatment method of choice. Rehabilitation programs to follow successful treatment of Achilles tendon disease are also presented. PMID:6999281

  18. Type 1 Achilles tendon rupture caused by grooming trauma in a young dog

    PubMed Central

    Isaka, M.; Befu, M.; Matsubara, N.; Ishikawa, M.; Aono, H.; Namba, S.

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon in small animal practice. A 9-month-old, female, mixed breed dog (weighing 2.2kg) was referred to our hospital with a primary complaint of right hind limb lameness. Complete right Achilles tendon rupture was diagnosed by physical examination and radiography. The tendon was surgically repaired the next day by using a three-loop and single near-far-far-near suture methods. Complete healing was achieved by 97 days post-surgery. This report describes the surgical technique used for complete Achilles tendon rupture repair in a young dog. PMID:26623339

  19. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. PMID:22344862

  20. Traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young athlete treated with percutaneous tenorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    MACERA, ARMANDO; CARULLI, CHRISTIAN; MATASSI, FABRIZIO; VENEZIANI, CARLO; INNOCENTI, MASSIMO

    2015-01-01

    While rupture of the Achilles tendon is one of the most frequent injuries sustained in sports and physical activity, bilateral Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon. We present the case of a 33-year-old man who sustained a bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in the absence of predisposing factors. The lesions were managed by percutaneous tenorrhaphy and casting. Six months after surgery he was able to return to his daily-life activities and to perform light sports activity. The Authors review the current literature on the management of this rare condition in young people, with or without risk factors. PMID:26904529

  1. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Emami-Moghaddam Tehrani, Mohammad; Lahiji, Farivar Abdollahzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR) remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia) to avoid complications after open repair. Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%). None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7%) were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications. PMID:25207295

  2. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  3. [Comprehensive treatment in Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, Juan; Avalos, Cecilia Henríquez

    2007-01-01

    Due to incapacity caused by calcaneal tendon injuries for the reintegration of patients back to their daily activities and/or sparts it is necessary to decrease the time of reinstatement of patients. At present these times have improved by a good surgical technique and an early rehabilitation, and the patient is returned quickly as he sees less disability. It is proposed in this paper a type of surgical treatment and an early rehabilitation program, which have shortened the time of disability and incorporation to their daily activities and sports to eight weeks in 10 patients with Achilles tendon plasty. PMID:18159917

  4. An unusual cause of Achilles tendon xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Parente, Fabienne; Vesnaver, Matthew; Massie, Rami; Baass, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Tendinous xanthomas are often thought to be pathognomonic for familial hypercholesterolemia. In this report, we present the case of a young man with a normal lipid profile and Achilles tendon xanthoma. Biochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis in this patient. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with xanthoma in tendons and the brain as well as progressive neurologic deficits. Unfortunately, this rare form of reversible dementia is thought to be underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disease with chenodeoxycholic acid is essential and has been shown to greatly improve the patient's symptoms and prognosis. PMID:27578138

  5. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  6. Vascular changes in the ruptured Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    PubMed

    Kvist, M; Józsa, L; Järvinen, M

    1992-01-01

    Thirty patients with ruptures of the Achilles tendon were studied. There were 21 men and 9 women with an average age of 36 years. Specimens from the tendon and paratenon in 24 were examined histologically. Tissue samples of 20 were studied by electron microscopy. Marked degenerative, obliterative and/or inflammatory vascular changes were found in all the ruptured tendons and their paratenon. Our findings indicate that poor vascularity play a role in the aetiology of rupture of the Achilles tendon. PMID:1473893

  7. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  8. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R. PMID:24414293

  9. Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive Repair of Traumatic and Simultaneous Rupture of Both Achilles Tendons: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Pawel; Karaczun, Maciej; Kruk, Bartosz; Szczypior, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Achilles injury is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon, however, is much less common and usually occurs spontaneously. Complete, traumatic, and bilateral ruptures are rare and typically require long periods of immobilization before the patient can return to full weightbearing. A 52-year-old male was hospitalized for bilateral traumatic rupture to both Achilles tendons. No risk factors for tendon rupture were found. Blood samples revealed no peripheral blood pathologic features. Both tendons were repaired with percutaneous, minimally invasive surgery using the Achillon(®) tendon suture system. Rehabilitation was begun 4 weeks later. An ankle-foot orthosis was prescribed to provide ankle support with an adjustable range of movement, and active plantar flexion was set at 0° to 30°. The patient remained non-weightbearing with the ankle-foot orthosis device and performed active range-of-motion exercises. At 8 weeks after surgery, we recommended that he begin walking with partial weightbearing using a foot-tibial orthosis with the range of motion set to 45° plantar flexion and 15° dorsiflexion. At 10 weeks postoperatively, he was encouraged to return to full weightbearing on both feet. Beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after minimally invasive surgery, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization after surgery, provided a rapid resumption to full weightbearing. We emphasize the clinical importance of a safe, simple treatment program that can be followed for a patient with damage to the Achilles tendons. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of minimally invasive repair of bilateral simultaneous traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon. PMID:26002678

  10. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. PMID:26678297

  11. Miniopen Repair of Ruptured Achilles Tendon in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute degenerative Achilles tendons ruptures may be managed either operatively or nonoperatively with the superiority of the operative treatment in reducing the risk of rerupture. Acute rupture of Achilles tendon is commonly seen in diabetic patients. Open techniques for Achilles tendon repair have been associated with significant complications as deep infection and wound-related problems. Patients and Methods. Thirteen type II diabetic patients with acute degenerative rupture of the Achilles tendon were managed by miniopen repair augmented by peroneus brevis tendon. Results. All repairs healed successfully. The patients were able to return to preinjury level of activity after a mean of 5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 15.1 preoperatively to 74.8 postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti ankle score was 59.6. Three patients suffered from superficial wound infection which was successfully managed. However, no patients suffered any major complications such as DVT, deep infection, or reruptures during the period of the study. Conclusion. Repair of acute degenerative tear of the Achilles tendon with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation could be successfully performed through a miniopen technique with minimization of wound complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27437478

  12. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  13. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  14. Endoscopic Achilles tenolysis for management of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon pain after repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture can result from suture granuloma formation, modification of the threshold of the pain receptors inside the tendon by scar tissue, expansion of the paratenon by tendon enlargement with secondary stimulation of mechanoreceptors, or underlying tendon degeneration. In the present technique report, an endoscopic technique of Achilles tenolysis for denervation and debulking is described that might be applicable in cases in which conservative treatment fails to alleviate the pain. PMID:23085384

  15. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads; Kovanen, Vuokko; Grosset, Jean-Francois; Snorgaard, Ole; Bencke, Jesper; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Bandholm, Thomas; Christensen, Tomas Møller; Boesen, Anders; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Aagaard, Per; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters, and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age-matched (45-70 yr) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of the outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness) between patients with well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetes. The overall effect of diabetes was explored by collapsing the diabetes groups (DB) compared with the controls. Skin collagen cross-linking lysylpyridinoline, hydroxylysylpyridinoline (136%, 80%, P < 0.01) and pentosidine concentrations (55%, P < 0.05) were markedly greater in DB. Furthermore, Achilles tendon material stiffness was higher in DB (54%, P < 0.01). Notably, DB also demonstrated higher forefoot/rearfoot peak-plantar-pressure ratio (33%, P < 0.01). Overall, Achilles tendon material stiffness and skin connective tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared with controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g., skin and joint capsule) may influence foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients. PMID:26542519

  16. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  17. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Demirel, Murat; Kaya, Defne; Ateşok, Kıvanç; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Although the Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes. PMID:24198562

  18. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. Methods in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. Results total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. Conclusion the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods. PMID:26605187

  19. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  20. Strain mapping in the Achilles tendon - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, Stijn; Desmet, Hannelore; Slagmolen, Pieter; Peers, Koen

    2016-06-14

    Achilles tendinopathy remains one of the most prevalent overuse injuries in elite as well as recreational athletes. Regardless of the fact that the aetiology of tendinopathy has not been fully understood, therapeutic mechanical loading programs have emerged as being the treatment of choice. In this light, mechanical properties of the tendon and their response to changes in loading or unloading have been the subject of many previous investigations. One of these properties often investigated is strain, a measure of relative deformation. By means of a systematic review, an overview was given of research in this field, with a primary objective to list the methods used and secondary aim to synthesize data on strain mapping in the Achilles tendon. Following the guidelines of the PRISMA statement, 47 articles were found appropriate for qualitative assessment. Achilles tendon strain has been investigated across a variety of contexts, including the response to exercise, walking, unloading, ageing, hormonal changes and weight. Only three studies investigated the effect of the presence of tendinopathy on strain. Ultrasound was the most often used imaging modality to measure or estimate strain. Further methodological parameters, e.g. the location of measurement, differed greatly between all different studies. Nearly all studies considered global strain. Some studies investigated the transverse strain response of the Achilles tendon. Recently, however, the role of local - intratendinous - strain distribution has been found to be of critical importance and further studies should focus on imaging modalities to investigate these local changes. PMID:27113537

  1. Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress on the tendon too quickly, leading to micro-injury of the tendon fibers. Due to this ... with over-pronation or gait abnormalities, custom orthotic devices may be prescribed. Night splints. Night splints help ...

  2. Response of rabbit Achilles tendon to chronic repetitive loading.

    PubMed

    Archambault, J M; Hart, D A; Herzog, W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the response of tendon to chronic repetitive loading. Controlled muscle stimulation was used to load the rabbit Achilles tendon at a frequency of 1.25 Hz for two hours per day, three days per week for a period of 11 weeks. Average peak tendon force was 26 N during the protocol. The loading protocol did not modify the gross morphology of the tissue, nor its water content or cellularity. Increases in mRNA expression of collagen Type III and MMPs were observed, but no signs of injury were detected by histologic examination of tendon and paratenon structures. The lack of a detectable injury response suggests that the tendons were not loaded beyond their capacity for repair. Factors additional to mechanical loading such as aging, illness or stress may be necessary to produce pathology. PMID:11696985

  3. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon in patients on steroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, J F

    1983-01-01

    Three patients are presented who sustained bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon while on systemic steroid therapy for chest disease; a fourth patient with polymyalgia rheumatica on steroids is also presented. This is further evidence that tendon rupture can be a direct complication of steroid treatment. The English-language literature on bilateral Achilles tendon rupture is reviewed. PMID:6651370

  4. Rat model of Achilles tendon disorder. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Messner, K; Wei, Y; Andersson, B; Gillquist, J; Räsänen, T

    1999-01-01

    Three-month-old male rats were subjected 3 times weekly for 1 h to eccentric exercise of one triceps surae muscle (30 stimulations/min) under general anesthesia in order to induce Achilles tendon disorder corresponding to paratenonitis and tendinosis in man. Net muscle work during the sessions ranged between 0.67 and 4.37 mJ (mean 1.72, SD 0.77). After 9 and 13 sessions, respectively, 2 rats started to show gait alterations during the functional test which was performed 2-3 times weekly. These rats were killed after additional sessions which showed a worsening of the limp. The other trained rats and controls did not limp and were killed after 7-11 weeks. Histologic evaluation of the Achilles tendons from the exercised limb showed in the majority of the cases hypervascularization, increased number of nerve filaments and increased immunoreactivity for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. The tendons from the nonstimulated limb looked normal. The distribution of collagen types I and II appeared normal in the tendon and its insertion to the calcaneus. Inflammation of the epi- and paratenon could be provoked in the rat, but tendon changes corresponding to chronic tendinosis did not develop within 11 weeks with the used training regime. The clinical relevance of this model for chronic tendon disease needs to be evaluated further. PMID:10460971

  5. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. PMID:26970908

  6. The seasonal variation of Achilles tendon ruptures in Vancouver, Canada: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alex; Grewal, Navdeep; Guy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the seasonal distribution of tendon ruptures in a large cohort of patients from Vancouver, Canada. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Acute Achilles tendon rupture cases that occurred from 1987 to 2010 at an academic hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Information was extracted from an orthopaedic database. Participants No direct contact was made with the participants. The following information was extracted from the OrthoTrauma database: age, sex, date of injury and season (winter, spring, summer and autumn), date of surgery if date of injury was unknown and type of injury (sport related or non-sport related/unspecified). Only acute Achilles tendon rupture cases were included; chronic cases were excluded along with those that were conservatively managed. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was to determine the seasonal pattern of Achilles tendon rupture. Secondary outcomes, such as differences in gender and mechanism of sport (non-sport vs sport related), were also assessed. Results There were 543 cases in total; 83% of the cases were men (average age 39.3) and 17% were women (average age 37.3). In total, 76% of cases were specified as sport related. The distribution of injuries varied significantly across seasons (χ2, p<0.05), with significantly more cases occurring in spring. The increase in the number of cases in spring was due to sport-related injuries, whereas non-sport-related cases were distributed evenly throughout the year. Conclusions The seasonality of sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures should be considered when developing preventive strategies and when timing their delivery. PMID:24519875

  7. Thicker Achilles tendons are a risk factor to develop Achilles tendinopathy in elite professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Jhingan, Sachin; Perry, Mark; O'Driscoll, Gary; Lewin, Colin; Teatino, Raphael; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2011-04-01

    The primary aim of this prospective cohort study was to compare the incidence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms in elite soccer players with and without baseline asymptomatic ultrasound abnormalities. This study also investigated the relationship between baseline tendon thickness and development of symptoms. Using ultrasonography, 18 players were examined in 2009 for the existence of hypoechoicity, paratenon blurring, focal thickening and/or neovascularisation, and anteroposterior tendon thickness was measured. Symptom development during the follow-up period was assessed by interview one year later. Baseline mid-tendon thickness was greater (p=0.041) in tendons that experienced symptoms [median (IQR): 0.53 (0.51-0.55) cm] in the following year than tendons remaining asymptomatic [0.48 (0.45-0.52) cm]. No association between the existence of baseline ultrasound signs and development of symptoms in the following year was observed (Chi-Square: 1.180, p=0.277). A thicker baseline mid-tendon thickness was identified as a risk indicator for the development of Achilles tendinopathy in elite soccer players. PMID:23738247

  8. [Achilles tendon rupture : Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards].

    PubMed

    Hertel, G; Götz, J; Grifka, J; Willers, J

    2016-08-01

    A superior life expectancy and an increased activity in the population result in an increase in degenerative diseases, such as Achilles tendon ruptures. The medical history and physical examinations are the methods of choice to diagnose Achilles tendon ruptures. Ultrasound and radiography represent reasonable extended diagnostic procedures. In order to decide on the medical indications for the therapy concept, the advantages and disadvantages of conservative and surgical treatment options have to be weighed up on an indivdual basis. There are explicit contraindications for both treatment options. For the surgical treatment concept open suture techniques, minimally invasive methods and reconstructive procedures are available. The postoperative management of the patient is as important as the choice of surgical technique. With the correct medical indications and supervision of the patient it is possible to achieve extremely satisfying results for the patient with both conservative and surgical treatment options. PMID:27405457

  9. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon in athletes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, B

    2000-01-01

    The rupture of the Achilles tendon during amateur or professional sport-related activities is becoming more frequent, as is the request for treatments that enable the fastest possible recovery. This study includes 30 patients who sustained rupture of the Achilles tendon during various sport activities; for the last five years we have performed percutaneous suture repair by means of two parallel Dacron threads equipped with a harpoon and a malleable needle. This method alone enables immediate mobilization and an early load, preserves the blood supply of the paratenon, benefits from the motion which accelerates repair, without the well known complications produced both by the non-operative and by open surgical treatments. Excellent results have been achieved and all patients returned to their pre-injury level of sports activity after 120 to 150 days. PMID:11126717

  10. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-09-28

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7-5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  11. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7–5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  12. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  13. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  14. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  15. Achilles Tendon Reflex in Accidental Hypothermia and Hypothermic Myxoedema

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, D.; Taig, D. R.; Emslie-Smith, D.

    1973-01-01

    The photomotogram (P.M.G.) of the Achilles tendon reflex was studied in 26 patients with hypothermia (rectal temperature 33·3°C or less), 10 of whom also had myxoedema (serum protein bound iodine 2·8 μg/100 ml or less). No reflex could be elicited in eight (31%) of these patients, including three of those with myxoedema. Hypothermia increases both the contraction and the relaxation times of the reflex, the relaxation phase being particularly prolonged in those with myxoedema. In those patients from whom the reflex was elicited the ratio of the contraction time to the “half-relaxation time” in the P.M.G. was less than unity in six of the seven with myxoedema, and considerably greater than unity in eight of the 11 (73%) who were euthyroid. Thus, analysis of the Achilles tendon reflex P.M.G. correctly predicted the thyroid status in 14 of the 18 hypothermic patients in whom the Achilles tendon reflex was present (78%). The wider use of this rapid test of thyroid function would allow a more rational use of thyroid hormones in hypothermic patients and so lead to a better assessment of their value. PMID:4121692

  16. Effects of BMP-12-Releasing Sutures on Achilles Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Lee, Jae-Sung; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Maassen, Nicholas X.; Baer, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon healing is a complex coordinated event orchestrated by numerous biologically active proteins. Unfortunately, tendons have limited regenerative potential and as a result, repair may be protracted months to years. Current treatment strategies do not offer localized delivery of biologically active proteins, which may result in reduced therapeutic efficacy. Surgical sutures coated with nanostructured minerals may provide a potentially universal tool to efficiently incorporate and deliver biologically active proteins directly to the wound. Additionally, previous reports indicated that treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) improved tendon healing. Based on this information, we hypothesized that mineral-coated surgical sutures may be an effective platform for localized BMP-12 delivery to an injured tendon. The objective of this study was, therefore, to elucidate the healing effects of mineral-coated sutures releasing BMP-12 using a rat Achilles healing model. The effects of BMP-12-releasing sutures were also compared with standard BMP-12 delivery methods, including delivery of BMP-12 through collagen sponge or direct injection. Rat Achilles tendons were unilaterally transected and repaired using BMP-12-releasing suture (0, 0.15, 1.5, or 3.0 μg), collagen sponge (0 or 1.5 μg BMP-12), or direct injection (0 or 1.5 μg). By 14 days postinjury, repair with BMP-12-releasing sutures reduced the appearance of adhesions to the tendon and decreased total cell numbers. BMP-12 released from sutures and collagen sponge also tended to improve collagen organization when compared with BMP-12 delivered through injection. Based on these results, the release of a protein from sutures was able to elicit a biological response. Furthermore, BMP-12-releasing sutures modulated tendon healing, and the delivery method dictated the response of the healing tissue to BMP-12. PMID:25354567

  17. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  18. Achilles detachment in rat and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: Promoted tendon-to-bone healing and opposed corticosteroid aggravation.

    PubMed

    Krivic, Andrija; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Huljev, Dubravko; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (BPC 157, as an antiulcer agent in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease; PLD-116, PL 14736, Pliva, no toxicity reported) alone (without carrier) ameliorates healing of tendon and bone, respectively, as well as other tissues. Thereby, we focus on Achilles tendon-to-bone healing: tendon to bone could not be healed spontaneously, but it was recovered by this peptide. After the rat's Achilles tendon was sharply transected from calcaneal bone, agents [BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg), 6alpha-methylprednisolone (1 mg), 0.9% NaCl (5 mL)] were given alone or in combination [/kg body weight (b.w.) intraperitoneally, once time daily, first 30-min after surgery, last 24 h before analysis]. Tested at days 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after Achilles detachment, BPC 157 improves healing functionally [Achilles functional index (AFI) values substantially increased], biomechanically (load to failure, stiffness, and Young elasticity modulus significantly increased), macro/microscopically, immunohistochemistry (better organization of collagen fibers, and advanced vascular appearance, more collagen type I). 6alpha-Methylprednisolone consistently aggravates the healing, while BPC 157 substantially reduces 6alpha-methylprednisolone healing aggravation. Thus, direct tendon-to-bone healing using stabile nontoxic peptide BPC 157 without a carrier might successfully exchange the present reconstructive surgical methods. PMID:16583442

  19. Macroscopic Anomalies and Pathological Findings in and Around the Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nonsurgical treatments for chronic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) results in unpredictable success rates. Surgical treatment may be chosen as reports show mostly encouraging but variable success rates depending on the pathology. The distribution of surgically confirmed pathologies in AT is largely unknown. Purpose: To ascertain the distributions of macroscopically observed anomalies in participants undergoing surgical treatment for chronic AT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The main macroscopic pathologies of 1661 chronic Achilles tendon overuse injuries, which were diagnosed and surgically treated by a single surgeon, were reviewed. The surgeries were performed on professional and recreational athletes during the years 1976-1980, 1986-1990, 1996-2000, and 2006-2010. Surgical diagnoses, along with age- and sport-specific characteristics, were collected retrospectively from patient records. Results: The relative proportion of tendinosis increased during the study period from 4.2% to 21%, and paratenonitis decreased from 50% to 26%. Retrocalcaneal pathologies were the most common surgically confirmed lesions at 30%, while the mean age at surgery increased by 11 years over the entire study period. Conclusion: Surgically confirmed pathologies in and around the Achilles tendon showed coherent changes, chronic paratenonitis, and retrocalcaneal problems as the most prevalent findings. The classification of midportion and insertional tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis in AT should strictly be used as a clinical diagnosis. During surgical evaluations, the diagnosis is further clarified as more specific pathologies may be identified. PMID:26535293

  20. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 accelerates healing of transected rat Achilles tendon and in vitro stimulates tendocytes growth.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, M; Sebecic, B; Patrlj, L; Jadrijevic, S; Suknaic, S; Perovic, D; Aralica, G; Zarkovic, N; Borovic, S; Srdjak, M; Hajdarevic, K; Kopljar, M; Batelja, L; Boban-Blagaic, A; Turcic, I; Anic, T; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2003-11-01

    In studies intended to improve healing of transected Achilles tendon, effective was a stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419). Currently in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PLD-116, PL 14736, Pliva), it ameliorates internal and external wound healing. In rats, the right Achilles tendon transected (5 mm proximal to its calcaneal insertion) presents with a large tendon defect between cut ends. Agents (/kg b.w., i.p., once time daily) (BPC 157 (dissolved in saline, with no carrier addition) (10 microg, 10 ng or 10 pg) or saline (5.0 ml)), were firstly applied at 30 min after surgery, the last application at 24 h before autopsy. Achilles functional index (AFI) was assessed once time daily. Biomechanical, microscopical and macroscopical assessment was on day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14. Controls generally have severely compromised healing. In comparison, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 fully improves recovery: (i) biomechanically, increased load of failure, load of failure per area and Young's modulus of elasticity; (ii) functionally, significantly higher AFI-values; (iii) microscopically, more mononuclears and less granulocytes, superior formation of fibroblasts, reticulin and collagen; (iv) macroscopically, smaller size and depth of tendon defect, and subsequently the reestablishment of full tendon integrity. Likewise, unlike TGF-beta, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, presenting with no effect on the growth of cultured cell of its own, consistently opposed 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a negative modulator of the growth. HNE-effect is opposed in both combinations: BPC 157+HNE (HNE growth inhibiting effect reversed into growth stimulation of cultured tendocytes) and HNE+BPC 157(abolished inhibiting activity of the aldehyde), both in the presence of serum and serum deprived conditions. In conclusion, these findings, particularly, Achilles tendon transection fully recovered in rats, peptide stability suitable delivery, usefully favor gastric

  1. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  2. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-05-18

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  3. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures: An Experimental Study on Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Şen, Baran; Güler, Serkan; Çeçen, Berivan; Kumtepe, Erdem; Bağrıyanık, Alper; Özkal, Sermin; Ali Özcan, M.; Özsan, Hayri; Şanlı, Namık; Tatari, M. Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Achilles tendon ruptures are characterized by a long recovery period, high re-rupture rate and late return to work. To overcome these difficulties and augment tendon repair, many agents have been used. Aims: To determine the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures in rabbits. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study included 14 New Zealand albino rabbits that were divided randomly into 2 groups, A and B, each containing seven rabbits. On day zero, all 28 Achilles tendons were tenotomized and repaired. In group A, the tendons were injected with PRP post-surgery, whereas those in group B were left untreated. On day 28, the right tendons in both groups were examined histopathologically via both light and electron microscopy, and the left tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing. Results: The histological and biomechanical findings in both light and electron microscopy in group A were better than those in group B, but the difference was not significant. According to Tang’s scale, the mean value in Group A was 3.57, while it was 3.0 in Group B. The mean value of Group A for the length of collagen bands was 48.09 nm while the mean value of Group B was 46.58 nm (p=0.406). In biomechanical tests, although stiffness values were higher in group A, the difference between groups was not significant. In addition, maximum load values did not differ between groups A and B. Conclusion: PRP had no effect on the healing process 28 days post-Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:26966624

  4. Different distributions of operative diagnoses for Achilles tendon overuse injuries in Italian and Finnish athletes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background the origin of chronic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is currently unclear and epidemiological factors, such as ethnicity, may be associated. Methods intraoperative findings from the treatment of 865 Finnish and 156 Italian athletic patients with chronic Achilles tendon related pain were evaluated, retrospectively. The mean age was 34 years (range, 18 to 65 years) in the Finnish and 29 years (range, 17–63 years) in the Italian patients. In total, 786 patients were males and 226 females of which 84 and 87% Finnish, respectively. Data were collected, retrospectively from patient records. The differences in the frequencies of operative findings were assessed for statistical significance. Results retrocalcaneal bursitis, partial tear and chronic paratenonitis were the most prevalent findings in patients with chronic AT undergoing surgery. Tendinosis and chronic paratenonitis were significantly (p=0.011) more common in Finnish athletes. Italian patients exhibited significantly (p<0.001) more insertional calcific tendinopathy (heel spurs) and prominent posterosuperior calcaneal corners (Haglund’s heel). Conclusion ethnicity appears to be associated with specific characteristics of overuse-related Achilles tendon pathology. This is an issue that should be considered in the planning of genetic research on AT. PMID:27331038

  5. The Gift Box Open Achilles Tendon Repair Method: A Retrospective Clinical Series.

    PubMed

    Labib, Sameh A; Hoffler, C Edward; Shah, Jay N; Rolf, Robert H; Tingan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have shown that the gift box technique for open Achilles tendon repair is twice as strong as a Krackow repair. The technique incorporates a paramedian skin incision with a midline paratenon incision, and a modification of the Krackow stitch is used to reinforce the repair. The wound is closed in layers such that the paratenon repair is offset from paramedian skin incision, further protecting the repair. The present study retrospectively reviews the clinical results for a series of patients who underwent the gift box technique for treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures from March 2002 to April 2007. The patients completed the Foot Function Index and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale. The tendon width and calf circumference were measured bilaterally and compared using paired t tests with a 5% α level. A total of 44 subjects, mean age 37.5 ± 8.6 years, underwent surgery approximately 10.8 ± 6.5 days after injury. The response rate was 35 (79.54%) patients for the questionnaire and 20 (45.45%) for the examination. The mean follow-up period was 35.7 ± 20.1 months. The complications included one stitch abscess, persistent pain, and keloid formation. One (2.86%) respondent reported significant weakness. Five (14.29%) respondents indicated persistent peri-incisional numbness. The range of motion was full or adequate. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score was 93.2 ± 6.8) and the mean Foot Function Index score was 7.0 ± 10.5. The calf girth and tendon width differences were statistically significantly between the limbs. The patients reported no repeat ruptures, sural nerve injuries, dehiscence, or infections. We present the outcomes data from patients who had undergone this alternative technique for Achilles tendon repair. The technique is reproducible, with good patient satisfaction and return to activity. The results compared well with the historical

  6. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wei Yee; Gheorghiu, Daniel; Rao, Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR) in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. PMID:27298913

  7. Ultrasound diagnosis and percutaneous treatment of Achilles tendon tethering: a case series.

    PubMed

    He, Lulu; Genin, Jason; Delzell, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to report 3 cases of Kager's fat pad scarring and tethering to the deep surface of the Achilles tendon in patients with Achilles tendinosis symptomatology. The 3 patients were diagnosed sonographically by the use of a dynamic maneuver we described and named the "Kager's squeeze" technique. The key finding for diagnosis is the deformation and bowing of the deep fibers of the Achilles tendon during dynamic squeezing of Kager's fat pad. After diagnosis, the patients were treated with ultrasound-guided hydrodissection and scar release to restore normal motion between Kager's fat pad and the Achilles tendon. All 3 patients experienced significant clinical improvement shortly after treatment. Therefore, we suspect that Kager's fat pad scarring with Achilles tendon tethering may mimic or exacerbate Achilles tendinosis symptomatology and should be considered a possible diagnosis when conservative treatments for Achilles tendinosis fail. We demonstrate that Kager's fat pad scarring with Achilles tendon tethering can be diagnosed and treated with a simple in-office hydrodissection technique, leading to improved patient outcomes. PMID:27311649

  8. Depiction of Achilles Tendon Microstructure In-Vivo Using High-Resolution 3D Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Liu, Jing; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of depicting the internal structure of the Achilles tendon in vivo using high-resolution 3D ultrashort echo-time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T. Materials and Methods For our UTE imaging, a minimum-phase radiofrequency pulse and an anisotropic field-of-view 3D radial acquisition were used to minimize the echo time and scan time. A fat saturation pulse was applied every eight spoke acquisitions to reduce blurring and chemical shift artifacts from fat and to improve dynamic range of the tendon signal. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were scanned with an isotropic spatial resolution of up to 0.6 mm. Fat-suppressed UTE images were qualitatively evaluated and compared to non-fat-suppressed UTE images and longer echo-time images. Results High-resolution UTE imaging was able to visualize the microstructure of the Achilles tendon. Fat suppression substantially improved the depiction of the internal structure. The UTE images revealed a fascicular pattern in the Achilles tendon and fibrocartilage at the tendon insertion. In a patient who had tendon elongation surgery after birth there was clear depiction of disrupted tendon structure. Conclusions High-resolution fat-suppressed 3D UTE imaging at 7T allows for evaluation of the Achilles tendon microstructure in vivo. PMID:24500089

  9. Patellofemoral Joint and Achilles Tendon Loads During Overground and Treadmill Running.

    PubMed

    Willy, Richard W; Halsey, Lisa; Hayek, Andrew; Johnson, Holly; Willson, John D

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Level 4, controlled laboratory study. Background Little is known regarding how the potential differences between treadmill and overground running may affect patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon loading characteristics. Objectives To compare measures of loading of the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon across treadmill and overground running in healthy, uninjured runners. Methods Eighteen healthy runners ran at their self-selected speed on an instrumented treadmill and overground, while 3-D running mechanics were sampled. A musculoskeletal model derived peak load, rate of loading, and estimated cumulative load per 1 km of continuous running for the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon for each condition. Data were analyzed via paired t tests and Pearson correlations to detect differences and assess relationships, respectively, between the 2 running mediums. Results No differences (P>.05) were found between treadmill and overground running for peak load, rate of loading, or estimated cumulative patellofemoral joint stress per 1 km of continuous running. However, treadmill running resulted in 12.5% greater peak Achilles tendon force (P<.001), 15.6% greater loading rate of Achilles tendon force (P<.001), and 14.2% greater estimated cumulative Achilles tendon force per 1 km of continuous running (P<.001) compared with overground running. There were strong (r>0.70) and moderate agreements (r>0.50) for most patellofemoral joint and Achilles measures, respectively, between treadmill and overground running. Conclusion No differences were observed in loading characteristics to the patellofemoral joint between running mediums; however, treadmill running resulted in greater Achilles tendon loading compared with overground running. Future investigations should examine whether sudden bouts of treadmill running may increase the risk of mechanical overload of the Achilles tendon in runners who habitually train overground. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016

  10. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model. PMID:26076317

  11. Concurrent deficits of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J.; Harvey, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Calf muscles and Achilles tendon play important roles in functional activities. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the uniarticular soleus (SOL) and biarticular gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon, including the fascicle length, pennation angle, and stiffness, change concurrently post stroke. Biomechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscles were evaluated bilaterally in 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors using combined ultrasonography-biomechanical measurements. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon including the length, cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and Young's modulus were evaluated, together with calf muscle biomechanical properties. Gastrocnemius and SOL contributions were separated using flexed and extended knee positions. The impaired side showed decreased fascicle length (GM: 6%, P = 0.002 and SOL: 9%, P = 0.03, at full knee extension and 0° ankle dorsiflexion) and increased fascicular stiffness (GM: 64%, P = 0.005 and SOL: 19%, P = 0.012, at a common 50 N force level). In contrast, Achilles tendon on the impaired side showed changes in the opposite direction as the muscle fascicles with increased tendon length (5%, P < 0.001), decreased tendon CSA (5%, P = 0.04), decreased tendon stiffness (42%, P < 0.001) and Young's modulus (30%, P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side. The fascicle and tendon stiffness changes were correlated negatively to the corresponding fascicle and tendon length changes, and decrease in Achilles tendon stiffness was correlated to the increases of SOL and GM fascicular stiffness (P < 0.05). Characterizations of calf muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon biomechanical properties help us better understand concurrent changes of fascicles and tendon as part of the calf muscle-tendon unit and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:25663670

  12. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluation of tenocyte seeded allografts on rat Achilles tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Güngörmüş, Cansın; Kolankaya, Dürdane; Aydin, Erkin

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries in humans as well as in animals' veterinary medicine are problematic because tendon has poor regenerative capacity and complete regeneration of the ruptured tendon is never achieved. In the last decade there has been an increasing need of treatment methods with different approaches. The aim of the current study was to improve the regeneration process of rat Achilles tendon with tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrices. For this purpose, Achilles tendons were harvested, decellularized and seeded as a mixture of three consecutive passages of tenocytes at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Specifically, cells with different passage numbers were compared with respect to growth characteristics, cellular senescence and collagen/tenocyte marker production before seeding process. The viability of reseeded tendon constructs was followed postoperatively up to 6 months in rat Achilles tendon by histopathological and biomechanical analysis. Our results suggests that tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrix can significantly improve the histological and biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissue without causing adverse immune reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first long-term study in the literature which was accomplished to prove the use of decellularized matrix in a clinically relevant model of rat Achilles tendon and the method suggested herein might have important implications for translation into the clinic. PMID:25771002

  13. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. PMID:25919320

  14. Using a Posterior Compartment Fasciotomy and Paratenon Closure in Acute Achilles Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Saper, David; Lybrand, Kyle; Creevy, William; Li, Xinning

    2016-07-01

    Soft tissue management, dissection, and handling are of paramount importance during Achilles tendon repair. Although surgical repairs of Achilles tendons have predictably excellent outcomes, complications including wound infection and stiffness are not uncommon. The authors' surgical technique for Achilles tendon repair includes tagging the posterior paratenon for later layered repair and incising the posterior fascia, exposing the flexor hallucis longus muscle belly. This posterior compartment fasciotomy allows for both hematoma evacuation away from the tenuous posterior skin and mobilization of the posterior paratendon for complete closure over the repaired Achilles tendon. With this modified technique, the authors report a 1% infection rate and a 1% failure rate. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e790-e793.]. PMID:27158828

  15. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine. PMID:18447938

  16. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  17. Middle-aged adults exhibit altered spatial variations in Achilles tendon wave speed

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; DeWall, Ryan; Martin, Jack; Lee, Kenneth; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in measured wave speed in the relaxed and stretched Achilles tendons of young and middle-aged adults. Wave speed was measured from the distal Achilles tendon, soleus aponeurosis, medial gastrocnemius aponeurosis and medial gastrocnemius muscle in healthy young (n = 15, aged 25 ± 4 years) and middle-aged (n = 10, aged 49 ± 4 years) adults in resting, dorsiflexed and plantarflexed postures. In both age groups, Achilles tendon wave speed decreased proximally, with the lowest wave speed measured in the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. Measured wave speed increased with passive dorsiflexion, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of tendons. There were no significant aging effects on wave speed in the free tendon or soleus aponeurosis. However, a significant, inverse relationship between gastrocnemius aponeurosis wave speed and age was observed in the dorsiflexed posture. We also observed significantly lower wave speeds in the gastrocnemius muscles of middle-aged adults when compared with young adults. These results suggest that Achilles tendon compliance increases in a distal-to-proximal pattern, with middle-aged adults exhibiting greater compliance in the distal gastrocnemius muscle and tendinous structures. An age-related change in the spatial variation in Achilles tendon compliance could affect localised tissue deformation patterns and injury potential within the triceps surae muscle-tendon units. PMID:26020294

  18. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Greenhalgh; Jonathan, Sinclair

    2014-01-01

    Recreational running is an activity with multiple reported health benefits for both sexes, however, chronic injuries caused by excessive and/or repetitive loading of the Achilles tendon are common. Males have been identified as being at an increased risk of suffering an injury to the Achilles tendon and as such, knowledge of differences in loading between the sexes may provide further information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74 ± 5.52 years, body height 1.80 ± 0.11 m and body mass 74.22 ± 7.27 kg) and fifteen female (age 25.13 ± 6.39 years, body height 1.68 ± 0.12 m and body mass 67.12 ± 9.11 kg) recreational runners volunteered to take part in the current investigation. Participants completed 10 trials running at 4.0 m·s−1 ±5% striking a force platform (1000 Hz) with their right foot. Ankle joint kinematics were synchronously recorded (250 Hz) using an optoelectric motion capture system. Ankle joint kinetics were computed using Newton-Euler inverse-dynamics. Net external ankle joint moments were then calculated. To estimate Achilles tendon kinetics the plantarflexion moment calculated was divided by an estimated Achilles tendon moment arm of 0.05 m. Differences in Achilles tendon kinetics were examined using independent sample t-tests (p<0.05). The results indicate that males were associated with significantly (p<0.05) greater Achilles tendon loads than females. The findings from this study support the notion that male recreational runners may be at greater risk of Achilles tendon pathology. PMID:25713676

  19. Effect of Calendula officinalis cream on achilles tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Aro, A A; Perez, M O; Vieira, C P; Esquisatto, M A M; Rodrigues, R A F; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the scientific community has undertaken research on plant extracts, searching for compounds with pharmacological activities that can be used in diverse fields of medicine. Calendula officinalis L. is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and wound healing properties when used to treat skin burns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of C. officinalis on the initial phase of Achilles tendon healing. Wistar rats were separated in three groups: Calendula (Cal)-rats with a transected tendon were treated with topical applications of C. officinalis cream and then euthanized 7 days after injury; Control (C)-rats were treated with only vehicle after transection; and Normal (N)-rats without tenotomy. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline (an indicator of total collagen) and non-collagenous proteins were observed in the Cal group in relation to the C group. Zymography showed no difference in the amount of the isoforms of metalloproteinase-2 and of metalloproteinase-9, between C and Cal groups. Polarization microscopy images analysis showed that the Cal group presented a slightly higher birefringence compared with the C group. In sections of tendons stained with toluidine blue, the transected groups presented higher metachromasy as compared with the N group. Immunocytochemistry analysis for chondroitin-6-sulfate showed no difference between the C and Cal groups. In conclusion, the topical application of C. officinalis after tendon transection increases the concentrations of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the collagen organization in the initial phase of healing. PMID:25266273

  20. Biomechanical and structural response of healing Achilles tendon to fatigue loading following acute injury

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Voleti, Pramod B.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Achilles tendon injuries affect both athletes and the general population, and their incidence is rising. In particular, the Achilles tendon is subject to dynamic loading at or near failure loads during activity, and fatigue induced damage is likely a contributing factor to ultimate tendon failure. Unfortunately, little is known about how injured Achilles tendons respond mechanically and structurally to fatigue loading during healing. Knowledge of these properties remains critical to best evaluate tendon damage induction and the ability of the tendon to maintain mechanical properties with repeated loading. Thus, this study investigated the mechanical and structural changes in healing mouse Achilles tendons during fatigue loading. Twenty four mice received bilateral full thickness, partial width excisional injuries to their Achilles tendons (IACUC approved) and twelve tendons from six mice were used as controls. Tendons were fatigue loaded to assess mechanical and structural properties simultaneously after 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks of healing using an integrated polarized light system. Results showed that the number of cycles to failure decreased dramatically (37-fold, p<0.005) due to injury, but increased throughout healing, ultimately recovering after 6 weeks. The tangent stiffness, hysteresis, and dynamic modulus did not improve with healing (p<0.005). Linear regression analysis was used to determine relationships between mechanical and structural properties. Of tendon structural properties, the apparent birefringence was able to best predict dynamic modulus (R2=0.88–0.92) throughout healing and fatigue life. This study reinforces the concept that fatigue loading is a sensitive metric to assess tendon healing and demonstrates potential structural metrics to predict mechanical properties. PMID:24280564

  1. Accelerated rehabilitation following Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture - Development of an evidence-based treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Brumann, Mareen; Baumbach, Sebastian F; Mutschler, Wolf; Polzer, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is a protracted injury. Surgery is only the beginning of a long rehabilitation period. Therefore, the rehabilitation protocol is an integral aspect to restore the pre-injury activity level. Despite several trials available comparing different treatment regimes, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal protocol. Consequently, the aim of our study was to systematically search the evidence available and define a precise rehabilitation programme after operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture based on the trials with the highest level of evidence. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. We identified twelve randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimes after operative repair of the Achilles tendon. Five trials compared full to non weight bearing, all applying immobilization in equinus. Immediate full weight bearing led to significant higher patient satisfaction, earlier ambulation and return to pre-injury activity. Four trials compared early ankle mobilization to immobilization. All trials found mobilization to be superior as it shortens time to return to work and sports significantly. Three trials compared the combination of full weight bearing and early ankle mobilization to immobilization. This combination was most beneficial. Patients showed significantly higher satisfaction, less use of rehabilitation resources, earlier return to pre-injury activities and further demonstrated significantly increased calf muscle strength, reduced atrophy and tendon elongation. No study found an increased rerupture rate for the more progressive treatment. In conclusion, the rehabilitation protocol after Achilles tendon repair should allow immediate full weight bearing. After the second postoperative week controlled ankle mobilization by free plantar flexion and limited dorsiflexion at 0° should be applied. PMID:25059505

  2. Dynamic creep and pre-conditioning of the Achilles tendon in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, David; Lum, Corey; Gaydos, Diane; Dunning, Russell

    2009-12-11

    Warm-up exercises are often advocated prior to strenuous exercise, but the warm-up duration and effect on muscle-tendon behavior are not well defined. The gastrocnemius-Achilles tendon complexes of 18 subjects were studied to quantify the dynamic creep response of the Achilles tendon in-vivo and the warm-up dose required for the Achilles tendon to achieve steady-state behavior. A custom testing chamber was used to determine each subject's maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during an isometric ankle plantar flexion effort. The subject's right knee and ankle were immobilized for one hour. Subjects then performed over seven minutes of cyclic isometric ankle plantar flexion efforts equal to 25-35% of their MVC at a frequency of 0.75 Hz. Ankle plantar flexion effort and images from dual ultrasound probes located over the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon and the calcaneus-Achilles tendon junction were acquired for eight seconds at the start of each sequential minute of the activity. Ultrasound images were analyzed to quantify the average relative Achilles tendon strain at 25% MVC force (epsilon(25%MVC)) for each minute. The epsilon(25%MVC) increased from 0.3% at the start of activity to 3.3% after seven minutes, giving a total dynamic creep of ~3.0%. The epsilon(25%MVC) increased by more than 0.56% per minute for the first five minutes and increased by less than 0.13% per minute thereafter. Therefore, following a period of inactivity, a low intensity warm-up lasting at least six minutes or producing 270 loading cycles is required for an Achilles tendon to reach a relatively steady-state behavior. PMID:19762028

  3. Sodium hyaluronate regulating angiogenesis during Achilles tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Halici, Mehmet; Karaoglu, Sinan; Canoz, Ozlem; Kabak, Sevki; Baktir, Ali

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SH (sodium hyaluronate-NaHA) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and type IV collagen expression during the Achilles-tendon healing process. Adult New Zealand white rabbits (n=32) aged 4 months and weighing 2.7-3.9 kg were used. The rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, and each group was divided into two subgroups and monitored for 6 and 12 weeks. Tendo calcanei were incised transversely and repaired. An injection of 0.5 ml NaHA (15 mg/ml) was administered between the tendon and paratenon of the right leg and repeated twice at one-week intervals. Equal numbers of animals were sacrificed at the 6th and 12th weeks, and the repaired tissue was examined macroscopically and histologically for the presence of VEGF and type IV collagen expression every week. The decrease in the amount of adhesion tissue and the acceleration of tendon healing in the NaHA group were significantly high when compared with control groups at 6 and 12 weeks (p<0.001, p<0.05). In the NaHA group, due to vascular proliferation VEGF immunostaining was strongly positive in the 6th week (p<0.05), and remained positive in the 12th week (p<0.05). Similar immunostaining findings were detected for type IV collagen in the 6th week. However, there was a significant decline in immunostaining rate in the 12th week (p<0.05). The increases in VEGF and type IV collagen expression following SH administration might be an indication that SH may partly be involved in regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:15609066

  4. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from .61 to .94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from .22 to .84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  5. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Yang, Y.; Bonesi, M.; Maffulli, G.; Phelan, C.; Meglinski, I.; El Haj, A.; Maffulli, N.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  6. Deleterious effects of local corticosteroid injections on the Achilles tendon of rats.

