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Sample records for acid etching dental

  1. Reliability evaluation of alumina-blasted/acid-etched versus laser-sintered dental implants.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Erika O; Júnior, Amilcar C Freitas; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-05-01

    Step-stress accelerated life testing (SSALT) and fractographic analysis were performed to evaluate the reliability and failure modes of dental implant fabricated by machining (surface treated with alumina blasting/acid etching) or laser sintering for anterior single-unit replacements. Forty-two dental implants (3.75 × 10 mm) were divided in two groups (n=21 each): laser sintered (LS) and alumina blasting/acid etching (AB/AE). The abutments were screwed to the implants and standardized maxillary central incisor metallic crowns were cemented and subjected to SSALT in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for a mission of 50,000 cycles at 200 N were calculated. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopes were used for failure analyses. The Beta (β) value derived from use-level probability Weibull calculation of 1.48 for group AB/AE indicated that damage accumulation likely was an accelerating factor, whereas the β of 0.78 for group LS indicated that load alone likely dictated the failure mechanism for this group, and that fatigue damage did not appear to accumulate. The reliability was not significantly different (p>0.9) between AB/AE (61 %) and LS (62 %). Fracture of the abutment and fixation screw was the chief failure mode. No implant fractures were observed. No differences in reliability and fracture mode were observed between LS and AB/AE implants used for anterior single-unit crowns. PMID:22843309

  2. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  3. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%±10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%±8.63%), SLA (58.47%±12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%±18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  4. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II-V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease.

  5. Comparison of bond strength and surface morphology of dental enamel for acid and Nd-YAG laser etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Ratna, P.; Koteeswaran, D.

    1999-05-01

    Recently, laser pretreatment of dental enamel has emerged as a new technique in the field of orthodontics. However, the changes in the morphology of the enamel surface is very much dependent on the wavelength of laser, emission mode of the laser, energy density, exposure time and the nature of the substance absorbing the energy. Based on these, we made a comparative in vitro study on laser etching with acid etching with reference to their bond strength. Studies were conducted on 90 freshly extracted, non carious, human maxillary or mandibular anteriors and premolars. Out of 90, 60 were randomly selected for laser irradiation. The other 30 were used for conventional acid pretreatment. The group of 60 were subjected to Nd-YAG laser exposure (1060 nm, 10 Hz) at differetn fluences. The remaining 30 were acid pretreated with 30% orthophosphoric acid. Suitable Begg's brackets were selected and bound to the pretreated surface and the bond strength were tested using Instron testing machine. The bond strength achieved through acid pretreatment is found to be appreciably greater than the laser pretreated tooth. Though the bond strength achieved through the acid pretreated tooth is found to be significantly greater than the laser pretreated specimens, the laser pretreatement is found to be successful enough to produce a clinically acceptable bond strength of > 0.60 Kb/mm. Examination of the laser pre-treated tooth under SEM showed globule formation which may produce the mechanical interface required for the retention of the resin material.

  6. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined. PMID:25642739

  7. Influence of acid-etched splinting methods on discoloration of dental enamel in four media: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Oikarinen, K S; Nieminen, T M

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the staining of enamel in relation to fixation of luxated teeth. Color changes induced by chlorhexidine, red wine, tea, and coffee were detected with a Minolta Chroma Meter (CR-121) after extracted teeth were treated to simulate construction of dental splinting. L*a*b* color readings were made before and after 7 days of incubation in the above-mentioned media in teeth treated 1) by acid-etching, 2) by acid-etching followed by resin, 3) by resin and composite, 4) by Triad Gel, and 5) by Protemp. L* is an indicator of black (0) and white (100). The a* values relate to the red (+100)-green (-100) color axes, and the b* values to the yellow (+100) and blue (-100) axes. Untreated teeth served as controls. One-way analysis of variance of mean L* values revealed no statistically significant differences in treatment. Discoloration was observed in all teeth, including the control ones. However, Protemp yielded the largest changes in mean L* values. Analysis of variance of mean L* values revealed statistically significant differences between incubation liquids because no increase in staining of enamel was noted after 7 days' incubation in chlorhexidine. Red wine increased the mean L* values more than coffee or tea. Changes in a*b* readings were toward red (+a*) after incubation in red wine, except in the case of teeth treated with resin. The color of all such teeth changed more toward yellow (+b*), because the resin used was yellow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7871352

  8. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  9. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Etching Duration on the Surface Micromorphology, Roughness, and Wettability of Dental Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Alkheraif, Abdulaziz A; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-01-01

    The current laboratory study is evaluating the effect of hydrofluoric acid etching duration on the surface characteristics of five silica-based glass ceramics. Changes in the pore pattern, crystal structure, roughness, and wettability were compared and evaluated. Seventy-five rectangularly shaped specimens were cut from each material (IPS e-max™, Dentsply Celtra™, Vita Suprinity™, Vita mark II™, and Vita Suprinity FC™); the sectioned samples were finished, polished, and ultrasonically cleaned. Specimens were randomly assigned into study groups: control (no etching) and four experimental groups (20, 40, 80 and 160 s of etching). The etched surfaces' microstructure including crystal structure, pore pattern, pore depth, and pore width was studied under a scanning electron microscope, and the surface roughness and wettability were analyzed using a non-contact surface profilometer and a contact angle measuring device, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey's test. The results showed a significant change in the pore number, pore pattern, crystal structure, surface roughness, and wettability with increased etching duration. Etching for a short time resulted in small pores, and etching for longer times resulted in wider, irregular grooves. A significant increase in the surface roughness and wettability was observed with an increase in the etching duration. The findings also suggested a strong association between the surface roughness and wettability. PMID:27240353

  10. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Etching Duration on the Surface Micromorphology, Roughness, and Wettability of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Alkheraif, Abdulaziz A.; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2016-01-01

    The current laboratory study is evaluating the effect of hydrofluoric acid etching duration on the surface characteristics of five silica-based glass ceramics. Changes in the pore pattern, crystal structure, roughness, and wettability were compared and evaluated. Seventy-five rectangularly shaped specimens were cut from each material (IPS e-max™, Dentsply Celtra™, Vita Suprinity™, Vita mark II™, and Vita Suprinity FC™); the sectioned samples were finished, polished, and ultrasonically cleaned. Specimens were randomly assigned into study groups: control (no etching) and four experimental groups (20, 40, 80 and 160 s of etching). The etched surfaces’ microstructure including crystal structure, pore pattern, pore depth, and pore width was studied under a scanning electron microscope, and the surface roughness and wettability were analyzed using a non-contact surface profilometer and a contact angle measuring device, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey’s test. The results showed a significant change in the pore number, pore pattern, crystal structure, surface roughness, and wettability with increased etching duration. Etching for a short time resulted in small pores, and etching for longer times resulted in wider, irregular grooves. A significant increase in the surface roughness and wettability was observed with an increase in the etching duration. The findings also suggested a strong association between the surface roughness and wettability. PMID:27240353

  11. SEM ANALYSIS OF THE ACID-ETCHED ENAMEL PATTERNS PROMOTED BY ACIDIC MONOMERS AND PHOSPHORIC ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Hipólito, Vinícius Di; Giannin, Marcelo; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Although self-etching bonding systems (SES) are indicated to prepare dental enamel for bonding, concerns have been expressed regarding their effectiveness. The aim of this study was to analyze the etching pattern (EP) of nine SES in comparison with 35% and 34% phosphoric acid etchants (FA) on intact (IN) and ground (GR) enamel surface. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two human third molars were sectioned in mesial-distal and buccal-lingual directions, and four dental fragments were obtained from each tooth. Half of the fragments were ground using 600-grit SiC paper and the other half remained intact. The fragments were randomly assigned into 22 groups, according to the texture of enamel surface (IN and GR) and the technique to etch the enamel (34% FA, 35% FA, AdheSE primer; Brush & Bond; Clearfil Protect Bond primer; iBond; One-up Bond F; OptiBond Solo Plus primer; Tyrian SPE primer; Unifil Bond primer and Xeno III). Conditioners were applied to IN and GR enamel surfaces, according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens etched with phosphoric acids were washed with water, while the surfaces treated with SES were submitted to alternate rinsing with alcohol and acetone. The specimens were dried, sputter-coated and examined under a scanning electron microscope. Results: For both IN and GR enamel surfaces, the EP of 34 and 35% FA was deeper and more homogeneous in comparison to EP of SES, except for Tyrian SPE. The acidic monomer action of self-etching systems was more effective on GR enamel. Conclusion: Most of the SES are less aggressive than phosphoric acid etchants and their etching effects were reduced on intact enamel surfaces. Uniterms: Dental acid etching; Dental enamel; Electron microscopy. PMID:19089243

  12. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets using two different laser etching, self etching and acid etching methods.

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Nihal; Akkurt, Atilim; Başaran, Güvenç

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage of brackets bonded by four different enamel etching techniques. Forty freshly extracted human premolars were divided randomly into four equal groups and received the following treatment: group 1, acid etching; group 2, self-etching primer (SEP); group 3, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching; and group 4, erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser etching. After photopolymerization, the teeth were kept in distilled water for 1 month and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. In addition, they were scored for marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the incisal and gingival margins. Statistical analyses consisted of the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction. Microleakage occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in all groups. For the adhesive-enamel surface, a significant difference was observed between group 1 and groups 2 (P = 0.011), 3 (P = 0.002), and 4 (P = 0.000) on the gingival side. Overall, significant differences were observed between group 1 and groups 3 (P = 0.003) and 4 (P = 0.000). In dental bonding procedures, acid etching was found to result in the least microleakage. Since etching with a laser decreases the risk of caries and is time-saving, it may serve as an alternative to acid etching. PMID:19562404

  13. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching on Fatigue Limits of Self-etching Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Scheidel, D D; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue limit (SFL) testing to determine the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel and dentin prior to application of self-etch adhesives for bonding resin composite to these substrates. Three self-etch adhesives--1) G- ænial Bond (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan); 2) OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp, Orange, CA, USA); and 3) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA)--were used to bond Z100 Restorative resin composite to enamel and dentin surfaces. A stainless-steel metal ring with an inner diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to flat-ground (4000 grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFL. Fifteen specimens each were used to determine initial SBS to human enamel/dentin, with and without pre-etching with a 35% phosphoric acid (Ultra-Etch, Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, UT, USA) for 15 seconds prior to the application of the adhesives. A staircase method of fatigue testing (25 specimens for each test) was then used to determine the SFL of resin composite bonded to enamel/dentin using a frequency of 10 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. A two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of SBS data, and a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFL data. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the area of the bonded restorative/tooth interface. For all three adhesive systems, phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel demonstrated significantly higher (p<0.05) SBS and SFL with pre-etching than it did without pre-etching. The SBS and SFL of dentin bonds decreased with phosphoric acid pre-etching. The SBS and SFL of bonds using phosphoric acid prior to application of self-etching adhesives clearly demonstrated different tendencies between enamel and dentin. The effect of using phosphoric acid, prior to the application of the self-etching adhesives, on SBS and SFL was

  14. Five-year retrospective radiographic follow-up study of dental implants with sandblasting with large grit, and acid etching-treated surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate five-year radiographic follow-up results of the Korean sandblasting with large grit, and acid etching (SLA)-treated implant system. Materials and Methods The subjects of the study are 54 patients who have been followed-up to date, of the patients who underwent implant surgery from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2011. In all, 176 implant placements were performed. Radiographs were taken before the first surgery, immediately after the first and second surgeries, immediately and six months after the final prosthesis installation, and every year after that. Bone loss was evaluated by the method suggested by Romanos and Nentwig. Results A total of 176 implant placements were performed-122 in men and 54 in women. These patients have been followed-up for an average of 4.9 years. In terms of prosthetic appliances, there were 156 bridges and 20 single prostheses. Nine implants installed in the maxillary molar area, three in the mandibular molar area and two in the maxillary premolar area were included in group M, with bone loss less than 2 mm at the crestal aspect of the implant. Of these, eight implants were single prostheses. In all, six implants failed-four in the mandible and two in the maxilla. All of these failures occurred in single-implant cases. The implant survival rate was 98.1% on the maxilla and 94.3% on the mandible, with an overall survival of 96.6%. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, implants with the SLA surface have a very superior survival rate in relatively poor bone environments such as the maxilla. PMID:26734558

  15. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  16. Gas Cluster Ion Beam Etching under Acetic Acid Vapor for Etch-Resistant Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Hinoura, Ryo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Hara, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) etching of etch-resistant materials under acetic acid vapor was studied for development of new manufacturing process of future nonvolatile memory. Etching depths of various etch-resistant materials (Pt, Ru, Ta, CoFe) with acetic acid vapor during O2-GCIB irradiations were 1.8-10.7 times higher than those without acetic acid. Also, etching depths of Ru, Ta, CoFe by Ar-GCIB with acetic acid vapor were 2.2-16.1 times higher than those without acetic acid. Even after etching of Pt, smoothing of Pt was realized using O2-GCIB under acetic acid. From XPS and angular distribution of sputtered Pt, it was shown that PtOx layer was formed on Pt after O2-GCIB irradiation. PtOx reacted with acetic acid by GCIB bombardments; as a result, increase of etching depth was observed.

  17. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  18. Rapid analysis of acid in etching and pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbina, V.P.; Chinokalov, V.Ya.

    1995-02-01

    A computational method for determining sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in two-component etching solutions has been proposed. The method makes use of linear relationships, assuming that the sum of free and bound acid in solution remains constant.