    PubMed

    Tatari, H; Kosay, C; Baran, O; Ozcan, O; Ozer, E

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pathological changes in the Achilles tendon and its paratenon after intratendinous corticosteroid injections and to reveal the effects of this drug on healthy tendon. We also sought for the effects of these injections compared with compression with a clamp on the Achilles tendons of the rats. Fifty-two Achilles tendons in 26 male Wistar rats were included in the study. Betamethasone injections were applied to the left tendons at different intervals, while the right tendons served for compression with mosquito clamps for varied periods. At the end of 30 days, all of the tendons were excised and examined histopathologically according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Histopathologic evaluation demonstrated some degree of degeneration in both groups. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference among the two groups, but in macroscopic evaluation, the tendons in the betamethasone group demonstrated enlargement and strong adhesion to the subcutaneous tissue. We conclude that intratendinous betamethasone injections are as harmful as compression with a clamp and can be used as a degeneration-producing model in further studies. Enlargement of the tendon mass and strong adhesion to the subcutaneous tissue can be due to injection of the betamethasone partly outside the tendon. PMID:11482466

  7. Ankle morbidity after autogenous Achilles tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jai Gon; Yoo, Jae Chul; Moon, Young Wan; Chang, Moon Jong; Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Mu Hyun

    2009-06-01

    Although several alternative autografts with reduced morbidity of harvest site have been introduced, no donor site is free of morbidity concerns. The authors report on ankle status after autogenous Achilles tendon harvesting with a minimum 10-year follow-up. From October 1994 to October 1996, a consecutive series of 47 ankles underwent harvesting of the medial third or half of the ipsilateral autogenous Achilles tendon for primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Donor site statuses were evaluated using a modified Thermann's scale. Postoperative isokinetic muscle strength testing was performed, and magnetic resonance images of donor sites were available for selected patients. Thirty-three ankles in the 32 patients were followed for more than 10 years. There were 27 men (84%) and 5 women (16%) with a mean age of 31 years (range 16-52 years) at the time of surgery. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years and 1 month (range 10 years and 5 months to 13 years and 4 months). Mean postoperative modified Thermann's scale score was 87 (range 45-95; SD 14.3). Twenty-five (76%) ankles achieved very good or good results. A slight decrease in calf circumference <1 cm was seen in the ten ankles, 1-2 cm in the four ankles. Nine ankles were mildly hypersensitive to meteorological changes. Peak torque of ankle plantar flexion was slightly lower on the index limb at both velocities in nine selected patients who carried out performance tests. However, there were no significant differences (5.2% at 30 degrees /s and 2.7% at 120 degrees /s, P = n.s. and P = n.s.). Of the 12 available follow-up magnetic resonance images, the average cross-sectional area of the remaining tendon was 82.01 mm(2) (range 69.05-107.35; SD 10.3), and their average thickness was 7.4 mm (range 6-10.35; SD 1.1). After a minimum 10-year follow-up, the harvesting of autogenous Achilles tendons was not found to significantly jeopardize ankle status. However, it also could not be independent of donor

  8. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  9. Achilles tendon repair with acellular tissue graft augmentation in neglected ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2007-01-01

    Neglected Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the quality and quantity of tendon tissue during repair combined with the magnitude of mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GRAFTJACKET, as an augmentation material in neglected Achilles tendon repair. Nine patients with neglected Achilles tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up for a minimum of 20 months. Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft and suturing circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early, functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20 to 30 months postoperative follow-up range, there has been no incidence of re-rupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 15.2 +/- 1.7 weeks. The results from this retrospective clinical series suggest that using an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment neglected Achilles tendon rupture primary repair offers desirable return-to-activity time points and viable surgical alternative over previously reported surgical options. PMID:17980842

  10. Ultrasound of the Achilles tendon after surgical repair: morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Rupp, S; Tempelhof, S; Fritsch, E

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasound is a well established method for the examination of the Achilles tendon. The objective of the study was to provide answers to the following questions: What ultrasonographic structural changes are long lasting after surgical repair? How important is ultrasound with regards to the functional evaluation of late results? 60 patients were examined at an average 11 years (2-19) after surgical repair of Achilles tendon rupture. In only four patients sonographic morphology of the tendon was according to the non-injured side. A variety of distinct basic alterations in ultrasound morphology was found: a hypoechogenic ribbon ventrally to the dorsal paratenon (n = 40), spots of hypoechogenic areas in the tendon (n = 18), dishomogeneous hyperechogenicity with preservation (n = 12) or dissolving (n = 22) of its fibrillar components along the longitudinal axis. In most of the cases the paratenon was thickened or could not be differentiated. In the dynamic ultrasound examination gliding mechanism of the achilles tendon was limited in 41 patients. Extensive functional subjective and objective parameters of all patients were evaluated in an Achilles tendon score. The results were rated as excellent (n = 18), good (n = 29), satisfactory (n = 12) and poor (n = 1). There was no statistical correlation between ultrasound morphology and clinical outcome. Therefore, it was concluded that ultrasound examination is able to reveal long-lasting alterations in echogenicity of the tendon but is only of limited value with regards to evaluation of the functional results after surgical repair. PMID:7788228

  11. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  12. Non-Uniform Displacements within the Achilles Tendon observed during Passive and Eccentric Loading

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate Achilles tendon tissue displacement patterns under passive and eccentric loading conditions. Nine healthy young adults were positioned prone on an examination table with their foot secured to a rotating footplate aligned with the ankle. Subjects cyclically rotated their ankle over a 25 deg range of motion at 0.5 Hz. An inertial load geared to the footplate induced eccentric plantarflexor contractions with dorsiflexion. Passive cyclic ankle motion was also performed over the same angular range of motion. An ultrasound transducer positioned over the distal Achilles tendon was used to collect radiofrequency (RF) images at 70 frames/sec. Two-dimensional ultrasound elastographic analysis of the RF data was used to track tendon tissue displacements throughout the cyclic motion. Non-uniform tissue displacement patterns were observed in all trials, with the deeper portions of the Achilles tendon consistently exhibiting larger displacements than the superficial tendon (average of 0.9–2.6 mm larger). Relative to the passive condition, eccentric loading consistently induced smaller tissue displacements in all tendon regions, except for the superficial tendon in a flexed knee posture. Significantly greater overall tissue displacement was observed in a more extended knee posture (30 deg) relative to a flexed knee posture (90 deg). These spatial- and posture-dependent displacement patterns suggest that the tendon undergoes nonuniform deformation under in vivo loading conditions. Such behavior could reflect relative sliding between the distinct tendon fascicles that arise from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. PMID:25150898

  13. [Treatment of an old Achilles tendon rupture with allografts. Report of case series].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Martínez-Arredondo, H

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of Achilles tendon occurs at 2-6 cm from its attachment in the calcaneus; its frequency is estimated at 7-18 cases per 100,000 population in the United States and it occurs more frequently in males. The diagnosis is made clinically and with ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging and treatment may be divided into acute or late. We present herein the use of allograft to treat patients with ruptures more than six weeks old; several techniques were used depending on the rupture site and the available allograft. Ten plasties were performed in ten patients with ruptures that occurred a mean of 8 months back; early rehabilitation was instituted and weight bearing was allowed at 4 weeks with a brace, which was removed at 12 weeks; patients could run at 12 weeks. Four wound dehiscence complications were reported, which resolved with second intention healing without the need for any other surgery, with good results and patient satisfaction. PMID:22512126

  14. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  15. Early changes in Achilles tendon behaviour in vivo following downhill backwards walking.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C W; Bradshaw, E J; Furness, T P; Kemp, J; Clark, R A

    2016-07-01

    Downhill backwards walking causes repeated, cyclical loading of the muscle-tendon unit. The effect this type of repeated loading has on the mechanical behaviour of the Achilles tendon is presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical response of the Achilles tendon aponeurosis complex following a downhill backwards walking protocol. Twenty active males (age: 22.3 ± 3.0 years; mass: 74.7 ± 5.6 kg; height: 1.8 ± 0.7 m) performed 60 min of downhill (8.5°), backwards walking on a treadmill at -0.67 m · s(-1). Data were collected before, immediately post, and 24-, 48- and 168-h post-downhill backwards walking. Achilles tendon aponeurosis elongation, strain and stiffness were measured using ultrasonography. Muscle force decreased immediately post-downhill backward walking (P = 0.019). There were increases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis stiffness at 24-h post-downhill backward walking (307 ± 179.6 N · mm(-1), P = 0.004), and decreases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis strain during maximum voluntary contraction at 24 (3.8 ± 1.7%, P = 0.008) and 48 h (3.9 ± 1.8%, P = 0.002) post. Repeated cyclical loading of downhill backwards walking affects the behaviour of the muscle-tendon unit, most likely by altering muscle compliance, and these changes result in tendon stiffness increases. PMID:26512914

  16. Ultrasound strain mapping of Achilles tendon compressive strain patterns during dorsiflexion.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Ruth L; Flemister, A Samuel; Ketz, John; Bucklin, Mary; Buckley, Mark R; Richards, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Heel lifts are commonly prescribed to patients with Achilles tendinopathy, yet little is known about the effect on tendon compressive strain. The purposes of the current study were to (1) develop a valid and reliable ultrasound elastography technique and algorithm to measure compressive strain of human Achilles tendon in vivo, (2) examine the effects of ankle dorsiflexion (lowering via controlled removal of a heel lift and partial squat) on compressive strain of the Achilles tendon insertion and (3) examine the relative compressive strain between the deep and superficial regions of the Achilles tendon insertion. All tasks started in a position equivalent to standing with a 30mm heel lift. An ultrasound transducer positioned over the Achilles tendon insertion was used to capture radiofrequency images. A non-rigid image registration-based algorithm was used to estimate compressive strain of the tendon, which was divided into 2 regions (superficial, deep). The bland-Altman test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to test validity and reliability. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare compressive strain between regions and across tasks. Compressive strain was accurately and reliably (ICC>0.75) quantified. There was greater compressive strain during the combined task of lowering and partial squat compared to the lowering (P=.001) and partial squat (P<.001) tasks separately. There was greater compressive strain in the deep region of the tendon compared to the superficial for all tasks (P=.001). While these findings need to be examined in a pathological population, heel lifts may reduce tendon compressive strain during daily activities. PMID:26655590

  17. Ultrasound Changes in Achilles Tendon and Gastrocnemius Medialis Muscle on Squat Eccentric Overload and Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Sanz-López, Fernando; Berzosa Sánchez, César; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Cruz-Diaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Sanz-López, F, Berzosa Sánchez, C, Hita-Contreras, F, Cruz-Diaz, D, and Martínez-Amat, A. Ultrasound changes in Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis muscle on squat eccentric overload and running performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2015-Previous studies have proven the adaptation to load in the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle after different types of exercise, such as running, heel drop training, and a variety of sports. These findings have been applied to improve performance and in the treatment and prevention of overuse injuries. However, the effects that squat performance may have on the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle are still unknown. Squats are a widely used training exercise that involves calf-muscle activation. Similarly, no reports have been published regarding the adaptation to load of trained and untrained subjects during several consecutive days of running. The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angles of the gastrocnemius medialis after eccentric overload training and within 3 days of running. Twenty healthy males who volunteered for this study were divided into 2 groups. Subjects in the eccentric overload training (ECC) group performed 6 weeks of eccentric overload training (twice weekly, 4 sets of 7 repetitions in a Yoyo squat device) before the running intervention. All participants, ECC and control (CONT) groups, ran on 3 consecutive days. After the eccentric training, an increase in the cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle was observed. As for the running intervention, the behavior of tissues in both groups was similar. These results suggest that eccentric overload training with squats promotes changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis muscle. Nevertheless, significant changes in the tissue do not appear between the running performance of trained and untrained subjects. PMID

  18. Does Achilles Tendon Cross Sectional Area Differ after Downhill, Level and Uphill Running in Trained Runners?

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Katy Andrews; Johnson, A. Wayne; Hunter, Iain; Myrer, J. William

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined how hill running affects the Achilles tendon, a common location for injuries in runners. Twenty females ran for 10 min on each of three randomly ordered grades (-6%, 0 and +6%) at speeds selected to match the metabolic rates. Achilles tendon (AT) cross-sectional area (CSA) was imaged using Doppler ultrasound and peak vertical forces were analyzed using an instrumented treadmill. A metabolic cart and gas analyzer ensured a similar metabolic cost across grades. Data were analyzed using a forward selection regression. Results showed similar decreases in AT CSA from pre- to post-run for all three conditions of ~5 to 7% (p = 0.0001). Active peak vertical forces were different across grades (p = 0.0001) with the largest occurring during downhill running and smallest during uphill running. Since changes in AT CSA were not different between grades, each form of running appears equal and acceptable in regards to how the Achilles tendon reacts. That is, the results suggest that the Achilles tendon is affected by downhill, level, and uphill running and a decrease in CSA appears to be a normal response. Key Points Downhill (- 6%), level and uphill (+ 6%) running at different speeds each caused a statistically significant decrease in the Achilles tendon cross-sectional area in healthy, trained runners. The magnitude of change in Achilles tendon cross-sectional area did not differ between grades when metabolic cost of running was matched. Downhill running resulted in the largest peak vertical force, while uphill running resulted in the smallest. PMID:25435775

  19. Longitudinal and transverse deformation of human Achilles tendon induced by isometric plantar flexion at different intensities.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Ikegawa, Shigeki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-06-01

    The present study determined in vivo deformation of the entire Achilles tendon in the longitudinal and transverse directions during isometric plantar flexions. Twelve young women and men performed isometric plantar flexions at 0% (rest), 30%, and 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) while a series of oblique longitudinal and cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images of the Achilles tendon were taken. At the distal end of the soleus muscle belly, the Achilles tendon was divided into the aponeurotic (ATapo) and the tendinous (ATten) components. The length of each component was measured in the MR images. The widths of the Achilles tendon were determined at 10 regions along ATapo and at four regions along ATten. Longitudinal and transverse strains were calculated as changes in relative length and width compared with those at rest. The ATapo deformed in both longitudinal and transverse directions at 30%MVC and 60%MVC. There was no difference between the strains of the ATapo at 30%MVC and 60%MVC either in the longitudinal (1.1 and 1.6%) or transverse (5.0∼11.4 and 5.0∼13.9%) direction. The ATten was elongated longitudinally (3.3%) to a greater amount than ATapo, while narrowing transversely in the most distal region (-4.6%). The current results show that the magnitude and the direction of contraction-induced deformation of Achilles tendon are different for the proximal and distal components. This may be related to the different functions of Achilles tendon, i.e., force transmission or elastic energy storage during muscle contractions. PMID:21415176

  20. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl; Bliddal, Henning; Torp-Pedersen, Soren; Langberg, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate the vascular response as indicated by colour Doppler (CD) activity in both the Achilles and patella tendon after loading during high-level badminton matches. The Achilles tendon was subdivided into a mid-tendon, pre-insertional, and insertional region and the anterior knee tendons into a quadriceps-, patella- and tuberositas region. Intra-tendinous flow was measured using both a semi-quantitative grading system (CD grading) and a quantitative scoring system (CF) on colour Doppler. Intra-tendinous flow in the Achilles and anterior knee tendons was examined in fourteen single players before tournament and after 1st and 2nd match, respectively on both the dominant and non-dominant side. All players had abnormal intra-tendinous flow (Colour Doppler ≥ grade 2) in at least one tendon in at least one scan during the tournament. At baseline, only two of the 14 players had normal flow in all the tendons examined. After 1st match, tendencies to higher intra-tendinous flow were observed in both the dominant patella tendon and non-dominant quadriceps tendon (P-values n.s.). After 2nd match, intra-tendinous flow was significant increased in the dominant patella tendon (P = 0.009). In all other locations, there was a trend towards a stepwise increase in intra-tendinous flow. The preliminary results indicate that high amount of intra-tendinous flow was found in elite badminton players at baseline and was increased after repetitive loading, especially in the patella tendon (dominant leg). The colour Doppler measurement can be used to determine changes in intra-tendinous flow after repetitive loading. PMID:20652535

  1. Somatomedin C immunoreactivity in the Achilles tendon varies in a dynamic manner with the mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Hansson, H A; Engström, A M; Holm, S; Rosenqvist, A L

    1988-10-01

    Distribution of the trophic peptide somatomedin C (Sm-C; insulin-like growth factor I; IGF-I) immunoreactivity was mapped in normal Achilles and tibialis anterior tendons. The spindle-shaped tendon fibroblasts showed faint perinuclear staining. Fibroblasts in the paratenon mostly had a more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity, i.e. faint to moderate. When analysing either tendon in detail, areas with more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity could be recognized and seemed to correlate with areas of high mechanical stress. Increased mechanical load induced over 3 days elevated IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of tendon fibroblasts. Peak intensity was reached in 7 days, and thereafter the IGF-I immunoreactivity seemed to decrease irrespective of persistent high mechanical load. Training the animals on a treadmill for from 20 up to 60 min per day for 5 days induced after 3-5 days increased IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of the tendon and paratenon fibroblasts. Sudden curtailment of loading the Achilles tendon resulted in a marked reduction of the IGF-I immunoreactivity in most fibroblasts within 3 days. After a week only a small number of tendon fibroblasts showed any IGF-I immunoreactivity. The IGF-I immunoreactivity of tendon fibroblasts thus correlates to mechanical loading of the tendon. It is proposed that IGF-I may have a trophic influence on tendon and paratenon cells by autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. PMID:3067520

  2. Outcome evaluation after Achilles tendon ruptures. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    SPENNACCHIO, PIETRO; VASCELLARI, ALBERTO; CUCCHI, DAVIDE; CANATA, GIAN LUIGI; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment and the best rehabilitation protocol after an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) remain a matter of controversy in orthopaedic and sports medicine. The use of validated injury-specific outcome instruments is the only way to clarify these issues, in order to ensure that patients receive the best possible treatment. This article describes the most commonly reported outcome measures used to assess patients treated for ATR. On the basis of the available evidence, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is the most appropriate outcome measure for evaluating the management of acute ATR. PMID:27386448

  3. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Achilles Tendon: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingwei; Ding, Weidong; Xu, Kui; Fan, Qingyu; Li, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the potential effects of irreversible electroporation ablation on the Achilles tendon in a rabbit model and to compare the histopathological and biomechanical changes between specimens following electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation. Methods A total of 140 six-month-old male New Zealand rabbits were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups, 70 in the radiofrequency ablation group and 70 in the electroporation group. In situ ablations were applied directly to the Achilles tendons of rabbits using typical electroporation (1800 V/cm, 90 pulses) and radiofrequency ablation (power control mode) protocols. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluations were performed to examine the effects of electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation over time. Results Both electroporation and radiofrequency ablation produced complete cell ablation in the target region. Thermal damage resulted in tendon rupture 3 days post radiofrequency ablation. In contrast, electroporation-ablated Achilles tendons preserved their biomechanical properties and showed no detectable rupture at this time point. The electroporation-ablated tendons exhibited signs of recovery, including tenoblast regeneration and angiogenesis within 2 weeks, and the restoration of their integral structure was evident within 12 weeks. Conclusions When applying electroporation to ablate solid tumors, major advantage could be that collateral damage to adjacent tendons or ligaments is minimized due to the unique ability of electroporation ablation to target the cell membrane. This advantage could have a significant impact on the field of tumor ablation near vital tendons or ligaments. PMID:26114962

  4. Influence of a lower leg brace on traction force in healthy and ruptured Achilles tendons

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Olof Helge; Dånmark, Ida; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background we investigated how ruptured Achilles tendons are loaded in a brace. There is an ongoing discussion whether patients should be recommended to bear weight on the injured limb. However, little is known about the effects of bracing on tensional loading of the healing Achilles tendon: it is uncertain if load-bearing actually stresses the Achilles tendon inside a brace. Methods we measured plantar flexion moment inside the brace, in order to estimate tensional loading of the tendon, by use of an insole with pressure transducers. Results after wearing the brace for 1 hour, young healthy individuals reduced their maximum flexion moment during gait by half. Patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed no measurable flexion moment during gait with the brace, 4 or 7 weeks after injury. Only when specifically instructed, they could produce a considerable plantar flexion moment. We noted that gait speed with the brace at 4 weeks correlated with a heel-raise functional test at 1 year: the higher the spontaneous gait speed, the less the functional difference between the injured and the uninjured leg (r2=0.68; p=0.002). Conclusion the correlation with gait speed suggests that the patients’ general physical aptness has an impact on the end result. PMID:26261783

  5. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue. PMID:23401563

  6. Gait characteristics following Achilles tendon elongation: the foot rocker perspective.

    PubMed

    Bober, Tadeusz; Dziuba, Alicja; Kobel-Buys, Krystyna; Kulig, Kornelia

    2008-01-01

    The action of three functional rockers, namely the heel, ankle and forefoot rocker, assist the progression of the leg over the supporting foot. The purpose of this case series was to analyze the occurrence of foot rockers during gait in three children with cerebral palsy (CP) who had undergone the tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL), procedure followed by a clinic- or home-based intervention and in one child with CP without history of surgery. Self-selected gait was video-recorded in a laboratory during six testing sessions at half-year intervals rendering a 3 year period of observation. One child had pre- and post-surgical gait data and the other two had post surgical data only. Sagittal plane knee angular velocity, as well as foot to ground positions, and foot rocker occurrence were analyzed. In a child with history of CP, and without history of surgery, mean angular velocities of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd foot rocker were 3.7, 0.57 and 6.67 rad/s, respectively, and the step length and cadence were normal. In children who underwent TAL the 1st and 2nd rocker was absent, as the initial contact of the foot with the ground was either with foot-flat or forefoot. The mean velocity of the 3rd rocker in children who underwent TAL was lower by approximately 50-80% than that of the nonsurgical case. Furthermore, the characteristic pattern of the knee joint to foot-floor position during gait was not observed in these cases. Foot rocker analysis identified children with abnormal gait characteristics. Following surgery these gait characteristics remained abnormal. PMID:18634352

  7. Microcirculation in healing and healthy Achilles tendon assessed with invasive laser doppler flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Arverud, Erica Domeij; Persson-Lindell, Olof; Sundquist, Fredrik; Labruto, Fausto; Edman, Gunnar; Ackermann, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Achilles tendon (AT) rupture exhibits a prolonged healing process with varying clinical outcome. Reduced blood flow to the AT has been considered an underlying factor to AT rupture (ATR) and impaired healing. In vivo measurements using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) may be a viable method to assess blood flow in healthy and healing AT. Methods 29 persons were included in the study; 9 being ATR patients and 20 healthy subjects without any prior symptoms from the AT. Invasive LDF was used to determine the post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) in the paratenon after 15 minutes of occlusion of the lower extremities. ATR patients were examined two weeks post-operatively. Results LDF-assessments demonstrated a significantly different (p < 0.001) PORH response in the healing- versus intact- and control AT. In the healing AT, a slow, flattened PORH was observed compared to a fast, high peak PORH in intact, healthy AT. Conclusion in vivo LDF appears to be a feasible method to assess alterations in blood flow in healing and intact AT. The healing ATs capability to react to an ischemic period is clearly impaired, which may be due to the trauma at injury and/or surgery or degenerative changes in the tendon. PMID:27331035

  8. A preliminary study on the effects of acellular tissue graft augmentation in acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2008-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GraftJacket Matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN), as an augmentation material in acute Achilles tendon repair. Eleven consecutive patients with acute tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up (20-31 months). Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft sutured circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20-month postoperative follow-up, there have been no cases of rerupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 11.8 +/- 0.75 weeks. These retrospective clinical results suggest that with an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment acute Achilles tendon, primary repair offers a desirable return-to-activity time without any rerupture or complications. ACFAS Level of Clinical Evidence: 2c. PMID:18156058

  9. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu, Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient’s quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22–34%), failure load (24–44%), and energy to failure (27–63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed. PMID:21266745

  10. Application of lariat lock catch knot suture in the achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocang; Feng, Xiaona; Yan, Ming; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize the clinical experience of repairing the Achilles tendon rupture by lariat lock catch knot suture. Between January 2011 and February, 2014, 32 cases of the Achilles tendon rupture were treated by lariat lock catch knot suture. There were 26 males and 6 females, with the average age of 39 years (range 17-53 years), including 13 left knees and 19 right knees. 29 wounds healed by first intention, and 3 cases who were performed local flap transfer due to necrosis of skin were healed by second intention. Thirty-two cases were followed up 10-25 months (13 months on average). No re-rupture of Achilles tendon or deep infection occurred during follow-up period. According to Arner-Lindholm assessment standard, the results were excellent in 19 cases and good in 13 cases, the excellent and good rate was 100%. Lariat lock catch knot suture is a safe and effective method for repairing Achilles tendon. PMID:26770612

  11. Development of cave foot deformity in failed repair of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Fortems, Y; Victor, J

    1993-01-01

    Two cases of failed primary repair of the Achilles tendon are reported. Cave foot deformity as an additional clinical sign of this condition is described. A possible biomechanical hypothesis is formulated, and a surgical procedure for correction of the symptoms is described. PMID:8323838

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of acellular collagen matrix augmented Achilles tendon repair in sheep.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Olsen, Raymond E; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana

    2010-01-01

    The rate of rerupture of repaired Achilles tendon in young and athletic populations remains high despite improvement in surgical techniques, suture design, and postsurgical management. Acellular biological matrices can be used to enhance the immediate strength of repaired tendons and to serve as scaffolds for cell in-growth and constructive tissue remodeling. A number of commercially available matrices have been used clinically, albeit with varying degrees of success and failure. The disparity is likely attributable to the different physical and biochemical properties of individual matrices. In this study, we investigated the biomechanical characteristics of 2 different acellular collagen matrices, namely TissueMend and GraftJacket, using a sheep Achilles tendon repair model. Static and cyclic creep, cyclic and linear construct stiffness, maximum load to failure, and displacement at maximum load were determined at time zero. We found that the maximum load to failure, displacement, and ultimate failure mode were similar between tendons augmented with either acellular collagen matrix; however, TissueMend augmentation yielded lower creep and smaller construct elongation than did GraftJacket. The results indicated that the strength of TissueMend-augmented tendons and GraftJacket-augmented tendons was not statistically significantly different, although tendons augmented with TissueMend displayed greater stiffness, which may be clinically advantageous in the restoration of ruptured tendons. PMID:20797586

  13. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. PMID:27108350

  14. Gait analysis before and after achilles tendon surgical suture in a single-subject study: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Buriani, Alessandro; Balasso, Alberto; Villaminar, Renato; Petrone, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a disabling injury that requires a long recovery time. We describe a unique case of a 46-year-old male who had undergone gait analysis as part of a personal physical examination and who, 16 months later, ruptured his left Achilles tendon while running. With gait kinematic and kinetic data available both before and after his injury, we determined the residual gait asymmetries on his uninjured side and compared the pre- and postinjury measurements. We analyzed his gait at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after his return to full weightbearing. Compared with the preinjury values, at 7 weeks he had almost complete range of motion in his left ankle (-2%) and a slight increase in gait velocity (+6%) and cadence (+3%). The peak power of his injured ankle was 90% of its preinjury value. In contrast, the unaffected ankle was at 118%. These observations suggest that measuring the asymmetries of the gait cycle, especially at the beginning of rehabilitation, can be used to improve treatment. We had the patient strengthen his ankle using a stationary bicycle before he returned to running. Kinetics also appears to be more powerful than kinematics in detecting functional asymmetries associated with reduced calf strength, even 15 weeks after surgery. Gait analysis could be used to predict the effectiveness of rehabilitation protocols and help calibrate and monitor the return to sports participation while preventing overloading muscle and tendon syndromes. PMID:25624039

  15. Long-Term Results of Mini-Open Repair Technique in the Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Taşatan, Ersin; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kırdemir, Vecihi

    2016-01-01

    patients' business or social life was detected in 18 patients who were assessed at 5 years after surgery; 2 patients could not be reached at 5 years. In conclusion, as a technique combining percutaneous and open surgical techniques, mini-open repair of Achilles tendon rupture allows a satisfactory end-to-end approximation of the tendon just in the open surgery and provides the wound healing advantages of percutaneous surgery. PMID:27289216

  16. The morphology and symptom history of the Achilles tendons of figure skaters: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Mark; Tillett, Eleanor; Mitchell, Sophie; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-04-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms and ultrasound (US) abnormalities in male and female ice skaters, and compared this to age-matched controls. The 20 skaters of mean (sd) age 17.3 (7.9) were recruited from British figure skating clubs. The 17 non-skaters of mean age 18.0 (3.7) were recruited from a secondary school and university. Each group had 12 females. All participants completed a questionnaire, and Achilles tendons were ultrasound-scanned for thickening, hypoechoic areas, paratenon blurring and neovascularization. Skaters experienced significantly more lifetime symptoms (p=0.012) than the control group but there were no differences in present symptoms. Mid-tendon longitudinal thickness and the coefficient of variation (CoV) for longitudinal tendon thickness were significantly greater in the skaters (p=0.001 and p=0.017 respectively). No other ultrasound abnormalities were detected in either group. Figure skaters may be at a greater risk of Achilles tendon problems than the general population and have adaptive changes in their tendons. PMID:23738283

  17. Gender and pregnancy affect neuropeptide responses of the rabbit Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Hart, D A; Kydd, A; Reno, C

    1999-08-01

    Tendons such as the Achilles tendon are complex structures that are hypocellular, hypovascular, and hyponeural. The development of pathophysiologic function in this tendon because of overuse is relatively common; however, the mechanisms responsible for the development of paratenonitis and tendinosis remain primarily undefined. To understand better a possible regulatory role for neuropeptides (substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide) known to be present in this tissue, the influence of substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide on messenger ribonucleic acid levels for numerous inflammatory molecules, growth factors, and proteinases and inhibitors have been assessed using a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method and explants of paratenon and Achilles tendon midsubstance tissue from adolescent male and female rabbits and tissue from primigravida females. Most of the significant (p < 0.01) changes observed were at the level of the growth factor transcripts and transcripts for proteinases and inhibitors. Twenty-one significant differences in the responsiveness between tissues from male and female rabbits were observed, and 12 significant differences in responsiveness between virgin females and primigravida rabbits were seen. Differences between paratenon and midsubstance responsiveness to the neuropeptides also were observed within each group of animals. The midsubstance tissue from pregnant animals was hyporesponsive to both neuropeptides. These results indicate that neurotransmitter responsiveness of Achilles tendon tissue differs in a gender specific manner and is influenced by pregnancy associated factors. PMID:10627708

  18. Surgical treatment of ruptures of the Achilles tendon: a review of long-term results.

    PubMed

    Krueger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Scherzer, S

    1995-06-01

    The rupture of the Achilles tendon is frequently sports-related. In the time from 1 January, 1978 until 31 December, 1988, we treated 358 men and 54 women with such an injury at the Staatliche Orthopaedische Klinik in Munich. The average age of these patients was 43 years. The site of the rupture was generally located between 3-5 cm proximal of the distal insertion of the tendon. In the follow-up examination of 122 patients with surgical treatment of tendo calcaneus ruptures 85% showed 'good' to 'very good' subjective results. Of the operated patients 97% would choose the same treatment under similar circumstances. The isokinetic studies demonstrated a loss of static and dynamic strength in plantar flexion of the ankle joint of 9.1%, and 16.7% respectively, when compared to the healthy contralateral side. The ultrasound examination revealed a thickening of the tendon and of the dorsal paratenon with changes in the internal structure of the injured Achilles tendon. In spite of these favourable results, the high complication rate of 15.1% shows the need for new and extensive studies regarding the various alternative treatment forms, such as functional, non-operative options, to finally resolve the debate about the optimal treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures. PMID:7551757

  19. The morphology and symptom history of the Achilles tendons of figure skaters: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark; Tillett, Eleanor; Mitchell, Sophie; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms and ultrasound (US) abnormalities in male and female ice skaters, and compared this to age-matched controls. The 20 skaters of mean (sd) age 17.3 (7.9) were recruited from British figure skating clubs. The 17 non-skaters of mean age 18.0 (3.7) were recruited from a secondary school and university. Each group had 12 females. All participants completed a questionnaire, and Achilles tendons were ultrasound-scanned for thickening, hypoechoic areas, paratenon blurring and neovascularization. Skaters experienced significantly more lifetime symptoms (p=0.012) than the control group but there were no differences in present symptoms. Mid-tendon longitudinal thickness and the coefficient of variation (CoV) for longitudinal tendon thickness were significantly greater in the skaters (p=0.001 and p=0.017 respectively). No other ultrasound abnormalities were detected in either group. Figure skaters may be at a greater risk of Achilles tendon problems than the general population and have adaptive changes in their tendons. PMID:23738283

  20. Extended field of view ultrasound imaging to evaluate Achilles tendon length and thickness: a reliability and validity study

    PubMed Central

    Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Shelley, Kristen; Powell, Stephen; Varrecchia, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Achilles tendon structural changes are common after injury and correlate with recovery of function. Having simple, inexpensive, yet valid and reliable measures of Achilles tendon structure are useful both in research and clinical. The purpose of this study was to perform reliability and validity measures of extended field of view (EFOV) ultrasound (US) imaging of the Achilles tendon. Methods eight cadavers (16 tendons) were used for the validation study to compare Achilles tendon length measurements from US images with actual measured length from dissected tendons. Nine healthy subjects (18 tendons) were included in the test-retest evaluation. Results the correlation between the US images and cadaveric measurements was excellent (ICC=0.895) for the length between calcaneus and the gastrocnemius and good (ICC=0.744) for the length between the calcaneus and the soleus. The between-limb reliability was excellent (ICC 0.886–0.940) for the tendon length measurements with standard error of measurements (SEM) of 0.64 cm for calcaneus to soleus and 0.67 cm for calcaneus to gastrocnemius. Between-day test-retest reliability was also excellent (ICC=0.898–0.944). Conclusion this study supports the use of EFOV US imaging as a reliable and valid method to determine Achilles tendon length and thickness, and using the uninjured limb for comparison. PMID:27331037

  1. Analysis of collagen organization in mouse achilles tendon using high-frequency ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Riggin, Corinne N; Sarver, Joseph J; Freedman, Benjamin R; Thomas, Stephen J; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-02-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are traumatic injuries, and techniques for assessing repair outcomes rely on patient-based measures of pain and function, which do not directly assess tendon healing. Consequently, there is a need for a quantitative, in vivo measure of tendon properties. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to validate ultrasound imaging for evaluating collagen organization in tendons. In this study, we compared our novel, high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging and analysis method to a standard measure of collagen organization, crossed polarizer (CP) imaging. Eighteen mouse Achilles tendons were harvested and placed into a testing fixture where HFUS and CP imaging could be performed simultaneously in a controlled loading environment. Two experiments were conducted: (1) effect of loading on collagen alignment and (2) effect of an excisional injury on collagen alignment. As expected, it was found that both the HFUS and CP methods could reliably detect an increase in alignment with increasing load, as well as a decrease in alignment with injury. This HFUS method demonstrates that structural measures of collagen organization in tendon can be determined through ultrasound imaging. This experiment also provides a mechanistic evaluation of tissue structure that could potentially be used to develop a targeted approach to aid in rehabilitation or monitor return to activity after tendon injury. PMID:24356929

  2. Longitudinal Slit Procedure in Addition to Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for a Refractory Wound With Exposed Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Erika; Mishima, Yoshito; Matsuo, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This case report reviews features of negative pressure wound therapy, particularly for the exposed Achilles tendon, and describes an additional effective procedure. Methods: An 87-year-old man presented with a soft-tissue defect measuring 3×5 cm with the exposed Achilles tendon as a sequela of deep burn. The condition of his affected leg was ischemic because of arteriosclerosis. We used negative pressure wound therapy and made 2 longitudinal slits penetrating the tendon to induce blood flow from the ventral side to the dorsal surface. Results: By this combination therapy, the surface of the exposed Achilles tendon was completely epithelialized and the tendon was spared without disuse syndrome. Conclusions: The authors conclude that this combination therapy is useful for covering the widely exposed tendon in aged patients. PMID:25848445

  3. Unrecognized pediatric partial Achilles tendon injury followed by traumatic completion: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vasileff, William Kelton; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are a relatively common athletic injury but are exceedingly rare in the pediatric population. We describe the case of a 10-year-old ice hockey player who experienced an Achilles tendon injury from a laceration to the posterior leg from a skate blade that led to a partial tendon laceration. This tendon injury was initially unrecognized despite an emergency department evaluation. The patient continued to complain of weakness and paresthesia after the skin laceration had healed. A traumatic dorsiflexion injury while running several weeks later led to a traumatic complete tendon rupture. The clinical, operative, and physical therapy records were reviewed to complete the history, treatment, and rehabilitation progress. The initial laceration injury had occurred 6 weeks before presentation, and the traumatic dorsiflexion injury had occurred 2 days before referral to an acute orthopedics clinic. Open repair was performed several days after the traumatic completion of the laceration, and the patient was immobilized in a cast for 5 weeks. The patient had weaned off crutches by 10 weeks postoperatively and had returned to some activities and light skating at 5.5 months. A full return to running and ice hockey had been achieved by 8 months postoperatively. The optimal repair for this injury has not been well established in published studies. We have concluded that laceration injuries have the potential to mask tendon injuries and that prolonged symptoms after a laceration should suggest occult pathologic features. Open tendon repair is a viable treatment option in the pediatric patient with Achilles tendon ruptures. A return to activities within a reasonable period can be expected with robust physical therapy. PMID:24713492

  4. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  5. Acute tear of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon: a new diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Morrissey, Dylan; Sarvananthan, Kasthuri; Chan, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background The fascia cruris encloses the posterior structures of the calf and connects to the paratenon and the Achilles tendon. We describe the clinical presentation, ultrasound imaging characteristics and the time to the recovery of tears of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon. Methods Retrospective review of 11 tears of the fascia cruris in the different legs as separate events in 9 patients (6 male and 3 female, mean age 35.52 years, range 11–48) identified using diagnostic ultrasound, after presenting with Achillodynia. Results 11 participants presented at a mean of 4.5 weeks (range 0.5–12) after onset of symptoms. The left Achilles was more commonly injured than the right (7 : 4) and the lateral side more than the medial (6 : 4) with one case with medial and lateral presentation. Clinically, there was swelling and tenderness over the medial or lateral border in the mid to upper portion of the Achilles. 7 of the 11 (63.6%) had functional overpronation. Ultrasound appearances of a tear were identified as hypoechoic area extending from the medial or lateral border of the Achilles extending along the anatomical plane of the fascia cruris. Average return to activity was 5.2 weeks (range 1–22). Participants presenting later had longer recovery but all participants returned to full activity (r=0.4). Conclusions This is the first description of the clinical details and sonographic findings of a tear to the fascia cruris at its attachment to the Achilles tendon. This needs to be considered as a cause of Achillodynia in athletes as recognition will affect the management. PMID:25202137

  6. Management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy through a Cincinnati incision

    PubMed Central

    Carmont, Michael R; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background About 10% of patients not responding to 3–6 months of conservative management for insertional Achilles tendinopathy undergo surgery. Traditionally, surgery of the Achilles tendon is performed through longitudinal extensile incisions. Such surgery is prone to the complications of wound healing, wound breakdown and iatrogenic nerve injury. Methods We describe our current method of exposure of the Achilles tendon insertion and debridement of the peritendinous and tendon tissue with osteotomy of the calcaneum through a transverse skin incision at the level of the Achilles insertion. Results This method has been used since 2002 on over 40 patients for exposure of the Achilles tendon insertion and the distal Achilles tendon. Conclusion The Cincinnati incision allows adequate exposure, has minimal risk of symptomatic iatrogenic nerve injury, and has minimal problems related to the scar. PMID:17697370

  7. Insulin-dependent diabetes impairs the inflammatory response and delays angiogenesis following Achilles tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Chbinou, Nadia; Frenette, Jérôme

    2004-05-01

    Although impaired wound healing associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus has been well studied in skin tissue, the influence of this metabolic disorder on tendon healing and recovery has not been extensively investigated. Because tendons are known to have limited repair potential, we studied the tendon-healing process by using a diabetic rat tendonitis model. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes influences the inflammatory response, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis in injured Achilles tendons. Diabetes was induced by injecting streptozotocin at 45 mg/kg body wt. Non-diabetic rats as well as diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic animals were then injected with collagenase. The accumulation of inflammatory cells was quantified in transversal sections of Achilles tendon by using immunohistochemical staining at days 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 posttrauma. The number of proliferative cells and the extent of neovascularization was also quantified in the paratenon and the core of the tendon at days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 posttrauma. Relative to nondiabetic and insulin-treated diabetic animals, the numbers of accumulated neutrophils and ED1(+) and ED2(+) macrophages in diabetic rats decreased by 46, 43, and 52%, respectively, in the first 3 days after injury compared with levels in nondiabetic and insulin-treated diabetic animals. The density of newly formed blood vessels decreased by 35 and 29% in the paratenon and the core of tendon, respectively, at days 3 and 7 after injury. Lastly, the concentration of proliferative cells decreased by 34% in the paratenon at day 7 posttrauma in injured tendons from diabetic rats relative to nondiabetic rats. These results indicate that alterations in inflammatory, angiogenic, and proliferative processes occurred in the diabetic state that might eventually perturb tendon healing and remodeling. PMID:14715491

  8. Operative Treatment of Haglund Syndrome With Central Achilles Tendon-Splitting Approach.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Chi-Young; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yoon-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Haglund syndrome is characterized by chronic posterior heel pain associated with a posterosuperior calcaneal prominence. We assessed the clinical and radiologic outcomes after operative treatment of Haglund syndrome using the central tendon-splitting approach. Fifteen feet in 15 patients were investigated retrospectively after surgery. Of the 15 patients, 14 were males (93.3%) and 1 was female (6.7%). Their mean age was 33.1 ± 8.2 (range 20 to 50) years. The mean follow-up duration was 3.5 ± 1.5 years (range 24 to 90 months). The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot Scale and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles scores were investigated to assess the clinical outcomes. Patient satisfaction was assessed at the latest follow-up visit. The lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Fowler-Philip angle, and parallel pitch line were measured to assess the foot shape and radiographic outcomes. Clinically, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score increased from 62.1 ± 7.5 preoperatively to 92.5 ± 3.5 at the latest follow-up visit. The mean Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles score increased from 53.2 ± 7.4 to 89.6 ± 3.4. All patients were satisfied with the operative results. Radiographically, all patients had cavus feet with an increased lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (mean +5.9° ± 5.0°) and calcaneal pitch angle (mean 26.0° ± 3.8°). The mean Fowler-Philip angle decreased from 58.9° ± 15.0° to 32.5° ± 7.2° postoperatively, and the positive parallel pitch line had changed to a negative value in all cases. Operative treatment with the central tendon-splitting approach appears to be safe and satisfactory for intractable Haglund syndrome. PMID:26232175

  9. Increase in sensory neuropeptides surrounding the Achilles tendon in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Heidgren, Marie-Louise; Kreicbergs, Andris; Ackermann, Paul W

    2005-03-01

    The Achilles tendon in rats with adjuvant arthritis was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for the occurrence of two sensory neuropeptides, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and a sensory modulating peptide, galanin (GAL). The tissue concentration of SP and CGRP in the Achilles tendon and its envelope, i.e. the paratenon and bony insertion, as assessed by RIA was increased by 22% and 71%, respectively, compared to normal controls, whereas the level of GAL was unchanged. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry applied to different regions of the tendon in arthritic rats disclosed an increased occurrence of SP and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the paratenon and bone tendinous junction, whereas GAL fibers were only increased at the bone tendinous junction. Notably, neither neuropeptides nor inflammatory cells were seen in the tendon proper. The increased occurrence of SP and CGRP in the tendon envelope presumably reflects inflammatory actions, whereas that of GAL implies an endogenous anti-inflammatory response. The observed SP and CGRP upregulation in the paratenon and bony insertion suggests a pathophysiological role in paratenonitis and enthesitis often seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Presumably Achillodynia originates in the tendon envelope rather than the tendon proper. The observations could be used to define new pharmacological targets for mitigating symptoms from tendons in rheumatoid arthritis and possibly also in other disorders. Whether a neuronal pathogenic mechanism underlies tendon overuse disorders in non-arthritic tendinopathies and the development of degeneration, i.e. tendinosis, remains to be studied. PMID:15734239

  10. Sustained Release of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution Facilitates Achilles Tendon Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Philip, Justin; Kamel, Rami A.; Canseco, Jose A.; Hackl, Florian; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Kim, Mi J.; Wilkie, Ryan; Caterson, Edward J.; Junker, Johan P. E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the United States, around 50% of all musculoskeletal injuries are soft tissue injuries including ligaments and tendons. The objective of this study is to assess the role of amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution (ACCS) in carboxy-methyl cellulose (CMC) gel in the healing of Achilles tendon in a rat model, and to examine its effects on mechanical properties and collagen content. Methods: Achilles tendons of Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed and transected. The distal and proximal ends were injected with either saline or ACCS in CMC, in a standardized fashion, and then sutured using a Kessler technique. Tendons from both groups were collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively and assessed for material properties. Collagen studies were performed, including collagen content, collagen cross-linking, tendon hydration, and immunohistochemistry. Tendons were also evaluated histologically for cross-sectional area. Results: Mechanical testing demonstrated that treatment with ACCS in CMC significantly enhances breaking strength, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and Young's modulus in the tendon repair at early time points. In context, collagen content, as well as collagen cross-linking, was also significantly affected by the treatment. Conclusion: The application of ACCS in CMC has a positive effect on healing tendons by improving mechanical properties at early time points. Previous studies on onetime application of ACCS (not in CMC) did not show significant improvement on tendon healing at any time point. Therefore, the delivery in a slow release media like CMC seems to be essential for the effects of ACCS demonstrated in this study. PMID:25210571

  11. Characterization and comparison of post-natal rat Achilles tendon-derived stem cells at different development stages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jialin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zeyu; Zhu, Ting; Shen, Weiliang; Ran, Jisheng; Tang, Qiaomei; Gong, Xiaonan; Backman, Ludvig J.; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiaowen; Wen, Feiqiu; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) are a potential cell source for tendon tissue engineering. The striking morphological and structural changes of tendon tissue during development indicate the complexity of TSPCs at different stages. This study aims to characterize and compare post-natal rat Achilles tendon tissue and TSPCs at different stages of development. The tendon tissue showed distinct differences during development: the tissue structure became denser and more regular, the nuclei became spindle-shaped and the cell number decreased with time. TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue showed the highest self-renewal ability, cell proliferation, and differentiation potential towards mesenchymal lineage, compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue. Microarray data showed up-regulation of several groups of genes in TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue, which may account for the unique cell characteristics during this specific stage of development. Our results indicate that TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue is a superior cell source as compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue, demonstrating the importance of choosing a suitable stem cell source for effective tendon tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:26972579

  12. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing conventional to minimally invasive approaches for repair of an Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Samuel E; Smith, Toby O; Hing, Caroline B

    2011-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are a common injury afflicting predominantly the young male occasional sportsman. Previous studies have shown that outcome is better with surgical repair for the young active patient. There is no consensus as to whether there is a difference in outcome between open and percutaneous minimally invasive surgery (MIS). A meta-analysis was undertaken to compare the clinical outcomes of MIS with conventional open surgical repair. Six randomised controlled trials of 277 Achilles tendon repairs were eligible for review. This included 136 minimally invasive repairs and 141 conventional open repairs. On analysis, there was no significant difference between the two surgical approaches in respect to the incidence of re-rupture, tissue adhesion, sural nerve injury, deep infection and deep vein thrombosis (p>0.05). However, MIS had a significantly reduced risk of superficial wound infection, with three times greater patient satisfaction for good to excellent results compared with conventional open surgical approaches. PMID:22017889

  13. Regional differences in stem cell/progenitor cell populations from the mouse achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Birk, David E

    2013-01-01

    Specific niches may affect how cells from different regions contribute to tendon biology, particularly in regard to the healing of certain tendinopathies. The objectives of this study are to determine whether distinct subpopulations of stem/progenitor cells are found within the tendon proper and the epi- and paratenon, the peritenon, as well as to characterize these stem/progenitor cell populations. In this study, we hypothesized that tendon stem/progenitor cells exist in each region, that these populations possess distinct features, and that these populations while multipotent could have differing potentials. To test this hypothesis, stem/progenitor cells were isolated and characterized from the peritenon and tendon proper of mouse Achilles tendons. Colony-forming unit and multipotency assays, as well as flow cytometry, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of stem cell markers were performed. Significantly, more stem/progenitor cell colonies were observed from cells derived from the tendon proper relative to the peritenon. Analysis of surface markers for stem/progenitor cells from both regions indicated that they were Sca1(+) (stem cell marker), Cd90(+) and Cd44(+) (fibroblast markers), Cd18(-) (leukocyte marker), Cd34(-) (hematopoietic and vascular marker), and Cd133(-) (perivascular marker). Tendon proper stem/progenitor cells had increased expression levels for tenomodulin (Tnmd) and scleraxis (Scx), indicative of enrichment of stem/progenitor cells of a tendon origin. In contrast, cells of the peritenon demonstrated relative increases in the vascular (endomucin) and pericyte (Cd133) markers relative to cells from the tendon proper. Stem/progenitor cells from both regions were multipotent (adipogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic, and tenogenic). These findings demonstrated that different progenitor populations exist within discrete niches of the Achilles tendon-tendon proper versus peritenon. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that

  14. Effects of tendon viscoelasticity in Achilles tendinosis on explosive performance and clinical severity in athletes.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-K; Lin, K-H; Su, S-C; Shih, T T-F; Huang, Y-C

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to compare viscoelastic properties of Achilles tendons between legs in elite athletes with unilateral tendinosis, and to investigate relationships between the properties and explosive performance and clinical severity. Seventeen male athletes (mean ± standard deviation age, 27.3 ± 2.0 years) who had unilateral, chronic middle-portion tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon were assessed by the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment questionnaire, measurements of tendon viscoelastic properties, voluntary electromechanical delay (EMD), normalized rate of force development (RFD), and one-leg hopping distance. Compared with the non-injured leg, the tendinopathic leg showed reduced tendon stiffness (-19.2%. P < 0.001), greater mechanical hysteresis (+21.2%, P = 0.004), lower elastic energy storage and release (-14.2%, P = 0.002 and -19.1%, P < 0.001), lower normalized RFD at one-fourth (-16.3%, P = 0.02), 2/4 (-17.3%, P = 0.006), and three-fourths maximal voluntary contraction (-13.7%, P = 0.02), longer soleus and medial gastrocnemius voluntary EMD (+26.9%, P = 0.009 and +24.0%, P = 0.004), and shorter hopping distances (-34.1%, P < 0.001). Tendon stiffness was correlated with normalized RFD, voluntary EMD in the medial gastrocnemius, and hopping distances (r ranged from -0.35 to 0.64, P < 0.05). Hysteresis was correlated to the soleus voluntary EMD and hopping distances (r = 0.42 and -0.39, P < 0.05). We concluded that altered tendon viscoelastic properties in Achilles tendinosis affect explosive performance in athletes. PMID:22830527

  15. [Microcirculation of the Achilles tendon and significance of the paratenon. A study with the plastination method].