  19. Surface characterization of alkali- and heat-treated Ti with or without prior acid etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sang-Hyun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Narayanan, Ramaswamy; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2012-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are used as implant materials in dental and orthopaedic applications. The material affinities to host bone tissue greatly concern with the recovery period and good prognosis. To obtain a material surface having excellent affinity to bone, acid etching prior to alkali- and heat-treatment of Ti was conducted. The surface characteristics of the prepared sample indicated that the roughness as well as the wettability increased by pre-etching. Bone-like apatite was formed on pre-etched, alkali- and heat-treated Ti surface in simulated body fluid (SBF) within 3 days, while it takes 5 days on the solely alkali- and heat-treated surface. Osteoblastic cells showed better compatibility on the per-etched surface compared to the pure Ti surface or alkali- and heat-treated surface. Moreover, the pre-etched surface showed better pull-off tensile adhesion strength against the deposited apatite. Thus, acid etching prior to alkali- and heat-treatment would be a promising method for enhancing the affinity of Ti to host bone tissue.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  1. Bone contact around acid-etched implants: a histological and histomorphometrical evaluation of two human-retrieved implants.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Petrone, Giovanna; Iezzi, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano

    2003-01-01

    The surface characteristics of dental implants play an important role in their clinical success. One of the most important surface characteristics of implants is their surface topography or roughness. Many techniques for preparing dental implant surfaces are in clinical use: turning, plasma spraying, coating, abrasive blasting, acid etching, and electropolishing. The Osseotite surface is prepared by a process of thermal dual etching with hydrochloric and sulfuric acid, which results in a clean, highly detailed surface texture devoid of entrapped foreign material and impurities. This seems to enhance fibrin attachment to the implant surface during the clotting process. The authors retrieved 2 Osseotite implants after 6 months to repair damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. Histologically, both implants appeared to be surrounded by newly formed bone. No gaps or fibrous tissues were present at the interface. The mean bone-implant contact percentage was 61.3% (+/- 3.8%). PMID:12614080

  2. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. PMID:23910263

  3. Effect of heat treatment on H2O2/HCl etched pure titanium dental implant: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Chun-Fei; Yin, Mei-nv; Ren, Ling-Fei; Lin, Hai-sheng; Shi, Geng-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Surface chemistry of dental implant plays an important role in osseointegration. Heat treatment might alter surface chemistry and result in different biological response. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of heat treatment of H2O2/HCl-treated Ti implants in cell attachment, proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. Material/Methods Sandblasted, dual acid-etched and H2O2/HCl heat-treated discs were set as the control group and sandblasted, dual acid-etched H2O2/HCl-treated discs were the test group. Both groups’ discs were sent for surface characterization. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on these 2 groups’ discs for 3 hours to 14 days, and then cell attachment, cell proliferation and cell differentiation were evaluated. Results Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that the titanium discs in the 2 groups shared the same surface topography, while x-ray diffraction examination showed an anatase layer in the control group and titanium hydride diffractions in the test group. The cell attachment of the test group was equivalent to that of the control group. Cell proliferation was slightly stimulated at all time points in the control group, but the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OC) production increased significantly in the test group compared with those in the control group at every time point investigated (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Moreover, the osteoblastic differentiation-related genes AKP-2, osteopontin (OPN) and OC were greatly up-regulated in the test group (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Conclusions The results implied that surface chemistry played an important role in cell response, and H2O2/HCl etched titanium surface without subsequent heat treatment might improve osseointegration response. PMID:22739726

  4. Comparative Study of the Effect of Acid Etching on Enamel Surface Roughness between Pumiced and Non-pumiced Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Lucas Guimarães; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pretti, Henrique; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Júnior, João Batista Novães; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective was to perform a comparative analysis of the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness between pumiced and non-pumiced teeth. Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of 32 dental surfaces divided into two groups: Group 1-16 surfaces having received pumice prophylaxis; and Group 2-16 surfaces not having received pumice prophylaxis. The teeth were kept in saline until the first record of surface roughness prior to etching. For each surface, a roughness graph was obtained through trials using a surface roughness tester. This procedure was repeated two more times at different locations for a total of three readings which, later, were converted in a mean value. The teeth were then acid etched with a 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s, rinsed with water, air dried, and tested with the roughness tester again using the same protocol described for baseline. The Quantikov image analysis program was used to measure the length of the graphs. The average value of the lengths was recorded for each surface before and after etching. The increase in roughness caused by acid etching was calculated and compared between groups. Results: The mean increase in roughness caused by the etching was 301 µm (11.37%) in Group 1 and 214 µm (8.33%) in Group 2. No statistically significant difference was found between samples with and without pumice prophylaxis (P = 0.283). Conclusion: The present study showed that the effect of acid etching on enamel roughness was not significantly affected by prior pumice prophylaxis. PMID:26435607

  5. An Invitro Evaluation of Antibacterial Properties of Self Etching Dental Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rekha A, Sri; Poppuri, Krishna Chaitanya; Prashanth P, Sai; Garapati, Surendranath

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The microbial flora of the oral cavity is extremely diverse. Residual bacteria in the oral cavity may remain at the tooth restoration interface and increase the risk of developing recurrent caries. The aim of this study is to evaluate the immediate and long term antibacterial effect of polymerised self etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Streptococcus mutans were used as a test organism. The self etching dental adhesives that were used are Adper Easy One, G-Bond, Clearfil S3 bond and Xeno V. Agar diffusion test (ADT) was performed on agar plates, in which four holes that were 4mm in diameter were punched. Then 200 μL of freshly grown S.mutans spread evenly. The four holes were immediately filled with the four tested materials and light polymerised them using a light curing unit. The agar plates were incubated for 72h at 37°C. For the direct contact test (DCT), the bonding agents were placed on the side walls of microtiter plate wells and light polymerized according to the manufacturer’s instructions. A 10μL bacterial suspension was placed on the tested material samples. Bacteria were allowed to directly contact the polymerized dental adhesives for 1h at 37oC. Fresh Brain heart infusion broth was then added. The bacterial growth was then spectrophotometrically measured in the wells every 30 min for 16h for 1,2, 7 and 14 days. Results: In the ADT, inhibitory halos were found around all the bonding agents, with greater inhibition halo seen around Xeno V after incubating for 72 h at 37°C. The readings obtained through DCT were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparisons tests, which showed no bacterial growth on fresh samples and after aging for one day in PBS with self etching adhesives. Results of DCT after aging for 2 days, 7 days and 14 days showed bacterial growth in all the bonding agents used with no significant difference from the control group.(p<0.001) Conclusion: All the dental adhesives showed

  6. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  7. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-02-01

    Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  8. Acid-etched splinting to a ceramometal abutment.

    PubMed

    Jordan, R D; Aquilino, S A; Krell, K V

    1986-05-01

    This technique describes an acid-etch metal splint with a ceramometal abutment. The internal surface of the DuraLingual Wing Form patterns provide undercuts necessary for composite bonding. The external surface provides a smooth solid metal surface when cast. Since this system uses mechanical undercuts, the resin-bonded splints can have multiple try-ins without the detrimental effects of burnishing and contamination that occur with electrolytically etched metal surfaces. If an abutment for a resin-retained fixed partial denture requires a ceramometal crown, a DuraLingual Wing Form can be incorporated onto its lingual surface thereby providing mechanical undercuts for bonding. The opposite undercuts of the crown and splint provide excellent bond strength for the system. PMID:3519944

  9. A comparative study of shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched and Er:YAG treatment on enamel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, Juliana C.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Cassimiro-silva, Patricia F.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with 37% phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser. Forty bovine incisors were divided into two groups. In Group I, the teeth were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid and brackets were bonded with Transbond XT; in Group II, the teeth were irradiated with Er:YAG and bonding with Transbond XT. After SBS test, the adhesive remnant index was determined. Adhesion to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser etching was inferior to that obtained after acid etching but exceeded what is believed to be clinically sufficient strength, and therefore can be used in patients.

  10. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under ×10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa) was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa) (P = 0.41). There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08). However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching. PMID:25097641

  11. Focused electron beam induced etching of copper in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Lindsay; Bresin, Matthew; Botman, Aurélien; Ranney, James; Hastings, J. Todd

    2015-12-01

    We show here that copper can be locally etched by an electron-beam induced reaction in a liquid. Aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is utilized as the etchant and all experiments are conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The extent of etch increases with liquid thickness and dose, and etch resolution improves with H2SO4 concentration. This approach shows the feasibility of liquid phase etching for material selectivity and has the potential for circuit editing.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Laminated Glass Treated by Acid Etching Combined with Cold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibao; Lu, Jinshan; Luo, Junming; Zhang, Jianjun; Ou, Junfei; Xu, Haitao

    2014-10-01

    To overcome the problem of interlaminar delamination of thermoplastic polyurethane laminated glass, silicate glass was etched with hydrofluoric acid and thermoplastic polyurethane was then treated with cold plasma. Compared with the untreated samples, the interlaminar shear strength of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 97%, 84% and 341%, respectively. Acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples exhibited a higher flexural strength and strain as compared with the untreated samples. The impact energy of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 8.7%, 8.1% and 11.6%, respectively, in comparison with the untreated samples. FT-IR analysis showed that a large number of -C=O, -CO-N and -CO-O-C- groups appeared on the surface of cold plasma-treated thermoplastic polyurethane, which resulted in the formation of hydrogen bonds. SEM results showed that some pittings formed on the surface of the silicate glass treated by acid etching, which resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional interface structure between the silicate glass and polyurethane. Hydrogen bonds combined with the three-dimensional interface between silicate glass and polyurethanes co-improved the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes laminated glass.

  13. Rolled-Up Nanotech: Illumination-Controlled Hydrofluoric Acid Etching of AlAs Sacrificial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costescu, Ruxandra M.; Deneke, Christoph; Thurmer, Dominic J.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of illumination on the hydrofluoric acid etching of AlAs sacrificial layers with systematically varied thicknesses in order to release and roll up InGaAs/GaAs bilayers was studied. For thicknesses of AlAs below 10 nm, there were two etching regimes for the area under illumination: one at low illumination intensities, in which the etching and releasing proceeds as expected and one at higher intensities in which the etching and any releasing are completely suppressed. The “etch suppression” area is well defined by the illumination spot, a feature that can be used to create heterogeneously etched regions with a high degree of control, shown here on patterned samples. Together with the studied self-limitation effect, the technique offers a way to determine the position of rolled-up micro- and nanotubes independently from the predefined lithographic pattern.

  14. Behavior of acid etching on titanium: topography, hydrophility and hydrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xi; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shaobing; Lu, Haibin; Ding, Xianglong

    2014-02-01

    Since acid etching is easily controlled and effective, it has become one of the most common methods of surface modification. However, the behavior of etching is seldom discussed. In this study, different surfaces of titanium were prepared by changing the etching temperature and time. Surface topography, roughness, contact angles, surface crystalline structure, hydrogen concentration and mechanical properties were observed. As a result, surface topography and roughness were more proportional to etching temperature; however, diffusion of hydrogen and tensile strength are more time-related to titanium hydride formation on the surface. Titanium becomes more hydrophilic after etching even though the micropits were not formed after etching. More and deeper cracks were found on the specimens with more hydrogen diffusion. Therefore, higher temperature and shorter time are an effective way to get a uniform surface and decrease the diffusion of hydrogen to prevent hydrogen embrittlement. PMID:24343349

  15. Investigation of laser-induced etching of Ti in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, R.J.; Metev, S.M.; Meteva, K.B.; Sepold, G.

    1996-12-31

    Laser-induced chemical etching of Ti in phosphoric acid has been investigated using cw Nd:YAG (1.064 {micro}m) and Argon lasers (514 nm) operating in the fundamental Gaussian mode. Two different regions of etching were observed, which are separated by a characteristic threshold value of the laser power and ascribed to melting of the metal. Below the threshold an exponential dependence of etch rates on laser power suggest a thermally activated etching mechanism. Time-resolved measurements indicate in this region the dissolution of the passivation layer followed by surface etching of the metal grains. After laser illumination an immediate repassivation of the recooled surface stops the etch reaction.

  16. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Metal and Ceramic Brackets using Conventional Acid Etching Technique and Er:YAG Laser Etching

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Sogra; Fekrazad, Reza; Shahraki, Neda; Goldani Moghadam, Mahdjoube

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to enamel using acid versus Er:YAG laser etching. Materials and methods. Eighty premolars were divided into 4 groups: AM (acid etching/ metal brackets), AC (acid etching/ ceramic brackets), LM (laser etching/ metal brackets) and LC (laser etching/ ceramic brackets). Enamel condition-ing was done using acid in AC and AM and Er:YAG laser in LC and LM. Brackets were debonded with a Dartec machine and the SBSs were determined. Adhesive remnant index was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Two additional teeth were conditioned with acid and laser for scanning electron microscopy examination. Comparisons of SBS value were done by ANOVA test. Results. statistical analyses showed that SBSs of acid groups were significantly higher than that of laser groups, but dif-ferences between SBS values of AC/ AM and LC/LM were not significant. SEM examination revealed different etching pattern. Conclusion. Low power Er:YAG laser etching offers clinically acceptable SBS which besides its other superiorities to acid etching can be an appropriate alternative for bonding of ceramic brackets. PMID:25024836

  17. Effects of acid-etching solutions on human enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fanchi, M; Breschi, L

    1995-06-01

    Nine noncarious human molars were extracted and stored in saline solution. Three standard occlusal cavities with beveled enamel margins were prepared on each tooth and etched with the etching solutions of three dentinal adhesive systems: (1) 37% phosphoric acid solution, (2) 4.3% oxalic acid and 2.6% aluminum salts solution, and (3) 10% maleic acid solution. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that all the etching solutions affected the enamel surface morphology. The solution of oxalic acid and aluminum salts removed primarily the prism core material and partially the periphery of the prisms, but did not affect the nonbeveled enamel surface. Phosphoric and maleic acids removed both prism core materials and prism periphery; these specimens also showed areas in which no prism morphology could be detected. These two acids also removed apatite crystals from the prism core of the intact enamel surface. PMID:8602425

  18. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  19. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  20. Comparative Evaluation of the Etching Pattern of Er,Cr:YSGG & Acid Etching on Extracted Human Teeth-An ESEM Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Ranjan, Shashi; Krishna, Naveen Kumar; Kole, Ravindra; Singh, Priyankar; Lakiang, Deirimika; Jayam, Chiranjeevi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Etching of enamel and dentin surfaces increases the surface area of the substrate for better bonding of the tooth colored restorative materials. Acid etching is the most commonly used method. Recently, hard tissue lasers have been used for this purpose. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the etching pattern of Er,Cr:YSGG and conventional etching on extracted human enamel and dentin specimens. Materials and Methods Total 40 extracted non-diseased teeth were selected, 20 anterior and 20 posterior teeth each for enamel and dentin specimens respectively. The sectioned samples were polished by 400 grit Silicon Carbide (SiC) paper to a thickness of 1.0 ± 0.5 mm. The enamel and dentin specimens were grouped as: GrE1 & GrD1 as control specimens, GrE2 & GrD2 were acid etched and GrE3 & GrD3 were lased. Acid etching was done using Conditioner 36 (37 % phosphoric acid) according to manufacturer instructions. Laser etching was done using Er,Cr:YSGG (Erbium, Chromium : Ytrium Scandium Gallium Garnet) at power settings of 3W, air 70% and water 20%. After surface treatment with assigned agents the specimens were analyzed under ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope) at X1000 and X5000 magnification. Results Chi Square and Student “t” statistical analysis was used to compare smear layer removal and etching patterns between GrE2-GrE3. GrD2 and GrD3 were compared for smear layer removal and diameter of dentinal tubule opening using the same statistical analysis. Chi-square test for removal of smear layer in any of the treated surfaces i.e., GrE2-E3 and GrD2-D3 did not differ significantly (p>0.05). While GrE2 showed predominantly type I etching pattern (Chi-square=2.78, 0.05

    0.10) and GrE3 showed type III etching (Chi-square=4.50, p<0.05). The tubule diameters were measured using GSA (Gesellschaft fur Softwareentwicklung und Analytik, Germany) image analyzer and the ‘t’ value of student ‘t’ test was 18.10 which was a

  1. Creation of hollow SAPO-34 single crystals via alkaline or acid etching.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuyan; Yang, Miao; Gao, Beibei; Wang, Linying; Tian, Peng; Xu, Shutao; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-04-14

    Hollow SAPO-34 crystals are created via selective etching of their precursor under controlled alkaline or acid conditions. The abundant/interconnected Si-O-Al domains and Si-O-Si networks at the outer layer of SAPO-34 crystals are revealed to be decisive factors for the base and acid treatments respectively to achieve a well-preserved hollow structure. PMID:27042708

  2. Instrumentation With Ultrasonic Scalers Facilitates Cleaning of the Sandblasted and Acid-Etched Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Beom; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, NamRyang; Park, Seojin; Jin, Seong-Ho; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Ko, Youngkyung

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical instrumentation is widely used to debride dental implants, but this may alter the surface properties of titanium, which in turn may influence bacterial adhesion and make it more difficult to remove the biofilm. This in vitro study was performed (1) to assess the amount of biofilm formation on a sand-blasted and acid-etched titanium fixture treated with ultrasonic scalers with metal, plastic, and carbon tips and (2) to evaluate how this treatment of titanium surfaces affects implant cleaning by brushing with dentifrice. The titanium fixtures were treated with various ultrasonic scaler tips, and surface roughness parameters were measured by confocal microscopy. Biofilm was formed on the treated fixtures by using pooled saliva from 10 subjects, and the quantity of the adherent bacteria was compared with crystal violet assay. The fixture surfaces with biofilm were brushed for total of 30 seconds with a toothbrush with dentifrice. The bacteria remaining on the brushed fixture surfaces were quantified by scanning electron microscopy. Surface changes were evident, and the changes of the surfaces were more discernible when metal tips were used. A statistically significant decrease in roughness value (arithmetic mean height of the surface) was seen in the 2 metal-tip groups and the single plastic-tip group. After brushing with dentifrice, the treated surfaces in all the treatment groups showed significantly fewer bacteria compared with the untreated surfaces in the control group, and the parts of the surfaces left untreated in the test groups. Within the limits of this study, treatment of titanium fixture surfaces with ultrasonic metal, plastic, or carbon tips significantly enhanced the bacterial removal efficacy of brushing. Thorough instrumentation that smooths the whole exposed surface may facilitate maintenance of the implants. PMID:24552131

  3. EFFECT OF ACID ETCHING OF GLASS IONOMER CEMENT SURFACE ON THE MICROLEAKAGE OF SANDWICH RESTORATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Álvaro Della; Pinzetta, Caroline; Rosa, Vinícius

    2007-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the sealing ability of different glass ionomer cements (GICs) used for sandwich restorations and to assess the effect of acid etching of GIC on microleakage at GIC-resin composite interface. Forty cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of 20 permanent human premolars (2 cavities per tooth), assigned to 4 groups (n=10) and restored as follows: Group CIE – conventional GIC (CI) was applied onto the axial and cervical cavity walls, allowed setting for 5 min and acid etched (E) along the cavity margins with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 s, washed for 30 s and water was blotted; the adhesive system was applied and light cured for 10 s, completing the restoration with composite resin light cured for 40 s; Group CIN – same as Group CIE, except for acid etching of the CI surface; Group RME – same as CIE, but using a resin modified GIC (RMGIC); Group RMN – same as Group RME, except for acid etching of the RMGIC surface. Specimens were soaked in 1% methylene blue dye solution at 24°C for 24 h, rinsed under running water for 1 h, bisected longitudinally and dye penetration was measured following the ISO/TS 11405-2003 standard. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests (α=0.05). Dye penetration scores were as follow: CIE – 2.5; CIN – 2.5; RME – 0.9; and RMN – 0.6. The results suggest that phosphoric acid etching of GIC prior to the placement of composite resin does not improve the sealing ability of sandwich restorations. The RMGIC was more effective in preventing dye penetration at the GIC-resin composite- dentin interfaces than CI. PMID:19089135

  4. Acid Etching and Plasma Sterilization Fail to Improve Osseointegration of Grit Blasted Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation. The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time. Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  5. Acid etching and plasma sterilization fail to improve osseointegration of grit blasted titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation.The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time.Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  6. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  7. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  8. Effect of adhesive hydrophilicity and curing-time on the permeability of resins bonded to water vs. ethanol-saturated acid-etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Agee, Kelli; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Carrilho, Marcela; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of five comonomer blends (R1-R5) of methacrylate-based experimental dental adhesives solvated with 10 mass% ethanol, at reducing the permeability of acid-etched dentin. The resins were light-cured for 20, 40 or 60 s. The acid-etched dentin was saturated with water or 100% ethanol. Method Human unerupted third molars were converted into crown segments by removing the occlusal enamel and roots. The resulting crown segments were attached to plastic plates connected to a fluid-filled system for quantifying fluid flow across smear layer-covered dentin, acid-etched dentin and resin-bonded dentin. The degree of conversion of the resins was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Result Application of the most hydrophobic comonomer blend (R1) to water-saturated dentin produced the smallest reductions in dentin permeability (31.9, 44.1 and 61.1% after light-curing for 20, 40 or 60 s respectively). Application of the same blend to ethanol-saturated dentin reduced permeability of 74.1, 78.4 and 81.2%, respectively (p<0.05). Although more hydrophilic resins produced larger reductions in permeability, the same trend of significantly greater reductions in ethanol-saturated dentin over that of water-saturated dentin remained. This result can be explained by the higher solubility of resins in ethanol vs. water. Significance The largest reductions in permeability produced by resins were equivalent but not superior, to those produced by smear layers. Resin sealing of dentin remains a technique-sensitive step in bonding etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin. PMID:18571228

  9. Effect of acid etching on bond strength of nanoionomer as an orthodontic bonding adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A new Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement known as nanoionomer containing nanofillers of fluoroaluminosilicate glass and nanofiller 'clusters' has been introduced. An in-vitro study aimed at evaluating shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of nanoionomer under etching/unetched condition for use as an orthodontic bonding agent. Material and Methods: A total of 75 extracted premolars were used, which were divided into three equal groups of 25 each: 1-Conventional adhesive (Enlight Light Cure, SDS, Ormco, CA, USA) was used after and etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, followed by Ortho Solo application 2-nanoionomer (Ketac™ N100, 3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was used after etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s 3-nanoionomer was used without etching. The SBS testing was performed using a digital universal testing machine (UTM-G-410B, Shanta Engineering). Evaluation of ARI was done using scanning electron microscopy. The SBS were compared using ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test for intergroup comparisons and ARI scores were compared with Chi-square test. Results: ANOVA (SBS, F = 104.75) and Chi-square (ARI, Chi-square = 30.71) tests revealed significant differences between groups (P < 0.01). The mean (SD) SBS achieved with conventional light cure adhesive was significantly higher (P < 0.05) (10.59 ± 2.03 Mpa, 95% CI, 9.74-11.41) than the nanoionomer groups (unetched 4.13 ± 0.88 Mpa, 95% CI, 3.79-4.47 and etched 9.32 ± 1.87 Mpa, 95% CI, 8.58-10.06). However, nanoionomer with etching, registered SBS in the clinically acceptable range of 5.9–7.8 MPa, as suggested by Reynolds (1975). The nanoionomer groups gave significantly lower ARI values than the conventional adhesive group. Conclusion: Based on this in-vitro study, nanoionomer with etching can be successfully used as an orthodontic bonding agent leaving less adhesive remnant on enamel surface, making cleaning easier. However, in-vivo studies are needed to confirm the validity

  10. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy Investigation of Frequency-Dependent Reflectance of Acid-Etched Human Dentin Using Homotopic Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marangos, Orestes; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations in modern restorative dentistry rely on the bond formed in the adhesive-infiltrated acid-etched dentin. The physical characteristics of etched dentin are, therefore, of paramount interest. However, characterization of the acid-etched zone in its natural state is fraught with problems stemming from a variety of sources including its narrow size, the presence of water, heterogeneity, and spatial scale dependency. We have developed a novel homotopic (same location) measurement methodology utilizing scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Homotopic measurements with SAM overcome the problems encountered by other characterization/ imaging methods. These measurements provide us with acoustic reflectance at the same location of both the pre- and post-etched dentin in its natural state. We have applied this methodology for in vitro measurements on dentin samples. Fourier spectra from acid-etched dentin showed amplitude reduction and shifts of the central frequency that were location dependent. Through calibration, the acoustic reflectance of acid-etched dentin was found to have complex and non-monotonic frequency dependence. These data suggest that acid-etching of dentin results in a near-surface graded layer of varying thickness and property gradations. The measurement methodology described in this paper can be applied to systematically characterize mechanical properties of heterogeneous soft layers and interfaces in biological materials. PMID:21429849

  11. Acid etching does not improve CoCrMo implant osseointegration in a canine implant model.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Stig S; Baas, Jorgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Soballe, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    Induction of bone ingrowth by topographical changes to implant surfaces is an attractive concept. Topographical modifications achieved by acid etching are potentially applicable to complex 3D surfaces. Using clinically relevant implant models, we explored the effect of wet etching porous bead-coated CoCrMo. The study was designed as two paired animal experiments with 10 dogs. Each dog received four implants; one in each medial femoral condyle (loaded 0.75-mm-gap model) and one in each proximal tibia (press-fit). The implants were observed for 6 weeks and were evaluated by biomechanical pushout tests and histomorphometry. We found that wet etching porous bead-coated CoCrMo implants failed to improve implant performance. Moreover, a tendency towards increased fibrous tissue formation, decreased new bone formation, and decreased mechanical fixation was observed. Surface topography on implants is able to stimulate bone-forming cells, but the clinical performance of an implant surface perhaps relies more on 3D geometrical structure and biocompatibility. Caution should be exercised regarding the results of wet etching of porous bead-coated CoCrMo and there is a need for more preclinical trials. PMID:20544657

  12. Torque Analysis of a Triple Acid-Etched Titanium Implant Surface

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; de Toledo, Cássio Torres; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Ribeiro, Fernando Salimon; Sakakura, Celso Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the removal torque of titanium implants treated with triple acid etching. Twenty-one rats were used in this study. For all animals, the tibia was prepared with a 2 mm drill, and a titanium implant (2 × 4 mm) was inserted after treatment using the subtraction method of triple acid etching. The flaps were sutured. Seven animals were killed 14, 28, and 63 days after implant installation, and the load necessary for removing the implant from the bone was evaluated by using a torque meter. The torque values were as follows: 3.3 ± 1.7 Ncm (14 days), 2.2 ± 1.3 Ncm (28 days), and 6.7 ± 1.4 Ncm (63 days). The torque value at the final healing period (63 days) was statistically significantly different from that at other time points tested (ANOVA, p = 0.0002). This preliminary study revealed that treatment with triple acid etching can create a promising and efficient surface for the process of osseointegration. PMID:26543898