    PubMed

    Graf, J; Schneider, U; Niethard, F U

    1990-05-01

    Rupture of a healthy Achilles tendon is disputed. A previous degenerative process with ischemia after recurrent microtraumas is usually held to be responsible. The vascular anatomy of eight human specimens was defined with a new method after perfusion through the femoral artery. This method allows exact analysis of the vessels even at a microscopic level. In contrast with the literature, the authors found a large number of anastomoses between the extra- and the intratendinous vessel system. The well-vascularized paratenon is therefore very important for the nutrition of the Achilles tendon. This fact must be taken into account during the surgical treatment of a rupture. The authors agree with the studies of the anatomist Lang who found a decrease of the intratendinous vascularization in an area 3 to 5 cm above the insertion in the os calcis. However a relationship between the frequency of rupture in this area and the vascular anatomy has not yet been shown. PMID:2198202

  16. Limited open repair of ruptured Achilles tendons with Bunnel-type sutures.

    PubMed

    Park, H G; Moon, D H; Yoon, J M

    2001-12-01

    A new method of repairing Achilles tendons, which uses a small medial skin incision with a Bunnel-type suture, was performed on 14 patients, and the clinical results were found satisfying. In order to restore the Achilles tendon to its original length, restore tensile strength in the suture site, and minimize injury to the sural nerve, an operative procedure has been devised which uses a limited open repair with a Bunnel-type suture. We followed 14 patients who had undergone the new procedure for a mean interval of 26 months after the injury. They returned to work in six weeks and to playing sports in 25 weeks. There were no cases of late rerupture nor injuries to the sural nerve. This technique approximated the preinjury length and resting tension of the musculo-tendinous apparatus and minimized sural nerve injury. PMID:11783926

  17. Z-lengthening of the Achilles Tendon with Transverse Skin Incision

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jong Seok; Lee, Jong Seo; Lee, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of various complications after Achilles tendon lengthening is mainly related to the length of surgical exposure and the lengthening method. A comprehensive technique to minimize the complications is required. Methods The treatment of Achilles tendon tightness in 57 patients (95 ankles) were performed by using a short transverse incision on a skin crease of the heel and by Z-lengthening of the tendon. In the severe cases, two or three transverse incisions were required for greater lengthening of the tendon, and a serial cast or Ilizarov apparatus was applied for the gradual correction. The results of these 95 ankles were compared to those of 18 ankles, which underwent percutaneous sliding lengthening, and to the 19 ankles, which received Z-lengthening with a medial longitudinal incision. Results The functional and cosmetic satisfaction was achieved among those who underwent the tendon lengthening with the new technique. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 56.1 to 81.8. The second operations to correct recurrence were performed in the two cerebral palsy patients. Conclusions The new technique has a low rate of complications such as scarring, adhesion, total transection, excessive lengthening, and recurrence of shortening. The excellent cosmesis and the short operation time are the additional advantages. PMID:24900904

  18. Titanium anchors for the repair of distal Achilles tendon ruptures: preliminary report of a new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, P; Bertone, C; Bonci, E; Donelli, L; Pagliantini, L

    1998-01-01

    From January 1995 to July 1996, the authors used Mitek GIV titanium anchors to treat seven patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon (four men, three women; average age 52.42 years; range, 33-62 years). All subjects had a total rupture of the most distal aspect of the tendon; none had an avulsion fracture. After dissection down to the paratenon, the reinsertion site was selected and a 2 to 3-cm-long trough carved through the cortex. Three holes were drilled at a distance of 0.5 cm one from the other and 1 cm parallel and distal to the trough. The anchors were then threaded, inserted into the holes, and engaged. Surgery was completed by resection of the frayed ends, reparation of the tendon, and insertion of the terminal end into the trough. At 6 months postoperative, a modified Mandelbaum and Pavanini clinical assessment indicated five excellent and two good outcomes. There were no cases of deep of superficial wound infection or skin necrosis. Despite the small number of patients and the short follow-up period, the authors believe this technique shows promise and that in selected cases the use of titanium anchors can facilitate the task of the surgeon and enable patients to return to normal and sports activities within 5 months after surgery. PMID:9571455

  19. Clinical assessment is sufficient to allow outcome evaluation following surgical management of Achilles tendon ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Atanas; Schaub, Frederic; Blanke, Fabian; Heisterbach, Patricia; Sachser, Franciska; Gösele, Andreas; Majewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Study design cross-sectional study in otherwise healthy athletic adults with a unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. Objectives define the relationships of active range of motion, calf circumference or number of heel raises to a full set of isokinetic parameters. Background Achilles tendon ruptures commonly occur during sports and create a considerable amount of morbidity. The benefits of different treatments are difficult to determine. Complex and expensive isokinetic testing is often required. If a simple force measurement could replace this testing, large clinical trials would be more easily feasible. Methods 74 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture and surgical treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Active range of motion (ROM), ratio of ROM, number of heel raises, ratio of heel raises, calf circumference and isokintetic measurements were recorded. Regression using a Bayesian elastic net showed the most important correlations. Results Active range of motion showed a significant correlation to peak torque angle at flexion and extension as well as increased sports activity. There was a negative correlation to percutaneous therapy. Active Heel raise showed a positive correlation to peak torque at dorsal extension and increased sports activity as well as a negative correlation to high postoperative pain, where as calf circumference was positive correlated to peak torque at dorsal extension and body height as well as negative correlated to female gender. Conclusion device independent measures, like range of Motion, and amount of Heel raise, are an excellent tool providing similar information compared to isokinetic testing and could be used to evaluate clinical outcome after Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:26261784

  20. Epidemiology and outcomes of Achilles tendon ruptures in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Selene G; Wray, Walter H; Brimmo, Olubusola; Sennett, Brian J; Wapner, Keith L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the epidemiology of Achilles tendon ruptures in the National Football League (NFL) and to quantify the impact of these injuries on player performance. A retrospective review of several online NFL player registries identified 31 Achilles tendon ruptures in NFL players between 1997 and 2002. Nineteen percent of injuries occurred during preseason play, while another 18% occurred during the first month of the official season. There was a postinjury reduction of 88%, 83%, and 78% in power ratings for wide receivers, running backs, and tight ends, respectively, over a 3-year period. There was a 95%, 87%, and 64% postinjury reduction in power ratings for linebackers, cornerbacks, and defensive tackles over a 3-year period. On average, players experienced a greater than 50% reduction in their power ratings following such an injury. Thirty-two percent (n = 10) of NFL players who sustained an Achilles tendon rupture did not return to play in the NFL. PMID:20400426

  1. Changes in collagen fibril pattern and adhesion force with collagenase-induced injury in rat Achilles tendon observed via AFM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seungdon; Cho, Ilsung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon consists mainly of type I collagen fibers that contain collagen fibrils. When the Achilles tendon is injured, it is inflamed. The collagenase-induced model has been widely used to study tendinitis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopy for bio-imaging include its non-requirement of a special coating and vacuum, and its capability to perform imaging in all environments. AFM force-distance measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry and materials science. Therefore, the changes in the ultrastructure and adhesion force of the collagen fibrils on the Achilles tendons of rats with Achilles tendinitis were observed using AFM. The changes in the structure of the Achilles tendons were evaluated based on the diameter and D-banding of the collagen fibrils. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis was induced with the injection of 30 microl crude collagenase into 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were each sacrificed on the first, second, third, fifth and seventh day after the collagenase injection. The normal and injured Achilles tendons were fixed in 4% buffered formalin and dehydrated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. AFM was performed using the non-contact mode at the resolution of 512 x 512 pixels, with a scan speed of 0.8 line/sec. The adhesion force was measured via the force-distance curve that resulted from the interactions between the AFM tip and the collagen fibril sample using the contact mode. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the Achilles tendons significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after the collagenase injection, and the pattern of the D-banding of the collagen fibrils was similar to that of the diameter changes. The adhesion force decreased until the fifth day after the collagenase injection, but increased on the seventh day after the collagenase injection (p < 0.0001). PMID:21446543

  2. Three-dimensional morphology and strain of the human Achilles free tendon immediately following eccentric heel drop exercise.

    PubMed

    Obst, Steven J; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the immediate effects of exercise on Achilles free tendon transverse morphology is limited to single site measurements acquired at rest using 2D ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed 3D description of changes in Achilles free tendon morphology immediately following a single clinical bout of exercise. Freehand 3D ultrasound was used to measure Achilles free tendon length, and regional cross-sectional area (CSA), medio-lateral (ML) diameter and antero-posterior (AP) diameter in healthy young adults (N=14) at rest and during isometric muscle contraction, immediately before and after 3×15 eccentric heel drops. Post-exercise reductions in transverse strain were limited to CSA and AP diameter in the mid-proximal region of the Achilles free tendon during muscle contraction. The change in CSA strain during muscle contraction was significantly correlated to the change in longitudinal strain (r=-0.72) and the change in AP diameter strain (r=0.64). Overall findings suggest the Achilles free tendon experiences a complex change in 3D morphology following eccentric heel drop exercise that manifests under contractile but not rest conditions, is most pronounced in the mid-proximal tendon and is primarily driven by changes in AP diameter strain and not ML diameter strain. PMID:26519510

  3. Multiparametric MR Imaging Depicts Glycosaminoglycan Change in the Achilles Tendon during Ciprofloxacin Administration in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Juras, Vladimir; Winhofer, Yvonne; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Vosshenrich, Jan; Hager, Benedikt; Wolf, Peter; Weber, Michael; Luger, Anton; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques (sodium MR imaging, glycosaminoglycan [GAG] chemical exchange saturation transfer [CEST], and T2* mapping) could be used as potential markers for biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon induced by ciprofloxacin intake. Materials and Methods The ethics committee of the Medical University of Vienna approved the protocol (number 1225/2012), and all patients gave written informed consent. Fourteen ankles from seven men (mean age, 32 years ± 12 [standard deviation]) were included in the study. All patients underwent 7-T MR imaging examinations of the Achilles tendon at baseline and 10 days and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake. Sodium signal and T2* maps were acquired with the variable echo-time sequence and the GAG CEST values were acquired with a three-dimensional radiofrequency spoiled gradient-recalled-echo sequence. Results The mean sodium signal was significantly decreased by 25% in the whole tendon (from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 130 arbitrary units [au] ± 8 to 98 au ± 5, respectively; P = .023) and returned to baseline after 5 months (116 au ± 10), as observed also at the tendon insertion (baseline, 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake, 134 au ± 8, 105 au ± 5, and 119 au ± 9, respectively; P = .034). The mean GAG CEST value in the whole tendon was parallel to the sodium signal with a decrease from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 4.74% ± 0.75 to 4.50% ± 0.23, respectively (P = .028) and an increase at 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake to 4.88% ± 1.02. Conclusion In conclusion, this study demonstrates a ciprofloxacin-induced reversible reduction of the normalized sodium MR imaging signal and the GAG CEST effect in the Achilles tendon of healthy volunteers. Changes in sodium MR imaging and GAG CEST in men may reflect a decrease of GAG content in the Achilles tendon after ciprofloxacin intake

  4. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed Central

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  5. Surgical repair of the ruptured Achilles tendon. Analysis of 40 patients treated by the same surgeon.

    PubMed

    Quigley, T B; Scheller, A D

    1980-01-01

    Forty patients with acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon were treated surgically by the same physician (T.B.Q.) during a period of 1947 to 1971. The average followup was 19 years. Ninety percent of the patients were men (average age 37.5 years) who were engaged in recreational sport activities. The majority denied a physical conditioning program. The acute ruptures were treated by a surgical procedure which consisted of a 15-cm incision on the medial aspect of the tendon with either the plantaris muscle being woven through the Achilles tendon in a clockwise fashion or a pull-out wire, supplemented with silk mattress sutures, being used to repair the ruptured tendon. The wound was closed and the patient's leg was immobilized. The wire was removed at 6 weeks. The rehabilitation plan consisted of ambulation with a heel lift and elastic stocking (the height of the lift was gradually reduced) and toe exercises. The patients began walking downstairs backwards at 3 months and continued exercises until full range of motion was attained. Subjectively, the results were excellent as graded by the patients. Objectively, there were some minor deficits but they did not impede the overall function. On a scale of 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent), the clinical results were rated excellent (42%), good (36%), fair (15%), and poor (6%). This review has supported our contention that a positive Thompson test is a reliable indicator for a rupture of the Achilles tendon and that surgical treatment of complete ruptures is a successful mode by the procedure described followed by our rehabilitation program. PMID:7396055

  6. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. PMID:26590729

  7. Physical activity modulates nerve plasticity and stimulates repair after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Kreicbergs, Andris; Renstrom, Per A F H; Ackermann, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    In a rat model of tendon rupture using semiquantitative methodology, healing was assessed according to the diameter of newly organized collagen and the occurrence of the sensory neuropeptides (SP, CGRP) in relation to different levels of physical activity. Normally, innervation of the Achilles tendon is confined to the paratenon. After rupture new nerve fibers grow into the tendon proper, but disappear after healing. In a first experiment to establish peak tissue and nerve regeneration after rupture, tendon tissues from freely moving rats were collected consecutively over 16 weeks. A peak increase in organized collagen and nerve ingrowth was observed between week 2 to 4 post rupture. Therefore, in a second experiment week 4 was chosen to assess the effect of physical activity on tendon healing in three groups of rats, that is, wheel running, plaster treated, and freely moving (controls). In the wheel-running group, the diameter of newly organized collagen was 94% ( p = 0.001) greater than that in the plaster-treated group and 48% ( p = 0.02) greater than that in the controls. Inversely, the neuronal occurrence of CGRP in the tendon proper was 57% ( p = 0.02) lower in the wheel-running group than that in the plaster-treated group and 53% ( p = 0.02) lower than that in the controls, suggesting an earlier neuronal in-growth and disappearance in the more active group. Physical activity speeds up tendon healing, which may prove to be linked to accelerated neuronal plasticity. PMID:17068813

  8. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances naked plasmid DNA transfection in rabbit Achilles tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qiu, L; Zhang, L; Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Luo, Y; Peng, Y; Lin, L

    2012-07-01

    The study was to investigate the probability of increasing the transfection of the gene in tendons by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. A mixture of microbubbles and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmids was injected into rabbit Achilles tendons by different administration routes and the tendons were ultrasound pulse by different ultrasonic conditions in order to determine the most appropriate conditions. Then, the rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) ultrasound + microbubbles + plasmid; (2) ultrasound+ plasmid; (3) microbubble + plasmid; (4) plasmid only. EGFP expression in the tendons and other tissues, and the damage to tendon and paratenon were all observed. The results showed that EGFP expression in the tendon was higher by ultrasound pulse with 2 W cm(-2) of output intensity and a 20% duty cycle for 10 min. Local injection was determined to be the better administration route. Among the four groups, EGFP expression in Group 1 was higher than that in other groups. EGFP expression was highest on seventh day, then it gradually decrease over time, and lasted more than 56 days. EGFP expression was not found in other tissues. There was no obvious injury caused by UTMD. Under suitable conditions, it is feasible to use UTMD as a safe and effective gene transfection therapy for tendon injuries. PMID:22033463

  9. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as ‘fasciacytes’. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm

  10. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-12-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as 'fasciacytes'. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm thick

  11. Overweight and obesity alters the cumulative transverse strain in the Achilles tendon immediately following exercise.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Scott C; Hooper, Sue L; Grigg, Nicole L; Nolan, Gregory; Smeathers, James E

    2013-07-01

    This research evaluated the effect of obesity on the acute cumulative transverse strain of the Achilles tendon in response to exercise. Twenty healthy adult males were categorized into 'low normal-weight' (BMI <23 kg m(-2)) and 'overweight' (BMI >27.5 kg m(-2)) groups based on intermediate cut-off points recommended by the World Health Organization. Longitudinal sonograms of the right Achilles tendon were acquired immediately prior and following weight-bearing ankle exercises. Achilles tendon thickness was measured 20-mm proximal to the calcaneal insertion and transverse tendon strain was calculated as the natural log of the ratio of post- to pre-exercise tendon thickness. The Achilles tendon was thicker in the overweight group both prior to (t18 = -2.91, P = 0.009) and following (t18 = -4.87, P < 0.001) exercise. The acute transverse strain response of the Achilles tendon in the overweight group (-10.7 ± 2.5%), however, was almost half that of the 'low normal-weight' (-19.5 ± 7.4%) group (t18 = -3.56, P = 0.004). These findings suggest that obesity is associated with structural changes in tendon that impairs intra-tendinous fluid movement in response to load and provides new insights into the link between tendon pathology and overweight and obesity. PMID:23768275

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the Achilles tendon insertion in man

    PubMed Central

    Milz, S; Rufai, A; Buettner, A; Putz, R; Ralphs, JR; Benjamin, M

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of type II collagen in sagittal sections of the Achilles tendon has been used to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) shape and position of three fibrocartilages (sesamoid, periosteal and enthesis) associated with its insertion. The results showed that there is a close correspondence between the shape and position of the sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilages – probably because of their functional interdependence. The former protects the tendon from compression during dorsiflexion of the foot, and the latter protects the superior tuberosity of the calcaneus. When the zone of calcified enthesis fibrocartilage and the subchondral bone are mapped in 3D, the reconstructions show that there is a complex pattern of interlocking between pieces of calcified fibrocartilage and bone at the insertion site. We suggest that this is of fundamental importance in anchoring the tendon to the bone, because the manner in which a tendon insertion develops makes it unlikely that many collagen fibres pass across the tissue boundary from tendon to bone. When force is transmitted to the bone from a loaded tendon, it is directed towards the plantar fascia by a series of highly orientated trabeculae that are clearly visible in 3D in thick resin sections. PMID:11895112

  13. Impact of drying and thiel embalming on mechanical properties of achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias André; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Lepeleere, Bram; Opsomer, Gert-Jan; Van Hoof, Tom; Victor, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical research and orthopedic training is regularly carried out on human cadavers. Given the post-mortem decay, these cadavers were usually frozen or embalmed. The embalming method according to Dr. Thiel was often praised for the preservation of natural texture. The main aim of this article was to quantitatively analyze the impact of this embalming technique on the biomechanical properties. To that extent, Achilles tendons (calcaneal tendons) of seven cadavers have been tested. For each cadaver, a first tendon was tested following a fresh-frozen conservation, the other following the Thiel embalming process. The results indicated a significant difference in Young's modulus between both groups (P values = 0.046). The secondary aim of this article was to analyze the impact of exposure to room conditions and associated dehydration on the biomechanical properties of cadaver tissue. Therefore, each tendon was tested before and after 2 hr of exposure to room conditions. The resulting dehydration caused a significant increase of the Young's modulus for the thawed fresh-frozen tendons. The properties of the Thiel embalmed tendons were not significantly altered. In conclusion, this research promoted the use of fresh-frozen specimens for biomechanical testing. Effort should, however, be made to minimize dehydration of the tested specimens. PMID:26378610

  14. Macrophage depletion reduces cell proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation but increases the ultimate tensile strength of injured Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    de la Durantaye, Mélissa; Piette, Antoine Boulanger; van Rooijen, Nico; Frenette, Jérôme

    2014-02-01

    Macrophages are present in large numbers and display specific and distinct phenotypes during the various phases of tissue repair. However, their role following tendon injury and during repair has never been investigated. We injected C57BL/6 mice daily for 4 days with liposome-encapsulated clodronate to deplete circulating monocytes/macrophages. Placebo mice were injected with PBS. The left Achilles tendons of the mice were transversely sectioned and sutured using the 8-strand technique. Macrophage accumulation and cell proliferation were significantly lower in the tendons of clodronate-treated mice than in those of PBS-treated mice on days 3 and 7 post-injury. TGF-β1 staining was significantly more intense in the tendons of PBS-treated mice on day 7 post-injury. Edema and the dry mass of the Achilles tendons were also higher in the PBS-treated mice on days 7 and 14 post-injury. No differences in absolute strength and stiffness were observed, but Young's modulus and maximal stress were significantly greater for tendons from the clodronate-treated mice than those from PBS-treated mice after 14 days of tendon repair. Overall, our findings showed that macrophages promote cell proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation but their presence leads to inferior ultimate tensile strength of the Achilles tendons. PMID:24307236

  15. Achilles tendon mechanical properties after both prolonged continuous running and prolonged intermittent shuttle running in cricket batting.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence; Dawson, Brian; Rubenson, Jonas

    2013-08-01

    Effects of prolonged running on Achilles tendon properties were assessed after a 60 min treadmill run and 140 min intermittent shuttle running (simulated cricket batting innings). Before and after exercise, 11 participants performed ramp-up plantar flexions to maximum-voluntary-contraction before gradual relaxation. Muscle-tendon-junction displacement was measured with ultrasonography. Tendon force was estimated using dynamometry and a musculoskeletal model. Gradients of the ramp-up force-displacement curves fitted between 0-40% and 50-90% of the preexercise maximal force determined stiffness in the low- and high-force-range, respectively. Hysteresis was determined using the ramp-up and relaxation force-displacement curves and elastic energy storage from the area under the ramp-up curve. In simulated batting, correlations between tendon properties and shuttle times were also assessed. After both protocols, Achilles tendon force decreased (4% to 5%, P < .050), but there were no changes in stiffness, hysteresis, or elastic energy. In simulated batting, Achilles tendon force and stiffness were both correlated to mean turn and mean sprint times (r = -0.719 to -0.830, P < .050). Neither protocol resulted in fatigue-related changes in tendon properties, but higher tendon stiffness and plantar flexion force were related to faster turn and sprint times, possibly by improving force transmission and control of movement when decelerating and accelerating. PMID:22923384

  16. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  17. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  18. Nintendo Wii related Achilles tendon rupture: first reported case and literature review of motion sensing video game injuries.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Manoharan, Gopikanthan; Moores, Thomas Steven; Patel, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures tend to occur more commonly in healthy men between the ages of 30 and 50 years who have had no previous injury or problem reported in the affected leg. The injury is usually due to sudden forced plantar flexion of the foot, unexpected dorsiflexion of the foot and violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot, all of which occur during high impact activities. We present the first reported case of interactive activity with Nintendo Wii games that have resulted in Achilles tendon rupture in a 46-year-old man. There have been no previous reports of Achilles tendon rupture with Nintendo Wii usage; it is a relatively uncommon mode of injury and is rare in terms of epidemiology of motion sensing video game injuries. PMID:24827648

  19. An opioid system in connective tissue: a study of achilles tendon in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, P W; Spetea, M; Nylander, I; Ploj, K; Ahmed, M; Kreicbergs, A

    2001-11-01

    The occurrence of endogenous opioids and their receptors in rat achilles tendon was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC), radioimmunoassay (RIA), and in vitro binding assays. The investigation focused on four enkephalins, dynorphin B, and nociceptin/orphanin FQ. Nerve fibers immunoreactive to all enkephalins (Met-enkephalin, Leu-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Lys, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe) were consistently found in the loose connective tissue and the paratenon, whereas dynorphin B and nociceptin/orphanin FQ could not be detected. The majority of enkephalin-positive nerve fibers exhibited varicosities predominantly seen in blood vessel walls. Measurable levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe and nociceptin/orphanin FQ were found in tendon tissue using RIA, whereas dynorphin B could not be detected. In addition to the endogenous opioids identified, delta-opioid receptors on nerve fibers were also detected by IHC. Binding assays to characterize the opioid binding sites showed that they were specific and saturable for [3H]-naloxone (Kd 7.01 +/- 0.98 nM; Bmax 23.52 +/- 2.23 fmol/mg protein). Our study demonstrates the occurrence of an opioid system in rat achilles tendon, which may be assumed to be present also in other connective tissues of the locomotor apparatus. This system may prove to be a useful target for pharmacological therapy in painful and inflammatory conditions by new drugs acting selectively in the periphery. PMID:11668192

  20. Surgical versus conservative treatment following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon: is there a pedobarographic difference?

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur; Çıraklı, Alper; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Duygulu, Fuat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Controversy remains regarding the optimal treatment method and postoperative rehabilitation of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. In this study, pedobarographic assessments of surgical and conservative treatments were compared. Material and methods A prospective assessment was made of 16 patients (eight surgical, eight conservative) and eight healthy controls using a plantar pressure measurement system. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the Footscan dynamic gait analysis system. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the evaluation of data. Results Nineteen males and five females were assessed, with an average age of 42.0±11.9 years. Follow-up was completed in 16 patients. No statistically significant difference was determined between the two treatment groups with regard to the gait analysis, but a difference was observed with the control group (P<0.001). All patients were able to resume their prior activities after 6 months and regained normal ranges of motion, with a high rate of satisfaction. Most of the patients (75%) were able to return to their pre-injury level of activities. Conclusion Satisfactory results were obtained through conservative treatment of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon. No significant differences or complications were observed in the group managed conservatively versus the group treated surgically. Further studies including 3D gait analyses and tendon biomechanical research are required to further investigate this issue. PMID:27621640

  1. Statins induce biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; de Almeida, Marcos dos Santos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2013-09-15

    Statins have been widely prescribed as lipid-lowering drugs and are associated with tendon rupture. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the possible biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon of rats after chronic treatment with statins. Dosages of statins were calculated using allometric scaling with reference to the 80mg/day and 20mg/day, doses recommended for humans. The rats were divided into the following groups: treated with simvastatin (S-20 and S-80), treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), and the control group that received no treatment (C). Measurements of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the plasma were performed. The levels of non-collagenous proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hydroxyproline were quantified. Western blotting for collagen I was performed, and the presence of metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 was investigated through zymography. The concentration of non-collagenous proteins in S-20 was less than the C group. There was a significant increase in pro-MMP-2 activity in A-80 group and in active MMP-2 in S-20 group compared to the C group. A significant increase in latent MMP-9 activity was observed in both the A-80 and S-20 groups when compared to C group. In the A-20 group, there was a lower amount of collagen I in relation to C group. In addition, a higher concentration of hydroxyproline was found in the S-20 group than the C group. The analysis of GAGs showed a significant increase in the A-20 group when compared to C group. The treatment induced remarkable alterations in the Achilles tendon and the response of the tissue seems to depend of the used statin dosage. The presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is evidence of the degradation and remodeling processes in the extracellular matrix of the tendons. Our results show that statins induce imbalance of extracellular matrix components and possibly induce microdamage in tendons. PMID:23831763

  2. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control. PMID:26454702

  3. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  4. Quantitative ultrasound method for assessing stress-strain properties and the cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Li, Chien-Ming; Lin, Chia-Hung; Yang, Chia-En; Wu, Jian-Xing; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly observed tendons injured with a variety of causes, such as trauma, overuse and degeneration, in the human body. Rupture and tendinosis are relatively common for this strong tendon. Stress-strain properties and shape change are important biomechanical properties of the tendon to assess surgical repair or healing progress. Currently, there are rather limited non-invasive methods available for precisely quantifying the in vivo biomechanical properties of the tendons. The aim of this study was to apply quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods, including ultrasonic attenuation and speed of sound (SOS), to investigate porcine tendons in different stress-strain conditions. In order to find a reliable method to evaluate the change of tendon shape, ultrasound measurement was also utilized for measuring tendon thickness and compared with the change in tendon cross-sectional area under different stress. A total of 15 porcine tendons of hind trotters were examined. The test results show that the attenuation and broadband ultrasound attenuation decreased and the SOS increased by a smaller magnitude as the uniaxial loading of the stress-strain upon tendons increased. Furthermore, the tendon thickness measured with the ultrasound method was significantly correlated with tendon cross-sectional area (Pearson coefficient = 0.86). These results also indicate that attenuation of QUS and ultrasonic thickness measurement are reliable and potential parameters for assessing biomechanical properties of tendons. Further investigations are needed to warrant the application of the proposed method in a clinical setting.

  5. Fibronectin in the ruptured human Achilles tendon and its paratenon. An immunoperoxidase study.

    PubMed

    Lehto, M; Jozsa, L; Kvist, M; Järvinen, M; Balint, B J; Reffy, A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role and distribution of fibronectin--a major connective tissue protein--in normal and ruptured Achilles tendon and its paratenon using peroxidase antiperoxidase (PAP) method and conventional histology. Samples were taken intraoperatively 6 to 48 hours after rupture from 30 patients, and 4 male cadavers served as controls. In controls fibronectin could not be detected in the tendinous connective tissue or in the areolar tissue of the paratenon. In the ruptured tendons fibronectin was detected around the tenocytes and in the collagen fibres in the necrotic and mucinous degenerated areas, but also in the macroscopically healthy areas of the tendon. In the oedematous paratenon vascular walls were rich in fibronectin and fat cells were outlined by fibronectin. Areas of homogenous deposition of fibronectin were also frequently seen in the paratenon. A vast amount of fibronectin was observed also at the site of rupture. The present results indicate that there are striking changes in the composition of connective tissue in degenerated tendon and paratenon. These changes seem to have increased susceptibility of the tendon to rupture. PMID:2201247

  6. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  7. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  8. The effects of prolonged peritendinous administration of PGE1 to the rat Achilles tendon: a possible animal model of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sullo, A; Maffulli, N; Capasso, G; Testa, V

    2001-01-01

    We studied the effects of peritendinous Achilles tendon injections of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on the Achilles tendon of rats. Five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 24 each) were studied. Groups 1 to 4 received weekly peritendinous injections. In group 1, one side was injected with 800 ng of PGE1 in 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl and the contralateral side was injected with 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl. In group 2, one side was injected with 800 ng of PGE1. In group 3, one side was injected with 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl. In group 4, a syringe needle was inserted in the peritenon unilaterally, but no substances were administered. In groups 2, 3, and 4, the contralateral tendon was used as the control. In group 5, treatment was not administered. Eight rats in each group were killed at each time point, after 7, 21, and 35 days of treatment. On day 7, values for average water content and average wet weight of the tendons treated with PGE1 were significantly higher than those in the control tendons (analysis of variance [ANOVA]; P = 0.02), with a histological picture of acute inflammation. On day 21, approximately half of the PGE1-treated tendons showed fibrosis of the paratenon, with adhesions and intra-tendinous degeneration, with the other half still showing a picture of acute inflammation. On day 35, all of the PGE1-treated tendons showed fibrosis of the paratenon, with adhesions and intra-tendinous degeneration. At all time points, there was no evidence of pathology in the tendons that had not received PGE1. Sham peritendinous injections and injections of normal saline did not produce inflammation in the Achilles tendons. Initially, local administration of PGE1 produced acute inflammation of the tendon and its surrounding tissues. Prolonged PGE1 administration produced peri- and intra-tendinous degeneration, providing a cheap, reproducible model of Achilles tendinopathy, which would allow studies of the effects of conservative and surgical management of the condition. PMID:11479765

  9. Viscoelastic Properties of Healthy Achilles Tendon are Independent of Isometric Plantar Flexion Strength and Cross-Sectional Area

    PubMed Central

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Soulas, Elizabeth M.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in tendon viscoelastic properties are observed after injuries and during healing as a product of altered composition and structure. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography is a new technique measuring viscoelastic properties of soft tissues using external shear waves. Tendon has not been studied with this technique, therefore, the aims of this study were to establish the range of shear and viscosity moduli in healthy Achilles tendons, determine bilateral differences of these parameters and explore correlations of viscoelasticity to plantar flexion strength and tendon area. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography was performed over the free portion of both Achilles tendons from 29 subjects. Isometric plantar flexion strength and cross sectional area were measured. The average shear and viscous moduli was 83.2kPa and 141.0Pa-s, respectively. No correlations existed between the shear or viscous modulus and area or strength. This indicates that viscoelastic properties can be considered novel, independent biomarkers. The shear and viscosity moduli were bilaterally equivalent (p=0.013,0.017) which allows determining pathologies through side-to-side deviations. The average bilateral coefficient of variation was 7.2% and 9.4% for shear and viscosity modulus, respectively. The viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon may provide an unbiased, non-subjective rating system of tendon recovery and optimizing treatment strategies. PMID:25882209

  10. Medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lee; Barrett, Rod; Lichtwark, Glen

    2012-10-11

    Individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) typically experience muscle weakness. The mechanisms responsible for muscle weakness in spastic CP are complex and may be influenced by the intrinsic mechanical properties of the muscle and tendon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic CP. Nine relatively high functioning young adults with spastic CP (GMFCS I, 17±2 years) and 10 typically developing individuals (18±2 years) participated in the study. Active MG torque-length and Achilles tendon properties were assessed under controlled conditions on a dynamometer. EMG was recorded from leg muscles and ultrasound was used to measure MG fascicle length and Achilles tendon length during maximal isometric contractions at five ankle angles throughout the available range of motion and during passive rotations imposed by the dynamometer. Compared to the typically developing group, the spastic CP group had 33% lower active ankle plantarflexion torque across the available range of ankle joint motion, partially explained by 37% smaller MG muscle and 4% greater antagonistic co-contraction. The Achilles tendon slack length was also 10% longer in the spastic CP group. This study confirms young adults with mild spastic CP have altered muscle-tendon mechanical properties. The adaptation of a longer Achilles tendon may facilitate a greater storage and recovery of elastic energy and partially compensate for decreased force and work production by the small muscles of the triceps surae during activities such as locomotion. PMID:22867763

  11. [Application of a new design of cryo-jaw and its biomechanical evaluation in rat achilles tendon in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Peng, Yongjin; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Xu, Kang; Mohanad, Khalid Ahmed; Lu, Yonggang; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to design a new, accurate and easy-to-use water bath cryo-jaw, and try to solve the problems met in small animals achilles tendon mechanical testing. The muscle-tendon-bony units were fixed in the clamps. SD rats achilles tendon were randomly divided into group A and B. Group A was tested by the newly designed water bath cryo-jaw, while group B was treated by non-water bath cryo-jaw. The mechanical tests revealed that non of the samples of the newly-designed water bath cryo-jaw in group A slipped and fell off, and the achilles tendons were in a physiologically active state, but one of the group B samples slipped and fell off, and the others had the frozen phenomenon obviously. The maximum stress, fracture displacement and Young's modulus of the rats in group A were significantly different compared to those in group B (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the new water bath cryo-jaw has more advantages than traditional ones. It exhibits a good simulation in vivo in the environmental conditions for testing the mechanical properties of the achilles tendon. PMID:25219256

  12. Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Treated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Promotes Meniscus Regeneration in a Rat Model of Massive Meniscal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Okuno, Makiko; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to examine whether bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) induces ectopic cartilage formation in the rat tendon, and whether transplantation of tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscal regeneration. Additionally, we analyzed the relative contributions of host and donor cells on the healing process after tendon transplantation in a rat model. Methods BMP-7 was injected in situ into the Achilles tendon of rats, and the histologic findings and gene profile were evaluated. Achilles tendon injected with 1 μg of BMP-7 was transplanted into a meniscal defect in rats. The regenerated meniscus and articular cartilage were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Achilles tendon from LacZ-transgenic rats was transplanted into the meniscal defect in wild-type rats, and vice versa. Results Injection of BMP-7 into the rat Achilles tendon induced the fibrochondrocyte differentiation of tendon cells and changed the collagen gene profile of tendon tissue to more closely approximate meniscal tissue. Transplantation of the rat Achilles tendon into a meniscal defect increased meniscal size. The rats that received the tendon treated with BMP-7 had a meniscus matrix that exhibited increased Safranin O and type II collagen staining, and showed a delay in articular cartilage degradation. Using LacZ-transgenic rats, we determined that the regeneration of the meniscus resulted from contribution from both donor and host cells. Conclusion Our findings indicate that BMP-7 induces ectopic cartilage formation in rat tendons. Transplantation of Achilles tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscus regeneration and prevents cartilage degeneration in a rat model of massive meniscal defect. Native cells in the rat Achilles tendon contribute to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23897174

  13. Imaging and simulation of Achilles tendon dynamics: Implications for walking performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-06-14

    The Achilles tendon (AT) is a complex structure, consisting of distinct fascicle bundles arising from each triceps surae muscle that may act as mechanically independent structures. Advances in tissue imaging are rapidly accelerating our understanding of the complexities of functional Achilles tendon behavior, with potentially important implications for musculoskeletal injury and performance. In this overview of our recent contributions to these efforts, we present the results of complementary experimental and computational approaches to investigate AT behavior during walking and its potential relevance to reduced triceps surae mechanical performance due to aging. Our experimental evidence reveals that older tendons exhibit smaller differences in tissue deformations than young adults between regions of the AT presumed to arise from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These observations are consistent with a reduced capacity for inter-fascicle sliding within the AT, which could have implications for the mechanical independence of the triceps surae muscles. More uniform AT deformations are also correlated with hallmark biomechanical features of elderly gait - namely, a loss of net ankle moment, power, and positive work during push-off. Simulating age-related reductions in the capacity for inter-fascicle sliding in the AT during walking predicts detriments in gastrocnemius muscle-tendon mechanical performance coupled with underlying shifts in fascicle kinematics during push-off. AT compliance, also suspected to vary due to age, systematically modulates those effects. By integrating in vivo imaging with computational modeling, we have gained theoretical insight into multi-scale biomechanical changes due to aging, hypotheses regarding their functional effects, and opportunities for experiments that validate or invalidate these assertions. PMID:27209552

  14. Glycine improves biochemical and biomechanical properties following inflammation of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; De Oliveira, Letícia Prado; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; Dos Santos De Almeida, Marcos; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra Gomes; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2015-03-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon is a clinical problem that motivates the scientific community to search for treatments that assist in restoring its functional properties. Glycine has broad biological effects, acting as a modulator of the inflammatory cascade, and is the predominant amino acid in collagen. A 5% glycine diet provided beneficial effects against toxicity and inflammation since glycine may restructure the collagen molecules faster due to its broad anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose was analyze the effects of a 5% glycine diet in rats as a treatment for the inflammatory process. The experimental groups were as follows: C (control group), G1 and G3 (inflammatory group), and G2 and G4 (glycine+inflammatory group). G1 and G2 were euthanized 8 days following injury, and G3 and G4 were euthanized 22 days following injury. The concentrations of hydroxyproline, non-collagenous proteins, and glycosaminoglycans, as well as the activity of MMP-2 and -9 were analyzed. Biomechanical and morphological tests were employed. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans were found in G4 and an increased activity of MMP-2 was found in G2. Higher birefringence was noted in group G2. The biomechanical results indicated that the tendon was more resistant to loading to rupture upon treatment with a glycine diet in group G4. Glycine induced the synthesis of important components of the tendon. A rapid remodeling was noted when compared with the inflamed-only groups. These data suggest that glycine may be a beneficial supplement for individuals with inflammation of the Achilles tendon. PMID:25156668

  15. Effect of low-level laser therapy on healing of tenotomized Achilles tendon in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nouruzian, Mohsen; Alidoust, Morteza; Bayat, Mohammad; Bayat, Mehernoush; Akbari, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with musculoskeletal damage. Investigations have indicated that healing of the surgically tenotomized Achilles tendon was considerably augmented following low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in non-diabetic, healthy animals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of LLLT on the Achilles tendon healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats via a biomechanical evaluating method. Thirty-three rats were divided into non-diabetic (n = 18) and diabetic (n = 15) groups. DM was induced in the rats by injections of STZ. The right Achilles tendons of all rats were tenotomized 1 month after STZ injections. The two experimental groups (n = 6 for each group) of non-diabetic rats were irradiated with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser at 2.9 and 11.5 J/cm(2) for ten consecutive days. The two experimental groups of diabetic rats (n = 5 for each group) were irradiated with a He-Ne laser at 2.9 and 4.3 J/cm(2) for ten consecutive days. The tendons were submitted to a tensiometric test. Significant improvements in the maximum stress (MS) values (Newton per square millimeter) were found following LLLT at 2.9 J/cm(2) in both the non-diabetic (p = 0.031) and diabetic (p = 0.019) experimental groups when compared with their control groups. LLLT at 2.9 J/cm(2) to the tenotomized Achilles tendons in the non-diabetic and diabetic rats significantly increased the strength and MS of repairing Achilles tendons in our study. PMID:22370620

  16. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case. PMID:26502456

  17. Posterior heel pain (retrocalcaneal bursitis, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy).

    PubMed

    Aronow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    The majority of patients with Achilles tendinopathy respond to nonoperative treatment. In patients with refractory symptoms, surgery can be considered. If paratenonitis is present, the paratenon is partially excised, and adhesions are released. Areas of symptomatic tendinosis are excised with repair of the residual defect in the Achilles tendon. An alternative for patients with tendinosis who are at increased risk for wound problems or who do not want a large open incision is percutaneous or endoscopic tenotomy. A symptomatic Haglund's deformity or inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa is excised. Augmentation of the Achilles tendon may be considered if debridement threatens the structural integrity of the tendon, in older patients, and in revision surgery. PMID:15555841

  18. Achilles tendon displacement patterns during passive stretch and eccentric loading are altered in middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate middle-age effects on Achilles displacement patterns under passive stretch and eccentric loading. Healthy young (24.1±1.4 years, n=9) and middle-aged (49.0±3.1 years, n=9) adults were positioned prone and the ankle was cyclically (0.5 Hz, 25 deg range) dorsiflexed during passive stretch and active lengthening. Achilles displacements were tracked in cine ultrasound using 2D speckle tracking. Displacements were found to be non-uniform, with mid and deep portions of the tendon displacing more than superficial portions. However, the degree of non-uniformity was significantly reduced in middle-aged adults, suggesting a potential age-related reduction in inter-fascicle sliding or a shift in loading sharing between plantarflexors. Eccentric loading reduced displacement magnitudes, likely reflecting distal tendon stretch induced via active muscle contractions. Changes in tendon displacement with active loading were greater in middle-aged adults, which could reflect greater tendon compliance. The observed age-related changes in Achilles tendon behavior may have implications for both plantarflexor performance and injury risk. PMID:25962378

  19. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H. R.; Dehghan, M. M.; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon. PMID:27175160

  20. Treatment of Large Recurrent Bilateral Xanthomatosis of Achilles Tendon- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, L.; Jambu, N.; Chittaranjan, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Xanthomas of the Achilles tendon are a rare interesting orthopaedic condition. There are very few articles dealing with the treatment of recurrent xanthomatosis of tendoachilles. Here we report this patient with bilateral recurrent xanthomatosis of tendoachilles. Case Report: A 37 year old male patient presented with multiple lesions in the body with bilateral swelling in the tendoachilles. The swelling was excised before three years elsewhere and there was recurrence of the lesion after 6 months subsequently. There was ulceration on the right side. The patient was treated by total resection of the lesion and reconstruction using tensorfascialata graft. Conclusion: Complete excision of the lesion is needed to reduce recurrence. Reconstruction of the defect is a challenge due to the large defect. Tensorfascialata graft results in good functional outcome of the patient even in large defects.

  1. Biochemical and morphological modifications in rabbit Achilles tendon during maturation and ageing.

    PubMed Central

    Cetta, G; Tenni, R; Zanaboni, G; De Luca, G; Ippolito, E; De Martino, C; Castellani, A A

    1982-01-01

    1. Achilles tendons of foetal, newborn, adult and old rabbits were examined by electron microscopy after staining by conventional methods or with the periodate/silver/methenamine technique. 2. The mean diameter of collagen fibrils increased with age whereas silver/methenamine-positivity became less evident. 3. Biochemical analyses showed a great decrease of the concentration of glycoproteins and galactosamine-containing glycosaminoglycans. 4. Collagen content increased with maturation and ageing of the tissue. 5. The extent of glycosylation of collagen hydroxylysine residues was also age-dependent; the total amount of hydroxylysyl glycosides rapidly decreased in the last days of prenatal life and in the first months after birth, corresponding to the rapid growth in collagen fibre diameter. 6. The hydroxylysyl diglycoside concentration decreased more markedly than that of the monoglycoside, thus indicating a possible gradual removal of the monosaccharide units. A role for the extent of glycosylation of tropocollagen molecules in fibre organization was suggested. Images PLATE 1 PMID:7115331

  2. Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Vibration Fails to Accelerate Ligament Healing but Stimulates Collagen Synthesis in the Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Keller, Benjamin V.; Davis, Matthew L.; Dahners, Laurence E.; Weinhold, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration accelerates fracture and wound healing and prevents disuse atrophy in musculoskeletal tissues. Purpose: To investigate the role of low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration as a treatment to accelerate healing of an acute ligament injury and to examine gene expression in the intact Achilles tendon of the injured limb after low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Complete surgical transection of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) was performed in 32 Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into control and low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration groups. Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration started on postoperative day 2, and rats received vibration for 30 minutes a day for 12 days. All rats were sacrificed 2 weeks after the operation, and their intact and injured MCLs were biomechanically tested or used for histological analysis. Intact Achilles tendons from the injured limb were evaluated for differences in gene expression. Results: Mechanical testing revealed no differences in the ultimate tensile load or the structural stiffness between the control and vibration groups for either the injured or intact MCL. Vibration exposure increased gene expression of collagen 1 alpha (3-fold), interleukin 6 (7-fold), cyclooxygenase 2 (5-fold), and bone morphogenetic protein 12 (4-fold) in the intact Achilles tendon when compared with control tendons (P < .05). Conclusion: While no differences were observed in the mechanical or histological properties of the fully transected MCL after low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration treatment, significant enhancements in gene expression were observed in the intact Achilles tendon. These included collagen, several inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors critical for tendons. Clinical Relevance: As low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration had no negative effects on ligament healing, vibration therapy may be a useful tool to accelerate healing

  3. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Achilles tendon loading patterns during barefoot walking and slow running on a treadmill: An ultrasonic propagation study.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M; Wearing, S C; Hooper, S L; Smeathers, J E; Horstmann, T; Brauner, T

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of tendon loading patterns during gait is important for understanding the pathogenesis of tendon "overuse" injury. Given that the speed of propagation of ultrasound in tendon is proportional to the applied load, this study used a noninvasive ultrasonic transmission technique to measure axial ultrasonic velocity in the right Achilles tendon of 27 healthy adults (11 females and 16 males; age, 26 ± 9 years; height, 1.73 ± 0.07 m; weight, 70.6 ± 21.2 kg), walking at self-selected speed (1.1 ± 0.1 m/s), and running at fixed slow speed (2 m/s) on a treadmill. Synchronous measures of ankle kinematics, spatiotemporal gait parameters, and vertical ground reaction forces were simultaneously measured. Slow running was associated with significantly higher cadence, shorter step length, but greater range of ankle movement, higher magnitude and rate of vertical ground reaction force, and higher ultrasonic velocity in the tendon than walking (P < 0.05). Ultrasonic velocity in the Achilles tendon was highly reproducible during walking and slow running (mean within-subject coefficient of variation < 2%). Ultrasonic maxima (P1, P2) and minima (M1, M2) were significantly higher and occurred earlier in the gait cycle (P1, M1, and M2) during running than walking (P < 0.05). Slow running was associated with higher and earlier peaks in loading of the Achilles tendon than walking. PMID:25913324

  5. Single-Stage Reconstruction of Achilles Tendon and Overlying Tissue With the Extended Temporoparietal Fasciagaleal Flap-23-Year Follow-Up and the Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dobke, Marek; Suliman, Ahmed; Mackert, Gina A; Herrera, Fernando A; Singer, Robert; Nelson, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of an established "gold standard" for complex Achilles tendon and regional soft tissue defect reconstruction, many techniques have been advocated. Two cases describing a novel technique of successful repair with the review of literature are presented. The underlying problem consisted of Achilles tendon necrosis with local inflammation in the first case and tendon contracture with foot malposition due to a burn injury in the other. Each patient, upon debridement, had a 6-cm Achilles tendon defect with associated overlying soft tissue deficits reconstructed with an extended temporoparietal fasciagaleal flap and a split thickness skin graft. Both cases highlight the successful functional and aesthetic quality as well as the durability of concurrent vascularized tendon and soft tissue replacement and coverage in 2 distinct clinical scenarios. PMID:27070674

  6. Effects of 12-wk eccentric calf muscle training on muscle-tendon glucose uptake and SEMG in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain.

    PubMed

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Magnusson, S Peter; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2014-07-15

    High-load eccentric exercises have been a key component in the conservative management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy. This study investigated the effects of a 12-wk progressive, home-based eccentric rehabilitation program on ankle plantar flexors' glucose uptake (GU) and myoelectric activity and Achilles tendon GU. A longitudinal study design with control (n = 10) and patient (n = 10) groups was used. Surface electromyography (SEMG) from four ankle plantar flexors and GU from the same muscles and the Achilles tendon were measured during submaximal intermittent isometric plantar flexion task. The results indicated that the symptomatic leg was weaker (P < 0.05) than the asymptomatic leg at baseline, but improved (P < 0.001) with eccentric rehabilitation. Additionally, the rehabilitation resulted in greater GU in both soleus (P < 0.01) and lateral gastrocnemius (P < 0.001) in the symptomatic leg, while the asymptomatic leg displayed higher uptake for medial gastrocnemius and flexor hallucis longus (P < 0.05). While both patient legs had higher tendon GU than the controls (P < 0.05), there was no rehabilitation effect on the tendon GU. Concerning SEMG, at baseline, soleus showed more relative activity in the symptomatic leg compared with both the asymptomatic and control legs (P < 0.05), probably reflecting an effort to compensate for the decreased force potential. The rehabilitation resulted in greater SEMG activity in the lateral gastrocnemius (P < 0.01) of the symptomatic leg with no other within- or between-group differences. Eccentric rehabilitation was effective in decreasing subjective severity of Achilles tendinopathy. It also resulted in redistribution of relative electrical activity, but not metabolic activity, within the triceps surae muscle. PMID:24855138

  7. An Investigation of the Immediate Effect of Static Stretching on the Morphology and Stiffness of Achilles Tendon in Dominant and Non-Dominant Legs

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tsz-chun Roxy; Ngo, Hiu-ching; Lau, Lai-wa; Leung, King-wah; Lo, Man-him; Yu, Ho-fai; Ying, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study was undertaken to investigate the immediate effect of static stretching on normal Achilles tendon morphology and stiffness, and the different effect on dominant and non-dominant legs; and to evaluate inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of using shear-wave elastography in measuring Achilles tendon stiffness. Methods 20 healthy subjects (13 males, 7 females) were included in the study. Thickness, cross-sectional area and stiffness of Achilles tendons in both legs were measured before and after 5-min static stretching using grey-scale ultrasound and shear-wave elastography. Inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of tendon stiffness measurements of six operators were evaluated. Results Result showed that there was no significant change in the thickness and cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon after static stretching in both dominant and non-dominant legs (p > 0.05). Tendon stiffness showed a significant increase in non-dominant leg (p < 0.05) but not in dominant leg (p > 0.05). The inter-operator reliability of shear-wave elastography measurements was 0.749 and the intra-operator reliability ranged from 0.751 to 0.941. Conclusion Shear-wave elastography is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool to assess the immediate stiffness change of Achilles tendon in response to static stretching with high intra-operator and inter-operator reliability. PMID:27120097

  8. A new approach to the pathology, clinical features and treatment of stress tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Perugia, L; Ippolitio, E; Postacchini, F

    1976-04-01

    On the basis of clinical, anatomical, surgical, histological and pathological investigations, the authors propose a classification of the tendinopathies of the Achilles tendon associated with stress. These are particularly common in the field of sport. Three syndromes are identified: a) pure peritendinitis; b) peritendinitis associated with tendinosis; c) pure tendinosis. The symptoms and possible complications are described and the problem of treatment is discussed. In pure peritendinitis tenolysis is recommended, but in peritendinitis associated with tendinosis it should be combined with extensive scarification of the tendon in order to promote revitalisation. PMID:977317

  9. Gene targeting of the transcription factor Mohawk in rats causes heterotopic ossification of Achilles tendon via failed tenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiaki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Kishida, Akio; Oyaizu, Takuya; Kayama, Tomohiro; Nakamichi, Ryo; Koda, Naoki; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Lotz, Martin K; Okawa, Atsushi; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-12

    Cell-based or pharmacological approaches for promoting tendon repair are currently not available because the molecular mechanisms of tendon development and healing are not well understood. Although analysis of knockout mice provides many critical insights, small animals such as mice have some limitations. In particular, precise physiological examination for mechanical load and the ability to obtain a sufficient number of primary tendon cells for molecular biology studies are challenging using mice. Here, we generated Mohawk (Mkx)(-/-) rats by using CRISPR/Cas9, which showed not only systemic hypoplasia of tendons similar to Mkx(-/-) mice, but also earlier heterotopic ossification of the Achilles tendon compared with Mkx(-/-) mice. Analysis of tendon-derived cells (TDCs) revealed that Mkx deficiency accelerated chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, whereas Mkx overexpression suppressed chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, mechanical stretch stimulation of Mkx(-/-) TDCs led to chondrogenic differentiation, whereas the same stimulation in Mkx(+/+) TDCs led to formation of tenocytes. ChIP-seq of Mkx overexpressing TDCs revealed significant peaks in tenogenic-related genes, such as collagen type (Col)1a1 and Col3a1, and chondrogenic differentiation-related genes, such as SRY-box (Sox)5, Sox6, and Sox9 Our results demonstrate that Mkx has a dual role, including accelerating tendon differentiation and preventing chondrogenic/osteogenic differentiation. This molecular network of Mkx provides a basis for tendon physiology and tissue engineering. PMID:27370800

  10. Achilles tendon ruptures stratified by age, race, and cause of injury among active duty U.S. Military members.

    PubMed

    Davis, J J; Mason, K T; Clark, D A

    1999-12-01

    A total of 865 members of the U.S. military underwent repair of Achilles tendon ruptures at U.S. military hospitals during calendar years 1994, 1995, and 1996. The discharge summaries of these patients were analyzed for patient demographic information, including age, race, and causative activity. Patients were then stratified by age, race, and cause of injury. Blacks were at increased risk for undergoing repair of the Achilles tendon compared with nonblacks (overall relative risk = 4.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.63, 4.74; summary odds ratio controlling for age = 3.69, CI = 3.25, 4.19). Participation in the game of basketball accounted for 64.9% of all injuries in black patients and 34.0% of all injuries in nonblack patients. Among those injured, blacks had a significantly increased risk for injury related to playing basketball than nonblacks (relative risk = 1.82, CI = 1.58, 2.10). This finding suggests that there may be other predisposing factor(s) that result in a higher risk of Achilles tendon ruptures in black individuals. PMID:10628159

  11. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma and Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Complications of Achilles Tendon Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; De Angelis, Barbara; Agovino, Annarita; Orlandi, Fabrizio; Migner, Alessandra; Di Pasquali, Camilla; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and hyaluronic acid (HA) constitute a system of tissue growth that can regenerate damaged tissue. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of PRP and HA in treatment of complications of Achilles tendon reconstruction. METHODS We selected ten patients affected by Achilles tendon injuries resulting from post-surgical complications subsequent to tenorrhaphy and have treated them with autologous PRP in combination with HA to evaluate the improvement of lesions with wound closure. RESULTS The treatment with PRP and HA for post-surgical complications of Achilles tendon was effective in healing and regeneration of soft and hard tissues. The healing time was shortened, and the treated area preserved a satisfying strength in plantar flexion and extension of the ankle, denoting to a decisive improvement in texture and a more rapid healing and a good cutaneous elasticity, with a significant reduction of the costs of hospitalization and the pain already the immediate postoperatively. The functional rehabilitation in terms of deambulation and joint mobility was complete. CONCLUSION The treatment we proposed allowed an easier and more rapid wound closure with excellent aesthetic improvement. Furthermore, the minimally invasive technique is well tolerated by patients. PMID:27579267

  12. Combination of hormone replacement therapy and high physical activity is associated with differences in Achilles tendon size in monozygotic female twin pairs.

    PubMed

    Finni, T; Kovanen, V; Ronkainen, P H A; Pöllänen, E; Bashford, G R; Kaprio, J; Alén, M; Kujala, U M; Sipilä, S

    2009-04-01

    Estrogen concentration has been suggested to play a role in tendon abnormalities and injury. In physically active postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been suggested to decrease tendon diameter. We hypothesized that HRT use and physical activity are associated with Achilles tendon size and tissue structure. The study applied cotwin analysis of fourteen 54- to 62-yr-old identical female twin pairs with current discordance for HRT use for an average of 7 yr. Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional areas were determined by ultrasonography, and tendon structural organization was analyzed from the images using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Maximal voluntary and twitch torques from plantar flexor muscles were measured. Serum levels of estradiol, estrone, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin were analyzed. Total daily metabolic equivalent score (MET-h/day) was calculated from physical activity questionnaires. Results showed that, in five physically active (MET > 4) pairs, the cotwins receiving HRT had greater estradiol level (P = 0.043) and smaller tendon cross-sectional area than their sisters (63 vs. 71 mm(2), P = 0.043). Among all pairs, Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area did not significantly differ between HRT using and nonusing twin sisters. Intrapair correlation for Achilles tendon thickness was high, despite HRT use discordance (r = 0.84, P < 0.001). LDA distinguished different tendon structure only from two of six examined twin pairs who had a similar level of physical activity. In conclusion, the effect of HRT on Achilles tendon characteristics independent of genetic confounding may be present only in the presence of sufficient physical activity. In physically active twin pairs, the higher level of estrogen seems to be associated with smaller tendon size. PMID:19164771

  13. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. PMID:24571598

  14. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. PMID:24571598

  15. Controlled release of curcumin from curcumin-loaded nanomicelles to prevent peritendinous adhesion during Achilles tendon healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weizhong; Li, Xuanyi; Comes Franchini, Mauro; Xu, Ke; Locatelli, Erica; Martin, Robert C; Monaco, Ilaria; Li, Yan; Cui, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    We introduced curcumin-loaded nanomicelles into a tendon-healing model to evaluate their effects on tendon healing and adhesion. Three groups consisting of 36 rats underwent rupture and repair of the Achilles tendon. The treatment group received an injection of curcumin-loaded nanomicelles (gold nanorods [GNRs]-1/curcumin in polymeric nanomicelles [curc@PMs] at a dosage of 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline) into the surgical site and exposed to laser postoperatively at weeks 1, 2, and 3, for three times 10 seconds each, on the surgical site in the rats that underwent tendon rupture and repair, while the other two groups received 0.44 mg curcumin/kg in 0.1 mL saline and 0.1 mL of saline, respectively. The specimens were harvested at 4 weeks and subjected to biomechanical and histological evaluation. The scoring results of tendon adhesion indicated that GNRs-1/curc@PMs group was in the lowest grade of peritendinous adhesions compared to the other groups. Histological assessment further confirmed the preventive effect of GNRs-1/curc@PMs on tendon adhesion. These findings indicated greater tendon strength with less adhesion in the group treated with GNRs-1/curc@PMs combined with laser exposure, and that nanoparticle-based therapy may be applied to prevent adhesion in clinical patients. PMID:27382278

  16. Effect of Footwear Modifications on Oscillations at the Achilles Tendon during Running on a Treadmill and Over Ground: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Ilka; Brown, Niklas; Alt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Achilles tendon injuries are known to commonly occur in runners. During running repeated impacts are transferred in axial direction along the lower leg, therefore possibly affecting the oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of different footwear modifications and different ground conditions (over ground versus treadmill) on oscillations at the Achilles tendon. Methods Oscillations were measured in 20 male runners using two tri-axial accelerometers. Participants ran in three different shoe types on a treadmill and over ground. Data analysis was limited to stance phase and performed in time and frequency space. Statistical comparison was conducted between oscillations in vertical and horizontal direction, between running shoes and between ground conditions (treadmill versus over ground running). Results Differences in the oscillation behavior could be detected between measurement directions with peak accelerations in the vertical being lower than those in the horizontal direction, p < 0.01. Peak accelerations occurred earlier at the distal accelerometer than at the proximal one, p < 0.01. Average normalized power differed between running shoes (p < 0.01) with harder damping material resulting in higher power values. Little to no power attenuation was found between the two accelerometers. Oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon is not influenced by ground condition. Conclusion Differences in shoe configurations may lead to variations in running technique and impact forces and therefore result in alterations of the vibration behavior at the Achilles tendon. The absence of power attenuation may have been caused by either a short distance between the two accelerometers or high stiffness of the tendon. High stiffness of the tendon will lead to complete transmission of the signal along the Achilles tendon and therefore no attenuation occurs. PMID:27010929

  17. Achilles tendon strain energy in distance running: consider the muscle energy cost.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jared R; MacIntosh, Brian R

    2015-01-15

    The return of tendon strain energy is thought to contribute to reducing the energy cost of running (Erun). However, this may not be consistent with the notion that increased Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is associated with a lower Erun. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for AT strain energy return relative to Erun for male and female runners of different abilities. A total of 46 long distance runners [18 elite male (EM), 12 trained male (TM), and 16 trained female (TF)] participated in this study. Erun was determined by indirect calorimetry at 75, 85, and 95% of the speed at lactate threshold (sLT), and energy cost per stride at each speed was estimated from previously reported stride length (SL)-speed relationships. AT force during running was estimated from reported vertical ground reaction force (Fz)-speed relationships, assuming an AT:ground reaction force moment arm ratio of 1.5. AT elongation was quantified during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction using ultrasound. Muscle energy cost was conservatively estimated on the basis of AT force and estimated cross-bridge mechanics and energetics. Significant group differences existed in sLT (EM > TM > TF; P < 0.001). A significant group × speed interaction was found in the energy storage/release per stride (TM > TF > EM; P < 0.001), the latter ranging from 10 to 70 J/stride. At all speeds and in all groups, estimated muscle energy cost exceeded energy return (P < 0.001). These results show that during distance running the muscle energy cost is substantially higher than the strain energy release from the AT. PMID:25593218

  18. Achilles tendon strain energy in distance running: consider the muscle energy cost

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    The return of tendon strain energy is thought to contribute to reducing the energy cost of running (Erun). However, this may not be consistent with the notion that increased Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is associated with a lower Erun. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for AT strain energy return relative to Erun for male and female runners of different abilities. A total of 46 long distance runners [18 elite male (EM), 12 trained male (TM), and 16 trained female (TF)] participated in this study. Erun was determined by indirect calorimetry at 75, 85, and 95% of the speed at lactate threshold (sLT), and energy cost per stride at each speed was estimated from previously reported stride length (SL)-speed relationships. AT force during running was estimated from reported vertical ground reaction force (Fz)-speed relationships, assuming an AT:ground reaction force moment arm ratio of 1.5. AT elongation was quantified during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction using ultrasound. Muscle energy cost was conservatively estimated on the basis of AT force and estimated cross-bridge mechanics and energetics. Significant group differences existed in sLT (EM > TM > TF; P < 0.001). A significant group × speed interaction was found in the energy storage/release per stride (TM > TF > EM; P < 0.001), the latter ranging from 10 to 70 J/stride. At all speeds and in all groups, estimated muscle energy cost exceeded energy return (P < 0.001). These results show that during distance running the muscle energy cost is substantially higher than the strain energy release from the AT. PMID:25593218

  19. Effects of Foot Strike and Step Frequency on Achilles Tendon Stress During Running.

    PubMed

    Lyght, Michael; Nockerts, Matthew; Kernozek, Thomas W; Ragan, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injuries are common in runners. The AT withstands high magnitudes of stress during running which may contribute to injury. Our purpose was to examine the effects of foot strike pattern and step frequency on AT stress and strain during running utilizing muscle forces based on a musculoskeletal model and subject-specific ultrasound-derived AT cross-sectional area. Nineteen female runners performed running trials under 6 conditions, including rearfoot strike and forefoot strike patterns at their preferred cadence, +5%, and -5% preferred cadence. Rearfoot strike patterns had less peak AT stress (P < .001), strain (P < .001), and strain rate (P < .001) compared with the forefoot strike pattern. A reduction in peak AT stress and strain were exhibited with a +5% preferred step frequency relative to the preferred condition using a rearfoot (P < .001) and forefoot (P=.005) strike pattern. Strain rate was not different (P > .05) between step frequencies within each foot strike condition. Our results suggest that a rearfoot pattern may reduce AT stress, strain, and strain rate. Increases in step frequency of 5% above preferred frequency, regardless of foot strike pattern, may also lower peak AT stress and strain. PMID:26955843

  20. Achilles Tendon Reflex (ATR) in response to short exposures of microgravity and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, M.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that latency and amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) are reduced after exposure to microgravity for 28 days. The objective of this study was to quantitatively measure the latency of ATR during brief (20 sec) exposure to microgravity in KC-135 parabolic flights. Methods: The ATR was elicited in ten men during parabolic flight with the ankle held neutrally, planarflexed, and dorsiflexed. During flight, the ATR was elicited during the zero G and 1.8 G phases. Postflight testing was performed flying back to the airfield. Latencies to onset of the ATR were calculated and analyses of variance were performed to determine the effect of gravity and ankle position on latency. Result: The mean latencies for zero-G, 1.8-G and postflight with the ankle in the neutral position were 32.7 plus or minus 0.5 ms, and 33.1 plus or minus 0.7 ms respectively, which were not significantly different. There was a trend toward prolongation of latencies postflight. The mean latency for those who were motion sick was 32.1 plus or minus 0.1 ms compared to 34.0 plus or minus 0.3 ms for those who were not sick. Conclusions: These studies indicate that neither the level of gravity nor ankle position significantly affected the latency of the ATR.

  1. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair. PMID:25333819

  2. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  3. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Promotes an Accelerated Healing of Achilles Tendon When Compared to Platelet-Rich Plasma in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Franciele; L. Duré, Gustavo; P. Klein, Caroline; F. Bampi, Vinícius; V. Padoin, Alexandre; D. Silva, Vinícius; Braga-Silva, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Autologous platelet concentrate has been used to improve the function and regeneration of injured tissues. Tendinopathies are common in clinical practice, although long-term treatment is required. On the basis of lead time, we compared the effect of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in repairing rat Achilles tendon. METHODS The effectiveness of using PRP and PRF was evaluated after 14 and 28 postoperative days by histological analysis. The quantification of collagen types I and III was performed by Sirius red staining. Qualitatively, the data were verified with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. RESULTS In Sirius red staining, no significant treatment differences were found between groups. Statistical difference was observed only between PRP (37.2% collagen) and the control group (16.2%) 14 days after treatment. Intra-groups compared twice showed a difference for collagen I (27.8% and 47.7%) and III (66.9% and 46.0%) in the PRF group. The control group showed differences only in collagen I (14.2% and 40.9%) and no other finding was observed in the PRP group. In H&E staining, PRF showed a better cellular organization when compared to the other groups at 28 days. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that PRF promotes accelerated regeneration of the Achilles tendon in rats, offering promising prospects for future clinical use. PMID:26284178

  4. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein-Didier, C; Andrade, R J; Brum, J; Hug, F; Tanter, M; Nordez, A; Gennisson, J-L

    2016-03-21

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear. PMID:26948399

  5. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  6. Functional evaluation of professional athletes treated with a mini-open technique for achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Antonio; Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Ciompi, Alessandro; Rossi, Cristina; Lupariello, Domenico; Ferretti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: in this study we report the functional results of 36 professional athletes treated with a combined percutaneous and mini-open technique. Methods: patients were evaluated with Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A), the objective 100-points Hannover scale and the Ergo-jump Bosco System device. Results: at a mean 28- month follow-up no re-rupture cases were observed. Six patients had minor complications. The Ergo-jump Bosco System device showed no significant differences in the side-to-side evaluation in regard to strength (−0.94%) and elasticity (+2.44%), while a significant post-operative loss was detected in the endurance trials (−6.78%). The Hannover scale showed an average score of 94.5, while the VISA-A had an average of 93.1. Thirty-one patients resumed their pre-operative sports activity level within five months from surgery. Conclusions: our results showed that the combined mini-open and percutaneous repair is an effective treatment for professional athletes, with satisfactory clinical and functional results, lack of major complications and a quick return to professional sports activity. PMID:25332932

  7. Early nerve regeneration after achilles tendon rupture--a prerequisite for healing? A study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Ahmed, Mahmood; Kreicbergs, Andris

    2002-07-01

    Nerve regeneration during healing of Achilles tendon rupture in the rat was studied by immunohistochemistry including semi-quantitative assessment. Neuronal markers for regenerating and mature fibers, ie., growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), respectively, were analyzed at different time points (1-16 weeks) post-rupture. In the paratenon, both the ruptured and intact contralateral tendon (control) consistently exhibited immunoreactivity to the two neuronal markers. However, in the proper tendinous tissue only the ruptured tendon showed immunoreactivity to GAP-43 and PGP 9.5. This expression was seen already at week 1 post-rupture to reach a peak at week 6 followed by a successive drop till week 16. Also the occurrence of sensory and autonomic fibers according to immunoreactivity for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), respectively, was analyzed. CGRP-positivity was abundantly seen from weeks 2-6 in both perivascular and sprouting free nerve endings in the proper tendon tissue undergoing healing. NPY appeared later, at weeks 6-8 post-rupture around blood vessels mainly located in the surrounding loose connective tissue. Apart from a role in vasoaction (CGRP, vasodilatory; NPY, vasoconstrictory). both neuropeptides have been implicated in fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation required for angiogenesis. The present study shows that early healing of ruptured tendons is characterized by an orchestrated, temporal appearance of nerve fibers expressing peptides with different actions. The observed pattern of neuronal regeneration and neuropeptide expression may prove to be important for normal connective tissue healing. PMID:12168677

  8. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  9. Further proof of the existence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in the human Achilles tendon: Presence of the AChRα7 receptor in tendon cells and cells in the peritendinous tissue.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Andersson, Gustav

    2015-11-01

    Human tendon cells have the capacity for acetylcholine (ACh) production. It is not known if the tendon cells also have the potential for ACh breakdown, nor if they show expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor AChRα7 (α7nAChR). Therefore, tendon tissue specimens from patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy/tendinosis and from normal midportion Achilles tendons were examined. Reaction for the degradative enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was found in some tenocytes in only a few tendinopathy tendons, and was never found in those of control tendons. Tenocytes displayed more regularly α7nAChR immunoreactivity. However, there was a marked heterogeneity in the degree of this reaction within and between the specimens. α7nAChR immunoreactivity was especially pronounced for tenocytes showing an oval/widened appearance. There was a tendency that the magnitude of α7nAChR immunoreactivity was higher in tendinopathy tendons as compared to control tendons. A stronger α7nAChR immunoreactivity than seen for tenocytes was observed for the cells in the peritendinous tissue. It is likely that the α7nAChR may be an important part of an auto-and paracrine loop of non-neuronal ACh that is released from the tendon cells. The effects may be related to proliferative and blood vessel regulatory functions as well as features related to collagen deposition. ACh can furthermore be of importance in leading to anti-inflammatory effects in the peritendinous tissue, a tissue nowadays considered to be of great relevance for the tendinopathy process. Overall, the findings show that tendon tissue, a tissue known to be devoid of cholinergic innervation, is a tissue in which there is a marked non-neuronal cholinergic system. PMID:25981114

  10. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture: influence of early weightbearing on biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex-a blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Dippmann, Christian; Ebskov, Lars; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque was significantly lower for the affected limb at 6 months (91%; p = .01), and the stiffness was significantly lower for the affected limb during the early part of dorsiflexion at 6 (67%; p < .001) and 12 (77%; p < .001) months. In conclusion, an increased stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was found in the non-weightbearing group. The altered stiffness and strength in the affected limb could affect the coordination of gait and running. PMID:25618802

  11. Aesthetically and functionally satisfying reconstruction of an Achilles tendon and overlying skin defect in a 15 year old girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wurzer, Paul; Eberl, Robert; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Parvizi, Daryousch; Rappl, Thomas; Spendel, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Achilles tendon and overlying soft tissue reconstruction presents an interdisciplinary challenge. In the literature many possible procedures are described, but each reconstruction in this region has its specific demands. Single stage reconstruction is normally pursued, but it is not always the best procedure for the patient, either aesthetically or functionally. We present a case of a 15 year old girl who suffered a soft tissue defect of 10cm×6cm in size at the area of the Achilles tendon due to a contact burn by an exhaust pipe during a motorcycle accident. For this case, reconstruction of the soft tissue defect using a free temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) and a full-thickness skin autograft was the best means to provide a satisfying result for both the patient and the surgeon. PMID:25000817

  12. Tendon Transfer Surgery for People With Tetraplegia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jennifer A; Sinnott, K Anne; Rothwell, Alastair G; Mohammed, Khalid D; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2016-06-01

    After cervical spinal cord injury, the loss of upper limb function is common. This affects an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living and participate in previous life roles. There are surgical procedures that can restore some of the upper limb function lost after cervical spinal cord injury. Tendon transfer surgery has been performed in the tetraplegic population since the early 1970s. The goals of surgery are to provide a person with tetraplegia with active elbow extension, wrist extension (if absent), and sufficient pinch and/or grip strength to perform activities of daily living without the need for adaptive equipment or orthoses. These procedures are suitable for a specific group, usually with spinal cord impairment of C4-8, with explicit components of motor and sensory loss. Comprehensive team assessments of current functioning, environment, and personal circumstances are important to ensure success of any procedure. Rehabilitation after tendon transfer surgery involves immobilization for tendon healing followed by specific, targeted therapy based on motor learning and goal-orientated training. Outcomes of tendon transfer surgery are not limited to the improvements in an individual's strength, function, and performance of activities but have much greater life affects, especially with regard to well-being, employment, and participation. This article will provide an overview of the aims of surgery, preoperative assessment, common procedures, postoperative rehabilitation strategies, and outcomes based on clinical experience and international published literature. PMID:27233594

  13. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women

    PubMed Central

    Csapo, R.; Malis, V.; Hodgson, J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4–5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11–12% vs. SW: 6–8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction. PMID:24505104

  14. Smad8/BMP2–Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Accelerated Recovery of the Biomechanical Properties of the Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Pelled, Gadi; Snedeker, Jess G.; Ben-Arav, Ayelet; Rigozzi, Samuela; Zilberman, Yoram; Kimelman-Bleich, Nadav; Gazit, Zulma; Müller, Ralph; Gazit, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendon tissue regeneration is an important goal for orthopedic medicine. We hypothesized that implantation of Smad8/BMP2–engineered MSCs in a full-thickness defect of the Achilles tendon (AT) would induce regeneration of tissue with improved biomechanical properties. A 2 mm defect was created in the distal region of murine ATs. The injured tendons were then sutured together or given implants of genetically engineered MSCs (GE group), nonengineered MSCs (CH3 group), or fibrin gel containing no cells (FG group). Three weeks later the mice were killed, and their healing tendons were excised and processed for histological or biomechanical analysis. A biomechanical analysis showed that tendons that received implants of genetically engineered MSCs had the highest effective stiffness (> 70% greater than natural healing, p < 0.001) and elastic modulus. There were no significant differences in either ultimate load or maximum stress among the treatment groups. Histological analysis revealed a tendon-like structure with elongated cells mainly in the GE group. ATs that had been implanted with Smad8/BMP2–engineered stem cells displayed a better material distribution and functional recovery than control groups. While additional study is required to determine long-term effects of GE MSCs on tendon healing, we conclude that genetically engineered MSCs may be a promising therapeutic tool for accelerating short-term functional recovery in the treatment of tendon injuries. PMID:22696396

  15. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures. PMID:25544391

  16. Achillon mini-open Achilles tendon repair: early outcomes and return to duty results in U.S. military service members.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; McCriskin, Brendan; Dutton, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report short-term outcomes and return to duty rates in a cohort of active duty U.S. military personnel who underwent repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using the Achillon mini-open technique. Between October 2009 and March 2012, 15 consecutive patients underwent mini-open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using the Achillon device by a single surgeon. Minor and major complications were recorded, and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and pain visual analog scores were recorded at regular follow-up intervals. At mean latest follow-up of 16.7 months postoperatively, all 15 patients had returned to full active duty status without major complications. Specifically, no patient experienced major wound complication, infection, or rerupture. Mean AOFAS score in 9 of 15 patients was 94.1; mean pain visual analog score in 12 of 15 patients was 1.4. The Achillon mini-open technique can be used for treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in appropriately selected high-demand patient populations with the expectation of minimal adverse outcomes. PMID:23449051

  17. Surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheath

    PubMed Central

    Finsen, Vilhjalmur; Håberg, Øyvind; Borchgrevink, Grethe Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    There are very few reports in the literature on the results of surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheaths of the digits. We reviewed 24 patients operated for flexor tendon sheath ganglia 8 (3–11) years previously. Two operations were for recurrences and one of these recurred again. There was one permanent digital nerve injury and one patient complained of cold sensibility. VAS (0=best; 100=worst) for mean general complaints from the hand was remembered as 51 before surgery and was 5 at review. Mean pain at review was reported as VAS 4 and general satisfaction with the operation as VAS 3. All stated that they would have consented to surgery if they had known the outcome in advance. We conclude that the results of surgery are good, although complications do occur. PMID:23705064

  18. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    PubMed

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration. PMID:24853711

  19. Evaluating the effect of low-level laser therapy on healing of tentomized Achilles tendon in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by light microscopical and gene expression examinations.

    PubMed

    Aliodoust, Morteza; Bayat, Mohammad; Jalili, Mohammad Reza; Sharifian, Zainalabedin; Dadpay, Masoomeh; Akbari, Mohammad; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Khoshvaghti, Amir; Bayat, Homa

    2014-07-01

    Tendon healing is impaired in individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). According to research, there is considerable improvement in the healing of surgically tenotomized Achilles tendons following low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in non-diabetic, healthy animals. This study uses light microscopic (LM) and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses to evaluate the ability of LLLT in healing Achilles tendons from streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats. A total of 88 rats were randomly divided into two groups, non-diabetic and diabetic. DM was induced in the rats by injections of STZ. The right Achilles tendons of all rats were tenotomized 1 month after administration of STZ. Laser-treated rats were treated with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser that had a 632.8-nm wavelength and 7.2-mW average power. Experimental group rats received a daily dose of 0.014 J (energy density, 2.9 J/cm(2)). Control rats did not receive LLLT. Animals were sacrificed on days 5, 10, and 15 post-operatively for semi-quantitative LM and semi-quantitative RT-PCR examinations of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) gene expression. The chi-square test showed that LLLT significantly reduced inflammation in non-diabetic rats compared with their non-diabetic controls (p = 0.02). LLLT significantly decreased inflammation in diabetic rats on days 5 (p = 0.03) and 10 (p = 0.02) compared to the corresponding control diabetic rats. According to the student's t test, LLLT significantly increased TGF-β1 gene expression in healthy (p = 0.000) and diabetic (p = 0.000) rats compared to their relevant controls. The He-Ne laser was effective in altering the inflammatory reaction and increasing TGF-β1 gene production. PMID:24622817

  20. Mesh Achilles tendon lengthening--a new method to treat equinus deformity in patients with spastic cerebral palsy: surgical technique and early results.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Huang, Ming-Tung; Su, Wei-Ren; Wu, Tung-Tai

    2013-01-01

    Equinus of the ankle is a common deformity in spastic cerebral palsy. Many methods have been developed to lengthen the Achilles tendon to correct the deformity. A new mesh Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) procedure that might decrease immobilization and promote recovery was performed in 36 tendons with equinus deformity (22 patients, average age=6.2). The results were compared with those of two other methods: the Vulpius group and the Z-lengthening group. The corrected dorsiflexion angle of the ankle at a subsequent 2-year follow-up of the mesh ATL and Vulpius groups matched (25.5±3.0 and 27.1±3.5°, respectively), whereas that of the Z-lengthening group was higher (33.9±3.8°). Nevertheless, statistics of the timing of each patient's readiness to begin rehabilitation and walking as well as gaining better stability for running and one-legged hopping indicated that the mesh ATL group recovered significantly quicker than the Vulpius and Z-lengthening groups. The mesh ATL procedure achieves a successful correction of the equinus deformity in spastic cerebral palsy comparable with that of the Vulpius procedure, with the advantage of preserving the gastrocnemius without a complete section. This confers greater antigravity stability and quicker recovery in patients. PMID:23192252

  1. MMP3 and TIMP2 gene variants as predisposing factors for Achilles tendon pathologies: Attempted replication study in a British case-control cohort.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Louis; Ribbans, William J; Raleigh, Stuart M

    2016-09-01

    Variants within the MMP3 (rs679620) and TIMP2 (rs4789932) genes have been associated with the risk of Achilles tendon pathology (ATP) in populations from South Africa and Australia. This study aimed to determine whether these variants were associated with the risk of ATP in British Caucasians. We recruited 118 cases with ATP, including a subset of 25 individuals with Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) and 131 controls. DNA samples were isolated from saliva and genotyped using qPCR. For the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant we found a significant (p = 0.038) difference in the genotype distribution frequency between males with ATP (CC, 39.4%; CT, 43.7%; TT, 16.9%) compared to male controls (CC, 20.7%; CT, 59.8%; TT, 19.5%). We also observed a difference in the TIMP2 rs4789932 genotype distribution between males with rupture compared to male controls (p = 0.038). The MMP3 rs679620 GG genotype was found to be overrepresented in the Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) group (AA, 24.0%; AG, 32.0%; GG, 44.0%) compared to controls (AA, 26.7%; AG, 54.2%; GG, 19.1%). In conclusion, the CT genotype of the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant was associated with lower risk of ATP in males. Furthermore, while we revealed differences for both variants in genotype distribution between the RUP and control groups, the sample size of the RUP group was small and confirmation would be required in additional cohorts. Finally, although both the TIMP2 rs4789932 and MMP3 rs679620 variants tentatively associated with ATP, there were differences in the direction of association compared to earlier work. PMID:27222816

  2. MMP3 and TIMP2 gene variants as predisposing factors for Achilles tendon pathologies: Attempted replication study in a British case–control cohort

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Louis; Ribbans, William J.; Raleigh, Stuart M.

    2016-01-01

    Variants within the MMP3 (rs679620) and TIMP2 (rs4789932) genes have been associated with the risk of Achilles tendon pathology (ATP) in populations from South Africa and Australia. This study aimed to determine whether these variants were associated with the risk of ATP in British Caucasians. We recruited 118 cases with ATP, including a subset of 25 individuals with Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) and 131 controls. DNA samples were isolated from saliva and genotyped using qPCR. For the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant we found a significant (p = 0.038) difference in the genotype distribution frequency between males with ATP (CC, 39.4%; CT, 43.7%; TT, 16.9%) compared to male controls (CC, 20.7%; CT, 59.8%; TT, 19.5%). We also observed a difference in the TIMP2 rs4789932 genotype distribution between males with rupture compared to male controls (p = 0.038). The MMP3 rs679620 GG genotype was found to be overrepresented in the Achilles tendon rupture (RUP) group (AA, 24.0%; AG, 32.0%; GG, 44.0%) compared to controls (AA, 26.7%; AG, 54.2%; GG, 19.1%). In conclusion, the CT genotype of the TIMP2 rs4789932 variant was associated with lower risk of ATP in males. Furthermore, while we revealed differences for both variants in genotype distribution between the RUP and control groups, the sample size of the RUP group was small and confirmation would be required in additional cohorts. Finally, although both the TIMP2 rs4789932 and MMP3 rs679620 variants tentatively associated with ATP, there were differences in the direction of association compared to earlier work. PMID:27222816

  3. Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

  4. A non-invasive, 3D, dynamic MRI method for measuring muscle moment arms in vivo: demonstration in the human ankle joint and Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Clarke, E C; Martin, J H; d'Entremont, A G; Pandy, M G; Wilson, D R; Herbert, R D

    2015-01-01

    Muscle moment arms are used widely in biomechanical analyses. Often they are measured in 2D or at a series of static joint positions. In the present study we demonstrate a simple MRI method for measuring muscle moment arms dynamically in 3D from a single range-of-motion cycle. We demonstrate this method in the Achilles tendon for comparison with other methods, and validate the method using a custom apparatus. The method involves registration of high-resolution joint geometry from MRI scans of the stationary joint with low-resolution geometries from ultrafast MRI scans of the slowly moving joint. Tibio-talar helical axes and 3D Achilles tendon moment arms were calculated throughout passive rotation for 10 adult subjects, and compared with recently published data. A simple validation was conducted by comparing MRI measurements with direct physical measurements made on a phantom. The moment arms measured using our method and those of others were similar and there was good agreement between physical measurements (mean 41.0mm) and MRI measurements (mean 39.5mm) made on the phantom. This new method can accurately measure muscle moment arms from a single range-of-motion cycle without the need to control rotation rate or gate the scanning. Supplementary data includes custom software to assist implementation. PMID:25466777

  5. Faut-il préférer une technique chirurgicale dans le traitement des ruptures du tendon d'Achille?

    PubMed Central

    Hani, Redouane; Kharmaz, Mohammed; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    La rupture du tendon d'Achille est de plus en plus fréquente dans le monde et dans notre pays en raison du développement considérable des activités sportives, de l'accroissement de leur intensité et de l'absence de moyens de prévention. Notre travail porte sur une étude concernant 58 cas de rupture du tendon d'Achille, avec un recul moyen compris entre 5 mois et 80 mois. L’âge moyen était de 36 ans, tous les patients inclus ont tous bénéficier d'un traitement chirurgical. Le but de notre étude étant de souligner la supériorité d'une technique chirurgicale par rapport à une autre dans la prise en charge, ainsi qu'une mise au point sur les différents aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et post-thérapeutiques de cette lésion. PMID:26161208

  6. The traumatic rupture of the Achilles’ tendon – an analysis of the modern methods of evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    BARDAŞ, CIPRIAN; BENEA, HOREA; MARTIN, ARTUR; TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE

    2013-01-01

    Aims The main aim of this article is an analysis of both advantages and disadvantages of the modern solutions of treatment – percutaneous surgery, in comparison with the classic methods of treatments described in the surgery of Achilles’ tendon. Patients and method The study was conducted on 23 patients admitted to the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic of Cluj-Napoca between January 2011–June 2012. Nineteen (19) patients were diagnosed with a complete rupture of the Achilles tendon and 4 patients with a partial rupture. The diagnosis of traumatic Achilles tendon ruptures was usually clinical, the Ultrasound (common or 3D) and the MRI confirmed the lesion and determined its location and extension. We analyzed the diagnostic methods, the elapsed time before surgery, the treatment options depending on lesion’s location, technical difficulties, costs, postoperative care, the average healing time, complications. Results The Ultrasound was performed in 65.2% of the patients (15 patients) for confirming the extension of the lesion and it served for pre-operative planning. In most of the cases, the classical methods of Achilles tendon reconstruction were used (18 cases). The complications rate was about 8%. We diagnosed an iterative Achilles tendon rupture (the patient was initially treated using the percutaneous methods) and a delay in cicatrisation. Conclusions The percutaneous surgical techniques are a viable alternative for the acute ruptures of Achilles tendon, the classic intervention has clear indications in lesions diagnosed late, in the recurrent tendon ruptures. PMID:26527933

  7. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and their combination on the healing of Achilles tendon in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Allahverdi, Amin; Sharifi, Davood; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Khansari, Mohammadreza; Dorbeh, Shahab Sarrout

    2015-05-01

    Tendon repair is still one of the challenges for rehabilitation. Various treatments for tendon injuries have been used in recent decade. This study was established to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment alone, and using combined method on the healing of Achilles tendon in rabbits. Seventy-two healthy mature male white New Zealand rabbits were divided randomly into four groups of 18 animals each: control: partial tenotomy with no treatment, only 1 mL normal saline was injected on days 1, 8, and 15 at the site of splitting; PRP: partial tenotomy with PRP treatment on days 1, 8, and 15 at the site of splitting; LLLT: partial tenotomy with LLLT (K30 hand-held probe, AZOR, Technica, Russia, 650 nm, 30 mW, surface area = 1 cm(2), 60 S/cm(2), energy density = 1.8 J/cm(2)) for 15 consecutive days; LLLT + PRP: partial tenotomy with LLLT + PRP. At the end of trial, the rabbits were euthanatized and tendon specimens were harvested and were submitted for histopathological evaluation, hydroxyproline levels, and biomechanical measurement. The Tukey post hoc test was performed. The results for these parameters showed that PRP or LLLT alone has significant advantages over untreated animals (P < 0.05). Furthermore, it was found that the combined treatment with PRP and LLLT is even more efficient. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the two groups of LLLT and PRP. However, the treatments combining PRP and LLLT showed significant results in comparison of PRP or LLLT alone (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that the healing time of injured tendon decreases by using the two therapies combined. PMID:25759233

  8. Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Scioli, M W

    1994-01-01

    Achilles tendinitis is a common condition of overuse seen in active individuals. It is multifactorial, usually due to a combination of anatomic and biomechanical characteristics along with poor training technique. Pathologic changes can involve the surrounding tissue (bursae, paratenon) or the tendon itself and can occur both at its insertion into the calcaneous and the critical hypovascular zone. A clear understanding of the cause and stage of the condition is critical for successful treatment, be it conservative or surgical. Recent advances in surgical technique and postoperative rehabilitation have been promising in returning individuals to their previous levels of activity. PMID:8290227

  9. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... off the ground, to go from walking to running, or to running uphill for example Tripped and fell, or had ... will cover your foot and go to your knee. Your toes will be ... prevent further injury. You can walk once your doctor says it ...