  13. PHOSPHATED, ACID-ETCHED IMPLANTS DECREASE MINERAL APPOSITION RATES NEAR IMPLANTS IN CANINES

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Christine Hyon; Kerns, David G.; Hallmon, William W.; Rivera-Hidalgo, Francisco; Nelson, Carl J.; Spears, Robert; Dechow, Paul C.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of phosphate-coated titanium on mineral apposition rate (MAR) and new bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in canines. Materials and Methods: 2.2 mm × 4 mm electrolytically phosphated or non-phosphated titanium implants with acid-etched surfaces were placed in 48 mandibular sites in 6 foxhounds. Tetracycline and calcein dyes were administered 1 week after implant placement and 1 week before sacrifice. At twelve weeks following implant healing, animals were sacrificed. MAR and BIC were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Light microscopic and histological evaluation was performed on undecalcified sections. Results: Microscopic evaluation showed the presence of healthy osteoblasts lining bone surfaces near implants. Similar bone-to-implant contact was observed in phosphated and non-phosphated titanium implant sites. MAR was significantly higher near non-phosphated titanium implant surfaces than the phosphated titanium samples. No significant differences were found between dogs or implant sites. Discussion and Conclusion: Acid-etched only implants showed significantly higher mineral apposition rates compared to acid-etched, phosphate-coated implants. PMID:20369085

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel surface with laser etching versus acid etching: An in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hoshing, Upendra A; Patil, Suvarna; Medha, Ashish; Bandekar, Siddhesh Dattatray

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study is in vitro evaluation of the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel which is pretreated using acid etchant and Er,Cr:Ysgg. Materials and Methods: 40 extracted human teeth were divided in two groups of 20 each (Groups A and B). In Group A, prepared surface of enamel was etched using 37% phosphoric acid (Scotchbond, 3M). In Group B, enamel was surface treated by a an Er, Cr: YSGG laser system (Waterlase MD, Biolase Technology Inc., San Clemente, CA, USA) operating at a wavelength of 2,780 nm and having a pulse duration of 140-200 microsecond with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and 40 Hz. Bonding agent ((Scotchbond Multipurpose, 3M) was applied over the test areas on 20 samples of Groups A and B each, and light cured. Composite resin (Ceram X duo Nanoceramic restorative, Densply) was applied onto the test areas as a 3 × 3 mm diameter bid, and light cured. The samples were tested for shear bond strength. Results: Mean shear bond strength for acid-etched enamel (26.41 ± 0.66MPa, range 25.155 to 27.150 MPa) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than for laser-etched enamel (16.23 ± 0.71MPa, range 15.233 to 17.334 MPa). Conclusions: For enamel surface, mean shear bond strength of bonded composite obtained after laser etching were significantly lower than those obtained after acid etching. PMID:25125842

  15. Micro/nanofabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Hinata, Toru; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2013-10-01

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  16. Acid-etched Fabry-Perot micro-cavities in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavaram, V. R.; Badcock, R. A.; Fernando, G. F.

    2007-07-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the design and fabrication of optical fibre-based sensor systems for applications in structural health monitoring. Two sensor designs have tended to dominate namely, fibre Bragg gratings and extrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot sensors. However, the cost and time associated with these sensors is relatively high and as a consequence, the current paper describes a simple procedure to fabricate intrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensors. The technique involves the use of hydrofluoric acid to etch a cavity in a cleaved optical fibre. Two such etched cavities were fusion spliced to create an intrinsic fibre Fabry-Perot cavity. The feasibility of using this device for strain monitoring was demonstrated. Excellent correlation was obtained between the optical and surface-mounted electrical resistance strain gauge.

  17. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. Results The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. Conclusions The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Key words:Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch. PMID:26855704

  18. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  19. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  20. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  1. Facile transition from hydrophilicity to superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity on aluminum alloy surface by simple acid etching and polymer coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenyong; Sun, Linyu; Luo, Yuting; Wu, Ruomei; Jiang, Haiyun; Chen, Yi; Zeng, Guangsheng; Liu, Yuejun

    2013-09-01

    The transition from the hydrophilic surface to the superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy via hydrochloric acid etching and polymer coating was investigated by contact angle (CA) measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of etching and polymer coating on the surface were discussed. The results showed that a superhydrophilic surface was facilely obtained after acid etching for 20 min and a superhydrophobic surface was readily fabricated by polypropylene (PP) coating after acid etching. When the etching time was 30 min, the CA was up to 157̊. By contrast, two other polymers of polystyrene (PS) and polypropylene grafting maleic anhydride (PP-g-MAH) were used to coat the aluminum alloy surface after acid etching. The results showed that the CA was up to 159̊ by coating PP-g-MAH, while the CA was only 141̊ by coating PS. By modifying the surface with the silane coupling agent before PP coating, the durability and solvent resistance performance of the superhydrophobic surface was further improved. The micro-nano concave-convex structures of the superhydrophilic surface and the superhydrophobic surface were further confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Combined with the natural hydrophilicity of aluminum alloy, the rough micro-nano structures of the surface led to the superhydrophilicity of the aluminum alloy surface, while the rough surface structures led to the superhydrophobicity of the aluminum alloy surface by combination with the material of PP with the low surface free energy.

  2. Color Stability of Enamel following Different Acid Etching and Color Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Basafa, Mohammad; Moazzami, Mostafa; Basafa, Behnoush; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different etching times on enamel color stability after immediate versus delayed exposure to colored artificial saliva (CAS). Materials and methods. Human first premolars were divided into five groups of twenty. A colorimeter was used according to the CIE system on the mid-buccal and mid-lingual surfaces to evaluate initial tooth color. Samples in group A remained unetched. In groups B to E, buccal and lingual surfaces were initially etched with phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Then, the samples in groups A and C were immersed in colored artificial saliva (cola+saliva). In group B, the teeth were immersed in simple artificial saliva (AS). Samples in groups D and E were immersed in AS for 24 and 72 hours, respectively before being immersed in colored AS. The teeth were immersed for one month in each solution before color measurement. During the test period, the teeth were retrieved from the staining solution and stored in AS for five minutes. This was repeated 60 times. Color changes of buccal and lingual surfaces were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analysis (α ≤0.05). Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of ΔE of buccal (P = 0.148) and lingual surfaces (P = 0.73). Conclusion. Extended time of etching did not result in significant enamel color change. Immediate and delayed exposure of etched enamel to staining solutions did not result in clinically detectable tooth color changes. PMID:25093048

  3. Study on the mechanism of platinum-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of SiC using density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, P. V.; Isohashi, A.; Kizaki, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Inagaki, K.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the SiC surface assisted by Pt as a catalyst is investigated using density functional theory. Etching is initiated by the dissociative adsorption of HF on step-edge Si, forming a five-fold coordinated Si moiety as a metastable state. This is followed by breaking of the Si-C back-bond by a H-transfer process. The gross activation barrier strongly correlates with the stability of the metastable state and is reduced by the formation of Pt-O chemical bonds, leading to an enhancement of the etching reaction.

  4. Effect of Lactic Acid Etching on Bonding Effectiveness of Orthodontic Bracket after Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of lactic acid at various concentrations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with the resin adhesive system before and after water storage. Materials and Methods. Hundred extracted human premolars were divided into 5 treatment groups and etched for 30 seconds with one of the following agents: lactic acid solution with (A) 10%, (B) 20%, (C) 30%, and (D) 50%; group E, 37% phosphoric acid (control). Metal brackets were bonded using a Transbond XT. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by shear bond strength after 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = .001). Results. Lactic acid concentration and water storage resulted in significant differences for brackets bond strength (P < .001). 20% lactic acid had significantly higher mean bond strength values (SD) for all conditions: 24 hours [12.2 (.7) MPa] and 6 months [10.1 (.6) MPa] of water storage. 37% phosphoric acid had intermediate bond strength values for all conditions: 24 hours [8.2 (.6) MPa] and 6 months [6.2 (.6) MPa] of water storage. Also, there were differences in bond strength between storage time, with a reduction in values from 24 hours and 6 months for all experimental groups (P < .001). Conclusion. Lactic acid could be used in place of phosphoric acid as an enamel etchant for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25006465

  5. In vitro remineralization of acid-etched human enamel with Ca 3SiO 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihong; Chang, Jiang; Deng, Yan; Joiner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Bioactive and inductive silicate-based bioceramics play an important role in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone and teeth. In the present study, a model was established to study the acid-etched enamel remineralization with tricalcium silicate (Ca 3SiO 5, C 3S) paste in vitro. After soaking in simulated oral fluid (SOF), Ca-P precipitation layer was formed on the enamel surface, with the prolonged soaking time, apatite layer turned into density and uniformity and thickness increasingly from 250 to 350 nm for 1 day to 1.7-1.9 μm for 7 days. Structure of apatite crystals was similar to that of hydroxyapatite (HAp). At the same time, surface smoothness of the remineralized layer is favorable for the oral hygiene. These results suggested that C 3S treated the acid-etched enamel can induce apatite formation, indicating the biomimic mineralization ability, and C 3S could be used as an agent of inductive biomineralization for the enamel prosthesis and protection.

  6. Stretchability of Silver Films on Thin Acid-Etched Rough Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates Fabricated by Electrospray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, S. M.; Cho, K. H.; Kang, C. N.; Choi, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the fabrication of Ag films through the electrospray deposition (ESD) technique on sub-millimeter-thick acid-etched rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates having both low and high modulus of elasticity. The main focus of the study is on the stretchable behavior of ESD-deposited Ag nanoparticles-based thin films on these substrates when subjected to axial strains. Experimental results suggest that the as-fabricated films on thin acid-etched rough low modulus PDMS has an average stretchability of 5.6% with an average increase in the resistance that is 23 times that of the initial resistance at electrical failure (complete rupture of the films). Comparatively, the stretchability of Ag films on the high modulus PDMS was found to be 3 times higher with 4.65 times increase in the resistance at electrical failure. Also, a high positive value of the piezoresistive coefficient for these films suggests that the resistivity changes during stretching, and thus deviation from the simplified models is inevitable. Based on these results, new models are presented that quantify the changes in resistance with strain.

  7. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for

  8. Simplified Etching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saranovitz, Norman S.

    1969-01-01

    The process for making a celluoid etching (drypaint technique) is feasible for the high school art room because the use of acid is avoided. The procedure outlined includes; 1) preparation of the plate, 2) inking the plate, 3) printing the plate, 4) tools necessary for the preceding. (BF)

  9. Acid Etching and Surface Coating of Glass-Fiber Posts: Bond Strength and Interface Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Bacchi, Ataís; Spazzin, Aloísio Oro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to glass-fiber post (GFP) treated or not with phosphoric acid, silane coupling agent, and unfilled resin. GFPs were etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid and different surface coating applied: silane coupling agent, unfilled resin, or both. Composite resin blocks were built around a 4-mm height on the GFP. Unfilled resin (20 s) and composite resin (40 s) were light activated by a light-emitting diode unit. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. Microtensile bond test was performed using a mechanical testing machine until failure (n=10). The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls' test (p<0.05). Failure modes were classified as adhesive, mixed, or cohesive failures. Additional specimens (n=3) were made to analyze the bonded interfaces by scanning electron microscopy. The statistical analysis showed the factor 'surface coating' was significant (p<0.05), whereas the factor 'HP etching' (p=0.131) and interaction between the factors (p=0.171) were not significant. The highest bond strength was found for the silane and unfilled resin group (p<0.05). A predominance of adhesive and cohesive failures was found. Differences regarding the homogeneity and thickness of the unfilled resin layer formed by different GFP surface treatments were observed. The application of silane and unfilled resin can improve the bond strength between GFP and resin composite. PMID:27058389

  10. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  12. Microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-etched primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Sungurtekin-Ekci, Elif; Oztas, Nurhan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser pre-treatment alone, or associated with acid-etching, on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to primary enamel. Twenty-five human primary molars were randomly divided into five groups including (1) 35 % acid etching, (2) 2.5-W laser etching, (3) 3.5-W laser etching, (4) 2.5-W laser etching + acid etching, and (5) 3.5-W laser etching + acid etching. Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at a wavelength of 2.780 nm and pulse duration of 140-200 μs with a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Following surface pre-treatment, the fissure sealant (ClinPro™, 3M Dental Products) was applied. Each tooth was sectioned and subjected to microtensile testing. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The microtensile bond strength values of group 1 were significantly higher than those of group 2, while no statistically significant difference was detected between groups 1, 3, 4, and 5. It was concluded that 3.5-W laser etching produced results comparable to conventional acid etching technique, whereas 2.5-W laser etching was not able to yield adequate bonding performance. PMID:25847685

  13. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  14. Effect of the application time of phosphoric acid and self-etch adhesive systems to sclerotic dentin