  10. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    MedlinePlus

    ... educational service. The content of FootCareMD, including text, images and graphics, is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnoses or treatments. If you need medical ...

  11. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... another accident Played a sport like tennis or basketball, with a lot of stopping and starting Most ... is OK for you to play tennis, racquetball, basketball, and other sports where you stop and start ...

  12. Achilles Tendinosis: Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options. PMID:25729512

  13. Multiple changes in gene expression in chronic human Achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ireland, D; Harrall, R; Curry, V; Holloway, G; Hackney, R; Hazleman, B; Riley, G

    2001-06-01

    Atlas cDNA cell interaction arrays (CLONTECH) were used to examine degenerate tissue from four patients with Achilles tendon disorders, in order to identify changes in expression of genes important in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The greatest difference between normal (post-mortem) and degenerate tissue samples was in the level of MMP-3 (stromelysin) mRNA, which was down-regulated in all the degenerate samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assay of RNA extracted from paired 'normal' and degenerate Achilles tendon tissue samples taken from tendons during surgery mirrored the results of the arrays. Levels of MMP-3 mRNA were lower, whereas levels of type-I and type-III collagen mRNAs were significantly higher, in the degenerate compared to the 'normal' samples. Immunoblotting of proteins extracted from the same tendon samples showed that three of four normal tissue samples taken from individuals without apparent tendon disorder had much higher levels of MMP-3 protein than 'normal' or degenerate samples from patients with tendinosis. We suggest that MMP-3 may play an important role in the regulation of tendon extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodelling. PMID:11420148

  14. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs. PMID:25488035

  15. Latency of the Achilles tendon reflex for detection of reduced functions of the peripheral nervous system in workers exposed to lead.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Y; Hirata, M; Okayama, A; Ichikawa, Y E; Goto, S

    1993-01-01

    The latency of the soleus muscle potential, evoked by a tap of the Achilles tendon, was used in the mass assessment of healthy male workers exposed to lead. Three groups were studied: a control, a low exposure, and a high exposure group. Mean blood lead concentrations were 9.3, 19.2, and 53.1 micrograms/100 ml respectively. Latencies were adjusted for age and height and then compared among the three groups. The mean corrected latency of the high exposure group showed a 4% increase compared with the other two groups (p < 0.01). The latencies of the other two groups showed no between group differences. These results were consistent with previous neurophysiological studies done by many researchers on workers exposed to lead. They suggested that nerve conduction velocities decreased from 3 to 13% among workers whose mean blood lead concentrations were more than 30 micrograms/100 ml. The method was simple, time conserving, non-invasive, and non-aversive, and provided a quantitative measure of the nerve conduction velocities of peripheral nerves. Thus it may be useful for early detection of occupationally related impairment of peripheral nerves. PMID:8457489

  16. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. Methods: One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host–graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Results: Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p < 0.05). Treatment also improved echogenicity and homogenicity of the tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the

  17. The Use of Hyaluronic Acid after Tendon Surgery and in Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid is safe and effective in the management of osteoarthritis, but its use in the treatment of tendon disorders has received less attention. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, evaluating experimental and clinical trials. A search of English-language articles was performed using the key search terms “hyaluronic acid” or “viscosupplementation” combined with “tendon,” “tendinopathy,“ “adhesions,“ or “gliding,“ independently. In quite all the experimental studies, performed after surgical procedures for tendon injuries or in the treatment of chronic tendinopathies, using different hyaluronic acid compounds, positive results (reduced formation of scars and granulation tissue after tendon repair, less adhesions and gliding resistance, and improved tissue healing) were observed. In a limited number of cases, hyaluronic acid has been employed in clinical practice. After flexor tendon surgery, a greater total active motion and fingers function, with an earlier return to work and daily activities, were observed. Similarly, in patients suffering from elbow, patellar, and shoulder tendons disorders, pain was reduced, and function improved. The positive effect of hyaluronic acid can be attributed to the anti-inflammatory activity, enhanced cell proliferation, and collagen deposition, besides the lubricating action on the sliding surface of the tendon. PMID:24895610

  18. Can ultrashort-TE (UTE) MRI sequences on a 3-T clinical scanner detect signal directly from collagen protons: freeze-dry and D2 O exchange studies of cortical bone and Achilles tendon specimens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Chang, Eric Y; Bydder, Graeme M; Du, Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Ultrashort-TE (UTE) sequences can obtain signal directly from short-T2 , collagen-rich tissues. It is generally accepted that bound and free water can be detected with UTE techniques, but the ability to detect protons directly on the collagen molecule remains controversial. In this study, we investigated the potential of UTE sequences on a 3-T clinical scanner to detect collagen protons via freeze-drying and D2 O-H2 O exchange studies. Experiments were performed on bovine cortical bone and human Achilles tendon specimens, which were either subject to freeze-drying for over 66 h or D2 O-H2 O exchange for 6 days. Specimens were imaged using two- and three-dimensional UTE with Cones trajectory techniques with a minimum TE of 8 μs at 3 T. UTE images before treatment showed high signal from all specimens with bi-component T2 * behavior. Bovine cortical bone showed a shorter T2 * component of 0.36 ms and a longer T2 * component of 2.30 ms with fractions of 78.2% and 21.8% by volume, respectively. Achilles tendon showed a shorter T2 * component of 1.22 ms and a longer T2 * component of 15.1 ms with fractions of 81.1% and 18.9% by volume, respectively. Imaging after freeze-drying or D2 O-H2 O exchange resulted in either the absence or near-absence of signal. These results indicate that bound and free water are the sole sources of UTE signal in bovine cortical bone and human Achilles tendon samples on a clinical 3-T scanner. Protons on the native collagen molecule are not directly visible when imaged using UTE sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27148693

  19. Avoidance of unfavourable results following primary flexor tendon surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, D.; Giesen, T.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the biological problems faced by those managing primary flexor tendon injuries and explains why these problems still thwart attempts to achieve normal, or near normal, function after this injury, despite a century of surgical effort. It considers the historical background of the early 20th century attempts to improve the results and analyses the clinical usefulness of more recent research into tendon core and circumferential suture modification, including the authors’ work in this field, and changes in post-operative mobilisation over the last 50 years. More recent manipulation of the sheath to improve results and the future possibility of manipulation of adhesions are discussed. It also discusses other factors, e.g., the patient, the experience of the surgeon, the use of therapists, the timing of repair, complex injuries, injuries in zones other than zone 2, which can have a bearing on the results and considers how these can be modified to avoid an unfavourable outcome. PMID:24501468

  20. Tendon Progenitor Cells in Injured Tendons Have Strong Chondrogenic Potential: The CD105-Negative Subpopulation Induces Chondrogenic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J.; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L.; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous BMPs or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a co-receptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. PMID:25220576

  1. Chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy: surgical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Oshri, Yael; Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Brin, Yaron Shagra; Karpf, Ronen; Massarwe, Sabri; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objective: insertional Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition among athletes and joggers. One fifth of the injuries involves the insertion of the tendon. The etiology is either due to mechanical overuse related to sports activity, or a systemic inflammatory disease. The clinical appearance includes pain and movement restriction. The primary treatment is conservative. The surgery referred to in this study (Calcaneal Osteotomy) is performed by decompression of the posterior margin of the calcaneus. If the tendon is degenerative, debridement is needed. There is controversy on the surgical outcome and the surgical approach. A retrospective analytic observational study. Methods: 20 patients who were diagnosed with IAT (21 feet) and were operated on between the years 2000–2007 by calcaneal osteotomy. Main outcome measures: the primary measure of success was diminished pain. It was demonstrated in the AOFAS score and in the VAS scale of pain. Results: the average grade in the AOFAS questionnaire improved by 20 points, and the average grading of pain in the VAS scale was decreased by 4.21. The median satisfaction rate was 8, the average was 5.81. 62% of the patients would repeat the surgery/recommend it. We found a significant relationship (p=0.022) between patients who avoided sports activity while suffering from insertional Achilles tendinopathy and the satisfaction rate from the surgery. Conclusions: using the calcaneal osteotomy technique as a surgical treatment for IAT is successful, and improves measures of pain and function. Low compliance with avoiding sports activity while suffering from an IAT might lead to a need for surgery. PMID:23738280

  2. Identifying factors related to Achilles tendon stress, strain, and stiffness before and after 6 months of growth in youth 10-14 years of age.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A

    2012-09-21

    The purposes of this study were (1) determine if youth peak Achilles tendon (AT) strain, peak AT stress, and AT stiffness, measured during an isometric plantar flexion, differed after six months (mos) of growth, and (2) determine if sex, physical activity level (Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ-C)), and/or growth rate (GR) were related to these properties. AT stress, strain, and stiffness were quantified in 20 boys (13.47±0.81 years) and 22 girls (11.18±0.82 years) at 2 times (0 and 6 mos). GR (change in height in 6 mos) was not significantly different between boys and girls (3.5±1.4 and 3.4±1.1cm/6 mos respectively). Peak AT strain and stiffness (mean 3.8±0.4% and 128.9±153.6N/mm, respectively) did not differ between testing sessions or sex. Peak AT stress (22.1±2.4 and 24.0±2.1MPa at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) did not differ between sex and increased significantly at 6 mos due to a significant decrease in AT cross-sectional area (40.6±1.3 and 38.1±1.6mm(2) at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) with no significant difference in peak AT force (882.3±93.9 and 900.3± 65.5N at 0 and 6 mos, respectively). Peak AT stress was significantly greater in subjects with greater PAQ-C scores (9.1% increase with 1 unit increase in PAQ-C score) and smaller in subjects with faster GRs (13.8% decrease with 1cm/6 mos increase in GR). These results indicate that of the AT mechanical properties quantified, none differed between sex, and only peak AT stress significantly differed after 6 months and was related to GR and physical activity. PMID:22877892

  3. Cas rare de rupture bilatérale des tendons d'Achille sans notion de tendinopathie ou de chirurgie de la cheville chez un jeune sportif: à propos d'un cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Belmoubarik, Amine; Abouchane, Merouane; Mahraoui, Mohamed Amine

    2015-01-01

    Les lésions du tendon d'Achille sont plus fréquentes que celles du tendon quadricipital ou patellaire. Les lésions bilatérales sont par contre plus rares et sont souvent associées à une notion de tendinopathie, d'injection de corticoïdes ou de maladies systémiques tels que le lupus érythémateux, l'ostéomalacie ou l'insuffisance rénale chronique. Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient de 34 ans victime d'une rupture bilatérale des tendons d'Achille suite à une réception de saut lors de la pratique de gymnastique. Le patient n’était pas suivi pour maladie de système ou mis sous corticothérapie ou fluoroquinolones. Le diagnostic a été suspecté devant une dépression anormalement creusant le relief sous cutané des deux tendons d'Achille avec une impossibilité de flexion dorsale des deux chevilles en association à un signe de Thompson bilatéralement positif. L’échographie a confirmé le diagnostic. Le patient a été traité par laçage et suture tendineuse à ciel ouvert. La rupture bilatérale du tendon d'Achille est rare. La plupart des patients rapportent une notion de maladie systémique ou un antécédent de chirurgie du genou. Nous rapportons le cas d'une lésion rare dans la littérature, une rupture bilatérale des tendons achiléens sans notions de maladies auto-immunes ni de traitement aux corticoïdes. Les lésions bilatérales présentent certaines particularités thérapeutiques et évolutives. En effet, deux difficultés sont à noter la première réside dans l'absence de référence comparative pour régler et apprécier l’équin physiologique lors de la réparation tendineuse. La deuxième difficulté est l'obligation de différer l'appui à 45 jours. Ce qui est contraignant pour le patient. La technique de réparation à ciel ouvert couplée à une immobilisation en équin protégeant la suture nous a donné des résultats satisfaisants. PMID:26140066

  4. The neuromechanical adaptations to Achilles tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Kulig, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Human movement is initiated, controlled and executed in a hierarchical system including the nervous system, muscle and tendon. If a component in the loop loses its integrity, the entire system has to adapt to that deficiency. Achilles tendon, when degenerated, exhibits lower stiffness. This local mechanical deficit may be compensated for by an alteration of motor commands from the CNS. These modulations in motor commands from the CNS may lead to altered activation of the agonist, synergist and antagonist muscles. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of tendon degeneration on its mechanical properties, the neuromechanical behaviour of the surrounding musculature and the existence of the CNS modulation accompanying tendinosis. We hypothesize that the degenerated tendon will lead to diminished tissue mechanical properties and protective muscle activation patterns, as well as an up-regulated descending drive from the CNS. Strong evidence, as reported in the present study, indicates that tendinotic tendons are more compliant compared to healthy tendons. This unilateral involvement affected the neuromuscular control on the involved side but not the non-involved side. The muscle–tendon unit on the tendinotic side exhibits a lowered temporal efficiency, which leads to altered CNS control. The altered CNS control is then expressed as an adapted muscle activation pattern in the lower leg. Taken together, the findings of the present study illustrate the co-ordinated multi-level adaptations to a mechanical lesion in a tendon caused by pathology. Key points Achilles tendinosis is a localized degenerative musculoskeletal disorder that develops over a long period of time and leads to a compliant human Achilles tendon. We demonstrate that the compliant Achilles tendon elicited a series of adaptations from different levels of the human movement control system, such as the muscle–tendon interaction, CNS control and other muscles in the lower leg. These results

  5. Treatment of Calcified Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy by the Posterior Midline Approach.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xu-Dong; Jiang, Hongfei; Wu, Yong-Ping; Tao, Hui-Min; Yang, Di-Sheng; Hu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the clinical outcomes of the posterior midline approach in the treatment of 34 patients with significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy. The posterior midline approach was applied for the surgical treatment of 34 patients with chronic significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy after failed conservative treatment. Gastrocnemius recession was performed simultaneously for patients with gastrocnemius contracture. The Fowler-Philip angle and parallel pitch lines were measured before surgery, and the visual analog scale, Tegner score, and Victorian Institute of Sport tendon study group score were recorded before and after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 45.2 ± 17.7 (range 24 to 84) months. After surgery, the visual analog scale score had decreased notably, and the Tegner score and Victorian Institute of Sport tendon study group score had increased significantly. The posterior midline approach can achieve satisfactory outcomes in the treatment of significantly calcified insertional Achilles tendinopathy, and gastrocnemius recession (Strayer procedure) should be performed for patients with gastrocnemius contracture to improve the surgical outcome. PMID:26874831

  6. Surgical treatment of chronic achilles tendinopathy: long-term results of the endoscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has long been established as a valid alternative for chronic Achilles tendinopathies that have failed conservative treatment. Endoscopic procedures have shown satisfactory preliminary results for managing such injuries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic surgery in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. We evaluated 27 endoscopic procedures in 24 patients (mean age 45.5 ± 8.9 years; 12 males and 12 females) with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and at least 5 (mean 7.7, range 5 to 14) years of follow-up. All ambulatory procedures consisted of paratenon debridement and longitudinal tenotomies. The clinical evaluation included 2 specific functional rating systems (the Achilles Tendon Scoring System and the Victorian Institute Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire) and a pain visual analog scale. Patient satisfaction with the procedure was assessed using a patient global assessment response to therapy Likert scale score. All patients had an improved clinical outcome at the final follow-up visit. Both scoring systems showed significant improvement in all clinical outcomes at the last follow-up visit. The Victorian Institute Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire score had improved from 37.0 ± 4.9 points preoperatively to 97.5 ± 12.1 points postoperatively (p = .0006). The Achilles Tendon Scoring System score had improved from 32.6 ± 13.1 points preoperatively to 97.2 ± 12.3 points postoperatively (p = .000006). The pain visual analog scale score averaged 0.2 ± 1.1, and the patient global assessment response to therapy score was 0.25 ± 0.71. The percentage of patients with an excellent patient global assessment response to therapy score was 85.1%. Two postoperative problems were reported (7.4%): a delayed keloid lesion and a seroma with chronic fistula. The infection rate and systemic complication rate were 0%. In conclusion, endoscopic surgery provided a high rate of excellent

  7. Achilles Tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the calf should be felt during the stretch. Physical Therapy. Physical therapy is very helpful in treating Achilles tendinitis. It ... will be able to return to sports activity. Physical therapy is an important part of recovery. Many patients ...

  8. Using the Literature to Understand Achilles' Fate.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Vesna S

    2016-05-01

    According to Greek mythology, Achilles was fatally wounded in his heel, bled out, and died. Several unproven hypotheses mention poisoning, infection, allergy, hemophilia, thyrotoxic storm (ie, pain and stress), and suicide. The author, a plastic surgeon who often treats chronic wounds, proposes an additional scenario: Although not mortally wounded, Achilles was considered dead, because in his time a wounded hero was as good as a dead hero, so he lived out the remainder of his life as former hero with a chronic wound far away from everyone. To determine whether his injury was enough to cause fatal bleeding and quick death or if other factors might have been in play, a search of the literature was conducted to enhance what is known about Achilles, basically through the tale related in The Iliad and the clinical impact of an Achilles' injury. Search terms utilized included bleeding tibialis posterior artery (3 manuscripts were found) and chronic wound, Achilles tendon (631 manuscripts were located). Although science may not be able to explain how and why Achilles died, the literature supported the conjecture that Achilles probably had a chronic wound with skin and paratenon defect, de- vitalized tendon tissue, bleeding, granulation, and repeated infections. It is interesting to consider the state of his injury and his mind in the making of this legend. PMID:27192720

  9. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Results Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. No sign of rejection was seen in the treated lesions. The collagen implant was invaded by the inflammatory cells at the inflammatory phase, followed by fibroplasia phase in which remnant of the collagen implant were still present while no inflammatory reaction could be seen in the lesions. However, the collagen implant was completely absorbed in the remodeling phase and the newly regenerated tendinous tissue filled the gap. Compared to the controls, the treated lesions showed improved tissue alignment and less peritendinous adhesion, muscle atrophy and fibrosis

  10. The role of collagen arrangement change during tendon healing demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Naoto; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu; Sekido, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    The dry weight of tendon tissue is accounted for mainly by collagen fibers. Accordingly, the tendon-healing process primarily involves repair of collagen fibers. During the remodeling phase of tendon healing, newly proliferating collagen fibers are transformed into a mature repaired tendon. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, the details of fibrous rebuilding have not been reported previously. The aim of this study was to visualize the ultrastructural changes and to obtain a clear understanding of the reorganization of the collagen fibers in the tendon repair site, using rat Achilles tendons. We used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with cell maceration as the main method of analysis. Pretreatment with cell maceration removed the cellular components successfully. This allowed precise visualization of each collagen fiber and the three-dimensional network of the fibers. This study was the first to apply the cell-maceration/SEM method to observe tendon tissue. Seven days after surgery, new collagen fibers grew extensively in the repair site in a random arrangement. Fourteen days after surgery, the collagen fibers began to form an axial arrangement. Near the tendon stump, this change progressed from the outer layer to the core region. On the other hand, in the middle of the repair site, it progressed from the core to the outer layer. Change in the axial arrangement of collagen fibers contributes to the connection between the repair site and the tendon stump and to the separation of the repair site from the paratenon. PMID:22859848

  11. PXL01 in Sodium Hyaluronate for Improvement of Hand Recovery after Flexor Tendon Repair Surgery: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Monica E.; Dahlin, Lars B.; Fridén, Jan; Hagberg, Lars; Larsen, Sören E.; Wiklund, Kerstin; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery. Methods This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery. Results The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.016 in PPAS). The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p = 0.0499 in PPAS). Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.048 in PPAS). Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p = 0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p = 0.016). At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p = 0.086 in PPAS). The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture. Conclusions Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the

  12. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cannon DL. Flexor and extensor tendon injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . ... Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  13. [Proximal and distal biceps tendon rupture--an indication for surgery?].

    PubMed

    Klonz, A; Eggers, C; Reilmann, H

    1998-09-01

    We reviewed 77 conservatively and 164 operatively treated cases of rupture of the long head of the biceps documented in the literature. Refixation offers a small but relatively constant improvement of flexion and supination power and thus reduces the number of cases with remaining light or marked weakness by one third. Deformity by the slipped muscle can be corrected effectively. As complications are uncommon surgery should be recommended to young and active patients and should at least be offered to less active patients. Thirteen patients were re-examined after operative repair for distal biceps tendon avulsion and 277 reported cases were reviewed. After conservative management (n = 20) the power of flexion remains reduced by 30%-40%, that of supination by more than 50%. The loss of flexion power, as well as the deformity can be nicely diminished by attachment of the distal biceps to the brachialis muscle (n = 22). There are no complications documented regarding this procedure. The anatomic reinsertion (n = 248) additionally reduces the loss of supination power to 0%-25%, but bears a higher risk of complications. The double-incision technique (n = 105 of 248) does not necessarily decrease this risk. There are as many nerve injuries reported as with the single-anterior approach. Additionally we are faced with the problem of radioulnar synostosis. The use of suture anchors provides a nice way of fixation of the tendon but does not facilitate the approach to the tuberosity. The distal biceps tendon rupture should be treated operatively. The adequate method of repair is to be determined individually. PMID:9816985

  14. Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, David; Giesen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As primary repair of divided flexor tendons becomes more common, secondary tendon surgery becomes largely that of the complications of primary repair, namely ruptured and adherent repairs. These occur with an incidence of each in most reported series world-wide of around 5%, with these problems having changed little in the last two decades, despite strengthening our suture repairs. Where the primary referral service is less well-developed, and as a more occasional occurrence where primary treatment is the routine, the surgeon faces different problems. Patients arrive at a hand unit variable, but longer, times after the primary insult, having had no, or bad, previous treatment. Sometimes the situation is the same, viz. an extended finger with no active flexion, but now no longer amenable to primary repair. Frequently, it is much more complex as a result of injuries to the other tissues of the digit and, also, as a result of the unaided healing process within the digit in the presence of an inactive flexor system. We present our experience in dealing with ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence. PMID:24459333

  15. Morphometrics of the Anterior Belly and Intermediate Tendon of the Digastric Muscle: Sexual Dimorphism and Implications for Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J; Pancake, Alex R; Lambert, H Wayne

    2016-07-01

    The anterior belly of the digastric muscle (ABDM) is important in a variety of surgeries including submental lipectomy, rhytidectomy, alteration of the cervicomental angle via muscle resection, the "digastric corset" procedure for submental rejuvenation, the submental artery flap, and reanimation of the mouth after facial nerve palsy. Despite its clinical significance, little information exists regarding the morphometrics of the ABDM or its associated intermediate tendon. This study analyzed a total of 35 intact ABDMs and 43 intact intermediate tendons from 23 cadavers. Measurements were taken of the following parameters: muscle belly area, muscle belly length, intermediate tendon length, and intermediate tendon width at mid-tendon. Normative descriptive statistics are included within the report. Males were found to have significantly longer left-sided muscle bellies than right-sided bellies from males (U = 23.0; P = 0.044), left-sided bellies from females (U = 19.0; P = 0.020), and right-sided bellies from females (U = 12.0; P = 0.035). The morphometry, including sexual dimorphism, presented in this report can aid in the surgical planning and execution of numerous operations performed in head and neck, especially digastric muscle transfer surgery. PMID:27258716

  16. Isolated Rheumatoid Nodule of the Achilles.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Paul J; Broussard, Gerald; Beaman, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 20% to 25% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have rheumatoid nodules. These nodules most commonly involve the soft tissues of the upper extremity, particularly adjacent to the olecranon. We present an uncommon case of a solitary rheumatoid nodule arising from the paratenon of the Achilles tendon with ultrasound and magnetic resonance images. PMID:26086458

  17. Achilles tendinopathy in amateur runners: role of adiposity (Tendinopathies and obesity)

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Oliva, Francesco; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Obesity is an important risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy, and running is usually carried out to reduce excess body weight. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy in young over-weight amateur runners. Male runners and non runners were recruited and, in each category, divided in two groups: normal weight, and overweight. Data about Achilles tendon thickness, vascularisation and structural abnormalities were collected using a Power Doppler Ultrasonography device. Achilles tendon thickness was greater in both normal weight or overweight runners, but the difference was significant only in normal weight subjects. In non - runners, thickness was significantly higher only in over-weight subjects. Sonographic abnormalities were significantly prevalent in overweight runners. Running is associated to a physiologic hypertrophy of Achilles tendon in normal weight subjects. Overweight runners may precociously develop tendon abnormalities, due to the increased stress and the unfavourable milieu of repair. PMID:23738273

  18. Nanostructural and nanomechanical responses of collagen fibrils in the collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Hee-Sang; Park, Hun-Kuk; Chung, Joo Ho

    2013-11-01

    Achilles tendons are vulnerable to acute or chronic injuries that lead to inflammation. We investigated nanostructural and nanomechanical changes in collagen fibrils from rat Achilles tendons over a period of 9 weeks after injury using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To evaluate the nanostructural changes in Achilles tendons, we measured the diameter and D-banding of collagen fibrils by AFM. And the adhesion forces, which were related to cross-linking of collagen, were calculated from the retraction process of a force-distance curve. We successfully observed the time course of changes in collagen fibrils during healing using AFM. The diameters and D-banding in healed tendons were similar to those of uninjured tendons at 9 weeks after injury, but the adhesion forces remained different from those of uninjured tendons. Our AFM results depicted the minute changes in Achilles tendon surface by natural healing quite well, even drawbacks to naturally healed tendon. Understanding changes in collagen cross-linking and structure while healing will lead to better understanding of healing mechanisms and subsequent improvements in treatment. And AFM can be applied as powerful tool to evaluate structural and property changes in collagen fibrils before and after injury and/or treatment in Achilles tendon. PMID:24245243

  19. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (P<0.05). The tissue engineered implants also reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and increased ultrasonographical echogenicity and homogenicity, maturation and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, tissue alignment and volume of the regenerated tissue compared to those of the control lesions (P<0.05). The implants were gradually absorbed and substituted by the new tendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice. PMID

  20. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  1. PSEUDOTUMORAL TOPHACEOUS INVOLVEMENT OF THE ACHILLES PARATENON.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, T; Crevits, I; Brijs, S; Debakker, G; Rosseel, F; Tieleman, A; De Man, R

    2015-01-01

    Gout is the most common form of microcrystalline arthropathy which usually does not pose a diagnostic challenge when patients have typical presentation, appropriate biochemical picture and classical radiographic appearance. However, formation of gouty tophi in unusual locations and with atypical presentations may mislead clinicians and radiologists, thereby justifying gout nickname as the "great mimicker". When interpreting images of tendon related masses, radiologists should be aware of gouty tophi as a possible differential given its variable and nonspecific imaging appearance. In this article, we present a case of a patient with a painless tophaceous gout nodule, adjacent to the Achilles tendon. PMID:26223063

  2. Cold weather training: a risk factor for Achilles paratendinitis among recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Finestone, A; Zin, D; Mandel, D; Novack, V

    2003-05-01

    In a prospective study of risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy among four induction cycles of infantry recruits, 95 out of 1405 recruits, (6.8%) were found to suffer from Achilles tendinopathy. In more than 94% of the cases, the tendinopathy was considered to be paratendinitis. Training season had a statistically significant effect on the incidence of Achilles paratendinitis with 3.6% suffering in the summer and 9.4% in the winter (p = .001). This increased risk for Achilles paratendinitis in cold weather outdoor training can be explained by a fall in temperature of the Achilles paratenon whose membranes are rich in mucopolysaccharides and serve as a lubricant for gliding of the tendon and epitenon. Decreased temperature may increase the viscosity of the lubricant and thereby increases friction and risk for Achilles paratendinitis. This same relationship illustrates why "warming up" before exercising may be important in lowering the incidence of Achilles paratendinitis. PMID:12801195

  3. [Rare causes and differential diagnoses of Achilles tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Lohrer, H

    1991-12-01

    Especially in sports disciplines involving high uniform stress by running, such as all running competitions in athletics, the condition known as achillodynia is a much-dreaded lesion. We evaluated an own series of 74 consecutive patients who reported pain at the achilles tendon, with regard to etiological aspects. It was a remarkable fact that besides the well-known classical reasons (degenerative changes in the center of the achilles tendon with spindle-shaped distension, aseptic irritated condition of the paratenon, bursitis subachillea mostly associated with Haglund's exostosis) numerous other syndromes may seem to be achilles tendon pain to individual athletes. To arrive at on-target therapy directed etiologically at the root cause of the disease, it will be necessary to differentiate them from one another: insertion tendopathies of the achilles tendon; metabolic diseases; arthritis and chondropathic disease of the ankle joint; hallux rigidus --rotation anomalies; tibia vara; os trigonum impingement syndrome --tendovaginitis of the flexor tendon at the retinaculum flexorum; stress fractures (calcaneus, fibula, tibia) Diagnosis is assisted, besides a detailed and exact clinical examination and an inspection of the sports shoes worn by the patient, by a biomechanical analysis of the running behaviour, an x-ray of the ankle joint, sonographic examination and clarification with the help of laboratory examinations, i.e. clinical pathology. PMID:1796345

  4. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  5. Tendon-Driven Continuum Robot for Endoscopic Surgery: Preclinical Development and Validation of a Tension Propagation Model

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takahisa; Okumura, Ichiro; Song, Sang-Eun; Golby, Alexandra J.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a tendon-driven continuum robot for endoscopic surgery. The robot has two sections for articulation actuated by tendon wires. By actuating the two sections independently, the robot can generate a variety of tip positions while maintaining the tip direction. This feature offers more flexibility in positioning the tip for large viewing angles of up to 180 degrees than does a conventional endoscope. To accurately estimate the tip position at large viewing angles, we employed kinematic mapping with a tension propagation model including friction between the tendon wires and the robot body. In a simulation study using this kinematic-mapping, the two-section robot at a target scale (outer diameter 1.7 mm and length 60 mm) produced a variety of tip positions within 50-mm ranges at the 180°-angle view. In the experimental validation, a 10:1 scale prototype performed three salient postures with different tip positions at the 180°-angle view. The proposed forward kinematic mapping (FKM) predicted the tip position within a tip-to-tip error of 6 mm over the 208-mm articulating length. The tip-to-tip error by FKM was significantly less than the one by conventional piecewise-constant-curvature approximation (PCCA) (FKM: 5.9 ± 2.9 mm vs. PCCA: 23.7 ± 3.6 mm, n=15, P < 0.01). PMID:26380544

  6. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  7. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  8. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  9. Achilles tendinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Thompson SR eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  10. Comparative ultrasonographic evaluation of the Achilles paratenon in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects: an imaging study.

    PubMed

    Stecco, A; Busoni, F; Stecco, C; Mattioli-Belmonte, M; Soldani, P; Condino, S; Ermolao, A; Zaccaria, M; Gesi, M

    2015-04-01

    Achilles tendon analysis represents one of the most frequently requested ultrasonographic evaluations, due to the high incidence of tendinopathy. Various authors have described inflammatory features of the paratenon recruited 22 subjects complaining of pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon and 22 healthy subjects. Both groups underwent ultrasonographic examination and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire administration. It was found statistically significant inter-group differences of the paratenon (p = 0.0001) as well as tendon thickness (p < 0.0001). Our results show that Achilles symptoms could also be associated with an increase in the paratenon thickness. We suggest that clinicians should carefully analyze paratenon thickness when evaluating patients with Achillodynia using ultrasound. It may be that the paratenon, when thickened, may explain some of the painful symptoms reported by patients and it is associated with a tendinopathy process, hence we suggest careful analysis in patients with Achillodynia. PMID:25047541

  11. Cholesterol level in non-insertional Achilles tendonopathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dishan

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is an autosomal dominant disease, with a prevalence of 1 in 500, where lipid deposits occur in the skin, tendons (particularly Achilles tendon) and arteries. It has a high risk of early coronary artery disease and mortality but is treatable with cholesterol lowering strategies if patients are diagnosed early. Studies in patients attending lipid clinics have shown that half the patients may have suffered from Achilles tendon symptoms 20 years earlier and it has been proposed that all patients presenting with Achilles tendon pain should have a serum cholesterol test. All consecutive patients seen in an adult foot and ankle clinic with non-insertional Achilles tendonopathy between April 2012 and March 2014 had their serum cholesterol measured. Only one patient in 83 (p=0.19) was diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia but 3 relatives of the proband patient were also diagnosed by cascade testing. Measurement of cholesterol in all patients presenting with achillodynia does not seem to be justified but the literature suggests that it should probably be considered in patients with bilateral extensive disease or those who give a history of intermittent episodes of severe pain lasting a few days. PMID:26275912

  12. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  13. Tailoring Tendon Transfer Surgery and Rehabilitation for a Musician: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Cynthia; Rivlin, Michael; Beredjiklian, Pedro K.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfers in hand patients are a commonly performed procedure after extensor tendon rupture. However, the standard side to side technique is not applicable in every patient. We present a case of a musician with unique demands to demonstrate the option to customize surgical technique and therapy regimen to the unique needs of each patient. An extensor indicis proprius to extensor digitorum communis transfer was performed in a 73 year old musician. A controlled active motion therapy protocol was followed. The patients musical practice regimen was incorporated into the therapy. The patient was able to independently extend her ring and small fingers in order to play her instrument and resumed play within one month postoperatively. A patient’s functional goals including avocations need to be considered when selecting the appropriate surgical and therapeutic approach. PMID:27200400

  14. Are Sport-Specific Profiles of Tendon Stiffness and Cross-Sectional Area Determined by Structural or Functional Integrity?

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether distinct sets of tendon properties are seen in athletes engaged in sports with contrasting requirements for tendon function and structural integrity. Patellar and Achilles tendon morphology and force-deformation relation were measured by combining ultrasonography, electromyography and dynamometry in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players and sedentary individuals. Tendon cross-sectional area normalized to body mass2/3 was smaller in water polo players than in other athletes (patellar and Achilles tendon; -28 to -24%) or controls (patellar tendon only; -9%). In contrast, the normalized cross-sectional area was larger in runners (patellar tendon only; +26%) and ski jumpers (patellar and Achilles tendon; +21% and +13%, respectively) than in controls. Tendon stiffness normalized to body mass2/3 only differed in ski jumpers, compared to controls (patellar and Achilles tendon; +11% and +27%, respectively) and to water polo players (Achilles tendon only; +23%). Tendon size appears as an adjusting variable to changes in loading volume and/or intensity, possibly to preserve ultimate strength or fatigue resistance. However, uncoupled morphological and mechanical properties indicate that functional requirements may also influence tendon adaptations. PMID:27362657

  15. Mechanisms of tendon injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Parks, William C.; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon disorders are common and lead to significant disability, pain, healthcare cost, and lost productivity. A wide range of injury mechanisms exist leading to tendinopathy or tendon rupture. Tears can occur in healthy tendons that are acutely overloaded (e.g., during a high speed or high impact event) or lacerated (e.g., a knife injury). Tendinitis or tendinosis can occur in tendons exposed to overuse conditions (e.g., an elite swimmer’s training regimen) or intrinsic tissue degeneration (e.g., age-related degeneration). The healing potential of a torn or pathologic tendon varies depending on anatomic location (e.g., Achilles vs. rotator cuff) and local environment (e.g., intrasynovial vs. extrasynovial). Although healing occurs to varying degrees, in general healing of repaired tendons follows the typical wound healing course, including an early inflammatory phase, followed by proliferative and remodeling phases. Numerous treatment approaches have been attempted to improve tendon healing, including growth factor- and cell-based therapies and rehabilitation protocols. This review will describe the current state of knowledge of injury and repair of the three most common tendinopathies-- flexor tendon lacerations, Achilles tendon rupture, and rotator cuff disorders-- with a particular focus on the use of animal models for understanding tendon healing. PMID:25641114

  16. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  17. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: a New Method to Measure in-vivo Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an elastography method to measure localized viscoelastic properties of tendon and to present initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction specific wave speeds were calculated using Local Frequency Estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel wise curve-fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels to those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as function of frequency that highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon showed that it is feasible to quantify local viscoeasltic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon showed a substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential of evaluating localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties due to injury and during recovery in a clinical setting. PMID:25796414

  18. Mechanisms of collagen fibril alignment in tendon injury: from tendon regeneration to artificial tendon.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Kojun; Tanaka, Hirohito F; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Ohkochi, Hiroki; Miyasaka, Muneo; Sato, Ryota; Kuzumaki, Toru; Yoshida, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    The process by which collagen fibrils are aligned following tendon injury remains unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the process of tendon regeneration by transmission electron microscopy, using a film model method. In mice, the Achilles tendon of medial head was transected. On day 3, after only the proximal end of the transected tendon was placed on film and kept in vivo, a translucent substance containing granules, called tendon gel, was secreted. On day 5, the granules assembled in a loose (L) layer, and coalesced tightly in a dense (D) layer, forming an L-D-L layered pattern. On day 10, granules showed high electron density in H layers, which developed into D-H-D layers on day 13. The distal end was placed on film to face the proximal end. On day 10, the tendon gel showed a D-H-D layer pattern. On day 11, mechanical stress from muscular constriction changed the tendon gel to aligned collagen fibrils (6 ± 2 nm in diameter). Thereafter, the diameter of the fibrils increased. Tendon gel harvested on day 5 or day 10 was pulled manually or by hanging weights (about 0.6 MPa). Aligned collagen fibrils (32 ± 7 nm in diameter) were created by traction using tendon gel harvested on day 10. PMID:21618275

  19. Photoacoustic microscopy of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Assessments of vascularity are important when assessing inflammation changes in tendon injuries since Achilles tendinitis is often accompanied with neovascularization or hypervascularity. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging in noninvasive monitoring of morphological and vascular changes in Achilles tendon injuries. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis model of mice was adopted here. During collagenase-induced tendinitis, a 25-MHz photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to image micro-vascular changes in Achilles tendons longitudinally up to 23 days. The positions of vessels imaged by PAM were identified by co-registration of PAM Bmode images with 25-MHz ultrasound (USM) ones. Morphological changes in Achilles tendons due to inflammation and edema were revealed by the PAM and USM images. Proliferation of new blood vessels within the tendons was also observed. Observed micro-vascular changes during tendinitis were similar to the findings in the literatures. This study demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging, owning required sensitivity and penetration, has the potential for high sensitive diagnosis and assessment of treatment performance in tendinopathy.

  20. Tendon and ligament injuries: the genetic component

    PubMed Central

    September, Alison V; Schwellnus, Martin P; Collins, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments within the upper and lower limbs are some of the more common sites of musculoskeletal injuries during physical activity. Several extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been shown to be associated with these injuries. More recently, studies have suggested that there is also, at least in part, a genetic component to the Achilles tendon, rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. However, specific genes have not been suggested to be associated with rotator cuff or anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Sequence variants of the tenascin C (TNC) gene, on the other hand, have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies and Achilles tendon ruptures, whereas a variant of the collagen V α 1 (COL5A1) gene has also been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies. Both genes encode for important structural components of tendons and ligaments. The COL5A1 gene encodes for a component of type V collagen, which has an important role in regulating collagen fibre assembly and fibre diameters. The TNC gene, on the other hand, encodes for TNC, which regulates the tissue's response to mechanical load. To date, only variants in two genes have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendon injuries. In addition, although specific genes have not been identified, investigators have suggested that there is also a genetic component to both rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In future, specific genotypes associated with increased risk of injury to specific tendons and ligaments can prevent these injuries by identifying individuals at higher risk. PMID:17261551

  1. Image-Guided Intervention of the Postoperative Foot and Ankle After Ligament and Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Monica; Walker, Miny; Amiras, Dimitri; Rosenfeld, Peter

    2016-02-01

    This review article describes the potential range of image-guided interventional procedures performed following foot and ankle ligament and/or tendon repair. Diagnosis of the cause of recurrent or persistent pain/symptoms in this postoperative group is challenging and requires a coordinated clinical and radiologic assessment. This directs appropriate treatment including image-guided intervention that may be used both as a diagnostic tool and a therapeutic option. There is a paucity of high-quality studies on the role of image-guided intervention in the foot and ankle after ligament/tendon repair. Many of the procedures used in this group are extrapolated from other areas of the body or the preoperative scenario. We review the role of imaging to identify the cause of postsurgical symptoms and to direct appropriate image-guided intervention. The available injectables and their roles are discussed. Specific surgical procedures are described including lateral ligament repair, Achilles repair, posterior tibialis tendon surgery, and peroneal tendon surgery. PMID:27077592

  2. Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Schneider, Michal Elisabeth; Malliaras, Peter; Chadwick, Martine; Connell, David Alister

    2015-01-01

    This primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE), B-mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy. The secondary aim was to establish the relationship between the strain ratio during sonoelastography and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores. The VISA-A questionnaire is a validated clinical rating scale that evaluates the symptoms and dysfunction of the Achilles tendon. One hundred twenty Achilles tendons of 120 consecutively registered patients with clinical symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy and another 120 gender- and age-matched, asymptomatic Achilles tendons of 120 healthy volunteers were assessed with B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher strain ratio scores and softer Achilles tendon properties compared with controls (p < 0.001). The strain ratio was moderately correlated with VISA-A scores (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy was 94.7%, 97.8% and 82.5% respectively. There was excellent correlation between the clinical reference standard and the grade of tendon quality on ASE (κ = 0.91, p < 0.05), compared with B-mode US (κ = 0.74, p < 0.05) and color Doppler imaging (κ = 0.49, p < 0.05). ASE is an accurate clinical tool in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy, with results comparable to those of B-mode US and excellent correlation with clinical findings. The strain ratio may offer promise as a supplementary tool for the objective evaluation of Achilles tendon properties. PMID:25438847

  3. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    PubMed

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. PMID:26059532

  4. The role of hind limb tendons in gibbon locomotion: springs or strings?

    PubMed

    Vereecke, Evie E; Channon, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Tendon properties have an important effect on the mechanical behaviour of muscles, with compliant tendons allowing near-isometric muscle contraction and facilitating elastic energy storage and recoil. Stiff tendons, in contrast, facilitate rapid force transfer and precise positional control. In humans, the long Achilles tendon contributes to the mechanical efficiency of running via elastic energy storage and recovery, and its presence has been linked to the evolution of habitual bipedalism. Gibbons also possess relatively long hind limb tendons; however, their role is as yet unknown. Based on their large dimensions, and inferring from the situation in humans, we hypothesize that the tendons in the gibbon hind limb will facilitate elastic energy storage and recoil during hind-limb-powered locomotion. To investigate this, we determined the material properties of the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon in vitro and linked this with available kinematic and kinetic data to evaluate their role in leaping and bipedalism. Tensile tests were conducted on tendon samples using a material testing machine and the load-displacement data were used to calculate stiffness, Young's modulus and hysteresis. In addition, the average stress-in-life and energy absorption capacity of both tendons were estimated. We found a functional difference between the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon, with the Achilles tendon being more suitable for elastic energy storage and release. The patellar tendon, in contrast, has a relatively high hysteresis, making it less suitable to act as elastic spring. This suggests that the gibbon Achilles tendon might fulfil a similar function as in humans, contributing to reducing the locomotor cost of bipedalism by acting as elastic spring, while the high stiffness of the patellar tendon might favour fast force transfer upon recoil and, possibly, enhance leaping performance. PMID:23868842

  5. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  6. Conservative management of Achilles Tendinopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Papa, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the conservative treatment and management of a 77-year old female patient presenting with chronic pain of 8 months duration in the midportion of the achilles tendon diagnosed as achilles tendinopathy. Clinical features: The main clinical feature was pain in the midportion of the achilles tendon, 2 to 6 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Symptom onset was gradual and unrelated to any acute trauma or overt injury mechanism. Intervention and outcome: The conservative treatment approach consisted of medical acupuncture with electrical stimulation, Graston Technique®, eccentric calf training, and rehabilitative exercise prescription. Outcome measures included verbal pain rating scale, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), and a return to activities of daily living (ADLs). The patient attained long-term resolution of her complaint and at 12 month follow-up reported no recurrence of symptoms. Conclusion: A combination of conservative rehabilitation strategies may be used by chiropractors to treat midportion achilles tendinopathy and allow an individual to return to pain free ADLs in a timely manner. PMID:22997472

  7. Case report: can sacroiliac joint dysfunction cause chronic Achilles tendinitis?

    PubMed

    Voorn, R

    1998-06-01

    This case study discusses the possible relationship between chronic Achilles tendinitis and sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The patient presented is an active pole jumper, competing at both the national and international levels. He suffered from chronic Achilles tendinitis during the 1994-95 season, and conservative treatment applied locally was not successful. The athlete discarded the possibility of operative debridement of the tendon. Instead, an evaluation of the kinetic chain of the lower extremity and pelvic-lumbar area was performed, and the athlete was diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction and Achilles tendinitis. Evaluation findings, treatment program, and treatment outcome are also presented. The literature regarding sacroiliac joint mechanics and biomechanics of the foot-knee-hip and pelvic area is discussed and used to support the author's thesis that sacroiliac joint dysfunction, in this case a backward rotation of the right ilium, may have changed the kinematic chain of the lower extremity and caused a tendinitis in the Achilles tendon of the affected leg. Sacroiliac joint function and dysfunction, the reliability of sacroiliac joint mobility tests, and the validity of treatment programs are still considered controversial, and more research is needed to understand these mechanisms. PMID:9617730

  8. Platelet-rich plasma: evidence for the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, B; Filardo, G; Kon, E; Marcacci, M

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced in the clinical practice to treat a growing number of different musculoskeletal pathologies. It is currently applied in the treatment of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies, which are common sport-related injuries very challenging to manage. Aim of the present paper was to review systematically the available clinical evidence concerning the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. A systematic review of the literature was performed according to the following inclusion criteria for relevant articles: (1) clinical reports of any level of evidence, (2) written in the English language, (3) with no time limitation and (4) on the use of PRP to treat conservatively Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Twenty-two studies were included and analyzed. Two studies on patellar tendinopathy were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whereas just one RCT was published on Achilles tendon. All the papers concerning patellar tendon reported positive outcome for PRP, which proved to be superior to other traditional approaches such as shock-wave therapy and dry needling. In the case of Achilles tendon, despite the encouraging findings reported by case series, the only RCT available showed no significant clinical difference between PRP and saline solution. The main finding of this study was the paucity of high-level literature regarding the application of PRP in the management of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, the clinical data currently available, although not univocal, suggest considering PRP as a therapeutic option for recalcitrant patellar and Achilles tendinopathies. PMID:25323041

  9. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  10. Achilles' death: anatomical considerations regarding the most famous trauma of the Trojan War.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, Sophia; Mavridis, Ioannis

    2013-03-01

    In Greek mythology, Achilles was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. As Achilles died because of a small wound on his heel, the term "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a person's principal weakness. But is the human heel a really vulnerable part of our body? Could a non-poisonous arrow have caused Achilles' death? Should an arrow be necessarily poisonous in order to cause a lethal heel would? The purpose of this effort is to explain, from an anatomic point of view, how Achilles heel wounding could have led to his death. The Achilles tendon is the strongest, largest and thickest tendon in the human body and plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. The blood supply of the tendon is from the peroneal and posterior tibial arteries. It is quite likely that the arrow which killed Achilles was poisoned. This supposition could be of course enough to cause his death. In case the arrow was not poisoned a rupture of the posterior tibial artery by the arrow could have caused a bleeding, but it seems unlikely for such a bleeding to be lethal. Moreover, a combination of these two theories could have also taken place, i.e. a poisoned arrow traumatizing the posterior tibial artery and hence causing rapid diffusion of the poison as well as bleeding. Furthermore, infectious and/or immunologic bases regarding Achilles' death could be considered. In our opinion, a poisoned arrow was probably the crucial factor leading to the famous inglorious death of this famous glorious Homeric hero. PMID:23425764

  11. INTEGRITY OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON AFTER OPEN SURGERY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY: A CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Osvandré; Piluski, Paulo; Tambani, Renato; Castro, Nero; Pimentel, Gilnei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the integrity of the subscapularis tendon by strength, function and magnetic resonance imaging after deltopectoralis access for anterior shoulder instability. Methods: 20 patients with anterior shoulder instability have been evaluated. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 40 months. Only male patients were included, with a mean of age of 29 years (20 − 42 years). The patients have been submitted to physical examinations of mobility, muscular strength, Belly Test and Gerber Test. The isokinetic strength in internal and external rotation, in angular speeds of 600/s and 1800/s, for both shoulders was measured using a dynamometer. In 15 patients magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out on both shoulders for evaluating the thickness, cross-sectional area and atrophy of the subscapularis muscle. Results: A significant difference was found between torque peaks at the speed of 600/s for internal (p=0.036) and external (p=0.008) rotation. However, at 1800/s the opposite happens (internal rotation: p=0.133; external rotation: p=0.393). Subscapularis muscle thickness and area are significantly smaller than the normal side, with a deficit of 19% and 23%, respectively. According to Rowe and UCLA scores, we find excellent and good results for the majority of patients, with a mean of 88 and 31.6 points, respectively. Conclusion: Despite of the good functional results, open surgery can limit strength and reduce the thickness and the cross-sectional area of subscapularis muscle. However, the best results were found in the patients who had the dominant side operated. PMID:27004190

  12. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  13. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  14. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy. A survey of surgical and histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Aström, M; Rausing, A

    1995-07-01

    The surgical findings and the histopathology are reported for 163 patients (134 males, 29 females; mean age, 38 years; range, 13-72 years; 75% athletes) with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Biopsy specimens from symptomatic (155 cases) and nonsymptomatic (90 cases) parts of the tendon and from the paratenon (97 cases) were obtained. Surgical reports were reviewed and histopathology was evaluated according to a standardized protocol. Eighteen tendons also were analyzed by immunofluorescence for fibrinogen, immunoglobulins, and complement. Degenerative changes (tendinosis) characterized by abnormal fiber structure, focal hypercellularity, and vascular proliferation were noted in 90% of biopsy specimens from symptomatic parts of the tendons and, to a lesser degree, in 20% from nonsymptomatic parts. Fibrinogen could be identified in most lesion biopsy specimens. Partial tendon ruptures were present in 19% of the patients and always occurred in areas afflicted with tendinosis. The paratenon was mostly normal or revealed only slight changes. Increasing age and male gender were associated with more pronounced histopathologic changes. Tendinosis, sometimes complicated by partial rupture, appears to be the major lesion in chronic Achilles tendinopathy; the paratenon is rarely involved. Important features are a lack of inflammatory cells and a poor healing response. PMID:7634699

  15. The blood supply of the tendon with a paratenon. An experimental study using hydrogen washout technique.

    PubMed

    Naito, M; Ogata, K

    1983-02-01

    The blood supply to the central third of the Achilles tendon was studied in adult rabbits using the hydrogen washout technique before and after soft tissue dissection including paratenon. The soft tissue dissection caused a decrease of the blood flow rate in the Achilles tendon by approximately 35 per cent. These results may indicate that the central third of the tendon with a paratenon receives its blood supply from the extrinsic vascular system by approximately 35 per cent and from the intrinsic vascular system by approximately 65 per cent. PMID:6852665

  16. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  17. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  18. Mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: why painful? An evidence-based philosophy.

    PubMed

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-08-01

    Chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy is generally difficult to treat as the background to the pain mechanisms has not yet been clarified. A wide range of conservative and surgical treatment options are available. Most address intratendinous degenerative changes when present, as it is believed that these changes are responsible for the symptoms. Since up to 34% of asymptomatic tendons show histopathological changes, we believe that the tendon proper is not the cause of pain in the majority of patients. Chronic painful tendons show the ingrowth of sensory and sympathetic nerves from the paratenon with release of nociceptive substances. Denervating the Achilles tendon by release of the paratenon is sufficient to cause pain relief in the majority of patients. This type of treatment has the additional advantage that it is associated with a shorter recovery time when compared with treatment options that address the tendon itself. An evidence-based philosophy on the cause of pain in chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy is presented. Level of evidence V. PMID:21567177

  19. Incidence of postoperative wound infections after open tendo Achilles repairs

    PubMed Central

    Marican, Mohd Mizan; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Tendo Achilles (TA), which is the confluence of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, is one of the most commonly injured tendons. The surgical repair of TA ruptures is associated with a significant risk of infection. This study examined several factors (i.e. gender, age, body mass index, history of diabetes mellitus, steroid use, acute or chronic TA injuries, type of surgical incision and type of sutures used) that may be associated with postoperative wound infection after open TA repair. METHODS This was a retrospective study involving 60 patients who underwent open TA repair over an 18-month period. Patients who had prior TA surgery or open TA injuries, or who needed soft tissues flaps were excluded. RESULTS Among the patients, 7 (11.7%) developed superficial wound infections that were successfully treated with oral antibiotics, while 3 (5.0%) developed deep wound infections that required at least one debridement procedure. No significant association was found between the risk of postoperative wound infection and gender, age, the presence of diabetes mellitus, acute or chronic ruptures, site of surgical incision and type of deep or superficial sutures used. CONCLUSION While diabetes mellitus and age did not appear to be associated with postoperative wound infections after open TA repair, obese patients were found to be two times more likely to develop a wound infection than normal-weight patients. The incidence of superficial wound infections in this study was similar to previously published results (11.7% vs. 8.2%–14.6%), but the incidence of deep infections was higher (5% vs. 1%–2%). PMID:26512146

  20. Comparison of postinjection protocols after intratendinous Achilles platelet-rich plasma injections: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I; de Jonge, Suzan; de Jonge, Milko C; Kerkhoffs, Gino M; Verhaar, Jan; van Dijk, C Niek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the distribution of intratendinous injected platelet-rich plasma (PRP) after 15 minutes of prone resting versus immediate manipulation simulating weightbearing. Ten cadaveric lower limbs were injected under ultrasound guidance with PRP dyed with India blue ink. The dyed PRP was injected into the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon, after which 5 specimens were placed in the prone position for 15 minutes (simulating rest) and the remaining 5 specimens were manipulated through 100 cycles of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion (simulating walking). Thereafter, the specimens were dissected, and the distribution of the India blue dye was ascertained. In the simulated rest group, every specimen showed dyed PRP in the Achilles tendon and in the space between the paratenon and tendon. The median craniocaudal spread of the PRP was 140 (range 125 to 190) mm. In 4 of the simulated rest tendons (80%), the distribution of PRP extended across the entire transverse plane width of the tendon. In the simulated motion group, every specimen showed dyed PRP extending across the entire transverse plane width of the tendon and in the space between the paratenon and tendon. The median craniocaudal spread was 135 (range 115 to 117) mm. No statistically significant difference was found in the amount of craniocaudal spread between the simulated motion and rest groups. In conclusion, it does not appear to matter whether the ankle has been moved through its range of motion or maintained stationary during the first 15 minutes after PRP injection into the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon. The precise meaning of this information in the clinical realm remains to be discerned. PMID:25128307

  1. Blood flow in chronic Achilles tendinosis. Radioactive microsphere study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Backman, C; Fridén, J; Widmark, A

    1991-08-01

    Cerium-labeled microspheres were used for blood-flow measurements in 7 New Zealand white rabbits with exercise-induced chronic Achilles paratenonitis and tendinosis. The blood flow increased 1.9 times more on the exercised side as compared with the contralateral, unexercised (control) side with respect to both the tendon and the paratenon. The blood flow of the tendon of the exercised leg showed a strong correlation with the blood flow in the paratenon of the ipsilateral side (r = 0.81). We concluded that the relative contribution of blood from the paratenon to the tendon remained unaltered in the exercised tendon and that degeneration of the tendon cannot be primarily explained by chronic circulatory impairment. PMID:1882683

  2. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway. PMID:21030672

  3. Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy with Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Vascular Fraction

    PubMed Central

    de Girolamo, Laura; Grassi, Miriam; Viganò, Marco; Orfei, Carlotta Perucca; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Usuelli, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Achilles tendinopathy commonly occurs in both active and inactive persons. It consists in the development of pain and inflammation in the early phases, with progression to the development of fibrotic tissue and degeneration of tendon matrix. Current conservative treatment approaches do not provide sustained satisfactory results, particularly in active patients, although platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection have shown to be effective in many cases. The therapeutic effect of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), either expanded or used directly within the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), have demonstrated to possess significant anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, mediated by the release of active factors, and thus potentially useful in the treatment of tendinopathy. Methods: Patients affected by non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy (range 18-55 y/o) were prospectively enrolled in this controlled study, and randomly assigned either to single PRP injection group (GPSIII kit, Biomet, USA) (n=28 tendons) or single adipose tissue SVF (FastKit, Corios, Italy) (n=28 tendons) injection group. All patients were assessed clinically pre-operatively and at 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 days from treatment, using VAS Pain, VISA-A, AOFAS and SF-36 forms. Patients also underwent to US and MRI before treatment and then at 4 and 6 month-follow-ups. An aliquot of SVF of each patient was analyzed in vitro for mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) content, viability, proliferation rate, differentiation potential and immunomodulatory ability. Sample size of the study was calculated with a power analysis based on VISA-A score. All the results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. A Wilcoxon test for paired data was performed to compare variables before and after surgery. Results: Population background data and pre-operative scores were similar in the two groups (p>0.05). At final follow up both patients group showed significantly improvements in all the scores in

  4. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  5. The effect of ciprofloxacin on tendon, paratenon, and capsular fibroblast metabolism.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J; Attia, E; Wickiewicz, T L; Hannafin, J A

    2000-01-01

    The pathologic mechanisms underlying fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy are poorly understood. The observed incidence of tendinitis and tendon rupture in patients treated with ciprofloxacin hydrochloride suggests that the fluoroquinolone antibiotics alter tendon fibroblast metabolism. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of ciprofloxacin on fibroblast metabolism in vitro. Canine Achilles tendon, paratenon, and shoulder capsule specimens were maintained in culture with ciprofloxacin (5, 10, or 50 microg/ml). Fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis, proteoglycan synthesis, and matrix-degrading activity were analyzed. Incubation of Achilles tendon, Achilles paratenon, and shoulder capsule fibroblasts with ciprofloxacin resulted in a statistically significant 66% to 68% decrease in cell proliferation compared with control cells at day 3 in culture. Ciprofloxacin caused a statistically significant 36% to 48% decrease in collagen synthesis compared with controls in all fibroblast cultures. Ciprofloxacin caused a statistically significant 14% to 60% decrease in proteoglycan synthesis in all fibroblast cell lines. Compared with unstimulated control fibroblasts, culture media from Achilles tendon, paratenon, and shoulder capsule cells that were exposed to ciprofloxacin demonstrated statistically significant increases in matrix-degrading proteolytic activity after 72 hours in culture. This study demonstrates that ciprofloxacin stimulates matrix-degrading protease activity from fibroblasts and that it exerts an inhibitory effect on fibroblast metabolism. The increase in protease activity and the inhibition of both cell proliferation and the synthesis of matrix ground substance may contribute to the clinically described tendinopathies associated with ciprofloxacin therapy. PMID:10843129

  6. A non-invasive method of tendon force measurement.

    PubMed

    Pourcelot, Philippe; Defontaine, Marielle; Ravary, Bérangère; Lemâtre, Mickaël; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2005-10-01

    The ability to measure the forces exerted in vivo on tendons and, consequently, the forces produced by muscles on tendons, offers a unique opportunity to investigate questions in disciplines as varied as physiology, biomechanics, orthopaedics and neuroscience. Until now, tendon loads could be assessed directly only by means of invasive sensors implanted within or attached to these collagenous structures. This study shows that the forces acting on tendons can be measured, in a non-invasive way, from the analysis of the propagation of an acoustic wave. Using the equine superficial digital flexor tendon as a model, it is demonstrated that the velocity of an ultrasonic wave propagating along the main axis of a tendon increases with the force applied to this tendon. Furthermore, we show that this velocity measurement can be performed even in the presence of skin overlying the tendon. To validate this measurement technique in vivo, the ultrasonic velocity plots obtained in the Achilles tendon at the walk were compared to the loads plots reported by other authors using invasive transducers. PMID:16084214

  7. Prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendinopathy and their association to intratendinous changes in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassel, M; Baur, H; Hirschmüller, A; Carlsohn, A; Fröhlich, K; Mayer, F

    2015-06-01

    Achilles (AT) and patellar tendons (PT) are commonly affected by tendinopathy in adult athletes but prevalence of symptoms and morphological changes in adolescents is unclear. The study aimed to determine prevalence of tendinopathy and intratendinous changes in ATs and PTs of adolescent athletes. A total of 760 adolescent athletes (13.0 ± 1.9 years; 160 ± 13 cm; 50 ± 14 kg) were examined. History, local clinical examination, and longitudinal Doppler ultrasound analysis for both ATs and PTs were performed including identification of intratendinous echoic changes and vascularization. Diagnosis of tendinopathy was complied clinically in case of positive history of tendon pain and tendon pain on palpation. Achilles tendinopathy was diagnosed in 1.8% and patellar tendinopathy in 5.8%. Vascularizations were visible in 3.0% of ATs and 11.4% of PTs, hypoechogenicities in 0.7% and 3.2% as well as hyperechogenicities in 0% and 0.3%, respectively. Vascularizations and hypoechogenicities were statistically significantly more often in males than in females (P ≤ 0.02). Subjects with patellar tendinopathy had higher prevalence of structural intratendinous changes than those without PT symptoms (P ≤ 0.001). In adolescent athletes, patellar tendinopathy is three times more frequent compared with Achilles tendinopathy. Longitudinal studies are necessary to investigate physiological or pathological origin of vascularizations and its predictive value in development of tendinopathy. PMID:25212527

  8. Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Puja; Aggarwal, Amita

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site. PMID:26894910

  9. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  10. Dynamic tracking of tendon elongation in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Mahta; Screen, Hazel; Morrissey, Dylan

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the elongation of the Achilles tendon by looking at the changing position of Myo-Tendenious Junction (MTJ) using ultrasound during isometric contraction on an Isometric dynamometer. A sequence of ultrasound images in the form of movie, obtained from a unit operating at a frequency of 12MHz during isometric contraction, was analyzed offline using MATLAB to track the MTJ. This investigation has implemented important techniques for in vivo feature extraction of Achilles tendon. Prior to feature extraction, the images were filtered by anisotropic diffusion method and morphological enhancements. The cross correlation search algorithm with an adaptive mask was utilized to track MTJ by comparing adjacent segmented frames. The present method was studied on seventeen subjects, where it was able to measure the related movement accurately.

  11. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug reduces neutrophil and macrophage accumulation but does not improve tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, David; Côté, Claude H; Frenette, Jérôme

    2003-07-01

    Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a beneficial effect on tendon regeneration is still a matter of debate. Given that inflammatory cells are thought to induce nonspecific damage following an injury, we tested the hypothesis that a 3-day treatment with diclofenac would protect tendons from inflammatory cell injury and would promote healing. Neutrophil and ED1(+) macrophage concentrations were determined in the paratenon and the core of the rat Achilles tendon following collagenase-induced injury. Hydroxyproline content, edema, and mechanical properties were also evaluated at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-trauma. Collagenase injections induced a 70% decrease in the ultimate rupture point at Day 3. Diclofenac treatments (1 mg/kg bid) selectively decreased the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages by 59% and 35%, respectively, in the paratenon, where blood vessels are numerous, but did not reduce the accumulation of neutrophils and ED1(+) macrophages in the core of the tendon. Edema was significantly reduced on Day 3 but persisted during the remodeling phase in the diclofenac-treated group only. The inhibition of leukocyte accumulation by diclofenac did not translate into a reduction of tissue damage or a promotion of tissue healing, because the mechanical properties of injured Achilles tendons were identical in placebo and diclofenac-treated groups. These results indicate that diclofenac reduced both edema and the accumulation of inflammatory cells within the paratenon but provided no biochemical or functional benefits for the Achilles tendon. PMID:12861039

  12. Tissue specific characteristics of cells isolated from human and rat tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, N; Rolf, CG; Scutt, A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tendon and ligament injuries are common and costly in terms of surgery and rehabilitation. This might be improved by using tissue engineered constructs to accelerate the repair process; a method used successfully for skin wound healing and cartilage repair. Progress in this field has however been limited; possibly due to an over-simplistic choice of donor cell. For tissue engineering purposes it is often assumed that all tendon and ligament cells are similar despite their differing roles and biomechanics. To clarify this, we have characterised cells from various tendons and ligaments of human and rat origin in terms of proliferation, response to dexamethasone and cell surface marker expression. Methods Cells isolated from tendons by collagenase digestion were plated out in DMEM containing 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin/streptomycin and ultraglutamine. Cell number and collagen accumulation were by determined methylene blue and Sirius red staining respectively. Expression of cell surface markers was established by flow cytometry. Results In the CFU-f assay, human PT-derived cells produced more and bigger colonies suggesting the presence of more progenitor cells with a higher proliferative capacity. Dexamethasone had no effect on colony number in ACL or PT cells but 10 nM dexamethasone increased colony size in ACL cultures whereas higher concentrations decreased colony size in both ACL and PT cultures. In secondary subcultures, dexamethasone had no significant effect on PT cultures whereas a stimulation was seen at low concentrations in the ACL cultures and an inhibition at higher concentrations. Collagen accumulation was inhibited with increasing doses in both ACL and PT cultures. This differential response was also seen in rat-derived cells with similar differences being seen between Achilles, Patellar and tail tendon cells. Cell surface marker expression was also source dependent; CD90 was expressed at higher levels by PT cells and in both humans and

  13. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  14. [Flexor tendon repair: a short story].

    PubMed

    Moutet, F; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V

    2014-12-01

    This short story of flexor tendon repair aims to illustrate hesitations and wanderings of this surgery. Obviously tendon repair was very early considered, but it developed and diffused rather lately. It became a routine practice only in 20th century. This was due on the one hand, in Occident, to the Galen's dogmatic interdiction, on the other hand, to the repair difficulties of this paradoxical structure. Actually tendon is made of fibroblasts and collagen (sticky substances), and then its only goal is to move. According to this necessity, whatever the used techniques are, gliding is the final purpose. Technical evolutions are illustrated by historical contributions to flexor tendon surgery of several "giants" of hand surgery. PMID:24837978

  15. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  16. Silastic tendon graft: its role in neglected tendon repair.

    PubMed

    LaBarbiera, A P; Solitto, R J

    1990-01-01

    A case history is presented of the repair of a neglected traumatic tendon laceration by the use of a permanent Silastic tendon implant, originally manufactured for hand surgery by a staged procedure. Stage I consists of implantation of the Silastic implant and allowance of a 2- to 3-month period for the production of a pseudosheath. Stage II consists of removal of the implant after using it to guide an auto- or allograft, through the newly formed pseudosheath for attachment to the anastomotic sites. PMID:2258563

  17. Measurement of stress strain and vibrational properties of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a new non-intrusive experimental procedure based on laser techniques for the measurement of mechanical properties of tendons. The procedure is based on the measurement of the first resonance frequency of the tendon by laser Doppler vibrometry during in vitro tensile experiments, with the final aim of establishing a measurement procedure to perform the mechanical characterization of tendons by extracting parameters such as the resonance frequency, also achievable during in vivo investigation. The experimental procedure is reported, taking into account the need to simulate the physiological conditions of the Achilles tendon, and the measurement technique used for the non-invasive determination of tendon cross-sectional area during tensile vibration tests at different load levels is described. The test procedure is based on a tensile machine, which measures longitudinal tendons undergoing controlled load conditions. Cross-sectional area is measured using a new non-contact procedure for the measurement of tendon perimeter (repeatability of 99% and accuracy of 2%). For each loading condition, vibration resonance frequency and damping, cross-sectional area and tensile force are measured, allowing thus a mechanical characterization of the tendon. Tendon stress-strain curves are reported. Stress-strain curves have been correlated to the first vibration resonance frequency and damping of the tendon measured using a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer. Moreover, experimental results have been compared with a theoretical model of a vibrating cord showing discrepancies. In vitro tests are reported, demonstrating the validity of the method for the comparison of different aged rabbit tendons.

  18. Nutritional research may be useful in treating tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Luke

    2016-06-01

    Tendon injures cause a great deal of disability and pain, and increase medical costs. However, relatively little is known about tendon biology and healing. Many tendon-related surgical procedures are not very successful and leave the patient with essentially a chronic injury. New therapeutic approaches for tendon injury are needed. Preliminary evidence suggests that various nutrients such as proteins, amino acids (leucine, arginine, glutamine), vitamins C and D, manganese, copper, zinc, and phytochemicals may be useful in improving tendon growth and healing. More research on nutrition and tendon health is needed. Because many nutrients are required for tendon health, nutritional interventions involving multiple nutrients may be more effective than single-nutrient strategies. In the future, ideal treatment regimens for tendon injuries may include a multifaceted "bundle" of nutrition, drugs, biologic products, extracellular matrix therapies, exercise/physical therapy, and possibly surgery. PMID:26921066

  19. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  20. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  1. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  2. Overuse tendon conditions: time to change a confusing terminology.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Khan, K M; Puddu, G

    1998-01-01

    In overuse clinical conditions in and around tendons, frank inflammation is infrequent, and is associated mostly with tendon ruptures. Tendinosis implies tendon degeneration without clinical or histological signs of intratendinous inflammation, and is not necessarily symptomatic. Patients undergoing an operation for Achilles tendinopathy show similar areas of degeneration. When the term tendinitis is used in a clinical context, it does not refer to a specific histopathological entity. However, tendinitis is commonly used for conditions that are truly tendinoses, and this leads athletes and coaches to underestimate the proven chronicity of the condition. Paratenonitis is characterized by acute edema and hypermia of the paratenon, with infiltration of inflammatory cells, possibly with production of a fibrinous exudate that fills the tendon sheath, causing the typical crepitus that can be felt on clinical examination. The term partial tear of a tendon should describe a macroscopically evident subcutaneous partial tear of a tendon, an uncommon acute lesion. Most articles describing the surgical treatment of 'partial tears' of a given tendon in reality deal with degenerative tendinopathies. The combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance should be labeled tendinopathy. According to the tissues affected, the terms tendinopathy, paratendinopathy, or pantendinopathy should be used. PMID:9848596

  3. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  4. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Werber, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS) of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. PMID:26491722

  5. Subscapularis Tendon Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Bok; Park, Young Eun; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Shon, Min Soo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    The subscapularis tendon plays an essential role in shoulder function. Although subscapularis tendon tears are less common than other rotator cuff tears, tears of the subscapularis tendon have increasingly been recognized with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. A suture bridge technique for the treatment of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears has provided the opportunity to improve the pressurized contact area and mean footprint pressure. However, suture bridge fixation of subscapularis tendon tears appears to be technically challenging. We describe an arthroscopic surgical technique for suture bridge repair of subscapularis tendon tears that obtains ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. Surgery using such a suture bridge technique is indicated for large tears, such as tears involving the entire first facet or more, tears with a disrupted lateral sling, and combined medium to large supraspinatus/infraspinatus tears. PMID:26052489

  6. Radiofrequency preserves histoarchitecture and enhances collagen synthesis in experimental tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Flavia Emi; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real; Andrade, Mauro; Teodoro, Walcy Rosolia; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the action of radiofrequency (RF) on the healing process after inducing experimental lesions of the Achilles tendon in rats. Wistar rats were surgically subjected to bilateral partial transverse sectioning of the Achilles tendon. The right tendon was treated with radiofrequency (RFT), whereas the left tendon served as a control (CT). On the third postoperative day, the rats were divided into three experimental groups consisting of ten rats each, which were treated with monopolar radiofrequency (Tonederm™) until they were sacrificed on the 7th, 14th or 28th days. The histological specimens were studied for inflammatory cell content, collagen types I and III, immunostaining and morphometry. Total collagen were biochemically analyzed and to evalute fibroblast and myofibroblast proliferation by vimentin and α-actin smooth muscle immunohistochemistry methods. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test, the sign test and the Kruskal-Wallis test to compare tendons treated with radiofrequency with the non-treated tendons (α=5%; α=10%). Larger amounts of collagen I with hydroxyproline content and myofibroblast cells were clearly evident within 7 days (p<0.05). No difference was observed in the inflammatory cell content between the groups. We found better collagen arrangement with RF administration across the entire time studied. Radiofrequency administration preserves histoarchitecture and enhances collagen synthesis during the initial phases of cicatrization, suggesting that the treatment can provide improved stiffness during the most vulnerable phases of tendon healing. Clinical studies may include RF among the therapeutic tools in tendinous lesion management. PMID:26337455

  7. Tendon, tendon healing, hyperlipidemia and statins

    PubMed Central

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Unay, Koray

    2011-01-01

    Summary Both hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome have adverse effect on tendon structure. Atorvastatin is most widely used antihyperlipidemic drug. Statins have adverse effects on the tendon. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between atorvastatin and skeletal muscles. Atorvastatin administered after the surgical repair of a ruptured tendon appears to affect revascularization, collagenization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and collagen construction. Therefore, further investigations on the effects of atorvastatin on tendon healing are needed. PMID:23738266

  8. Using your shoulder after surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... You had surgery on your shoulder to repair a muscle, tendon, or cartilage tear. The surgeon may have removed damaged tissue. You will need to know how ...

  9. Tendon Injuries of the Hand in Kirikkale, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Elif

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tendon injuries are one of the most common injuries of the hand and challenging problems in trauma surgery. They usually require surgical repair and unlike the single tendon injuries, flexor tendon injuries have higher morbidities when accompanied with nerve injuries. In the present study, I aimed to report the clinical experiences and outcomes about tendon injuries. METHODS A total of 180 patients (149 males, 31 females) between 17 and 56 years old were operated in the clinic due to tendon injury. Seventy isolated extensor tendon injuries, 60 isolated flexor tendon injuries, 30 multiple flexor tendon and major nerve injuries, 18 combined extensor and flexor tendon injuries, and 2 combined extensor, flexor and major nerve injuries were treated. All patients were admitted to the clinic in acute phase and operated immediately. Physiotherapy was started in the third day of the operation. RESULTS Patients were followed up between 6 and 18 months (mean 12.4 months). There was not any major complications except one female patient (0.5%) who did not conform to the treatment protocol after flexor tendon injury. Fifteen patients (8.5%) had poor flexor range of motion. The other patients were healed uneventfully. CONCLUSION Tendon healing may cause some complications from mild to severe degrees. However, atraumatic surgery and a comprehensive postoperative early physiotherapy could decrease these complication rates.

  10. Chronic achilles paratenonitis with tendinosis: an experimental model in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Backman, C; Boquist, L; Fridén, J; Lorentzon, R; Toolanen, G

    1990-07-01

    An experimental model for inducing chronic Achilles paratenonitis with tendinosis in the rabbit is presented. Thirteen rabbits were exercised in a kicking machine producing passive flexions and extensions of the ankle joint. Active contractions of the triceps surae muscles were induced by electric stimulation via surface electrodes. The animals were exercised for 5 to 6 weeks, with a rate of 150 flexions and extensions per minute for 2 h, three times a week. Light microscopic examination showed degenerative changes of the tendon, and increased number of capillaries, infiltrates of inflammatory cells, edema, and fibrosis in the paratenon. We conclude that chronic Achilles paratenonitis with tendinosis can be experimentally induced in a standardized manner in rabbits. PMID:2355294

  11. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  12. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  13. Sensory neuropeptidergic pattern in tendon, ligament and joint capsule. A study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, P W; Finn, A; Ahmed, M

    1999-07-13

    The normal occurrence of sensory neuropeptides in tendons, ligaments and joint capsules in the rat was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Nerve fibres immunoreactive to substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A, galanin and somatostatin were identified in the Achilles tendon as well as the collateral ligaments and joint capsule of the knee. The neuropeptidergic fibres were predominantly found in the epiligament and paratenon. However, SP- and CGRP-positive fibres were also seen in the proper ligament and tendon tissues. RIA showed higher concentrations of SP and CGRP in tendons than in ligaments and capsules. The morphological and quantitative data obtained on sensory neuropeptides in normal tendons, ligaments and joint capsules may be used as a reference for tissue analysis in painful and inflammatory conditions of the locomotor apparatus. PMID:10424674

  14. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft. PMID:23814244

  15. Single-Stage Flexor Tendon Grafting: Refining the Steps.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Derek R; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Single-stage tendon grafting for reconstruction of zone I and II flexor tendon injuries is a challenging procedure in hand surgery. Careful patient selection, strict indications, and adherence to sound surgical principles are mandatory for return of digital motion. PMID:26026357

  16. Pitfalls during biomechanical testing - Evaluation of different fixation methods for measuring tendons endurance properties.

    PubMed

    Hangody, Gy; Pánics, G; Szebényi, G; Kiss, R; Hangody, L; Pap, K

    2016-03-01

    The goal of the study was to find a proper technique to fix tendon grafts into an INSTRON loading machine. From 8 human cadavers, 40 grafts were collected. We removed the bone-patella tendon-bone grafts, the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, the quadriceps tendon-bone grafts, the Achilles tendons, and the peroneus longus tendons from each lower extremity. We tested the tendon grafts with five different types of fixation devices: surgical thread (Premicron 3), general mounting clamp, wire mesh, cement fixation, and a modified clamp for an INSTRON loading machine. The mean failure load in case of surgical thread fixation was (381N ± 26N). The results with the general clamp were (527N ± 45N). The wire meshes were more promising (750N ± 21N), but did not reach the outcomes we desired. Easy slippages of the ends of the tendons from the cement encasements were observed (253N ± 18N). We then began to use Shi's clamp that could produce 977N ± 416N peak force. We combined Shi's clamp with freezing of the graft and the rupture of the tendon itself demonstrated an average force of 2198 N ± 773N. We determined that our modified frozen clamp fixed the specimens against high tensile forces. PMID:27030630

  17. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-01-01

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon. PMID:25415472

  18. Rapamycin Attenuates Age-associated Changes in Tibialis Anterior Tendon Viscoelastic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zaseck, Lauren Wood; Miller, Richard A; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin extends mouse life span, but the extent to which rapamycin prevents aging-associated changes in specific tissues remains unclear. Stiffness increases and collagen turnover decreases in mouse tendon with aging; thus, our aim was to determine the effect of long-term rapamycin treatment on the mechanical and structural properties of tendons from old mice. Tendons were harvested from female UM-HET3 mice maintained on a standard chow diet for 4 (adult) or 22 (old) months or fed chow containing polymer-encapsulated rapamycin (eRAPA) from 9 to 22 months of age (old RAPA). Stiffness was twofold higher for tendons of old compared with adult mice, but in old RAPA mice, tendon stiffness was maintained at a value not different from that of adults. Additionally, expression of collagen decreased, expression of matrix metalloproteinase-8 increased, and total hydroxyproline content trended toward decreased levels in tendons of old eRAPA-fed mice compared with controls. Finally, age-associated calcification of Achilles tendons and accompanying elevations in expression of chondrocyte and osteoblast markers were all lower in old eRAPA-fed mice. These results suggest that long-term administration of rapamycin alters the molecular pathways responsible for aging of tendon extracellular matrix, resulting in tissue that is structurally and mechanically similar to tendons in adult mice. PMID:26809496

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF TENDON REPAIR USING MUSCLE GRAFTS TRANSDUCED WITH TGF-β1 cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Martin; Porter, Ryan M.; Betz, Oliver B.; Betz, Volker M.; Clahsen, Harald; Flückiger, Rudolf; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application. PMID:22354460

  20. Diabetes alters mechanical properties and collagen fiber re-alignment in multiple mouse tendons.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Bhatt, Pankti R; Liechty, Kenneth W; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber re-alignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load. PMID:24833253

  1. Diabetes Alters Mechanical Properties and Collagen Fiber Re-Alignment in Multiple Mouse Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Connizzo, Brianne K.; Bhatt, Pankti R.; Liechty, Kenneth W.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber realignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load. PMID:24833253

  2. Low-power-laser therapy used in tendon damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupinska, Ewa

    1996-03-01

    The following paper covers evaluation of low-power laser therapy results in chronic Achilles tendon damage and external Epicondylalia (tennis elbow). Fifty patients with Achilles damage (18 women and 32 men, age average 30, 24 plus or minus 10, 39 years) and fifty patients having external Epicondyalgiae (31 women and 19 men, age average 44, 36 plus or minus 10, 88 years) have been examined. The patients were irradiated by semiconductor infrared laser wavelength 904 nm separately or together with helium-neon laser wavelength 632.8 nm. The results of therapy have been based on the patient's interviews and examinations of patients as well as on the Laitinen pain questionnaire. The results prove analgesic effects in usage of low- power laser radiation therapy can be obtained.

  3. Proteomic analysis reveals age-related changes in tendon matrix composition, with age- and injury-specific matrix fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Peffers, Mandy J; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Collins, John A; Eong, Robin; Wei, Timothy K J; Screen, Hazel R C; Clegg, Peter D

    2014-09-12

    Energy storing tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), are highly prone to injury, the incidence of which increases with aging. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that result in increased injury in aged tendons are not well established but are thought to result in altered matrix turnover. However, little attempt has been made to fully characterize the tendon proteome nor determine how the abundance of specific tendon proteins changes with aging and/or injury. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the protein profile of normal SDFTs from young and old horses using label-free relative quantification to identify differentially abundant proteins and peptide fragments between age groups. The protein profile of injured SDFTs from young and old horses was also assessed. The results demonstrate distinct proteomic profiles in young and old tendon, with alterations in the levels of proteins involved in matrix organization and regulation of cell tension. Furthermore, we identified several new peptide fragments (neopeptides) present in aged tendons, suggesting that there are age-specific cleavage patterns within the SDFT. Proteomic profile also differed between young and old injured tendon, with a greater number of neopeptides identified in young injured tendon. This study has increased the knowledge of molecular events associated with tendon aging and injury, suggesting that maintenance and repair of tendon tissue may be reduced in aged individuals and may help to explain why the risk of injury increases with aging. PMID:25077967

  4. Pressurized liquid filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.E.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes an apparatus for detecting a leak in a tension leg platform tendon, comprising: a fluid-tight tensioned tubular tendon, the tendon connected on its upper end to a buoyant offshore structure and on its lower end to an anchor means. The anchor means is connected to the sea floor; means for supplying liquid to the tendon; means for pressurizing the liquid in excess of the maximum hydrostatic pressure exerted by the sea water on the tendon; and means for monitoring pressure, the means monitoring variations in liquid pressure to the tendon.

  5. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  6. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  7. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase

    PubMed Central

    Paleckis, Vidas; Mickevičius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Streckis, Vytautas; Pääsuke, Mati; Rutkauskas, Saulius; Steponavičiūtė, Rasa; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9) performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP), patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1) steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2) larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3) increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4) increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement. Key points Frequent drop jump training induces activation mode dependent muscle torque depression late in the training period. No significant changes in the thickness of patellar and Achilles tendons are observed during frequent training, while CSA increases towards the end of training period. Longitudinal effect for jump height but not for muscle strength is evident

  8. Prevention of Simvastatin-Induced Inhibition of Tendon Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression by Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Cheng-Lun; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2016-02-01

    Statins have been reported to induce tendinopathy and even tendon rupture. The present study was designed to investigate the potential molecular mechanism underlying the adverse effect of simvastatin on tendon cells. An in vitro tendon healing model was performed using tendon cells isolated from rat Achilles tendons. The viability of tendon cells and cell cycle progression were examined by the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Immunofluorescent staining for Ki-67 was used to assess the proliferation activity of tendon cells. Western blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation was used to determine the protein expression of cell cycle-related proteins. To investigate the potential mechanism underlying the effect of statins on tendon cells, mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) was added to simvastatin-treated tendon cells. Simvastatin inhibited the in vitro tendon healing model and tendon cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated reduced ki-67 expression in simvastatin-treated tendon cells. Furthermore, simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. The expression levels of cdk1, cdk2, cyclin A, and cyclin E were downregulated by simvastatin in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin was proved to mediate the reduction of mevalonate, and the addition of exogenous GGPP completely prevented the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on tendon cells. The present study demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced tendinopathy or tendon rupture. GGPP was shown to prevent the adverse effect of simvastatin in tendon cells without interfering with its cholesterol-reducing efficacy. PMID:26577051

  9. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  10. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  11. Changes in Macrophage Phenotype and Induction of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Genes Following Acute Achilles Tenotomy and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Lubardic, Jovan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Tendon injuries occur frequently in physically active individuals, but the clinical outcomes for these injuries can be poor. In many injured tissues the repair process is orchestrated by two types of cells, macrophages and fibroblasts. Macrophages, which have both proinflammatory (M1) and antiinflammatory (M2) phenotypes, can directly participate in tissue remodeling and direct the response of other cells through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. In many organ systems, epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into fibroblasts, which can then regenerate damaged ECM. This process is triggered via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) signaling programs. Most tendons are surrounded by sheets of epithelial cells, and these tissue layers could provide a source of fibroblasts to repair injured tendons. To gain greater insight into the biology of tendon repair, we performed a tenotomy and repair in Achilles tendons of adult rats and determined changes in macrophage phenotype, and ECM- and EMT-related genes over a four week time course. The results from this study suggest that changes in macrophage phenotype and activation of EMT-related programs likely contribute to the degradation and subsequent repair of injured tendon tissue. PMID:24700411

  12. Changes in macrophage phenotype and induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition genes following acute Achilles tenotomy and repair.

    PubMed

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Lubardic, Jovan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L

    2014-07-01

    Tendon injuries occur frequently in physically active individuals, but the clinical outcomes for these injuries can be poor. In many injured tissues the repair process is orchestrated by two types of cells, macrophages and fibroblasts. Macrophages, which have both pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes, can directly participate in tissue remodeling and direct the response of other cells through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. In many organ systems, epithelial cells can trans-differentiate into fibroblasts, which can then regenerate damaged ECM. This process is triggered via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) signaling programs. Most tendons are surrounded by sheets of epithelial cells, and these tissue layers could provide a source of fibroblasts to repair injured tendons. To gain greater insight into the biology of tendon repair, we performed a tenotomy and repair in Achilles tendons of adult rats and determined changes in macrophage phenotype, and ECM- and EMT-related genes over a 4-week time course. The results from this study suggest that changes in macrophage phenotype and activation of EMT-related programs likely contribute to the degradation and subsequent repair of injured tendon tissue. PMID:24700411

  13. Triceps tendon rupture: the knowledge acquired from the anatomy to the surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Celli, A

    2015-09-01

    Triceps injuries are relatively uncommon in most traumatic events, and the distal triceps tendon ruptures are rare. Recently, the knowledge of this tendon lesion has increased, and it seems to be related to more precise diagnostic and clinical assessments. The most common mechanism of injury remains a forceful eccentric contraction of the muscle, while several other risk factors have been studied as chronic renal failure, endocrine disorders, metabolic bone diseases as well as steroid use. Olecranon bursitis and local corticosteroid injections may also play a role. The commonest site of rupture is at the tendon's insertion into the olecranon and rarely at the myotendinous junction or intramuscularly. The surgical intervention is recommended in acute complete ruptures, and non-operative treatment is reserved for patients with major comorbidities, as well as for partial ruptures with little functional disability and in low demanding patients. Various techniques and approaches as the direct repair to bone, the tendon augmentation, the anconeus rotation flap and the Achilles tendon allograft have been proposed for the management of these challenging injuries. The goal of surgical management should be an anatomical repair of the injured tendon by selection of a procedure with a low complication rate and one that allows early mobilization. This manuscript focuses the triceps tendon ruptures starting from the anatomy to the diagnosis and entity of the triceps tendon injuries, as well as the indications and guidelines for the management. PMID:25957546

  14. A cross-sectional study of the plantar flexor muscle and tendon during growth.

    PubMed

    Kubo, K; Teshima, T; Hirose, N; Tsunoda, N

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate growth changes in human plantar flexor muscle and tendons. In addition, we ascertained whether growth changes in muscle and tendon were more closely related to skeletal age than chronological age. 22 elementary school children (ESC), 19 junior high school students (JHS), and 23 young adults (ADT) men participated in this study. Maximal strain and hysteresis of tendon structures and cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon were measured using ultrasonography. In addition, skeletal age was assessed using Tanner-Whitehouse III method. Maximal strain of ESC was significantly greater than that of other groups, while no significant difference was observed between JHS and ADT. There was no difference in hysteresis among 3 groups. Relative cross-sectional area (to body mass(2/3)) of ADT was significantly smaller than that of other groups. For ESC and JHS, measured variables of muscle and tendon were significantly correlated to both chronological and skeletal ages. These results suggested that immature musculoskeletal system was protected by more extensible and larger tendon structures in ESC and only by larger tendon structures in JHS, respectively. Furthermore, there were no differences in correlation coefficient values between measured variables of muscle and tendon and chronological or skeletal ages. PMID:24577863

  15. Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; Haxby Abbott, J.; Mcdonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has emerged as a possible treatment modality for tendinopathies. Human studies have investigated LLLT for Achilles Tendinopathy and the effectiveness remains contentious. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in the management of Achilles Tendinopathy. Method: Forty patients were randomised into an active laser or placebo group; all patients, therapists and investigator were blinded to allocation. All patients were given an eccentric exercise program and irradiated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with either an active or placebo laser at 6 standardized points over the affected tendons. Irradiation parameters in the active laser group were: 810 nm, 100 mW, applied to 6 points on the tendon for 30 seconds giving a dose of 3 J per point and 18 J per session; power density 100 mW/cm2. Outcome measures were the VISA-A questionnaire and a visual analogue scale of pain. Patients were measured before treatment, at 4 and 12 weeks. ANCOVA was used to analyze data, using the effects of baseline measurements as a covariate. Results: Within groups, there were significant improvements (p<0.05) at 4 and 12 weeks for all outcome measures, except pain for the laser group at 4 weeks (p = 0.13). Between groups differences at both 4 and 12 weeks showed no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: This use of the above parameters demonstrated no added benefit of LLLT over that of eccentric exercise in the treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy.