    PubMed Central

    MENA-SERRANO, Alexandra Patricia; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; PEREZ, Miguel Muñoz; MARTINS, Gislaine Cristine; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; REIS, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of application time on the resin-dentin bond strength (µTBS) and etching pattern of adhesive systems applied on sclerotic dentine. Material and Methods: A total of forty-two bovine incisors had their roots removed. The 1-step self-etch GO (SDI), the 2-step self-etch Adper SE Bond (3MESPE) and the 35% phosphoric acid (3MESPE) from the 2-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (3MESPE) were applied on the bovine incisal surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions or duplicating the recommended conditioning time. After adhesive application, thirty teeth were restored with composite resin, stored for 24 h in distilled water at 37º C, and sectioned into resin-dentin bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) and tested according to the µTBS at 0.5 mm/min. The etching pattern of the remaining twelve teeth (n=4 for each material) was examined under scanning electron microscopy. Each tooth was divided into a buccal-to-lingual direction into three thirds, and each third randomly assigned to the groups: control (no treatment), according to the manufacturers' instructions and duplicating the recommended application time. The µTBS and the relative percentage of the tubule area opening were evaluated by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Results: The duplication of the conditioning time favored only the GO adhesive (p<0.05). Both application methods significantly increased the tubule area opening (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Conclusions: The efficacy of duplicating the conditioning time was only effective for the 1-step self-etch adhesive system tested. PMID:23739856

  15. Sour sweets and acidic beverage consumption are risk indicators for dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Jenny Bogstad; Skudutyte-Rysstad, Rasa; Tveit, Anne B; Sandvik, Leiv; Mulic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between dental erosive wear and potential background, behavioural and dietary risk indicators and to assess whether there is a dose-response relationship between the level of acidic beverage consumption and dental erosive wear among adolescents. Of 846 adolescents (aged 16-18 years) scheduled for dental recall examinations, 795 (94%) accepted to participate. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding their background (gender and age), tooth-brushing frequency and dietary habits (the amount and frequency of acidic food and beverage consumption as well as the chosen method and manner of consuming acidic drinks). The association between the presence of erosive lesions and the possible risk indicators was assessed by logistic regression analyses. Of all participants examined, 37% had ≥3 surfaces with dental erosions and were considered to be affected individuals. In the present study, multivariate logistic analyses revealed a significant association between the dental erosive wear and high consumption of sour sweets and sports drinks. The tooth-brushing frequency was not significantly associated with dental erosive wear. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the results are the first to indicate a dose-response relationship between the daily consumption of acidic drinks and dental erosive wear. PMID:25765077

  16. Micro/nanofabrication of poly({sub L}-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Hinata, Toru; Washio, Masakazu; Oshima, Akihiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2013-10-14

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly({sub L}-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  17. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient. PMID:27209395

  18. Influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on bond durability of universal adhesives and surface free-energy characteristics of enamel.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel. Three universal adhesives and extracted human molars were used. Two no-pre-etching groups were prepared: ground enamel; and enamel after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 s to remove the smear layer. Four pre-etching groups were prepared: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 3, 5, 10, and 15 s. Shear bond strength (SBS) values of universal adhesive after no thermal cycling and after 30,000 or 60,000 thermal cycles, and surface free-energy values of enamel surfaces, calculated from contact angle measurements, were determined. The specimens that had been pre-etched showed significantly higher SBS and surface free-energy values than the specimens that had not been pre-etched, regardless of the aging condition and adhesive type. The SBS and surface free-energy values did not increase for pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. There were no significant differences in SBS values and surface free-energy characteristics between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. PMID:27315775

  19. Influence of acid-etching and ceramic primers on the repair of a glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, J R C; Souza, Rodrigo O A; Nogueira Junior, L; Ozcan, M; Bottino, M A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different primers on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between a feldspathic ceramic and two composites. Forty blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 5.0 mm³) were prepared from Vita Mark II . After polishing, they were randomly divided into 10 groups according to the surface treatment: Group 1, hydrofluoric acid 10% (HF) + silane; Group 2, CoJet + silane; Group 3, HF + Metal/Zirconia Primer; Group 4, HF + Clearfil Primer; Group 5, HF + Alloy Primer; Group 6, HF + V-Primer; Group 7, Metal/Zirconia Primer; Group 8, Clearfil Primer; Group 9, Alloy Primer; Group 10, V-Primer. After each surface treatment, an adhesive was applied and one of two composite resins was incrementally built up. The sticks obtained from each block (bonded area: 1.0 mm² ± 0.2 mm) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days and submitted to thermocycling (7,000 cycles; 5 degrees C/55 degrees C ± 1 degree C). The μTBS test was carried out using a universal testing machine (1.0 mm/min). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and a Tukey test (a = 0.05). The surface treatments significantly affected the results (P < 0.05); no difference was observed between the composites (P > 0.05). The bond strength means (MPa) were as follows: Group 1a = 29.6; Group 1b = 33.7; Group 2a = 28.9; Group 2b = 27.1; Group 3a = 13.8; Group 3b = 14.9; Group 4a = 18.6; Group 4b = 19.4; Group 5a = 15.3; Group 5b = 16.5; Group 6a = 11; Group 6b = 18; Groups 7a to 10b = 0. While the use of primers alone was not sufficient for adequate bond strengths to feldspathic ceramic, HF etching followed by any silane delivered higher bond strength. PMID:22414522

  20. Investigations on the SR method growth, etching, birefringence, laser damage threshold and dielectric characterization of sodium acid phthalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, A.; Ramasamy, P.; Verma, Sunil

    2011-03-01

    Optically good quality semi-organic single crystal of sodium acid phthalate (NaAP) was successfully grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. Transparent, colourless <0 0 1> oriented unidirectional bulk single crystals of diameters 10 and 20 mm and length maximum up to 75 mm were grown by the SR method. The grown crystals were subjected to various characterization studies such as etching, birefringence, laser damage threshold, UV-vis spectrum and dielectric measurement. The value of birefringence and quality were ascertained by birefringence studies.

  1. Assessment of Microleakage of Class V Composite Resin Restoration Following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) Laser Conditioning and Acid Etching with Two Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Arbabzadeh Zavareh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Birang, Reza; Eskini, Massoumeh; Bouraima, Stephane Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of laser for cavity preparation or conditioning of dentin and enamelsurfaces as an alternative for dental tissue acid-etch have increased in recent years. Theaim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage at enamel-composite and dentincompositeinterfaces following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet(Er:YAG) laserconditioning or acid-etching of enamel and dentin, hybridized with different bonding systems. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of 50 recentlyextracted intact human posterior teeth with occlusal margin in the enamel and gingival marginin the dentin. The cavities were randomly assigned to five groups: group1:conditioned withlaser (Energy=120mJ, Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100μs for Enamel and Energy=80mJ,Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100μs for Dentin) + Optibond FL, group2:conditioned withlaser + etching with 35% phosphoric acid + Optibond FL, group3:conditioned with laser+ Clearfil SE Bond, group 4 (control):acid etched with 35% phosphoric acid + OptibondFL, group 5 (control): Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored using Point 4 compositeresin. All samples were stored in distilled water at 37°c for 24 h, then were thermocycled for500 cycles and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 h. The teeth were sectionedbucco-lingually to evaluate the dye penetration. Kruskal-Wallis & Mann-Whitney testswere used for statistical analysis. Results: In occlusal margins, the least microleakage showed in groups 2, 4 and 5. Themaximum microleakage was observed in group 3 (P=0.009). In gingival margins, the leastmicroleakage was recorded in group2, while the most microleakage was found in group5 (P=0.001). Differences between 5 study groups were statistically significant (P<0.05).The microleakage scores were higher at the gingival margins. Conclusion: The use of the Er:YAG laser for conditioning with different dentin adhesivesystems influenced the marginal sealing of composite resin

  2. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in µ-TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  3. 1,3-Diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid as an alternative coinitiator for acidic photopolymerizable dental materials.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Valente, Lisia L; Peralta, Sonia L; Fernández, María Raquel; Lima, Giana da S; Petzhold, Cesar L; Piva, Evandro; Ogliari, Fabrício A

    2013-10-01

    The ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB) is widely used as a coinitiator of the camphorquinone (CQ), but in acidic circumstances it might present some instability, reducing the polymerization efficiency of the material. Considering this, new coinitiators are being evaluated. Hence, this study evaluated the kinetic of polymerization (KP), the degree of conversion (DC), and the rate of polymerization (RP ) of experimental resin adhesives containing 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as a coinitiator of the CQ. The experimental monomeric blend was prepared with bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and acidic monomers. CQ was added at 1 mol % as photoinitiator. Six groups were formulated: four containing concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 mol % of TBA, one without coinitiator, and the last one containing 1 mol % of EDAB (control group). The KP and the RP were performed using real-time Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The group without coinitiator has not formed a polymer, whereas the addition of TBA resulted in the conversion of monomers in polymer. The DC of the adhesives was as higher as the increase in the TBA content. The group with 2 mol % of TBA presented improved DC and reactivity (RP ) than the other groups and the control one. Hence, the TBA has performed as a coinitiator of the CQ for the radical polymerization of methacrylate resin adhesives and it has improved the DC and the reactivity of the materials. Thus, it is a potential coinitiator for the photopolymerization of dental materials. PMID:23564499

  4. UV-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid in the sub-micronchannels of oxidized PET track-etched membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we report on functionalization of track-etched membrane based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET TeMs) oxidized by advanced oxidation systems and by grafting of acrylic acid using photochemical initiation technique for the purpose of increasing functionality thus expanding its practical application. Among advanced oxidation processes (H2O2/UV) system had been chosen to introduce maximum concentration of carboxylic acid groups. Benzophenone (BP) photo-initiator was first immobilized on the surfaces of cylindrical pores which were later filled with aq. acrylic acid solution. UV-irradiation from both sides of PET TeMs has led to the formation of grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) chains inside the membrane sub-micronchannels. Effect of oxygen-rich surface of PET TeMs on BP adsorption and subsequent process of photo-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) were studied by ESR. The surface of oxidized and AA grafted PET TeMs was characterized by UV-vis, ATR-FTIR, XPS spectroscopies and by SEM.

  5. Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Polyacrylic Acid Etching and Their Application in Gene Delivery to Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    CAO, BINRUI; QIU, PENGHE; MAO, CHUANBIN

    2013-01-01

    Novel monodisperse mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (m-IONPs) were synthesized by a postsynthesis etching approach and characterized by electron microscopy. In this approach, solid iron oxide nanoparticles (s-IONPs) were first prepared following a solvothermal method, and then etched anisotropically by polyacrylic acid to form the mesoporous nanostructures. MTT cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the m-IONPs have good biocompatibility with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Owing to their mesoporous structure and good biocompatibility, these monodisperse m-IONPs were used as a nonviral vector for the delivery of a gene of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) tagged with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) into the hard-to-transfect stem cells. Successful gene delivery and transfection were verified by detecting the GFP fluorescence from MSCs using fluorescence microscopy. Our results illustrated that the m-IONPs synthesized in this work can serve as a potential nonviral carrier in gene therapy where stem cells should be first transfected and then implanted into disease sites for disease treatment. PMID:23913581

  6. Unintentional F doping of SrTiO3(001) etched in HF acid-structure and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Scott A.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Capan, Cigdem; Sun, Guangyuan

    2012-02-01

    We show that the HF acid etch commonly used to prepare SrTiO3(001) for heteroepitaxial growth of complex oxides results in a non-negligible level of F doping within the terminal surface layer of TiO2. Using a combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanned angle x-ray photoelectron diffraction, we determine that on average ~ 13% of the O anions in the surface layer are replaced by F, but that F does not occupy O sites in deeper layers. Despite this perturbation to the surface, the Fermi level remains unpinned, and the surface-state density, which determines the amount of band bending, is driven by factors other than F doping. The presence of F at the STO surface is expected to result in lower electron mobilities at complex oxide heterojunctions involving STO substrates because of impurity scattering. Unintentional F doping can be substantially reduced by replacing the HF-etch step with a boil in deionized water, which in conjunction with an oxygen tube furnace anneal, leaves the surface flat and TiO2 terminated.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p < or = 0.05. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that

  8. Evaluation of Bone Healing on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Implants Coated with Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite: An In Vivo Study in Rabbit Femur

    PubMed Central

    Melin Svanborg, Lory; Meirelles, Luiz; Franke Stenport, Victoria; Currie, Fredrik; Andersson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating if a coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals would enhance bone healing over time in trabecular bone. Sandblasted and acid etched titanium implants with and without a submicron thick coat of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nano-HA) were implanted in rabbit femur with healing times of 2, 4, and 9 weeks. Removal torque analyses and histological evaluations were performed. The torque analysis did not show any significant differences between the implants at any healing time. The control implant showed a tendency of more newly formed bone after 4 weeks of healing and significantly higher bone area values after 9 weeks of healing. According to the results from this present study, both control and nano-HA surfaces were biocompatible and osteoconductive. A submicron thick coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals deposited onto blasted and acid etched screw shaped titanium implants did not enhance bone healing, as compared to blasted and etched control implants when placed in trabecular bone. PMID:24723952

  9. Redox buffered hydrofluoric acid etchant for the reduction of galvanic attack during release etching of MEMS devices having noble material films

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Matthew G.

    2009-10-06

    Etchant solutions comprising a redox buffer can be used during the release etch step to reduce damage to the structural layers of a MEMS device that has noble material films. A preferred redox buffer comprises a soluble thiophosphoric acid, ester, or salt that maintains the electrochemical potential of the etchant solution at a level that prevents oxidation of the structural material. Therefore, the redox buffer preferentially oxidizes in place of the structural material. The sacrificial redox buffer thereby protects the exposed structural layers while permitting the dissolution of sacrificial oxide layers during the release etch.

  10. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    PubMed Central

    STEINHAUSER, Henrique Caballero; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8): C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197) and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed. PMID:24676577

  11. In vivo remineralization of acid-etched enamel in non-brushing areas as influenced by fluoridated orthodontic adhesive and toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Praxedes-Neto, Otávio José; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Florêncio-Filho, Cícero; Farias, Arthur Costa Rodrigues; Drennan, John; De Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the in vivo remineralization of acid-etched enamel in non-brushing areas as influenced by fluoridated orthodontic adhesive and toothpaste. One hundred and twenty teeth from 30 volunteers were selected. The teeth were assigned to four treatments: no treatment (negative control); 37% phosphoric acid-etching (PAE) (positive control); PAE + resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC); and, PAE + composite resin. Patients brushed teeth with fluoridated (n = 15) or non-fluoridated (n = 15) toothpastes, so that etched enamel was protected with screens and it was not in contact with the brush bristles. Remineralization was evaluated by means of laser fluorescence (LF), environmental scanning electronic microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry after extraction. The LF means were compared by means of Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney tests. Environmental scanning electron microscopy scores were compared among the groups using a Kruskal Wallis test, whereas the Ca/P ratio was evaluated by means of an Analysis of Variance with subparcels (treatments) and Tukey's post-hoc test. There were no statistically significant differences between the tooth pastes and between the orthodontic adhesives evaluated. Most teeth presented only partial enamel remineralization. Therefore, the fluoride released by the RMGIC was not enough to cause increased crystal regrowth in the acid-etched enamel. The use of fluoridated toothpaste did not provide positive additional effect. PMID:22298375

  12. Oral lactic acid bacteria related to the occurrence and/or progression of dental caries in Japanese preschool children

    PubMed Central

    SHIMADA, Ayumi; NODA, Masafumi; MATOBA, Yasuyuki; KUMAGAI, Takanori; KOZAI, Katsuyuki; SUGIYAMA, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially those classified into the genus Lactobacillus, is associated with the progression of dental caries in preschool children. Nevertheless, the kinds of species of LAB and the characteristics that are important for dental caries have been unclear. The aims of this study were: (1) to investigate the distribution of oral LAB among Japanese preschool children with various prevalence levels of caries; and (2) to reveal the characteristics of these isolated LAB species. Seventy-four Japanese preschool children were examined for caries scores and caries progression, and their dental cavity samples were collected for LAB isolation and identification. The saliva-induced agglutination rate and the resistance to acidic environments of the identified strains were measured. Statistical analysis showed that preschool children carrying Lactobacillus (L.) salivarius or Streptococcus mutans have a significantly higher prevalence of dental caries, the growth ability in acidic environments correlates with the caries scores of individuals with L. salivarius, and the caries scores exhibit positive correlation with saliva-induced agglutination in L. salivarius. These results show that specific Lactobacillus species are associated with dental caries based on the level of carious lesion severity. The present study suggests that these specific Lactobacillus species, especially those with easily agglutinated properties and acid resistance, affect the dental caries scores of preschool children, and that these properties may provide useful information for research into the prevention of dental caries. PMID:25918670

  13. Effect of the Acidic Dental Resin Monomer 10-methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate on Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Haejin; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-11-01

    Although 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) is frequently used as an acidic resin monomer in dental adhesives, its effect on dental pulp cells (DPCs) has been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10-MDP on the inflammatory response and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs at minimally toxic concentrations. We found that 10-MDP caused the release of inflammatory cytokines including NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 10-MDP reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization nodule formation and mRNA expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osterix and Runx2 in a concentration-dependent manner with low toxicity. In addition, 10-MDP induced activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated whether the effect of 10-MDP was related to the induction of HO-1 and found that treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the production of 10-MDP-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines and the inhibition of differentiation markers. Pre-treatment with either a GSH synthesis inhibitor or antioxidants blocked 10-MDP-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways. Taken together, the results of this study showed that minimally toxic concentrations of 10-MDP promoted an inflammatory response and suppressed odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction through MAPK and NF-κB signalling. PMID:25847254

  14. Dental resins based on dimer acid dimethacrylates: a route to high conversion with low polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Ge, Junhao; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2010-05-01

    Incomplete polymerization, volumetric shrinkage, and shrinkage stress are among the primary disadvantages of current resin-based dental composites. Generally, any attempt to increase final double bond conversion only exacerbates polymerization shrinkage and stress. The use of dimer acid-derived dimethacrylate (DADMA) monomers in novel dental resin formulations is examined in this article as a potential means to address these disparate goals. A series of high molecular weight DADMA monomers with different functional groups used to connect the C36 dimer acid core and the methacrylates were formulated with urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and/or ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) at various compositions to manipulate comonomer compatibility and polymeric mechanical properties. Along with reaction kinetics, dynamic polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress were assessed. Specific DADMA monomers demonstrated limited miscibility with either Bis-EMA or UDMA. Appropriate ternary resin formulations produced homogeneous monomeric mixtures capable of controlled polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) to yield heterogeneous final polymers. Reduced polymerization shrinkage and stress along with higher conversion was observed for DADMA ternary systems compared with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin control. The PIPS process resulted in a modest volume recovery and stress relaxation in the later stages of polymerization. These results indicate that certain dimer acid-derived dimethacrylates possess the potential to replace TEGDMA as a reactive diluent in dental resins that display a favorable and unique combination of properties. PMID:20521567

  15. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provine, J.; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-06-01

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiNx and evaluate the film's WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  16. The Effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Sandblasting with Large Grit and Acid Etching (SLA) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Tahereh; Ayoubian, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 6W power Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2) on the biologic compatibility of the Sandblasting with large grit and acid etching (SLA) titanium discs through studying of the Sarcoma Osteogenic (SaOS-2) human osteoblast-like cells viability. Methods: Sterilized titanium discs were used together with SaOS-2 human osteoblast-like cells. 6 sterilized SLA titanium discs of the experimental group were exposed to irradiation by CO2 laser with a power of 6W and 10.600nm wavelength, at fixed frequency of 80Hz during 45 seconds in both pulse and non-contact settings. SaOS-2 human osteoblast-like cells were incubated under 37°C in humid atmosphere (95% weather, 5% CO2) for 72 hours. MTT test was performed to measure the ratio level of cellular proliferation. Results: The results indicated that at 570nm wavelength, the 6W CO2 laser power have not affected the cellular viability. Conclusion: CO2 laser in 6w power has had no effect on the biologic compatibility of the SLA titanium surface PMID:25606313

  17. Effects of Acid Treatment on Dental Zirconia: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Haifeng; Shen, Shuping; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Feimin; Chen, Chen; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric (HF) acid, acetic acid, and citric acid treatments on the physical properties and structure of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) at ambient temperature. In total, 110 bar-shaped zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to 11 groups. The specimens in the control group (C) received no surface treatment, while those in the Cage group were hydrothermally aged at 134°C and 0.2 MPa for 20 h. Ten specimens each were immersed at ambient temperature in 5% and 40% HF acid for 2 h (40HF0), 1 day (5HF1, 40HF1), and 5 days (5HF5, 40HF5), while 10 each were immersed at ambient temperature in 10% acetic acid and 20% citric acid for 7 (AC7, CI7) and 14 days (AC14, CI14). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to quantitatively estimate the monoclinic phase. Furthermore, flexural strength, surface roughness, and surface Vickers hardness were measured after treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the surface morphology. The Cage group specimens exhibited an increased monoclinic phase and flexural strength. Furthermore, 40% HF acid immersion decreased the flexural strength and surface hardness and deteriorated the surface finish, while 5% HF acid immersion only decreased the surface hardness. All the HF acid-immersed specimens showed an etched surface texture on SEM observations, while the other groups did not. These findings suggest that the treatment of Y-TZP with 40% HF acid at ambient temperature causes potential damage, while treatment with 5% HF acid, acetic acid, and citric acid is safe. PMID:26301413

  18. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental nanocomposites containing glyoxylic acid modified high-aspect ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers with enhanced dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Xu, Changqi; Wang, Yong; Shi, Jian; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of the glyoxylic acid (GA) modification of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers on their dispersion in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental composites and also investigate the mechanical properties, water absorption, and water solubility of the resulting dental resins and composites. Scanning/Transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images showed that microsized HAP nanofiber bundles could be effectively broken down to individual HAP nanofibers with an average length of ~15 μm after the surface modification process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) characterization confirmed glyoxylic acid was chemically grafted on the HAP nanofiber surface, hypothetically by reacting with the amine group on HAP nanofiber surface. The enhanced dispersion of HAP nanofibers in dental matrix led to increased biaxial flexural strength (BFS) compared with the corresponding dental resins and composites filled with untreated HAP nanofibers. In addition, impregnation of small mass fractions of the glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers into the BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resins (5wt%, 10wt%) or composites (2wt%, 3wt%) could also substantially improve the BFS in comparison with the controls(pure resins or dental composites filled with silica particles alone). Larger mass fractions could not further increase the mechanical property or even degrade the BFS values. Water behavior testing results indicated that the addition of glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers resulted in higher water absorption and water solubility values which is not preferred for clinical application. In summary, well dispersed HAP nanofibers and their dental composites with enhanced mechanical property have been successfully fabricated but the water absorption and water solubility of such dental composites need to be

  19. Uniform nano-ripples on the sidewall of silicon carbide micro-hole fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation and acid etching

    SciTech Connect

    Khuat, Vanthanh; Chen, Tao; Gao, Bo; Si, Jinhai Ma, Yuncan; Hou, Xun

    2014-06-16

    Uniform nano-ripples were observed on the sidewall of micro-holes in silicon carbide fabricated by 800-nm femtosecond laser and chemical selective etching. The morphology of the ripple was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy. The formation mechanism of the micro-holes was attributed to the chemical reaction of the laser affected zone with mixed solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid. The formation of nano-ripples on the sidewall of the holes could be attributed to the standing wave generated in z direction due to the interference between the incident wave and the reflected wave.

  20. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of SiN-AlN Composites for Ultra Low Wet Etch Rates in Hydrofluoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongmin; Provine, J; Walch, Stephen P; Park, Joonsuk; Phuthong, Witchukorn; Dadlani, Anup L; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Kihyun; Prinz, Fritz B

    2016-07-13

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposited (ALD) of hydrofluoric acid (HF) etch resistant and electrically insulating films for sidewall spacer processing. Silicon nitride (SiN) has been the prototypical material for this need and extensive work has been conducted into realizing sufficiently lower wet etch rates (WERs) as well as leakage currents to meet industry needs. In this work, we report on the development of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) composites of SiN and AlN to minimize WER and leakage current density. In particular, the role of aluminum and the optimum amount of Al contained in the composite structures have been explored. Films with near zero WER in dilute HF and leakage currents density similar to pure PEALD SiN films could be simultaneously realized through composites which incorporate ≥13 at. % Al, with a maximum thermal budget of 350 °C. PMID:27295338

  1. Micro-PIXE and micro-RBS characterization of micropores in porous silicon prepared using microwave-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muthanna; Grime, Geoffrey W

    2013-04-01

    Porous silicon (PS) has been prepared using a microwave-assisted hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching method from a silicon wafer pre-implanted with 5 MeV Cu ions. The use of microbeam proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) and microbeam Rutherford backscattering techniques reveals for the first time the capability of these techniques for studying the formation of micropores. The porous structures observed from micro-PIXE imaging results are compared to scanning electron microscope images. It was observed that the implanted copper accumulates in the same location as the pores and that at high implanted dose the pores form large-scale patterns of lines and concentric circles. This is the first work demonstrating the use of microwave-assisted HF etching in the formation of PS. PMID:23388452

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of novel dental monomer with branched carboxyl acid group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Berrie, Cynthia L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the water miscibility and increase the mechanical properties of dentin adhesives, a new glycerol-based monomer with vinyl and carboxylic acid, 4-((1,3-bis(-methacryloyloxy)propan-2-yl)oxy)-2-methylene-4-oxobutanoic acid (BMPMOB), was synthesized and characterized. Dentin adhesive formulations containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (BisGMA), and BMPMOB were characterized with regard to real-time photopolymerization behavior, water sorption, dynamic mechanical analysis, and microscale three-dimensional internal morphologies and compared with HEMA/BisGMA controls. The experimental adhesive copolymers showed higher glass transition temperature and rubbery moduli, as well as improved water miscibility compared to the controls. The enhanced properties of the adhesive copolymers indicated that BMPMOB is a promising comonomer for dental restorative materials. PMID:24596134

  3. Effects of Dextrose and Lipopolysaccharide on the Corrosion Behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V Alloy with a Smooth Surface or Treated with Double-Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Faverani, Leonardo P.; Assunção, Wirley G.; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio P.; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T.; Barao, Valentim A.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and infections are associated with a high risk of implant failure. However, the effects of such conditions on the electrochemical stability of titanium materials remain unclear. This study evaluated the corrosion behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy, with a smooth surface or conditioned by double-acid-etching, in simulated body fluid with different concentrations of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. For the electrochemical assay, the open-circuit-potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic test were used. The disc surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Their surface roughness and Vickers microhardness were also tested. The quantitative data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation and independent t-tests (α = 0.05). In the corrosion parameters, there was a strong lipopolysaccharide correlation with the Ipass (passivation current density), Cdl (double-layer capacitance), and Rp (polarization resistance) values (p<0.05) for the Ti-6Al-4V alloy with surface treatment by double-acid-etching. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide was correlated with the Icorr (corrosion current density) and Ipass (p<0.05). The acid-treated groups showed a significant increase in Cdl values and reduced Rp values (p<0.05, t-test). According to the topography, there was an increase in surface roughness (R2 = 0.726, p<0.0001 for the smooth surface; R2 = 0.405, p = 0.036 for the double-acid-etching-treated surface). The microhardness of the smooth Ti-6Al-4V alloy decreased (p<0.05) and that of the treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy increased (p<0.0001). Atomic force microscopy showed changes in the microstructure of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy by increasing the surface thickness mainly in the group associated with dextrose and lipopolysaccharide. The combination of dextrose and lipopolysaccharide affected the corrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface treated with double-acid-etching. However, no

  4. Effect of acid vapor etching on morphological and opto-electric properties of flat silicon and silicon nanowire arrays: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amri, Chohdi; Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a comparative study between porous silicon (pSi) and porous silicon nanowires (pSiNWs). Acid Vapor Etching (AVE) treatment has been used to perform porous structure on flat Si and SiNWs array substrates respectively. SiNW structure is prepared by the widely used Silver catalyzed etching method. SEM and TEM images show that AVE treatment induces porous structure in the whole Si wafer and the SiNW sidewall. Comparatively to pSi, pSiNWs exhibit a low reflectivity in the whole spectral range which decreases with etching duration. However, the reflectivity of pSi changes with porous layer thickness. Both pSi and pSiNWs exhibit a significant PL peak situated at 2 eV. PL peaks are attributed to the quantum confinement effect in the silicon nanocrystallites (SiNCs). We discussed the significant enhancement in the peak intensities and a shift toward lower energy displayed in Raman spectra for both pSi and pSiNWs. We reported a correlative study of the AVE treatment effect on the minority carrier life time of flat silicon and SiNW arrays with the passivation effect of chemical induced silicon oxides highlighted by FTIR spectra.