  16. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  17. The influence of radiofrequency ablation patterns on length, histological and mechanical properties of tendons

    PubMed Central

    Oron, Amir; Reshef, Noam; Beer, Yiftah; Brosh, Tamar; Agar, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Summary The use of radiofrequency ablation for thermomodulation of connective tissues has gained acceptance with some surgeons. It is now mainly used for shoulder instability, and two techniques are commonly applied – ablation in a uniform pattern (paintbrush) and ablation in a linearly dispersed fashion (grid). The use of these techniques for shrinkage of tendons or cruciate ligaments is not widely accepted but may be utilized in selected cases. We assessed the effects of thermo-modulation via monopolar radiofrequency ablation using these two techniques on the histological and biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. 16 paired rabbit achilles tendons were divided into two treatment groups. Using a Monopolar RF device, eight tendons were treated using the paintbrush technique, and eight using the grid technique. The tendons were shrunk to about 90% of their original length, and the paired tendons were used as control. Following thermomodulation, tendons were pulled to tear using the Instron 4502 (Instron, Mass.) device. We found treated tendons were significantly less resistant to tear when compared to control; the average load to failure of the treatment group was 19.4% lower (p=0.05) than the control group values and the average tissue stiffness in the treatment group was 11.3% lower (p=0.051) than the control group. We found a tendency towards a lower resistance to pull in the tendon group treated using the grid technique. Histological analysis demonstrated areas of collagen denaturation correlated to areas of thermomodulation. A random point of failure was found along the tendons in the paintbrush group whereas the typical point of failure in the grid group was located at the treatment point or at its margins. Our findings demonstrate that use of the grid technique in ablation of tendons creates typical failure points (locus minoris resistenci) which bring about failure and alter the biomechanical properties of the thermomodulated tendons

  18. Distal biceps tendon injuries--current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tony; Jazayeri, Reza; Sherman, Orrin H; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Three percent of all biceps tendon ruptures occur at the distal aspect, where the tendon inserts into the radial tuberosity. Distal bicep tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males after an eccentric extension load is applied to the elbow. Patients usually complain of a sudden, sharp, and painful tearing sensation in the antecubital region, with a palpable defect. The biceps squeeze and hook tests are specific maneuvers by which to diagnose distal biceps ruptures on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound maybe be helpful to distinguish between partial and complete tears. Anatomic studies suggest there are two distinct insertions for the short and long heads of the distal biceps. The short head may be a more powerful flexor, and the long head may be a more powerful supinator. Nonoperative treatment typically results in loss of flexion and supination strength and endurance. Early anatomic re-attachment is the goal. Surgical approaches include one- or two-incision techniques, and tendon fixation methods include the use of suture anchors, bone tunnels, an endobutton, or biotenodesis screws. Biomechanical studies have shown that endobuttons have higher load-to-failure strengths, compared to the other fixation methods. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that patients do well regardless of surgical approach or fixation method. Possible complications include nerve injuries, heterotopic ossification, postoperative fracture, tendon rerupture, complex regional pain syndrome, and wound infection. Partial ruptures are significantly less common and initially can be treated conservatively. Chronic tears are more difficult to treat because of possible tendon retraction and poor tissue quality. Tendon grafts using semitendinosus, fascia lata, hamstring, Achilles (calcaneal), or flexor carpi radialis have been successfully used for length restoration in these cases. PMID:20632985

  19. Return to athletic activity after foot and ankle surgery: a preliminary report on select procedures.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A

    2000-01-01

    One hundred thirty-eight "athletic" patients from the author's practice underwent retrospective review of their foot and ankle surgery that was performed from 1990 to 1997 to evaluate the time to return to activity. Athletes were defined as follows: professional, varsity college and high school, runners amassing more than 25 miles per week, or those involved in regular competition. No recreational athletes were included. Average follow-up for the group as a whole was 49.4 months, (range, 12-108 months). One hundred seventeen of the 138 patients were able to be contacted and/or had been evaluated by September 1998. One hundred thirteen patients considered their surgery a success. All but two patients were able to return to the desired level of performance. Twenty-three of the patients increased their activity level after surgery. Twenty-eight athletes underwent Achilles tendon-related surgery (average follow-up was 44.5 months). Runners undergoing peritenolyses had an average return to activity of 4.0 weeks (range, 3-6 weeks). Patients undergoing Achilles procedure involving bone resection had an average return to activity of 13.8 weeks (range, 10-20 weeks). Forty-four bunionectomy procedures were performed, including 31 first metatarsal osteotomies. The group's average follow-up was 52.9 months (range, 13-100 months), and average return to activity for the first metatarsal osteotomies was 8.9 weeks. There were 48 rearfoot procedures. Lateral ankle stabilization procedures returned to activity on an average of 10 weeks (range, 7-16 weeks), while excised ossicles (os tibiale externum, os trigonum) had an average return to activity of 9.1 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). Seven neuroma patients (via dorsal approach) had a return to activity of 4.0 weeks (range, 2.5-6 weeks), sesamoidectomy 7.5 weeks (range, 4-10 weeks), and Valenti arthroplasty of 6.5 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks), respectively. There were minimal complications. Two patients in the Achilles surgery group

  20. A novel application of biosynthetic tissue-engineered tridimensional implant on large tendon defects: a comprehensive, detailed, in vivo investigation with significant clinical value.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; MeimandiParizi, Abdolhamid

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a biosynthetic implant on tendon healing in vivo. Fifty white New Zealand male rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, namely treated (n = 25) and control (n = 25) groups. A large gap was created in the Achilles tendon and was maintained by Kessler pattern. In the treated group, the implant was inserted in the injured area. No implant was used in the control group. Contrast radiography, hematology, and clinical examination were conducted during the course of the experiment. The animals were euthanized at 60 days post injury (DPI) and their Achilles tendons were subjected to the gross, histopathologic, and biomechanical analyses and the hydroxyproline content of these tendons was also evaluated. Another five treated animals, as a pilot group, were used to define the inflammatory reaction at 10 DPI. Severe inflammatory reaction was initiated by the partially degraded implant, at 10 DPI. However, at 60 DPI, the inflammation subsided, the implant was mostly removed but a few small remnants were still present in the injured area. The newly formed tendon, properly aligned along the longitudinal axis of the Achilles tendon replaced the collagen implant. In the control tendons, a loose areolar connective tissue which tightly adhered to the peri-tendinous tissue was the only regenerated structure in the injured area. At this stage, the treated tendons showed significantly higher ultimate strength (p = 0.001), yield strength (p = 0.001), and stiffness (p = 0.001) compared with the control ones. Application of the biosynthetic implant was a safe and effective option in managing the large tendon defects and could be considered as a substitute for autografts in clinical practice. PMID:23509953

  1. Chronic Achilles paratenonitis in athletes: a histological and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kvist, M; Józsa, L; Järvinen, M J; Kvist, H

    1987-01-01

    Pathological alterations of chronic Achilles paratenonitis were studied histologically and histochemically in tissue samples obtained operatively from 16 athletes with this complaint and from 3 control patients. The activities of 11 different enzymes--lactate, succinate, malate, glucose-6-phosphate and glutamate dehydrogenases, lipoamide dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase (NADH2- and NADPH2-diaphorases), acid and alkaline phosphatases, phosphorylase and leucylaminopeptidase--were studied. Pathological findings were located diffusely around the tendon. A slight inflammatory cell reaction was found in all cases. The fatty areolar tissue was clearly thickened and edematous, and showed fibrinous exudations, widespread fat necrosis, considerable connective tissue proliferation and adhesion formation. The blood vessels showed profound degenerative and necrotizing changes. The thin membranes of the paratenon were clearly hypertrophied. Increased enzyme activities were mainly found in the fibroblasts, inflammatory cells and vascular walls. A moderate activity of lysosomal enzymes, an increased activity of enzymes of electron transport, anaerobic glycolysis, pentose phosphate shunt and decreased activity of those of aerobic energy metabolism were found. Simultaneously an increased amount of both neutral and acid mucopolysaccharides and a locally increased amount of elastic fibres were found in the inflamed paratenon. These results indicate that marked metabolic changes occur in paratenonitis, i.e. an increased catabolism and decreased oxygenation of the inflamed areas. The morphological alterations suggest that the gliding function of the paratenon may be impaired. PMID:3588019

  2. [Isolated injury of the subscapular muscle tendon].

    PubMed

    Thielemann, F W; Kley, U; Holz, U

    1992-03-01

    Avulsion of the subscapularis tendon is caused by a combined abduction and external rotation trauma of the upper limb. Weakness of internal rotation and a positive apprehension test are clinical signs of the injury. A fracture of the lesser tuberosity in the x-ray film or a disruption of the subscapularis tendon documented in dynamic sonography of the shoulder clarify the diagnosis. Operative treatment is indicated of prevent weakness of internal rotation as well as anterior instability. This recommendation is supported by four cases with full range of motion and good anterior stability after surgery. PMID:1585252

  3. Tendon involvement in patients with gout: an ultrasound study of prevalence.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Pineda, Carlos; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Reginato, Anthony; Alva, Magaly; Audisio, Marcelo; Bertoli, Ana; Cazenave, Tomas; Gutiérrez, Marwin; Mora, Claudia; Py, Guillermo; Sedano, Oscar; Solano, Carla; de Miguel, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate, by ultrasonography (US), the prevalence in the quadriceps, patellar, and Achilles tendon involvement of gout compared to that of patients with osteoarthritis and asymptomatic marathon runners. This is a multicenter, multinational, transverse cross-sectional, and comparative study comprising 80 patients with the diagnosis of gout according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, compared with two control groups: 35 patients with generalized osteoarthritis according to the ACR criteria and 35 subjects who were healthy marathon runners. Demographics and clinical characteristics, such as age, gender, comorbidity, disease duration, pain at the enthesis in the knee and ankle, frequency of disease exacerbations, uric acid level more than 7.2 mg at the time of evaluation, and type of treatment, were recorded. All participants were examined by ultrasound at the quadriceps, the patellar at its proximal and distal insertion, and the Achilles tendon to detect intra-tendinous tophus or aggregates according to the OMERACT definitions. Descriptive statistics and differences between groups were analyzed by chi-square test. Sensitivity and specificity by US were calculated. The prevalence of intra-tendinous aggregates and tophi in gout was significant compared with the other groups. Both lesions were the most frequent at the distal patellar insertion, followed by the quadriceps, Achilles, and proximal patellar insertion ones. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), intra-tendinous hyperechoic aggregates were observed in 20 % of quadriceps tendons and in 11 % of patellar tendons at its proximal insertion, while in the healthy marathon runner group, the Achilles tendon had this kind of lesion in 17 % of the subjects. Neither the OA nor the healthy marathon runners had intra-tendinous tophi. The sensitivity and specificity of US to detect tophi or aggregates were 69.6 and 92 %, respectively, tendon involvement at

  4. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  5. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  6. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  7. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  8. The role of graft materials in suture augmentation for tendon repairs and reattachment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Iesaka, Kazuho

    2005-08-01

    Various biomaterials have been used to augment sutures for the repair and reattachment of tendons. This study examined four different graft materials in a simple and reproducible model using chicken Achilles tendons to determine the strength and mechanism of suture reinforcement of tendon repairs. The graft materials tested were Gore-Tex(R) Soft Tissue Patch, Graftjacket, bovine pericardium, and an experimental graft material from Xylos Corporation. Testing was performed in shear to simulate forces on a torn tendon repair and pull-off to simulate those on a tendon reattachment to bone. Compared to unaugmented suture, grafts increased suture fixation strength from 10% to 60% in shear and from 0% to 36% in pull-off with the bovine pericardium graft, providing significant improvement in both tests. In no cases (even unaugmented) did the suture pull directly through the tendon, but instead sliced along it, demonstrating that the interface between the suture and the tendon determines fixation strength. Grafts function by increasing the area, friction, and nature of this interface, not by acting as a barrier for suture pull-through. PMID:15981174

  9. Nanostructured Tendon-Derived Scaffolds for Enhanced Bone Regeneration by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyung; Alberti, Kyle; Lee, Jong Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Hee Seok; Xu, Qiaobing; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Decellularized matrix-based scaffolds can induce enhanced tissue regeneration due to their biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical similarity to native tissues. In this study, we report a nanostructured decellularized tendon scaffold with aligned, nanofibrous structures to enhance osteogenic differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Using a bioskiving method, we prepared decellularized tendon scaffolds from tissue slices of bovine Achilles and neck tendons with or without fixation, and investigated the effects on physical and mechanical properties of decellularized tendon scaffolds, based on the types and concentrations of cross-linking agents. In general, we found that decellularized tendon scaffolds without fixative treatments were more effective in inducing osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hADSCs in vitro. When non-cross-linked decellularized tendon scaffolds were applied together with hydroxyapatite for hADSC transplantation in critical-sized bone defects, they promoted bone-specific collagen deposition and mineralized bone formation 4 and 8 weeks after hADSC transplantation, compared to conventional collagen type I scaffolds. Interestingly, stacking of decellularized tendon scaffolds cultured with osteogenically committed hADSCs and those containing human cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) induced vascularized bone regeneration in the defects 8 weeks after transplantation. Our study suggests that biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds made of decellularized tissue matrices can serve as functional tissue-engineering scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis of stem cells. PMID:27502160

  10. Periostin secreted by mesenchymal stem cells supports tendon formation in an ectopic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noack, Sandra; Seiffart, Virginia; Willbold, Elmar; Laggies, Sandra; Winkel, Andreas; Shahab-Osterloh, Sandra; Flörkemeier, Thilo; Hertwig, Falk; Steinhoff, Christine; Nuber, Ulrike A; Gross, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    True tendon regeneration in human patients remains a vision of musculoskeletal therapies. In comparison to other mesenchymal lineages the biology of tenogenic differentiation is barely understood. Specifically, easy and efficient protocols are lacking that might enable tendon cell and tissue differentiation based on adult (stem) cell sources. In the murine mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T½, overexpression of the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and a constitutively active transcription factor, Smad8 L+MH2, mediates tendon cell differentiation in vitro and the formation of tendon-like tissue in vivo. We hypothesized that during this differentiation secreted factors involved in extracellular matrix formation exert a major impact on tendon development. Gene expression analyses revealed four genes encoding secreted factors that are notably upregulated: periostin, C-type lectin domain family 3 (member b), RNase A4, and follistatin-like 1. These factors have not previously been implicated in tendon biology. Among these, periostin showed a specific expression in tenocytes of adult mouse Achilles tendon and in chondrocytes within the nonmineralized fibrocartilage zone of the enthesis with the calcaneus. Overexpression of periostin alone or in combination with constitutively active BMP receptor type in human mesenchymal stem cells and subsequent implantation into ectopic sites in mice demonstrated a reproducible moderate tenogenic capacity that has not been described before. Therefore, periostin may belong to the factors contributing to the development of tenogenic tissue. PMID:24809660

  11. Periostin Secreted by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Supports Tendon Formation in an Ectopic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Sandra; Seiffart, Virginia; Willbold, Elmar; Laggies, Sandra; Winkel, Andreas; Shahab-Osterloh, Sandra; Flörkemeier, Thilo; Hertwig, Falk; Steinhoff, Christine; Nuber, Ulrike A.; Gross, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    True tendon regeneration in human patients remains a vision of musculoskeletal therapies. In comparison to other mesenchymal lineages the biology of tenogenic differentiation is barely understood. Specifically, easy and efficient protocols are lacking that might enable tendon cell and tissue differentiation based on adult (stem) cell sources. In the murine mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T½, overexpression of the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and a constitutively active transcription factor, Smad8 L+MH2, mediates tendon cell differentiation in vitro and the formation of tendon-like tissue in vivo. We hypothesized that during this differentiation secreted factors involved in extracellular matrix formation exert a major impact on tendon development. Gene expression analyses revealed four genes encoding secreted factors that are notably upregulated: periostin, C-type lectin domain family 3 (member b), RNase A4, and follistatin-like 1. These factors have not previously been implicated in tendon biology. Among these, periostin showed a specific expression in tenocytes of adult mouse Achilles tendon and in chondrocytes within the nonmineralized fibrocartilage zone of the enthesis with the calcaneus. Overexpression of periostin alone or in combination with constitutively active BMP receptor type in human mesenchymal stem cells and subsequent implantation into ectopic sites in mice demonstrated a reproducible moderate tenogenic capacity that has not been described before. Therefore, periostin may belong to the factors contributing to the development of tenogenic tissue. PMID:24809660

  12. Variant course of extensor pollicis longus tendon in the second wrist extensor compartment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Baek, Jong Hun

    2016-05-01

    Among the muscles involved in thumb movement, the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon of the hand is considered the most consistent structure with the least variation among individuals. There have been a few reports regarding different types of supernumerary tendons; however, an abnormal course of the EPL tendon is extremely rare. We describe a case of a variant course of a single EPL tendon appearing in the second extensor compartment of the wrist. This case was observed incidentally during wrist surgery, and demonstrates a unique variation of tendon course, which has not been reported previously. The knowledge of this anatomic variation is helpful in surgical planning and for making accurate diagnoses. PMID:26253859

  13. Tendon proper- and peritenon-derived progenitor cells have unique tenogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Multipotent progenitor populations exist within the tendon proper and peritenon of the Achilles tendon. Progenitor populations derived from the tendon proper and peritenon are enriched with distinct cell types that are distinguished by expression of markers of tendon and vascular or pericyte origins, respectively. The objective of this study was to discern the unique tenogenic properties of tendon proper- and peritenon-derived progenitors within an in vitro model. We hypothesized that progenitors from each region contribute differently to tendon formation; thus, when incorporated into a regenerative model, progenitors from each region will respond uniquely. Moreover, we hypothesized that cell populations like progenitors were capable of stimulating tenogenic differentiation, so we generated conditioned media from these cell types to analyze their stimulatory potentials. Methods Isolated progenitors were seeded within fibrinogen/thrombin gel-based constructs with or without supplementation with recombinant growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF5). Early and late in culture, gene expression of differentiation markers and matrix assembly genes was analyzed. Tendon construct ultrastructure was also compared after 45 days. Moreover, conditioned media from tendon proper-derived progenitors, peritenon-derived progenitors, or tenocytes was applied to each of the three cell types to determine paracrine stimulatory effects of the factors secreted from each of the respective cell types. Results The cell orientation, extracellular domain and fibril organization of constructs were comparable to embryonic tendon. The tendon proper-derived progenitors produced a more tendon-like construct than the peritenon-derived progenitors. Seeded tendon proper-derived progenitors expressed greater levels of tenogenic markers and matrix assembly genes, relative to peritenon-derived progenitors. However, GDF5 supplementation improved expression of matrix assembly genes in peritenon

  14. Neglected bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon: A case report.

    PubMed

    Cherrad, Taoufik; Louaste, Jamal; Kasmaoui, El Houcine; Bousbaä, Hicham; Rachid, Khaled

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is extremely rare and is generally associated to some chronic diseases. When the rupture becomes chronic, it is more difficult to repair that as it remained untreated. The diagnosis, which is clinical, is often delayed, guided by standard radiography and confirmed by ultrasound or MRI. The management of a bilateral neglected, chronic patellar tendon rupture must address some serious difficulties: the proximally retracted patella, the reconstruction of the patellar tendon, finally, the temporary protection of this repair. We report a case of neglected bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon in a chronic hemodialysis patient, treated with a plastic surgery of the ipsilateral quadriceps tendon. PMID:26566349

  15. Comparative study of laser and LED systems of low intensity applied to tendon healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, J. L. N.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Parizotto, N. A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Low-intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Light Emitting Diode Therapy (LEDT) of low intensity on the treatment of lesioned Achilles tendon of rats. The experimental model consisted of a partial mechanical lesion on the right Achilles tendon deep portion of 90 rats. One hour after the lesion, the injured animals received applications of laser/LED (685, 830/630, 880 nm), and the same procedure was repeated at 24-h intervals, for 10 days. The healing process and deposition of collagen were evaluated based on a polarization microscopy analysis of the alignment and organization of collagen bundles, through the birefringence (optical retardation-OR). The results showed a real efficiency of treatments based on LEDT and confirmed that LILT seems to be effective on healing process. Although absence of coherence of LED light, tendon healing treatment with this feature was satisfactory and can certainly replace treatments based on laser light applications. Applications of infrared laser at 830 nm and LED 880 nm were more efficient when the aim is a good organization, aggregation, and alignment of the collagen bundles on tendon healing. However, more research is needed for a safety and more efficient determination of a protocol with LED.

  16. Co-effect of silk and amniotic membrane for tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young-Kwon; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Eo, Su-Rak

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the feasibility and biocompatibility of a silk scaffold and a composite silk scaffold in terms of new tendon generation using a rabbit Achilles tendon model. The silk scaffold was constructed using a weaving machine, then soaked in a 1% collagen-hyaluronan (HA) solution and air-dried, whereas the composite silk scaffold was composed of a silk scaffold containing a lyophilized collagen-HA substrate. Tenocytes were cultured in vitro to compare cell populations in the two groups. The cellular densities on composite silk scaffolds were 40% higher on average than those on silk scaffolds in 30-day tenocyte cultures. The tendon scaffolds had implanted into Achilles tendon defects in 16 white New Zealand rabbits. Rabbits were randomly divided into the following three groups: group I, silk scaffold alone; group II, composite silk scaffold; and group III, composite silk scaffold wrapped by an amniotic membrane. Implants were harvested 2, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation. Histological examinations were conducted using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome, and by performing immunohistochemical staining for CD34. After 12 weeks, the three groups were distinguishable based on gross examination. The histological examination revealed more organized collagen fibrils in groups III, which showed a dense, parallel, linear organization of collagen bundles. CD34 staining revealed neoangiogenesis in groups III. The results of this research showed that collagen-HA substrates with amniotic membrane accelerate cellular migration and angiogenesis in neotendons. PMID:27188627

  17. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  18. Alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation triggers Achilles tenocyte hypercellularity: Comparison between two model systems

    PubMed Central

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Fong, G; Alfredson, H; Scott, A; Danielson, P

    2013-01-01

    The histopathology of tendons with painful tendinopathy is often tendinosis, a fibrosis-like condition of unclear pathogenesis characterized by tissue changes including hypercellularity. The primary tendon cells (tenocytes) have been shown to express adrenoreceptors (mainly alpha-2A) as well as markers of catecholamine production, particularly in tendinosis. It is known that adrenergic stimulation can induce proliferation in other cells. The present study investigated the effects of an exogenously administered alpha-2 adrenergic agonist in an established in vivo Achilles tendinosis model (rabbit) and also in an in vitro human tendon cell culture model. The catecholamine producing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase and the alpha-2A-adrenoreceptor (α2A AR) were expressed by tenocytes, and alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation had a proliferative effect on these cells, in both models. The proliferation was inhibited by administration of an α2A AR antagonist, and the in vitro model further showed that the proliferative alpha-2A effect was mediated via a mitogenic cell signaling pathway involving phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. The results indicate that catecholamines produced by tenocytes in tendinosis might contribute to the proliferative nature of the pathology through stimulation of the α2A AR, pointing to a novel target for future therapies. The study furthermore shows that animal models are not necessarily required for all aspects of this research. PMID:22292987

  19. Implantation of a Novel Biologic and Hybridized Tissue Engineered Bioimplant in Large Tendon Defect: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  20. "Achilles in Vietnam" and the Humanities Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, James A.

    This paper discusses the book "Achilles in Vietnam" (Jonathan Shay) in relation to Homer's "Iliad" and the need for society to accept the consequences of veterans' experiences. Classical allusions to the epic are incorporated into the study and U.S. experience of the Vietnam War. The paper advocates student "ownership" of literature study and…

  1. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  2. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Peroneal Tendon Injuries Text Size Print Bookmark ... foot run side-by-side behind the outer ankle bone. One peroneal tendon attaches to the outer ...

  3. Hemispheric specificity for proprioception: Postural control of standing following right or left hemisphere damage during ankle tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Noémie C; Maynard, Luc; Abbas, Djawad; Mesure, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Right brain damage (RBD) following stroke often causes significant postural instability. In standing (without vision), patients with RBD are more unstable than those with left brain damage (LBD). We hypothesised that this postural instability would relate to the cortical integration of proprioceptive afferents. The aim of this study was to use tendon vibration to investigate whether these changes were specific to the paretic or non-paretic limbs. 14 LBD, 12 RBD patients and 20 healthy subjects were included. Displacement of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) was recorded during quiet standing, then during 3 vibration conditions (80 Hz - 20s): paretic limb, non-paretic limb (left and right limbs for control subjects) and bilateral. Vibration was applied separately to the peroneal and Achilles tendons. Mean antero-posterior position of the CoP, variability and velocity were calculated before (4s), during and after (24s) vibration. For all parameters, the strongest perturbation was during Achilles vibrations. The Achilles non-paretic condition induced a larger backward displacement than the Achilles paretic condition. This condition caused specific behaviour on the velocity: the LBD group was perturbed at the onset of the vibrations, but gradually recovered their stability; the RBD group was significantly perturbed thereafter. After bilateral Achilles vibration, RBD patients required the most time to restore initial posture. The reduction in use of information from the paretic limb may be a central strategy to deal with risk-of-fall situations such as during Achilles vibration. The postural behaviour is profoundly altered by lesions of the right hemisphere when proprioception is perturbed. PMID:26358149

  4. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  5. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  6. Effects of resistance training on tendon mechanical properties and rapid force production in prepubertal children

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, C. M.; Korff, T.; Fath, F.

    2014-01-01

    Children develop lower levels of muscle force, and at slower rates, than adults. Although strength training in children is expected to reduce this differential, a synchronous adaptation in the tendon must be achieved to ensure forces continue to be transmitted to the skeleton with efficiency while minimizing the risk of strain-related tendon injury. We hypothesized that resistance training (RT) would alter tendon mechanical properties in children concomitantly with changes in force production characteristics. Twenty prepubertal children (age 8.9 ± 0.3 yr) were equally divided into control (nontraining) and experimental (training) groups. The training group completed a 10-wk RT intervention consisting of 2–3 sets of 8–15 plantar flexion contractions performed twice weekly on a recumbent calf-raise machine. Achilles tendon properties (cross-sectional area, elongation, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus), electromechanical delay (EMD; time between the onset of muscle activity and force), rate of force development (RFD; slope of the force-time curve), and rate of electromyographic (EMG) increase (REI; slope of the EMG time curve) were measured before and after RT. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus increased significantly after RT in the experimental group only (∼29% and ∼25%, respectively); all other tendon properties were not significantly altered, although there were mean decreases in both peak tendon strain and strain at a given force level (14% and 24%, respectively; not significant) which may have implications for tendon injury risk and muscle fiber mechanics. A decrease of ∼13% in EMD was found after RT for the experimental group, which paralleled the increase in tendon stiffness (r = −0.59); however, RFD and REI were unchanged. The present data show that the Achilles tendon adapts to RT in prepubertal children and is paralleled by a change in EMD, although the magnitude of this change did not appear to be sufficient to influence RFD

  7. The influence of atorvastatin on tendon healing: an experimental study on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Sakarya, Bulent; Unay, Koray; Elmali, Nurzat; Aydin, Nasuhi Engin

    2010-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The most commonly used antihyperlipidemic drugs are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins), of which atorvastatin is one of the most widely used. Little is known about the relationship between tendinopathy and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) or the effects of atorvastatin use on tendon healing following surgical repair of tendon rupture. We hypothesized that atorvastatin negatively affects this healing process. The Achilles tendons of 16 New Zealand rabbits were ruptured surgically and repaired with sutures. Eight of the rabbits were given oral atorvastatin. The other 8 served as a surgical control group. Six weeks postoperatively, all the rabbits were sacrificed, and the repaired tendons were removed. After standard histological preparation, fibroblastic activity, re-vascularization, collagenization, collagen construction, and inflammatory-cell infiltration were evaluated. On comparing the atorvastatin and surgical control groups, we observed no difference in fibroblastic activity. Although it did not reach statistical significance in our study, a difference was noted in revascularization, collagenization, and inflammatory cell infiltration; and a statistical difference was observed in collagen construction. Doubt remains about the adverse effect of atorvastatin use during tendon healing. Further investigations in animal and human models are needed on the effects of tendon healing when atorvastatin is administered for a longer time frame prior to the injury. PMID:20806777

  8. Ageing does not result in a decline in cell synthetic activity in an injury prone tendon.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, C T; McDermott, B T; Goodship, A E; Clegg, P D; Birch, H L

    2016-06-01

    Advancing age is a well-known risk factor for tendon disease. Energy-storing tendons [e.g., human Achilles, equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT)] are particularly vulnerable and it is thought that injury occurs following an accumulation of micro-damage in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Several authors suggest that age-related micro-damage accumulates due to a failure of the aging cell population to maintain the ECM or an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways. We hypothesized that ageing results in a decreased ability of tendon cells to synthesize matrix components and matrix-degrading enzymes, resulting in a reduced turnover of the ECM and a decreased ability to repair micro-damage. The SDFT was collected from horses aged 3-30 years with no signs of tendon injury. Cell synthetic and degradative ability was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels. Telomere length was measured as an additional marker of cell ageing. There was no decrease in cellularity or relative telomere length with increasing age, and no decline in mRNA or protein levels for matrix proteins or degradative enzymes. The results suggest that the mechanism for age-related tendon deterioration is not due to reduced cellularity or a loss of synthetic functionality and that alternative mechanisms should be considered. PMID:26058332

  9. Inhibitory mechanisms following electrical stimulation of tendon and cutaneous afferents in the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2010-01-13

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon (TES) produced strong reflex depression (duration>250 ms) of a small background contraction in both heads of gastrocnemius (GA) via large diameter electrodes localized to the tendon. The inhibitory responses were produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. In this study, the contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to the depression was investigated by studying conditioning effects of tendon afferent stimulation on the mechanical tendon reflex (TR) and magnetic motor evoked potential (MEP). TES completely inhibited the TR over an ISI of 300 ms that commenced before and continued during and after the period of voluntary EMG depression. Tendon afferent conditioning stimuli also partially inhibited the MEP, but over a short time course confined to the period of voluntary EMG depression. The strength and extended time course of tendon afferent conditioning of the TR and its failure to produce a similar depression of the MEP are consistent with a mechanism involving presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. Cutaneous (sural nerve) afferent conditioning partially inhibited the TR and MEP over a short time course (ISI <100 ms) resembling the inhibition seen in the voluntary EMG. This was consistent with the postsynaptic origin of cutaneous inhibition of the motoneurons. PMID:19850015

  10. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon. PMID:26567337

  11. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  12. Acute Simultaneous Ruptures of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwang Chul; Park, Sung-Hae

    2014-01-01

    Acute simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon is a rare injury. We present a case report of a 32-year-old male patient with ruptured ACL and ipsilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained while playing baseball. Surgery was performed on the patellar tendon and the ACL simultaneously. The clinical and radiological outcomes of the treatment were successful. We present this case with a review of the literatures. PMID:24639949

  13. Risk Factors of Tendo-Achilles Injury in Football, Cricket and Badminton Players at Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, M J; Giasuddin, A S M; Khalil, M I

    2015-04-01

    Achilles tendon is the tendon connecting the heel with the calf muscles. Tendo-achilles injury (TAI) in players is common in games. The frequency of TAI is unknown and aetiology is controversial: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was done to determine the prevalence of TAI and associated factors contributing to it in football, cricket and badminton. From January to June 2012, male players (n = 131), age -17-35 years, were selected by purposive sampling technique from renowned sporting clubs at Dhaka, Bangladesh. TAI was diagnosed through structured questionnaire and interviewing the respondents. The analysis by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) programme revealed that 11.5% players suffered from TAI, i.e. prevalence was 115 per 1000 respondents. Most injuries (70/131; 53.4%) occurred in the playground and (59/131; 45.3%) happened in practice field. Injuries among the players of third division were higher, i.e. about 36% (p = 0.000). TAI was significantly dependent on occupation (p = 0.046), BMI (p = 0.008), divisional status (p = 0.023), game type (p = 0.043), ground condition (p = 0.05) and injury severity (p = 0.000). The injured players referred for treatment to the physiotherapist was highest (9/15, i.e. 60%) followed by the physicians (5/15, i.e. 33%) (p = 0.000). The associations of TAI with various factors were discussed suggesting effective measures be taken and treatment, particularly physiotherapy, be given to injured players. However, there is a need of team work with sports medicine specialist also to enable the injured players to continue their professional games. PMID:27089630

  14. Tendon Adaptation to Sport-specific Loading in Adolescent Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassel, M; Carlsohn, A; Fröhlich, K; John, M; Riegels, N; Mayer, F

    2016-02-01

    Tendon adaptation due to mechanical loading is controversially discussed. However, data concerning the development of tendon thickness in adolescent athletes is sparse. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in Achilles (AT) and patellar tendon (PT) thickness in adolescent athletes while considering age, gender and sport-specific loading. In 500 adolescent competitive athletes of 16 different sports and 40 recreational controls both ATs and PTs were sonographically measured. Subjects were divided into 2 age groups (< 13; ≥ 13 years) and 6 sport type categories (ball, combat, and water sports, combined disciplines, cycling, controls). In addition, 3 risk groups (low, moderate, high) were created according to the athlete's risk of developing tendinopathy. AT and PT thickness did not significantly differ between age groups (AT/PT:<13: 5.4±0.7 mm/3.6±0.5 mm;≥13: 5.3±0.7 mm/3.6±0.5 mm). In both age groups males presented higher tendon thickness than females (p<0.001). AT thickness was highest in ball sports/cyclists and lowest in controls (p≤0.002). PT thickness was greatest in water sports and lowest in controls (p=0.02). High risk athletes presented slightly higher AT thickness compared to the low risk group (p=0.03). Increased AT and PT thickness in certain sport types compared to controls supports the hypothesis of structural tendon adaptation due to sport-specific loading. PMID:26509367

  15. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  16. The additional value of a night splint to eccentric exercises in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, R J; Weir, A; Visser, R J A; de Winter, ThC; Tol, J L

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess whether the use of a night splint is of added benefit on functional outcome in treating chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Methods This was a single‐blind, prospective, single centre, randomised controlled trial set in the Sports Medical Department, The Hague Medical Centre, The Netherlands. Inclusion criteria were: age 18–70 years, active participation in sports, and tendon pain localised at 2–7 cm from distal insertion. Exclusion criteria were: insertional disorders, partial or complete ruptures, or systemic illness. 70 tendons were included and randomised into one of two treatment groups: eccentric exercises with a night splint (night splint group, n = 36) or eccentric exercises only (eccentric group, n = 34). Interventions Both groups completed a 12‐week heavy‐load eccentric training programme. One group received a night splint in addition to eccentric exercises. At baseline and follow‐up at 12 weeks, patient satisfaction, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment–Achilles questionnaire (VISA‐A) score and reported compliance were recorded by a single‐blind trained researcher who was blinded to the treatment. Results After 12 weeks, patient satisfaction in the eccentric group was 63% compared with 48% in the night splint group. The VISA‐A score significantly improved in both groups; in the eccentric group from 50.1 to 68.8 (p = 0.001) and in the night splint group from 49.4 to 67.0 (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups in VISA‐A score (p = 0.815) and patient satisfaction (p = 0.261). Conclusion A night splint is not beneficial in addition to eccentric exercises in the treatment of chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:17178774

  17. Subrupture Tendon Fatigue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Laudier, Damien M.; Shine, Jean H.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and microstructural bases of tendon fatigue, by which damage accumulates and contributes to degradation, are poorly understood. To investigate the tendon fatigue process, rat flexor digitorum longus tendons were cyclically loaded (1–16 N) until reaching one of three levels of fatigue damage, defined as peak clamp-to-clamp strain magnitudes representing key intervals in the fatigue life: i) Low (6.0%–7.0%); ii) Moderate (8.5%–9.5%); and iii) High (11.0%–12.0%). Stiffness, hysteresis, and clamp-to-clamp strain were assessed diagnostically (by cyclic loading at 1–8 N) before and after fatigue loading and following an unloaded recovery period to identify mechanical parameters as measures of damage. Results showed that tendon clamp-to-clamp strain increased from pre- to post-fatigue loading significantly and progressively with the fatigue damage level (p≤0.010). In contrast, changes in both stiffness and hysteresis were significant only at the High fatigue level (p≤0.043). Correlative microstructural analyses showed that Low level of fatigue was characterized by isolated, transverse patterns of kinked fiber deformations. At higher fatigue levels, tendons exhibited fiber dissociation and localized ruptures of the fibers. Histomorphometric analysis showed that damage area fraction increased significantly with fatigue level (p≤0.048). The current findings characterized the sequential, microstructural events that underlie the tendon fatigue process and indicate that tendon deformation can be used to accurately assess the progression of damage accumulation in tendons. PMID:18683881

  18. Successful management of bilateral patellar tendon rupture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Shipov, A; Shahar, R; Joseph, R; Milgram, J

    2008-01-01

    A seven-year-old, 41 kg, intact, cross breed dog, was presented with a history of bilateral hind limb lameness after falling from a height of 1 m. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with bilateral patellar tendon rupture. Surgical repair was performed bilaterally. The tendons were sutured primarily, and an internal splint of nylon leader was added. Good apposition of the severed tendon ends had been achieved intraoperatively; however, post operative radiographs showed supra-trochlear displacement of both patellae. The casts used to immobilize the stifle joints slipped distally and three days post operatively the tendon repair had broken down, bilaterally. Revision surgery was undertaken and the tendons were re-sutured. Nylon leader was placed through holes that had been drilled in the patellae and tibiae. The stifle joints were immobilized with type I external skeletal fixators (ESFs). Both freeform polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) connecting bars were found to be broken at the level of the stifle joints two days later, without any disruption of the primary tendon repair. Each connecting bar was replaced with two connecting bars of PMMA reinforced with 3 mm steel wire. The dog was fully weight-bearing with a reduced range of motion in flexion immediately after removal of the ESFs at six weeks and was still sound 18 months post-operatively. Primary tendon repair in combination with adequate immobilization allowed for an excellent outcome in a complicated bilateral pathology. PMID:18545725

  19. Second Harmonic Generation Confocal Microscopy of Collagen Type I from Rat Tendon Cryosections

    PubMed Central

    Theodossiou, Theodossis A.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ekwobi, Chidi; Becker, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We performed second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of collagen in rat-tendon cryosections, using femtosecond laser scanning confocal microscopy, both in backscattering and transmission geometries. SHG transmission images of collagen fibers were spatially resolved due to a coherent, directional SHG component. This effect was enhanced with the use of an index-matching fluid (ni = 1.52). The average SHG intensity oscillated with wavelength in the backscattered geometry (isotropic SHG component), whereas the spectral profile was consistent with quasi-phase-matching conditions in transmission geometry (forward propagating, coherent SHG component) around 440 nm (λp = 880 nm). Collagen type I from bovine Achilles tendon was imaged for SHG in the backscattered geometry and its first-order effective nonlinear coefficient was determined (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\vert}d_{{\\mathrm{eff}}}{\\vert}\\approx 0.085({\\pm}0.025){\\times}10^{-12}{\\mathrm{mV}}^{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) by comparison to samples of inorganic materials with known effective nonlinear coefficients (LiNbO3 and LiIO3). The SHG spectral response of collagen type I from bovine Achilles tendon matched that of the rat-tendon cryosections in backscattered geometry. Collagen types I, II, and VI powders (nonfibrous) did not show any detectable SHG, indicating a lack of noncentrosymmetric crystalline structure at the molecular level. The various stages of collagen thermal denaturation were investigated in rat-tendon cryosections using SHG and bright-field imaging. Thermal denaturation resulted in the gradual destruction of the SHG signal. PMID:17130233

  20. A Review of Current Concepts in Flexor Tendon Repair: Physiology, Biomechanics, Surgical Technique and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Rymer, Ben; Theobald, Peter; Thomas, Peter B M

    2015-12-28

    Historically, the surgical treatment of flexor tendon injuries has always been associated with controversy. It was not until 1967, when the paper entitled Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man's land was presented at the American Society of Hand Surgery, which reported excellent results and catalyzed the implementation of this technique into worldwide practice. We present an up to date literature review using PubMed and Google Scholar where the terms flexor tendon, repair and rehabilitation were used. Topics covered included functional anatomy, nutrition, biome-chanics, suture repair, repair site gapping, and rehabilitation. This article aims to provide a comprehensive and complete overview of flexor tendon repairs. PMID:26793293

  1. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  2. Imaging horse tendons using multimodal 2-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Eichorst, John Paul; Durgam, Sushmitha; Fried, Glenn A; Stewart, Allison A; Stewart, Matthew C

    2014-03-15

    Injuries and damage to tendons plague both human and equine athletes. At the site of injuries, various cells congregate to repair and re-structure the collagen. Treatments for collagen injury range from simple procedures such as icing and pharmaceutical treatments to more complex surgeries and the implantation of stem cells. Regardless of the treatment, the level of mechanical stimulation incurred by the recovering tendon is crucial. However, for a given tendon injury, it is not known precisely how much of a load should be applied for an effective recovery. Both too much and too little loading of the tendon could be detrimental during recovery. A mapping of the complex local environment imparted to any cell present at the site of a tendon injury may however, convey fundamental insights related to their decision making as a function of applied load. Therefore, fundamentally knowing how cells translate mechanical cues from their external environment into signals regulating their functions during repair is crucial to more effectively treat these types of injuries. In this paper, we studied systems of tendons with a variety of 2-photon-based imaging techniques to examine the local mechanical environment of cells in both normal and injured tendons. These tendons were chemically treated to instigate various extents of injury and in some cases, were injected with stem cells. The results related by each imaging technique distinguish with high contrast and resolution multiple morphologies of the cells' nuclei and the alignment of the collagen during injury. The incorporation of 2-photon FLIM into this study probed new features in the local environment of the nuclei that were not apparent with steady-state imaging. Overall, this paper focuses on horse tendon injury pattern and analysis with different 2-photon confocal modalities useful for wide variety of application in damaged tissues. PMID:23871762

  3. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  4. Effects of denervation and immobilization on collagen synthesis in rat skeletal muscle and tendon.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, J; Myllylä, V; Myllylä, R; Vihko, V; Väänänen, K; Takala, T E

    1988-06-01

    The activities of prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PH) and galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase (GGT), both enzymes of collagen biosynthesis, and the concentration of hydroxyproline (HYP) were measured in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles of rats after sciatic nerve neurectomy combined with cast immobilization of the denervated limb for 1 and 3 wk. PH and GGT were also observed in Achilles and tibialis anterior tendons after cast immobilization without neurectomy. After neurectomy the specific PH activity in the denervated gastrocnemius muscle increased by 215% (P less than 0.001). The specific GGT activity increased by 92-110% (P less than 0.01) in the denervated gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles. Elevation of the muscular HYP concentration by 118-170% (P less than 0.001) in the denervated muscles was observed. The PH, GGT, and HYP responses of the denervated muscles immobilized at a lengthened or shortened position during denervation atrophy did not generally differ significantly from those of the unfixed denervated ones. The specific PH and GGT activities of the disused tendons decreased by 62 (P less than 0.01) and 25% (P less than 0.001), respectively, in tendons immobilized in a chronically shortened position. The results suggest that denervation atrophy of skeletal muscle is associated with both an increased level of muscular collagen biosynthesis and with an increased muscular collagen concentration. The PH and GGT responses of the cast-immobilized tendons suggest adaptive changes in collagen biosynthesis of the disused tendon. PMID:2837917

  5. Fiber Bragg grating displacement sensor for movement measurement of tendons and ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liang; Song, Gangbing; Conditt, Michael; Noble, Philip C.; Li, Hongnan

    2007-10-01

    Biomechanical studies often involve measurements of the strains developed in tendons or ligaments in posture or locomotion. Fiber-optic sensors present an attractive option for the measurement of strains in tendons and ligaments because of their low cost, ease of implementation, and increased accuracy compared with other implantable transducers. A new displacement sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating and shape memory alloy technology is proposed for the monitoring of tendon and ligament strains in different postures and in locomotion. After sensor calibration in the laboratory, a comparison of the fiber sensors and traditional camera displacement sensors was carried out to evaluate the performance of the fiber sensor during the application of tension to the Achilles tendon. Additional experiments were performed in cadaver knees to assess the suitability of these fiber sensors to measure ligament deformation in a variety of simulated postures. The results demonstrate that the proposed fiber Bragg grating sensor is a highly accurate, easily implantable, and minimally invasive method of measuring tendon and ligament displacement.

  6. Rabbit tendon cells produce MMP-3 in response to fluid flow without significant calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Joanne M; Elfervig-Wall, Michelle K; Tsuzaki, Mari; Herzog, Walter; Banes, Albert J

    2002-03-01

    Forces applied to tendon during movement cause cellular deformation, as well as fluid movement. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that rabbit tendon fibroblasts detect and respond to fluid-induced shear stress. Cells were isolated from the paratenon of the rabbit Achilles tendon and then subjected to fluid flow at 1 dyn/cm(2) for 6h in a specially designed multi-slide flow device. The application of fluid flow led to an increased expression of the collagenase-1 (MMP-1), stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) genes. The release of proMMP-3 into the medium exhibited a dose-response with the level of fluid shear stress. However, not all cells aligned in the direction of flow. In other experiments, the same cells were incubated with the calcium-reactive dye FURA-2 AM, then subjected to laminar fluid flow in a parallel plate flow chamber. The cells did not significantly increase intracellular calcium concentration when exposed to fluid shear stress levels of up to 25 dyn/cm(2). These results show that gene expression in rabbit tendon cells is sensitive to fluid flow, but that signal transduction is not dependent on intracellular calcium transients. The upregulation of the MMP-1, MMP-3 and COX-2 genes shows that fluid flow could be an important mechanical stimulus for tendon remodelling or injury. PMID:11858805

  7. Unsuccessful regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon harvested for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, A; Ochi, M; Deie, M; Adachi, N

    2012-12-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) analyses have demonstrated that semitendinosus tendon can regenerate at a high rate following harvesting the tendon for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Although it is known that the regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon does not occur in all the patients, the reason for this unsuccessful regeneration of the tendon in certain patients remains unknown. We recently encountered two cases in which regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was unsuccessful because of apparent reasons. These patients experienced a sudden sharp pain in the posterior aspect of their thighs when their hamstring muscles were subjected to aggressive load at 3 and 4 weeks after surgery. At the follow-up examination conducted after 12 months, 3D CT imaging revealed unsuccessful regeneration of the semitendinosus tendons in both cases. Severe proximal retraction of the semitendinosus muscle belly was also confirmed. PMID:23123037

  8. Effects of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid on torn rotator cuff tendons in vitro and in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Keiichirou; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto; Matsueda, Satoko

    2015-10-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) or hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in subacromial injection for the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears (RCT); this study addresses the question of how CS and HA affect the tendon tissue and fibroblasts in vitro and in rats. Cell proliferation assays were performed in human tendon fibroblasts from RCT. Rats underwent surgery to create RCT, and the surgical sites were injected with CS or HA. The rotator cuff tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ultrastructural analysis. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased with CS in vitro (p < 0.05). Maximal load of CS-treated tendons was significantly decreased compared with that of HA-treated tendons (p < 0.05), as well as PCNA(+) cells at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Ultrastructural observations of the CS-treated rats detected apoptosis of tendon fibroblasts 24 h after surgery. Histological and biomechanical data 4 weeks after surgery were not significant among the three groups. Unlike HA, CS caused cell death, and inhibition of the proliferation of tendon fibroblasts, leading to a delay of tendon healing involved and a subsequent decrease of biomechanical strength at the surgical site. PMID:26174562

  9. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  10. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection. PMID:26590723

  11. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  12. Outcome following addition of peroneus brevis tendon transfer to treatment of acquired posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, S J; Deland, J T

    2001-04-01

    The flexor digitorum longus, the tendon most often used for transfer in posterior tibial tendon insufficiency, is one-half to one-third the size of the posterior tibial tendon. Occasionally it may be particularly small or may have been previously used for transfer. In these cases, the senior author has felt that the addition of a transfer of the Peroneus Brevis (PBr) tendon may be helpful in maintaining sufficient tendon and muscle mass to rebalance the foot. Thirteen patients who underwent this procedure were retrospectively identified and matched by age and length of follow-up to patients who underwent a more standard tendon transfer operation minus the addition of the PBr transfer. Pain and functional status were then assessed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle/hindfoot rating scale. Each patient was tested by an independent physical therapist to evaluate inversion and eversion strength. The mean duration of follow-up was 20.6 months (12 to 34 months). The average AOFAS score of the PBr group was 75.8 compared to 71.5 for the standard control group. There was no significant difference between the groups when inversion or eversion strengths were compared. Inversion strength and eversion strength was rated good or excellent (4 or 5) in 12 out of 13 of the PBr transfer group patients. No major complications were encountered in either group. Although it does not increase inversion strength, a PBr transfer can be used to augment a small FDL without causing significant eversion weakness. This can be useful when the FDL is particularly small or in revision surgery. PMID:11354442

  13. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maureen A; Laverty, Peter H; Soiderer, Emily E

    2005-03-01

    Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  14. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  15. Radiostereometric Evaluation of Tendon Elongation after Distal Biceps Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nathan; Keller, Robert A.; Guest, John-Michael; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Operative repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures have shown successful outcomes. However, little is known about the amount of tendon or repair site lengthening or creep. Treatment algorithms in regards to repair fixation, immobilization, initiation of activity and physical therapy are largely made on previous tendon healing principles and anecdotal findings. The purpose of our study was to evaluate distal biceps tendon repair via intratendinous radiostereometric analysis to evaluate tendon lengthening/creep at different time intervals of healing. Methods: Ten patients were recruited who sustained a distal biceps rupture requiring operative repair. Distal biceps repairs were performed using an endobutton only, single incision technique. Intraoperatively, two 2-mm tantalum beads with laser-etched holes were sutured to the distal biceps tendon. One bead was placed at the radius tendon interface and the other placed 1cm proximal to the first bead. Beads were evaluated via both CT scans immediately post-operatively and at 16 weeks and x-rays obtained at time 0 and then at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements were made using the endobutton to bead and bead-to-bead distances in order to assess repair site elongation as well as tendon elongation over time. Following final follow-up, patients underwent a DASH questionnaire and ultrasound to confirm the integrity of the tendon. Results: Ten patients were included in the study. Nine patients had complete ruptures with one having a partial rupture that underwent completion and subsequent repair. All patients showed statistically significant lengthening after surgery. The mean amount of lengthening after surgery was 21.8 mm (range 10.1-29.7 mm, p < 0.05). The repair site lengthened a mean of 12.5 mm (range 8.8-17.0 mm, p <0.05) and the tendon lengthened a mean of 9.4 mm (range: 4.0-18.8 mm, p<0.05) from surgery to final follow-up. The greatest change in lengthening was noted between time 0 and week 4 (mean: 11.8 mm

  16. Architecture and functional ecology of the human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Butler, Erin E; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2016-04-01

    The gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit (MTU) is central to human locomotion. Structural variation in the human gastrocnemius MTU is predicted to affect the efficiency of locomotion, a concept most often explored in the context of performance activities. For example, stiffness of the Achilles tendon varies among individuals with different histories of competitive running. Such a finding highlights the functional variation of individuals and raises the possibility of similar variation between populations, perhaps in response to specific ecological or environmental demands. Researchers often assume minimal variation in human populations, or that industrialized populations represent the human species as well as any other. Yet rainforest hunter-gatherers, which often express the human pygmy phenotype, contradict such assumptions. Indeed, the human pygmy phenotype is a potential model system for exploring the range of ecomorphological variation in the architecture of human hindlimb muscles, a concept we review here. PMID:26712532

  17. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Kjaer, M; Baldwin, K M; Schjerling, P

    2007-01-01

    Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle–tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-β-1 (TGF-β-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7–9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve. RNA was extracted from medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon tissue 24 h after the last training bout, and mRNA levels for collagens I and III, TGF-β-1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), lysyl oxidase (LOX), metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and 2) were measured by Northern blotting and/or real-time PCR. In tendon, expression of TGF-β-1 and collagens I and III (but not CTGF) increased in response to all types of training. Similarly, enzymes/factors involved in collagen processing were induced in tendon, especially LOX (up to 37-fold), which could indicate a loading-induced increase in cross-linking of tendon collagen. In skeletal muscle, a similar regulation of gene expression was observed, but in contrast to the tendon response, the effect of eccentric training was significantly greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-β-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle–tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon to the specific mechanical stimulus. PMID:17540706

  18. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  19. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  20. The Prevalence and Role of Low Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients with Peroneal Tendon Pathologies: A Potential Source for Tendon Subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A low lying peroneus brevis muscle belly is a rare anomaly. There are few published studies that support presence of this anomaly as an etiology for peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a low lying peroneus muscle belly (LLMB) and tendon subluxation is not well explored. In this retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing a primary peroneal tendon surgery, in a five year period, were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI, in comparison to intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease was investigated. Presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologies in patients with and without LLMB was compared. Sensitivity of MRI was high in identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, LLMB was seen in 62.00% of patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% cases of tenosynovitis, 29.03% cases of tendon subluxation, and 80.65% cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear. While presence of a LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, among the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant LLMB. More studies with a larger patient population are needed to better study the role of a low lying muscle belly as a mass occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  1. Prevalence and Role of a Low-Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients With Peroneal Tendon Pathologic Features: A Potential Source of Tendon Subluxation.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A peroneus brevis low-lying muscle belly (LLMB) is a rare anomaly. A few published studies have supported the presence of this anomaly as an etiology for a peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a peroneus brevis LLMB and tendon subluxation has not been well explored. In the present retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing primary peroneal tendon surgery during a 5-year period were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared with the intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease were investigated. The presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologic features in patients with and without a peroneus brevis LLMB was also compared. The sensitivity of MRI was high for identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a peroneus brevis LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, a peroneus brevis LLMB was seen in 62.00% of the patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% of the patients with tenosynovitis, 29.03% of those with tendon subluxation, and 80.65% of those with a peroneus brevis tendon tear. Although the presence of a peroneus brevis LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, of the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant peroneus brevis LLMB. More studies with larger patient populations are needed to better investigate the role of a peroneus brevis LLMB as a mass-occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  2. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  3. Traumatic flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Andre, A; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N; Faruch, M

    2015-12-01

    The flexor system of the fingers consisting of flexor tendons and finger pulleys is a key anatomic structure for the grasping function. Athletes and manual workers are particularly at risk for closed injuries of the flexor system: ruptured pulleys, ruptures of the flexor digitorum profundus from its distal attachment ("jersey finger"), and less frequently, ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis and of the lumbrical muscles. Open injuries vary more and their imaging features are more complex since tendons may be torn in several locations, the locations may be unusual, the injuries may be associated with nerve and vascular injuries, fibrosis… Sonography is the best imaging modality to associate with the clinical exam for it allows an experienced physician to make an accurate and early diagnosis, crucial to appropriate early treatment planning. PMID:26564614

  4. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture. PMID:22704825

  5. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  6. Percutanous management of tricuspid regurgitation: The "Achilles tendon" of transcatheter valve interventions.

    PubMed

    Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    Moderate-to-severe tricuspid insufficiency affects 1.6 million patients in the USA, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality and without safe and effective medical or surgical treatment options. The unique tricuspid valve anatomy, the presence of immediate adjacent anatomic landmarks at risk and the decreased blood pressure of flow complicate the development of effective transcatheter strategies. The HOVER trial will assess the safety and effectiveness of the CAVI approach with implantation of the Edwards, Sapien XT in the inferior vena cava. PMID:27530194

  7. Physical therapy in conservative (functional) treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vavra-Hadziahmetović, N; Hadziahmetović, Z; Smajlović, F

    2000-01-01

    1. All patients returned to their daily working activities. 2. We did not record a single case with complications. 3. With regard to other methods of treatment the functional treatment is apparently without an alternative, but at the same time requires methods that seek full engagement of a surgeon, a radiologist and a physiatrist. 4. In order to avoid compromising and make the treatment successful, it is necessary to keep up with the implementation protocol, to have available adequate coeffective shoes or other means, and to possess certain level of clinical experience. PMID:10934845

  8. Influence of low intensity laser therapy (AsGa) on the cicatrization process of mechanic tendon injury in wistar rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. G. M.; Oliveira Filho, G. R.; Lima, M. T. B. R. M.; Ferreira, A. S.; Silva, J. G.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the low level Laser therapy (AsGa) in the experimental tendon injury. Low level Laser therapy has been used in several studies to observe the regenerative quality and tecidual cicatrization. Forty Wistar rats (male) were divided into 4 groups: control group (C-group); injury group (L-group); treated group with Laser therapy 3 J/cm2 (3J-group); and treated group with Laser therapy 6 J/cm2 (6J-group). Groups L, 3J, and 6J were submitted to a mechanic Achilles tendon injury with a Kocher Forceps for 10 s. The animals were sacrificed after ten days of treatment. Histopathological evaluation using hematoxylin-eosin and Picro-Sirius staining showed a decreased ( p < 0.05) of collagen in L-group (353.12 ± 9.85 μm2/field) compared to C-group (215.13 ± 22.63 μm2/field). Animals treated with Laser showed a significant increase in collagen fibers despite the applied dosage (3J-group: 375.89 ± 26.99 μm2/field; 6J group: 400.34 ± 62.92 μm2/field; p < 0.05). These data suggest that low-level Laser therapy was efficient for the treatment of mechanics Achilles tendon injury in Wistar rats.

  9. Peritendinous elastase treatment induces tendon degeneration in rats: A potential model of tendinopathy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yen-Ting; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of elastase on tendinopathy, as well as to evaluate the potential for peritendinous injections of elastase into rats to cause tendinopathy. We first investigated the expression of elastase in the tendons of patients with tendinopathy, and then established the effects of elastase injection on the Achilles tendons of rats. Ultrasonographic and incapacitance testing was used to conduct tests for 8 weeks. Tendon tissues were collected for histological observation and protein levels of collagen type I and type III were detected using Western blotting. The percentage of elastase-positive cells increased in human specimens with grades II and III tendinopathy. The rat model demonstrated that the thickness of the tendon increased after elastase injection during Week 2-8. Hypercellularity and focal lesions were detected after Week 2. The expression of elastase was increased and elastin was decreased in Week 8. Collagen type I expression was decreased, but type III was increased in Week 4. These results suggested that elastase may be involved in the development of chronic tendinopathy, and that peritendinous injection of elastase may result in tendinopathy in rats. PMID:26291184

  10. Restricted differentiation potential of progenitor cell populations obtained from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT)

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, William James Edward; Comerford, Eithne Josephine Veronica; Clegg, Peter David; Canty‐Laird, Elizabeth Gail

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to characterize stem and progenitor cell populations from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon, an energy‐storing tendon with similarities to the human Achilles tendon, which is frequently injured. Using published methods for the isolation of tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells by low‐density plating we found that isolated cells possessed clonogenicity but were unable to fully differentiate towards mesenchymal lineages using trilineage differentiation assays. In particular, adipogenic differentiation appeared to be restricted, as assessed by Oil Red O staining of stem/progenitor cells cultured in adipogenic medium. We then assessed whether differential adhesion to fibronectin substrates could be used to isolate a population of cells with broader differentiation potential. However we found little difference in the stem and tenogenic gene expression profile of these cells as compared to tenocytes, although the expression of thrombospondin‐4 was significantly reduced in hypoxic conditions. Tendon‐derived stem/progenitor cells isolated by differential adhesion to fibronectin had a similar differentiation potential to cells isolated by low density plating, and when grown in either normoxic or hypoxic conditions. In summary, we have found a restricted differentiation potential of cells isolated from the equine superficial digital flexor tendon despite evidence for stem/progenitor‐like characteristics. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 33:849–858, 2015. PMID:25877997

  11. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy. PMID:24402919

  12. Regulatory role of collagen V in establishing mechanical properties of tendons and ligaments is tissue dependent.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Freedman, Benjamin R; Fried, Joanna H; Sun, Mei; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with classic (type I) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), characterized by heterozygous mutations in the Col5a1 and Col5a2 genes, exhibit connective tissue hyperelasticity and recurrent joint dislocations, indicating a potential regulatory role for collagen V in joint stabilizing soft tissues. This study asked whether the contribution of collagen V to the establishment of mechanical properties is tissue dependent. We mechanically tested four different tissues from wild type and targeted collagen V-null mice: the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon, Achilles tendon (ACH), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the supraspinatus tendon (SST). Area was significantly reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group in the FDL, ACH, and SST. Maximum load and stiffness were reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group for all tissues. However, insertion site and midsubstance modulus were reduced only for the ACL and SST. This study provides evidence that the regulatory role of collagen V in extracellular matrix assembly is tissue dependent and that joint instability in classic EDS may be caused in part by insufficient mechanical properties of the tendons and ligaments surrounding each joint. PMID:25876927

  13. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  14. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate plus Sodium Chondroitin Sulfate Solution on Peritendinous Adhesion and Tendon Healing: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Gümüştaş, Seyit Ali; Kom, Mustafa; Uludağ, Abuzer; Serbest, Sancar; Eröksüz, Yesari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adhesion formation following tendon injury is a serious clinical problem. Aims: In this experimental study, the effects of the combination of sodium hyaluronate (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) on peritendinous adhesion and tendon healing were evaluated. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty-one mature Sprague Dawley male rats were randomly divided into three equal groups. The rats’ Achilles tendons were cut and repaired with a modified Kessler technique. About 0.25 and 0.50 mL of the HA and CS (HA+CS) combination were injected subcutaneously into the repair site of the rats in groups 1 and 2, respectively, on days 0, 3, 7, and 10. The subjects in group 3 were used as the control group. At 6 weeks, all rats were euthanized. The tenotomy site was examined macroscopically in all animal subjects. Four samples were assigned to the histopathological examination group, and the others were assigned to the biomechanical assessment group. Results: Inflammation and adhesion in both treatment groups were observed at a lower rate than in the control group. The collagen filaments in both treatment groups were regular and the number was low when compared to the control group. However, there was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and the control group. The quantity, quality, and grade of the adhesions were statistically significantly lower in group 2 when compared with the other groups. The mean maximum stress strength in group 2 was statistically significantly higher than that in group 1 and the control group. Conclusion: Local administration of the HA+CS combination solution is a valid tool for preventing peritendinous adhesion after extrasynovial tendon repair such as Achilles tendon, and is a treatment option in such cases. PMID:27308069

  15. Electroacupuncture increases the concentration and organization of collagen in a tendon healing model in rats.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Marcos dos Santos; de Aro, Andréa Aparecida; Guerra, Flávia Da Ré; Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; de Campos Vidal, Benedicto; Rosa Pimentel, Edson

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on the composition and organization of the extracellular matrix of the rat Achilles tendon after a partial transection during the proliferative phase of healing. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: rats that were not tenotomized (G1), tenotomized rats (G2), and rats that were tenotomized and submitted to EA (G3). EA was applied 15 days after injury at the ST36 and BL57 acupoints for 20 min, three times per week on alternate days for a total of six sessions. Biochemical analyses were performed using non-collagenous proteins, glycosaminoglycans, and hydroxyproline quantifications. An analysis of metalloproteinase-2 was carried out by zymography. The general organization of the extracellular matrix and the metachromasy of the tendons were analyzed under light microscopy. The organization of the bundles of collagen fibers was analyzed by birefringence analysis. The results showed that EA did not alter the concentration of non-collagenous proteins or glycosaminoglycans or the enzymatic activity of metalloproteinase-2 in the transected tendons. However, the concentration of hydroxyproline was significantly increased when these tendons were treated by EA. The analysis of birefringence showed a higher organization of collagen fibers in the group treated by EA. These results indicate, for the first time, that EA may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment of tendon injuries by increasing the concentration of collagen and by inducing a better molecular organization of the collagen fibers, which may improve the mechanical strength of the tendon after injury. PMID:22891942

  16. A Comparison of Two Different High-Volume Image-Guided Injection Procedures for Patients With Chronic Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pragmatic Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Patrick C; Mahadevan, Dev; Bhatt, Raj; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a comparison evaluation of outcomes after 2 different high-volume image-guided injection (HVIGI) procedures performed under direct ultrasound guidance in patients with chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. In group A, the HVIGI involved high-volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 40 mL of saline) and no dry needling. In group B, the HVIGI involved a smaller volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 20 mL of saline) and dry needling of the Achilles tendon. A total of 34 patients were identified from the clinical records, with a mean overall age of 50.6 (range 26 to 83) years and an overall mean follow-up duration of 277 (range 49 to 596) days. The change between the preinjection and postinjection Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles scores of 33.4 ± 22.5 points in group A and 6.94 ± 22.2 points in group B, was statistically significant (p = .002). In group A, 3 patients (16.7%) required surgical treatment compared with 6 patients (37.5%) in group B requiring surgical treatment (p = .180). Our results indicated that a higher volume without dry needling compared with a lower volume with dry needling resulted in greater improvement in noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. However, confounding factors mean it is not possible to categorically state that this difference was solely due to different injection techniques. PMID:27286927

  17. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (2) width and thickness of the tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (3) degrees of tendon adhesions were significantly lighter

  18. Reflex responses at the human ankle: the importance of tendon compliance.

    PubMed Central

    Rack, P M; Ross, H F; Thilmann, A F; Walters, D K

    1983-01-01

    Subjects with active stretch reflexes responded to an imposed sinusoidal movement of the ankle joint with a reflex force whose amplitude and timing varied widely with changes in the frequency of movement. At some frequency between 6 and 8 Hz, the reflex force tended to offset the non-reflex component of resistance, and thus to reduce the total resistance to movement. At this frequency the reflex response was particularly vigorous, with a deep modulation of electromyogram (e.m.g.) activity and a displacement of the joint stiffness vectors far from their high frequency values. The total resistance to movement might then be small, or it might be zero, or the reflex might actually assist the movement. As the frequency of movement was decreased through this critical range, the timing of the reflex response to movement changed rapidly with an abrupt advancement of the triceps surae e.m.g. signal, and a wide separation of the joint stiffness vectors as they passed close to the origin. This result was attributed to a changing distribution of the movement between the muscle fibres and an elastic Achilles tendon. It was assumed that at most frequencies the muscle fibres resisted extension, so that a major part of the imposed movement went into stretching the tendon; when, however, at 6-8 Hz, the reflex response was so timed as to reduce or abolish the resistance of the muscle fibres, more of the movement would take place in them. The muscle spindles would 'see' this larger movement of the muscle fibres, and generate correspondingly more reflex activity. A simplified model of the muscle-tendon combination behaves in a way that supports this view, and the available information about the human Achilles tendon indicates that it is sufficiently compliant for such an explanation. Therefore, movements imposed on the ankle joint would not necessarily be 'seen' by the muscle spindles, since they would be modified by transmission through a compliant tendon. By assuming a value for the

  19. Design and performance of a fiber bragg grating displacement sensor for movement measurement of tendon and ligament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liang; Song, Gangbing; Conditt, Michael; Noble, Philip C.; Li, Hongnan

    2007-04-01

    Biomechanical studies often involve measurements of the strains developed in tendons or ligaments in posture or locomotion. Fiber optic sensors present an attractive option for measurement of strains in tendons and ligaments due to their low cost, ease of implementation, and increased accuracy compared to other implantable transducers. A new displacement sensor based on fiber Bragg grating and shape memory alloy technology is proposed for the monitoring of tendon and ligament strains in different postures and in locomotion. After sensor calibration in the laboratory, a comparison test between the fiber sensors and traditional camera displacement sensors was carried out to evaluate the performance of the fiber sensor during application of tension to the Achilles tendon. Additional experiments were performed in cadaver knees to assess the suitability of these fiber sensors for measuring ligament deformation in a variety of simulated postures. The results demonstrate that the proposed fiber Bragg grating sensor is a high-accuracy, easily implantable, and minimally invasive method of measuring tendon and ligament displacement.

  20. Role of xenogenous bovine platelet gel embedded within collagen implant on tendon healing: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is demanding. Platelet concentrates may be useful to favor healing in such conditions. The characteristics of bovine platelet-gel embedded within a collagen-implant were determined in vitro, and its healing efficacy was examined in a large Achilles tendon defect in rabbits. Two cm of the left Achilles tendon of 60 rabbits were excised, and the animals were randomly assigned to control (no implant), collagen-implant, or bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant groups. The tendon edges were maintained aligned using a Kessler suture. No implant was inserted in the control group. In the two other groups, a collagen-implant or bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant was inserted in the defect. The bioelectricity and serum platelet-derived growth factor levels were measured weekly and at 60 days post injury, respectively. After euthanasia at 60 days post injury, the tendons were tested at macroscopic, microscopic, and ultrastructural levels, and their dry matter and biomechanical performances were also assessed. Another 60 rabbits were assigned to receive no implant, a collagen-implant, or a bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant, euthanized at 10, 20, 30, and 40 days post injury, and their tendons were evaluated grossly and histologically to determine host-graft interactions. Compared to the control and collagen-implant, treatment with bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant improved tissue bioelectricity and serum platelet-derived growth factor levels, and increased cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation. It also increased number, diameter, and density of the collagen fibrils, alignment and maturation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, biomechanical properties and dry matter content of the injured tendons at 60 days post injury. The bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant also increased biodegradability, biocompatibility, and tissue incorporation behavior of the implant compared to the collagen-implant alone

  1. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P; Larsen, J O; Martinussen, T; List, E O; Kopchick, J J; Kjaer, M; Heinemeier, K M

    2014-02-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant transgenic mice that expressed bovine GH (bGH) and had high circulating levels of GH and IGF-I, 2) dwarf mice with a disrupted GH receptor gene (GHR-/-) leading to GH resistance and low circulating IGF-I, and 3) a wild-type control group (CTRL). We measured the ultra-structure, collagen content and mRNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon and muscle compared to CTRL. Mean collagen fibril diameter was significantly decreased with both high and low GH/IGF-I signaling, but the GHR-/- mouse tendons were most severely affected with a total loss of the normal bimodal diameter distribution. In conclusion, chronic manipulation of the GH/IGF-I axis influenced both morphology and mRNA levels of selected genes in the muscle-tendon unit of mice. Whereas only moderate structural changes were observed with up-regulation of GH/IGF-I axis, disruption of the GH receptor had pronounced effects upon tendon ultra-structure. PMID:24080228

  2. Achilles tendinitis as a rare extraintestinal manifestation of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Zenda, Takahiro; Araki, Ichiro; Nakamiya, Otoyuki; Tokuumi, Yuji; Shimada, Yuka; Komai, Keigo; Taniuchi, Yukie

    2016-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease often have extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) involving almost all organ systems, but little has been reported on Achilles tendinitis. Herein, we present a unique case of Achilles tendinitis, which manifested shortly after initiation of mesalazine therapy for ulcerative colitis. A 26-year-old Japanese woman with bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps lasting for 7 days was referred to our hospital. The Lichtiger clinical activity index (CAI) score was 9 at the first visit. Based on the clinical symptoms and examination results, she was diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis in the active phase, and treatment with mesalazine (2.4 g/day) and probiotics was initiated. Her symptoms resolved within 7 days of treatment (CAI 3). However, she then developed bilateral Achilles tendinitis without any apparent cause. The Achilles tendinitis subsided with conservative management within 2 weeks, despite continuation of mesalazine therapy. This case instructively suggests that Achilles tendinitis should be noted as an EIM of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27059338

  3. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) enhances the in vitro-induced differentiation of human tendon-derived stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs)

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Laura; Raffa, Salvatore; Vetrano, Mario; Ranieri, Danilo; Malisan, Florence; Scrofani, Cristina; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Ferretti, Andrea; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Visco, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive and innovative technology for the management of specific tendinopathies. In order to elucidate the ESWT-mediated clinical benefits, human Tendon-derived Stem/Progenitor cells (hTSPCs) explanted from 5 healthy semitendinosus (ST) and 5 ruptured Achilles (AT) tendons were established. While hTSPCs from the two groups showed similar proliferation rates and stem cell surface marker profiles, we found that the clonogenic potential was maintained only in cells derived from healthy donors. Interestingly, ESWT significantly accelerated hTSPCs differentiation, suggesting that the clinical benefits of ESWT may be ascribed to increased efficiency of tendon repair after injury. PMID:26843618

  4. Glycosaminoglycans of human rotator cuff tendons: changes with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R L; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the glycosaminoglycans of the adult human rotator cuff tendon matrix, to characterise changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Rotator cuff (supraspinatus) tendons (n = 84) and common biceps tendons (n = 26) were obtained from cadavers with no history of tendon pathology (age range 11-95 years). Biopsies of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons, n = 53) were obtained during open shoulder surgery to repair shoulder lesions (age range 38-80 years). Glycosaminoglycans were extracted by papain digestion and analysed by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, the carbazole assay for uronic acid and the dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay for sulphated glycosaminoglycans. Some digests were analysed for keratan sulphate by 5D4 monoclonal antibody ELISA. Soluble proteoglycans were extracted in 4M guanidine hydrochloride and analysed by 4-15% SDS PAGE. RESULTS--The mean (SD) sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the normal cadaver supraspinatus tendon was 12.3 (4.3) micrograms/mg dry weight, between three and ten times greater than in the common biceps tendon [1.2 (0.6) micrograms/mg dry weight]. The major GAG was chondroitin sulphate [6.9 (2.6) micrograms/mg dry weight], with a smaller proportion of dermatan sulphate [2.5 (1.2) micrograms/mg dry weight]. In contrast, the common biceps tendon contained predominantly dermatan sulphate [0.8 (0.2) microgram/mg dry weight] with less chondroitin sulphate [0.2 (0.2) microgram/mg dry weight]. There was no difference in the concentration of hyaluronan in these tendons [9.3 (2.8) micrograms/mg dry weight and 10.8 (4.3) micrograms/mg dry weight respectively] and there was no significant change of hyaluronan with age. Keratan sulphate was a small but significant component of the supraspinatus tendon [0.43 (0.33) microgram/mg dry weight, n = 25], whereas there was little or none in the common biceps tendon [0.04 (0

  5. TLP tendon bottom connector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, H.S.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a bottom connector for connecting a tendon segment of a tension leg platform to a subsea template which includes a receptacle for the connector comprising: a first body member adapted to be received within an anchor receptacle, a second body member connected to the first body member through a flexible joint for universally pivotal movement and adapted to be connected to the tendon segment, a latch carrier movable with respect to the first body member and having latch segments pivotally connected to the latch carrier, the latch segments being such that in one position of the latch carrier, the latch segments engage both a recess in the receptacle and the first body member when the connector is inserted into the receptacle a sufficient distance so that the latch segments and carrier will react to the recess and such that when the latch carrier is in another position, the latch segments are clear of the recess to enable the connector to move further into the receptacle or to allow the bottom connector to be removed from the receptacle, and release means operative to maintain the carrier in the other position if a decision is made to remove the connector from the receptacle.

  6. Ovine tendon collagen: Extraction, characterisation and fabrication of thin films for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, M B; Lokanathan, Y; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I; Chowdhury, S R

    2016-11-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in the human body, thus widely used in tissue engineering and subsequent clinical applications. This study aimed to extract collagen from ovine (Ovis aries) Achilles tendon (OTC), and to evaluate its physicochemical properties and its potential to fabricate thin film with collagen fibrils in a random or aligned orientation. Acid-solubilized protein was extracted from ovine Achilles tendon using 0.35M acetic acid, and 80% of extracted protein was measured as collagen. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of alpha 1 and alpha 2 chain of collagen type I (col I). Further analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of triple helix structure of col I, similar to commercially available rat tail col I. Drying the OTC solution at 37°C resulted in formation of a thin film with randomly orientated collagen fibrils (random collagen film; RCF). Introduction of unidirectional mechanical intervention using a platform rocker prior to drying facilitated the fabrication of a film with aligned orientation of collagen fibril (aligned collagen film; ACF). It was shown that both RCF and ACF significantly enhanced human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment and proliferation than that on plastic surface. Moreover, cells were distributed randomly on RCF, but aligned with the direction of mechanical intervention on ACF. In conclusion, ovine tendon could be an alternative source of col I to fabricate scaffold for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27524008

  7. Histopathological, biomechanical, and behavioral pain findings of Achilles tendinopathy using an animal model of overuse injury

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Leila; Vachon, Pascal; Beaudry, Francis; Langelier, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Animal models of forced running are used to study overuse tendinopathy, a common health problem for which clear evidence for effective and accessible treatments is still lacking. In these models, pain evaluation is necessary to better understand the disease, help design and evaluate therapies, and ensure humane treatment of the animals. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to evaluate pain and pathologic findings in an animal model of moderate Achilles tendinopathy induced by treadmill running. Air puffs, instead of electrical shocks, were used to stimulate running so that pain associated with stimulation would be avoided. Pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated in vivo using a new instrumented plier, whereas spinal cord peptides were analyzed ex vivo with high‐performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Tendon histologic slides were semiquantitatively evaluated, using the Bonar score technique and biomechanical properties, using the traction test. After 8 weeks of treadmill running (2 weeks for adaptation and 6 weeks for the lesion protocol), the protocol was stopped because the air puffs became ineffective to stimulate running. We, nevertheless, observed some histologic changes characteristic of overuse tendinopathy as well as decreased mechanical properties, increased Substance P and dynorphin A peptides but without pressure pain sensitivity. These results suggest that air‐puffs stimulation is sufficient to induce an early stage tendinopathy to study new therapeutic drugs without inducing unnecessary pain. They also indicate that pain‐associated peptides could be related with movement evoked pain and with the sharp breakdown of the running performance. PMID:25602018

  8. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    González, Juan C; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Pérez, Jorge E; Carmona, Jorge U

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1 from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT. PMID:26781753

  9. Autologous leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma therapy for Achilles tendinopathy induced by collagenase in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan C.; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E.; Pérez, Jorge E.; Carmona, Jorge U.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-reduced platelet-rich plasma (LR-PRP) is a therapy for tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon (TAT); however, there is scarce information regarding LR-PRP effects in rabbit models of TAT. We compared, at 4 and 12 weeks (w), the LR-PRP and placebo (PBS) effects on ultrasonography, histology and relative gene expression of collagen types I (COL1A1) and III (COL3A1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 24 rabbits with TAT induced by collagenase. The rabbits (treated with both treatments) were euthanatised after either 4 or 12 w. A healthy group (HG (n = 6)) was included. At 4 and 12 w, the LR-PRP group had a no statistically different histology score to the HG. At w 4, the COL1A1 expression was significantly higher in the LR-PRP group when compared to HG, and the expression of COL3A1from both LR-PRP and PBS-treated tendons was significantly higher when compared to the HG. At w 12, the expression of COL3A1 remained significantly higher in the PBS group in comparison to the LR-PRP group and the HG. At w 4, the LR-PRP group presented a significantly higher expression of VEGF when compared to the PBS group and the HG. In conclusion, LR-PRP treatment showed regenerative properties in rabbits with TAT. PMID:26781753

  10. Effectiveness of hybridized nano- and microstructure biodegradable, biocompatible, collagen-based, three-dimensional bioimplants in repair of a large tendon-defect model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdulhamid; Silver, Ian A; Tanideh, Nader; Golestani, Navid

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of hybridized, three-dimensional (3D) collagen implants in repair of experimentally-induced tendon defects in rabbits. Seventy-five mature New Zealand albino rabbits were divided into treated (n = 50) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. In treated animals defects were filled with hybridized collagen implants and repaired with sutures. In control rabbits tendon defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by ultrasonography. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) at 60 days post-injury. All control animals were euthanized at 60 days. Tendon lesions of all animals were examined morphologically and histologically immediately after death. Those of the experimental groups (n = 20 for each) were examined for gross pathological, histopathological and ultrastructural changes together with dry matter content at 60 days post-injury, as were the normal, contralateral tendons of both groups. In comparison with healing lesions of control animals, the treated tendons showed greater numbers of mature tenoblasts and tenocytes, minimal peritendinous adhesions and oedema, together with greater echogenicity, homogeneity and fibril alignment. Fewer chronic inflammatory cells were present in treated than control tendons. Hybridized collagen implants acted as scaffolds for tenoblasts and longitudinally-orientated newly-formed collagen fibrils, which encouraged tendon repair with homogeneous, well-organized highly aligned scar tissue that was histologically and ultrastructurally more mature than in untreated controls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23637093

  11. Partial Tendon Release for Treatment of a Symptomatic Snapping Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Scott A.; Quach, Tony; McAllister, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Snapping of the biceps femoris tendon over the fibular head is an uncommon condition. Reported causes include an anomalous insertion of the tendon, trauma at the insertion site of the tendon, and an abnormality of the fibular head. This article reports a case of a painful snapping biceps femoris tendon in a patient without an anomalous tendon insertion or an abnormality of the fibular head. Partial release of the superior aspect of the tendon resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:23015904

  12. Evolutionary Origins of C-Terminal (GPP)n 3-Hydroxyproline Formation in Vertebrate Tendon Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Werther, Rachel; Weis, MaryAnn; Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Eyre, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half the proline residues in fibrillar collagen are hydroxylated. The predominant form is 4-hydroxyproline, which helps fold and stabilize the triple helix. A minor form, 3-hydroxyproline, still has no clear function. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we recently revealed several previously unknown molecular sites of 3-hydroxyproline in fibrillar collagen chains. In fibril-forming A-clade collagen chains, four new partially occupied 3-hydroxyproline sites were found (A2, A3, A4 and (GPP)n) in addition to the fully occupied A1 site at Pro986. The C-terminal (GPP)n motif has five consecutive GPP triplets in α1(I), four in α2(I) and three in α1(II), all subject to 3-hydroxylation. The evolutionary origins of this substrate sequence were investigated by surveying the pattern of its 3-hydroxyproline occupancy from early chordates through amphibians, birds and mammals. Different tissue sources of type I collagen (tendon, bone and skin) and type II collagen (cartilage and notochord) were examined by mass spectrometry. The (GPP)n domain was found to be a major substrate for 3-hydroxylation only in vertebrate fibrillar collagens. In higher vertebrates (mouse, bovine and human), up to five 3-hydroxyproline residues per (GPP)n motif were found in α1(I) and four in α2(I), with an average of two residues per chain. In vertebrate type I collagen the modification exhibited clear tissue specificity, with 3-hydroxyproline prominent only in tendon. The occupancy also showed developmental changes in Achilles tendon, with increasing 3-hydroxyproline levels with age. The biological significance is unclear but the level of 3-hydroxylation at the (GPP)n site appears to have increased as tendons evolved and shows both tendon type and developmental variations within a species. PMID:24695516

  13. Evolutionary origins of C-terminal (GPP)n 3-hydroxyproline formation in vertebrate tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Hudson, David M; Werther, Rachel; Weis, MaryAnn; Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Eyre, David R

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half the proline residues in fibrillar collagen are hydroxylated. The predominant form is 4-hydroxyproline, which helps fold and stabilize the triple helix. A minor form, 3-hydroxyproline, still has no clear function. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we recently revealed several previously unknown molecular sites of 3-hydroxyproline in fibrillar collagen chains. In fibril-forming A-clade collagen chains, four new partially occupied 3-hydroxyproline sites were found (A2, A3, A4 and (GPP)n) in addition to the fully occupied A1 site at Pro986. The C-terminal (GPP)n motif has five consecutive GPP triplets in α1(I), four in α2(I) and three in α1(II), all subject to 3-hydroxylation. The evolutionary origins of this substrate sequence were investigated by surveying the pattern of its 3-hydroxyproline occupancy from early chordates through amphibians, birds and mammals. Different tissue sources of type I collagen (tendon, bone and skin) and type II collagen (cartilage and notochord) were examined by mass spectrometry. The (GPP)n domain was found to be a major substrate for 3-hydroxylation only in vertebrate fibrillar collagens. In higher vertebrates (mouse, bovine and human), up to five 3-hydroxyproline residues per (GPP)n motif were found in α1(I) and four in α2(I), with an average of two residues per chain. In vertebrate type I collagen the modification exhibited clear tissue specificity, with 3-hydroxyproline prominent only in tendon. The occupancy also showed developmental changes in Achilles tendon, with increasing 3-hydroxyproline levels with age. The biological significance is unclear but the level of 3-hydroxylation at the (GPP)n site appears to have increased as tendons evolved and shows both tendon type and developmental variations within a species. PMID:24695516

  14. Scaffolds for Tendon and Ligament Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Anthony; Butler, David L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Cagle, Paul J; Proctor, Christopher S; Ratcliffe, Seena S; Flatow, Evan L

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced tendon and ligament repair would have a major impact on orthopaedic surgery outcomes, resulting in reduced repair failures and repeat surgeries, more rapid return to function, and reduced health care costs. Scaffolds have been used for mechanical and biologic reinforcement of repair and regeneration with mixed results. This review summarizes efforts made using biologic and synthetic scaffolds using rotator cuff and ACL as examples of clinical applications, discusses recent advances that have shown promising clinical outcomes, and provides insight into future therapy. PMID:25650098

  15. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  16. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. PMID:25419468

  17. Generation of tendon-to-bone interface "enthesis" with use of recombinant BMP-2 in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Yoshida, Gen; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2007-11-01

    The anatomical structure at bone-tendon and bone-ligament interfaces is called the enthesis. Histologically, the enthesis is characterized by a transitional series of tissue layers from the end of the tendon to bone, including tendon, fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. This arrangement yields stronger direct connection of the soft tissues to bone. In surgical repair, the enthesis has proven difficult to reproduce, and the success of ligament-bone bonding has depended on the fibrous attachment that forms after any ligament reconstructions. In this study, we attempted to generate a direct-insertion enthesis in two stages. First, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was injected into the flexor digitorum communis tendon in the rabbit hind limb to induce ectopic ossicle formation. In a second step, the resultant tendon/ossicle complex was then surgically transferred onto the surface of the rabbit tibia to generate a stable tendon-bone junction. One month following surgery, histomorphological examination confirmed direct insertion of tendon-bone structures in the proximal tibia of the rabbit. Ultimate failure loads of the BMP-2-generated tendon-bone junction were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that it is possible to successfully regenerate a direct tendon-to-bone enthesis. Use of this approach may enable successful reconstruction of joints rendered unstable after ligamentous rupture or laxity after anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:17557323

  18. Effect of partial-thickness tear on loading capacities of the supraspinatus tendon: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Becce, Fabio; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon frequently occur at its insertion on the greater tubercule of the humerus, causing pain and reduced strength and range of motion. The goal of this work was to quantify the loss of loading capacity due to tendon tears at the insertion area. A finite element model of the supraspinatus tendon was developed using in vivo magnetic resonance images data. The tendon was represented by an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive law identified with experimental measurements. A failure criterion was proposed and calibrated with experimental data. A partial-thickness tear was gradually increased, starting from the deep articular-sided fibres. For different values of tendon tear thickness, the tendon was mechanically loaded up to failure. The numerical model predicted a loss in loading capacity of the tendon as the tear thickness progressed. Tendon failure was more likely when the tendon tear exceeded 20%. The predictions of the model were consistent with experimental studies. Partial-thickness tears below 40% tear are sufficiently stable to persist physiotherapeutic exercises. Above 60% tear surgery should be considered to restore shoulder strength. PMID:26290956

  19. Kennedy and Achilles: A Classical Approach on Political Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Uses the careers of President John F. Kennedy and the legendary Greek hero Achilles to explore the intersections among mythological status, public perception, and leadership. Observes fascinating parallels between both men and their roles as soldiers, generational representatives, and martyred heroes. (MJP)

  20. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  1. Elastic properties of Thiel-embalmed human ankle tendon and ligament.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaochun; Kemp, Sandy; Corner, George; Eisma, Roos; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Thiel embalming is recommended as an alternative to formalin-based embalming because it preserves tissue elasticity, color, and flexibility in the long term, with low infection and toxicity risk. The degree to which Thiel embalming preserves elasticity has so far been assessed mainly by subjective scoring, with little quantitative verification. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of Thiel embalming on the elastic properties of human ankle tendons and ligament. Biomechanical tensile tests were carried out on six Thiel-embalmed samples each of the peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and calcaneal tendons, and the calcaneofibular ligament, with strain rates of 0.25%s(-1), 2%s(-1), and 8%s(-1). The stress-strain relationship was calculated from the force-extension response with cross-sectional area and gauge length. Young's modulus was determined from the stress-strain curve. The results showed that the tendon and ligament elasticity were lower after Thiel embalming than the literature values for fresh nonembalmed tendons and ligament. The biomechanical tensile test showed that the measured elasticity of Thiel-embalmed tendons and ligaments increased with the strain rate. The Thiel embalming method is useful for preserving human ankle tendons and ligaments for anatomy and surgery teaching and research, but users need to be aware of its softening effects. The method retains the mechanical strain rate effect on tendons and ligament. PMID:25707906

  2. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  3. A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat.

    PubMed

    Blomgran, Parmis; Blomgran, Robert; Ernerudh, Jan; Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and Treg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and Treg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the Treg cell fraction was lower (p < 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more Treg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger. PMID:27405922

  4. Regulatory Role of Collagen V in Establishing Mechanical Properties of Tendons and Ligaments is Tissue-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Connizzo, Brianne K.; Freedman, Benjamin R.; Fried, Joanna H.; Sun, Mei; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with classic (type I) Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), characterized by heterozygous mutations in the Col5a1 and Col5a2 genes, exhibit connective tissue hyperelasticity and recurrent joint dislocations, indicating a potential regulatory role for collagen V in joint stabilizing soft tissues. This study asked whether the contribution of collagen V to the establishment of mechanical properties is tissue-dependent. We mechanically tested four different tissues from wild type and targeted collagen V-null mice: the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL), Achilles tendon (ACH), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the supraspinatus tendon (SST). Area was significantly reduced in the Col5a1ΔTen/ΔTen group in the FDL, ACH, and SST. Maximum load and stiffness were reduced in the Col5a1ΔTen/ΔTen group for all tissues. However, insertion site and midsubstance modulus were reduced only for the ACL and SST. This study provides evidence that the regulatory role of collagen V in extracellular matrix assembly is tissue-dependent and that joint instability in classic EDS may be caused in part by insufficient mechanical properties of the tendons and ligaments surrounding each joint. PMID:25876927

  5. A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blomgran, Parmis; Blomgran, Robert; Ernerudh, Jan; Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45+) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3+CD4+) and Treg cells (CD25+ Foxp3+) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and Treg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the Treg cell fraction was lower (p < 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more Treg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger. PMID:27405922

  6. A Review of Current Concepts in Flexor Tendon Repair: Physiology, Biomechanics, Surgical Technique and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Ben; Theobald, Peter; Thomas, Peter B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the surgical treatment of flexor tendon injuries has always been associated with controversy. It was not until 1967, when the paper entitled Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man’s land was presented at the American Society of Hand Surgery, which reported excellent results and catalyzed the implementation of this technique into worldwide practice. We present an up to date literature review using PubMed and Google Scholar where the terms flexor tendon, repair and rehabilitation were used. Topics covered included functional anatomy, nutrition, biome-chanics, suture repair, repair site gapping, and rehabilitation. This article aims to provide a comprehensive and complete overview of flexor tendon repairs. PMID:26793293

  7. Sonographic evaluation of the distal iliopsoas tendon using a new approach.

    PubMed

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Blasi, Marc; Miguel, Maribel; Vallejo, Beatriz; Margalet, Eric; Bong, David A; Martinoli, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Sonography of the iliopsoas tendon plays an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative and postoperative management for the increasing number of patients under consideration for arthroscopically guided hip interventions such as iliopsoas tenotomy in a variety of conditions, including arthropathy, periarticular calcifications, and cam-type deformities of the femoral head. The ability to visualize the iliopsoas tendon pre-operatively can be helpful diagnostically in patients presenting with hip pain and can aid in planning surgery, while evaluating the tendon postoperatively is important in the assessment of causes of postoperative pain and other potential complications. We present a novel technique for visualizing the distal iliopsoas tendon complex in the longitudinal axis at its insertion on the lesser trochanter on sonography. PMID:25336491

  8. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  9. Human Adipose Stem Cells Differentiated on Braided Polylactide Scaffolds Is a Potential Approach for Tendon Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Vuornos, Kaisa; Björninen, Miina; Talvitie, Elina; Paakinaho, Kaarlo; Kellomäki, Minna; Huhtala, Heini; Miettinen, Susanna; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi

    2016-03-01

    Growing number of musculoskeletal defects increases the demand for engineered tendon. Our aim was to find an efficient strategy to produce tendon-like matrix in vitro. To allow efficient differentiation of human adipose stem cells (h