  5. 24% Indigenously Prepared Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Compared to Self-Etching Adhesives and their Effect on Shear Bond Strength of Composites in Primary Teeth: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Priya; Tandil, Yogesh L.; T.P., Chandru; Gupta, Anamika; Kalaria, Devendra; Kumar, Prafful

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the years, it has been known that 34% phosphoric acid is the benchmark in etchants with the best shear bond strength shown with composites in primary teeth. However, with latest technological advancements and innovations, in order to reduce the number of steps and less damage to the tooth structure, non-rinse conditioner (NRC) & Single-Etch and various other etchants have been tried and tested. These etchants have been found to have shear bond strength comparable to phosphoric acid. In this study, indigenously prepared 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been compared with established etchants, as to prove if their shear bond strength was closely related. As it is a well-known fact that EDTA could be less damaging to the enamel during etching and hence can be an alternative for etching of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study 60 caries-free primary molars were used, they were sectioned in the middle, after making area for bonding; the marked area was then etched using different etchants for 30 s. Each of the teeth was then rinsed and bonded with composite resin and thermocycling was done. Shear bond strength testing was done on the composite using Universal Testing Machine. Results: Results of the study showed that phosphoric acid showed the highest bond strength, closely followed by Single Etch (Adper Prompt) and NRC, then by EDTA. Conclusions: About 24% EDTA can be another comparable replacement for phosphoric acid if used with a Single Etch Primer, like Prime and Bond NT on primary teeth. 34% phosphoric acid has the highest bond strength values with composite resin. Single etch followed by NRC has the second and third highest bond strength values, which are comparable to phosphoric acid. PMID:26464540

  6. Effects of a newly designed HEMA-free, multi-purpose, single-bottle, self-etching adhesive on bonding to dental hard tissues, zirconia-based ceramics, and gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Jogetsu, Yoshiyuki; Shinno, Kazuya; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding effectiveness of newly designed self-etching adhesives to four types of adherends--enamel, dentin, zirconia, and gold (Au) alloy. Five experimental adhesives were prepared, which contained 3.0-5.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP), 3.0 wt% 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) or 17.0 wt% 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET), 0-0.5 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT), and varying contents of Bis-GMA, dimethacrylate monomers, water, acetone, and a photoinitiator system. After 2,000 times of thermal cycling, shear bond strengths (SBSs) between a resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Japan) and the four adherends, bonded using the experimental adhesives, were measured at 1.0 mm/min. No statistically significant differences in SBS for bonding to ground enamel, dentin, sandblasted zirconia and Au alloy (p>0.05) were found between experimental adhesives which contained 6-MHPA and/or 6-MHPP, 4-MET or 4-AET, 6-MHDT and/or 10-MDDT, Bis-GMA, and dimethacrylates. An adhesive layer of less than 5.0 µm thickness, by scanning electron microscopy observation, revealed strong adhesion to the four adherends. Therefore, the newly designed multi-purpose, self-etching adhesive strongly adhered to all the four adherend materials tested. PMID:21946481

  7. Acidic pH resistance of grafted chitosan on dental implant.

    PubMed

    Campos, Doris M; Toury, Bérengère; D'Almeida, Mélanie; Attik, Ghania N; Ferrand, Alice; Renoud, Pauline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, access to dental care has increasingly become a service requested by the population, especially in the case of dental implants. However, the major cause of implant failure is an inflammatory disease: peri-implantitis. Currently, the adhesion strength of antibacterial coatings at implant surfaces remains a problem to solve. In order to propose a functionalized implant with a resistant antibacterial coating, a novel method of chitosan immobilization at implant surface has been investigated. Functionalization of the pre-active titanium (Ti) surface was performed using triethoxysilylpropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) as a coupling agent which forms a stable double peptide bond with chitosan. The chitosan presence and the chemical resistibility of the coating under acid pH solutions (pH 5 and pH 3) were confirmed by FTIR-ATR and XPS analyses. Furthermore, peel test results showed high adhesive resistance of the TESPSA/chitosan coating at the substrate. Cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell morphology with confocal imaging. Images showed healthy morphology of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1). Finally, the reported method for chitosan immobilization on Ti surface via peptide bindings allows for the improvement of its adhesive capacities and resistibility while maintaining its cytocompatibility. Surface functionalization using the TESPSA/chitosan coupling method is noncytotoxic and stable even in drastic environments as found in oral cavity, thus making it a valuable candidate for clinical implantology applications. PMID:24972881

  8. Effect of initiator on photopolymerization of acidic, aqueous dental model adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinglin; Peng, Zhonghua; Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated different initiator systems in self-etching model adhesives, in which camphorquinone (CQ) or [3-(3,4-dimethyl-9-oxo-9H-thioxanthen-2-yloxy)-2-hydroxylpropy] trimethylammonium chloride (QTX) was employed as a photoinitiator (dye). N-phenylglycine (NPG), ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E) or 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was used as the coinitiator (CI). The role of diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP) in the polymerization process was also studied. The concentrations of dye, CI, and DPIHP in model adhesives were all maintained at 0.022 mmol per gram monomer. The model adhesive contained two monomers: (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate) (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) whose mass ratio was 1:1, thus representing an acidic and hydrophilic formulation. The polymerization rate and the degree of conversion (DC) of the model adhesives with 5, 15, or 25% water content were determined using FTIR/ATR with a time-based spectrum analysis. The results indicated that with CQ as the photoinitiator, 4E appeared to be the most efficient CI, whereas the CQ-DMAEMA combination led to very low radical generation efficiency (DC < 5%). DPIHP exhibited little effect on the polymerization process. With QTX as the photoinitiator, however, DPIHP played an essential role. Without DPIHP, all three QTX-CI systems failed to initiate polymerization (DC < 5%). The QTX-DPIHP combination, on the other hand, was found to be a viable initiator system. The above results provide the critical information for the development of self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:18671261

  9. Toxicity of a dental adhesive compared with ionizing radiation and zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Olivares, Amparo; Achel, Daniel-Giyngiri; García-Cruz, Emilio; Fondevilla-Soler, Adriana; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the toxicity of aqueous dilutions of a universal self-priming dental adhesive (DA) and comparing these with those elicited by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), Zoledronic acid (Z) treatment and the synergic effects of the combined treatment with IR+Z. Material and Methods The genotoxic effect of DA was determined by the increase in the frequency of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked in cultured human lymphocytes before and after exposure to 2Gy of X-rays. The cytotoxic effect was studied by using the MTT cell viability test in normal prostate cell lines (PNT2) after exposure to different X-ray doses (0Gy-20Gy). The cell lines divided into different groups and treated with different test substances: DA in presence of O2, DA in absence of O2, Z-treated and control. Results An in vitro dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxic effect of DA, Z and IR on PNT2 cells (p>0.001) was demonstrated. DA without-O2, following the recommendations of manufacturers, had a more pronounced effect of increasing cell death than DA with-O2 (p<0.001). In the genotoxicity assay, DA at 25% of its original concentration significantly increased chromosome damage (p<0.001). The samples studied were found to be toxic, and the samples photo-polymerized in absence of O2 showed a bigger cytotoxic effect comparable to the additive toxic effect showed by the combined treatment of IR+Z. Conclusions Additional effort should be carried out to develop adhesives, which would reduce the release of hazardous substances; since toxic effects are similar to that reported by other agents whose clinical use is controlled by the health authorities. Key words: Micronucleus, toxicity, dental adhesive, zolendronic acid, radiation effects. PMID:26034923

  10. Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid Etched Quantum Dots as a "Turn-On" Fluorescence Probe for Detection of Trace Zinc in Food.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Fangdi; Xu, Guanhong; Wu, Yanzi; Hu, Chunting; Song, Quan; Yang, Jing; Hu, Qin

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a simple and rapid "turn-on" fluorescence sensor for Zn2+ based on ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) etched CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was developed. First, the initial bright fluorescence of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) capped CdTe QDs was effectively quenched by EDTA, and then the presence of Zn2+ could "turn on" the weak fluorescence of QDs quenched by EDTA due to the formation of ZnS passivation shell. The increase of fluorescence intensity of EDTA etched QDs was found to be linear with the concentration of Zn2+ added. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve of this method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 9.1-1 09.1 μM of Zn2+ with the correlation coefficient R2 = 0.998. The limit of detection (3σ/K) was 2 μM. The developed QDs-based sensor was successfully applied to detect trace zinc in zinc fortified table salts and energy drinks with satisfactory results. PMID:27427745

  11. Jaw osteonecrosis management around a dental implant inserted 2 years before starting treatment with zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; García Medina, Blas; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; Jiménez-Burkhardt, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BP) are a type of drug known to inhibit bone resorption through complex interventions. Their primary mechanism of action is aimed at the cellular level, inhibiting osteoclast activity and so bone resorption. BPs are widely used, with many patients receiving continuous treatment for years. But it is well known that these drugs can produce osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Zoledronic acid (ZA) is an intravenous BP used in the treatment and prophylaxis of bone disease in patients with malignant tumors with bone implication. ZA is the most potent BP in clinical development. This report describes the case of a 62-year-old woman with breast cancer antecedents which relapsed, who had received a maxillary dental implant two years before the start of therapy with zoledronic acid. She later developed osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), which began in the peri-implant area, and was treated for stage 3 ONJ by sub-total maxillectomy. Key words:Bisphosphonates, zoledronic acid, osteonecrosis of the jaw, peri-implantitis, maxillectomy. PMID:26330946

  12. Etching of nanostructures on soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Elmer; Zhao, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Nanostructures were created on the surface of optical glass using nanosphere lithography. The substrates were etched with vapor-phase hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The etching rate was studied and compared with existing results of wet and dry HF etching. An empirical etching rate formula is found for etching depth up to 300 nm. The subsequent artificial material layer demonstrated enhanced transmittance in optical wavelengths. PMID:24978727

  13. Etching Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    20-page report reviews methods available for etching specific layers on wafers and discusses automation techniques and features on one particular automated system. Compares two major etching methods, chemical (wet) and plasma (dry), and discusses areas in need of development. Methods covered include "dip-and-dunk" manual method of chemical etching, automated chemical etching, and plasma etching.

  14. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Jennifer L.; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size were synthesized via a spray-drying technique and incorporated into a resin. Flexural strength of nanocomposite with 10 to 30% NACP fillers matched the strength of a commercial hybrid composite (p > 0.1). Nanocomposite with 40% NACP matched the strength of a microfill composite, which was 2-fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer. Nanocomposite with 40% NACP neutralized a lactic acid solution of pH 4 by rapidly increasing the pH to 5.69 in 10 min. In contrast, the commercial controls had pH staying at near 4. Using Streptoccocus mutans, an agar disk-diffusion test showed no inhibition zone for commercial controls. In contrast, the inhibition zone was (2.5 ± 0.7) mm for nanocomposite with 40% NACP. Crystal violet staining showed that S. mutans coverage on nanocomposite was 1/4 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel calcium–phosphate nanocomposite matched the mechanical properties of commercial composite and rapidly neutralized lactic acid of pH 4. The nanocomposite appeared to moderately reduce the S. mutans growth, and further study is needed to obtain strong antimicrobial properties. The new nanocomposite may have potential to reduce secondary caries and restoration fracture, two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. PMID:21504057

  15. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Jennifer L; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C; Xu, Hockin H K

    2011-07-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size were synthesized via a spray-drying technique and incorporated into a resin. Flexural strength of nanocomposite with 10 to 30% NACP fillers matched the strength of a commercial hybrid composite (p > 0.1). Nanocomposite with 40% NACP matched the strength of a microfill composite, which was 2-fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer. Nanocomposite with 40% NACP neutralized a lactic acid solution of pH 4 by rapidly increasing the pH to 5.69 in 10 min. In contrast, the commercial controls had pH staying at near 4. Using Streptoccocus mutans, an agar disk-diffusion test showed no inhibition zone for commercial controls. In contrast, the inhibition zone was (2.5 ± 0.7) mm for nanocomposite with 40% NACP. Crystal violet staining showed that S. mutans coverage on nanocomposite was 1/4 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel calcium-phosphate nanocomposite matched the mechanical properties of commercial composite and rapidly neutralized lactic acid of pH 4. The nanocomposite appeared to moderately reduce the S. mutans growth, and further study is needed to obtain strong antimicrobial properties. The new nanocomposite may have potential to reduce secondary caries and restoration fracture, two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. PMID:21504057

  16. Etching of Crystalline ZnO Surfaces upon Phosphonic Acid Adsorption: Guidelines for the Realization of Well-Engineered Functional Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Alexandra; Klöffel, Tobias; Eußner, Jens; Harms, Klaus; Dehnen, Stefanie; Meyer, Bernd; Witte, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Functionalization of metal oxides by means of covalently bound self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) offers a tailoring of surface electronic properties such as their work function and, in combination with its large charge carrier mobility, renders ZnO a promising conductive oxide for use as transparent electrode material in optoelectronic devices. In this study, we show that the formation of phosphonic acid-anchored SAMs on ZnO competes with an unwanted chemical side reaction, leading to the formation of surface precipitates and severe surface damage at prolonged immersion times of several days. Combining atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), the stability and structure of the aggregates formed upon immersion of ZnO single crystal surfaces of different orientations [(0001̅), (0001), and (101̅0)] in phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) solution were studied. By intentionally increasing the immersion time to more than 1 week, large crystalline precipitates are formed, which are identified as zinc phosphonate. Moreover, the energetics and the reaction pathway of this transformation have been evaluated using density functional theory (DFT), showing that zinc phosphonate is thermodynamically more favorable than phosphonic acid SAMs on ZnO. Precipitation is also found for phosphonic acids with fluorinated aromatic backbones, while less precipitation occurs upon formation of SAMs with phenylphosphinic anchoring units. By contrast, no precipitates are formed when PPA monolayer films are prepared by sublimation under vacuum conditions, yielding smooth surfaces without noticeable etching. PMID:27159837

  17. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  18. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  19. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  20. Influence of different pre-etching times on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Scheidel, Donal D; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence on dentin bonding of phosphoric acid pre-etching times before the application of self-etch adhesives. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives [Prime & Bond Elect (EL) and Scotchbond Universal (SU)], a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive [G-aenial Bond (GB)], and a two-step self-etch adhesive [OptiBond XTR (OX)] were used. The SBS and SFS values were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching times of 3, 10, or 15 s before application of the adhesives, and for a control without pre-etching. For groups with 3 s of pre-etching, SU and EL showed higher SBS values than control groups. No significant difference was observed for GB among the 3 s, 10 s, and control groups, but the 15 s pre-etching group showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values than the control group. No significant difference was found for OX among the pre-etching groups. Reducing phosphoric acid pre-etching time can minimize the adverse effect on dentin bonding durability for the conventional self-etch adhesives. Furthermore, a short phosphoric acid pre-etching time enhances the dentin bonding performance of universal adhesives. PMID:26918658

  1. Dry etching of metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, D.

    1983-01-01

    The production dry etch processes are reviewed from the perspective of microelectronic fabrication applications. The major dry etch processes used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices can be divided into two categories - plasma processes in which samples are directly exposed to an electrical discharge, and ion beam processes in which samples are etched by a beam of ions extracted from a discharge. The plasma etch processes can be distinguished by the degree to which ion bombardment contributes to the etch process. This, in turn is related to capability for anisotropic etching. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) and Ion Beam Etching are of most interest for etching of thin film metals. RIE is generally considered the best process for large volume, anisotropic aluminum etching.

  2. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  3. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  4. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  5. Release of cetyl pyridinium chloride from fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Andrew; Coleman, Nichola J.; Tüzüner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the antimicrobial nature of a fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement can be enhanced by the addition of 5% cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC). Materials and methods The temporary cement, Cavex Temporary was employed, and additions of CPC were made to either the base or the catalyst paste prior to mixing the cement. Release of CPC from set cement specimens was followed using reverse-phase HPLC for a period of up to 2 weeks following specimen preparation. Potential interactions between Cavex and CPC were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and antimicrobial effects were determined using zone of inhibition measurements after 24 h with disc-shaped specimens in cultured Streptococcus mutans. Results FTIR showed no interaction between CPC and the components of the cement. CPC release was found to follow a diffusion mechanism for the first 6 h or so, and to equilibrate after approximately 2 weeks, with no significant differences between release profiles when the additive was incorporated into the base or the catalyst paste. Diffusion was rapid, and had a diffusion coefficient of approximately 1 × 10−9 m2 s−1 in both cases. Total release was in the range 10–12% of the CPC loading. Zones of inhibition around discs containing CPC were significantly larger than those around the control discs of CPC-free cement. Conclusions The antimicrobial character of this temporary cement can be enhanced by the addition of CPC. Such enhancement is of potential clinical value, though further in vivo work is needed to confirm this. PMID:27335898

  6. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2015-12-01

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml-1) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml-1) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications.Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu2+. The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu2+/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu2+ and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical

  7. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  8. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  9. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  10. Effect of bulk microstructure of commercially pure titanium on surface characteristics and fatigue properties after surface modification by sand blasting and acid-etching.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Ng, H P; Lapovok, R; Estrin, Y; Lowe, T C; Anumalasetty, V N

    2016-04-01

    Surface modification techniques are widely used to enhance the biological response to the implant materials. These techniques generally create a roughened surface, effectively increasing the surface area thus promoting cell adhesion. However, a negative side effect is a higher susceptibility of a roughened surface to failure due to the presence of multiple stress concentrators. The purpose of the study reported here was to examine the effects of surface modification by sand blasting and acid-etching (SLA) on the microstructure and fatigue performance of coarse-grained and ultrafine-grained (UFG) commercially pure titanium. Finer grain sizes, produced by equal channel angular pressing, resulted in lower values of surface roughness in SLA-processed material. This effect was associated with greater resistance of the UFG structure to plastic deformation. The fatigue properties of UFG Ti were found to be superior to those of coarse-grained Ti and conventional Ti-6Al-4V, both before and after SLA-treatment. PMID:26703365

  11. Effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet laser irradiation on the surface microstructure and roughness of sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched implants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hun; Kwon, Young-Hyuk; Herr, Yeek; Shin, Seung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation on sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) implant surface microstructure according to varying energy levels and application times of the laser. Methods The implant surface was irradiated by the Er:YAG laser under combined conditions of 100, 140, or 180 mJ/pulse and an application time of 1 minute, 1.5 minutes, or 2 minutes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface roughness of the specimens. Results All experimental conditions of Er:YAG laser irradiation, except the power setting of 100 mJ/pulse for 1 minute and 1.5 minutes, led to an alteration in the implant surface. SEM evaluation showed a decrease in the surface roughness of the implants. However, the difference was not statistically significant. Alterations of implant surfaces included meltdown and flattening. More extensive alterations were present with increasing laser energy and application time. Conclusions To ensure no damage to their surfaces, it is recommended that SLA implants be irradiated with an Er:YAG laser below 100 mJ/pulse and 1.5 minutes for detoxifying the implant surfaces. PMID:21811689

  12. Early bone response to machined, sandblasting acid etching (SLA) and novel surface-functionalization (SLAffinity) titanium implants: characterization, biomechanical analysis and histological evaluation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Hsu, Heng-Jui; Peng, Pei-Wen; Wu, Ching-Zong; Ou, Keng-Liang; Cheng, Han-Yi; Walinski, Christopher J; Sugiatno, Erwan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine early tissue response and osseointegration in the animal model. The surface morphologies of SLAffinity were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The microstructures were examined by X-ray diffraction, and hardness was measured by nanoindentation. Moreover, the safety and toxicity properties were evaluated using computer-aided programs and cell cytotoxicity assays. In the animal model, implants were installed in the mandibular canine-premolar area of 12 miniature pigs. Each pig received three implants: machine, sandblasted, large grit, acid-etched, and SLAffinity-treated implants. The results showed that surface treatment did affect bone-to-implant contact (BIC) significantly. At 3 weeks, the SLAffinity-treated implants were found to present significantly higher BIC values than the untreated implants. The SLAffinity treatments enhanced osseointegration significantly, especially at early stages of bone tissue healing. As described above, the results of the present study demonstrate that the SLAffinity treatment is a reliable surface modification method. PMID:26418567

  13. Quantification of proteins using enhanced etching of Ag coated Au nanorods by the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid pair with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Hou, Shuai; Yan, Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-14

    Plasmonic nanosensors show great potential in ultrasensitive detection, especially with the plasmon peak position as the detection modality. Herein, a new sensitive but simple total protein quantification method termed the SPR-BCA assay is demonstrated by combining plasmonic nanosensors with protein oxidation by Cu(2+). The easy tuning of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features of plasmonic nanostructures makes them ideal sensing platforms. We found that the Cu(2+)/bicinchoninic acid (BCA) pair exhibits accelerated etching of Au@Ag nanorods and results in the LSPR peak shift. A linear relationship between Cu(2+) and the LSPR shift is found in a double logarithmic coordinate. Such double logarithm relationship is transferred to the concentration of proteins. Theoretical simulation shows that Au nanorods with large aspect ratios and small core sizes show high detection sensitivity. Via optimized sensor design, we achieved an increased sensitivity (the limit of detection was 3.4 ng ml(-1)) and a wide working range (0.5 to 1000 μg ml(-1)) compared with the traditional BCA assay. The universal applicability of our method to various proteins further proves its potential in practical applications. PMID:26669539

  14. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  15. The Influence of Low-Level Laser on Osseointegration Around Machined and Sandblasted Acid-Etched Implants: A Removal Torque and Histomorphometric Analyses.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Eduardo Rolim; Torres, Marco Antônio Rambo Osório; Meyer, Kleber Ricardo Monteiro; Zani, Sabrina Rebollo; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai; Grossi, Márcio Lima

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the influence of laser application on osseointegration around implants with different surface characteristics is limited. This study aims to evaluate the influence of low-level lasers on the early stages of osseointegration. Ninety-six external hex implants (3.75 mm × 5.0 mm) were placed in 24 rabbits-one machined and one sandblasted acid-etched per tibia. The rabbits were later divided into the laser group, which received a total dose of 24 J/cm(2) of gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser over 15 days, and a control group. At 16 and 30 days after surgery, removal torque and histomorphometric analyses were performed. No statistical differences in removal torque or histomorphometric analyses were verified between laser and control groups regardless of implant surface (P > .05). Time was the only variable presenting significant differences between measurements (P < .05). Low-level laser had no significant short-term effect on bone-to-implant contact and removal torque values regardless of implant surface characteristics. PMID:23834724

  16. Comparison of alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on different Ti surfaces: modified sandblasted with large grit and acid-etched (MSLA), laser-treated, and laser and acid-treated Ti surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jie; Kim, So-Nam

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant surface treatment on cell differentiation of osteoblast cells. For this purpose, three surfaces were compared: (1) a modified SLA (MSLA: sand-blasted with large grit, acid-etched, and immersed in 0.9% NaCl), (2) a laser treatment (LT: laser treatment) titanium surface and (3) a laser and acid-treated (LAT: laser treatment, acid-etched) titanium surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS The MSLA surfaces were considered as the control group, and LT and LAT surfaces as test groups. Alkaline phosphatase expression (ALP) was used to quantify osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell. Surface roughness was evaluated by a contact profilometer (URFPAK-SV; Mitutoyo, Kawasaki, Japan) and characterized by two parameters: mean roughness (Ra) and maximum peak-to-valley height (Rt). RESULTS Scanning electron microscope revealed that MSLA (control group) surface was not as rough as LT, LAT surface (test groups). Alkaline phosphatase expression, the measure of osteoblastic differentiation, and total ALP expression by surface-adherent cells were found to be highest at 21 days for all three surfaces tested (P<.05). Furthermore, ALP expression levels of MSLA and LAT surfaces were significantly higher than expression levels of LT surface-adherent cells at 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively (P<.05). However, ALP expression levels between MSLA and LAT surface were equal at 7, 14, and 21 days (P>.05). CONCLUSION This study suggested that MSLA and LAT surfaces exhibited more favorable environment for osteoblast differentiation when compared with LT surface, the results that are important for implant surface modification studies. PMID:27350860

  17. Structural and dynamical studies of acid-mediated conversion in amorphous-calcium-phosphate based dental composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Skrtic, Drago; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Kathleen M.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2014-07-28

    Our objective was to investigate the complex structural and dynamical conversion process of the amorphous-calcium-phosphate (ACP)-to-apatite transition in ACP based dental composite materials. Composite disks were prepared using zirconia hybridized ACP fillers (0.4 mass fraction) and photo-activated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin (0.6 mass fraction). We performed an investigation of the solution-mediated ACP-to-apatite conversion mechanism in controlled acidic aqueous environment with in situ ultra-small angle X-ray scattering based coherent X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray diffraction, as well as other complementary techniques. We established that the ACP-to-apatite conversion in ACP composites is a two-step process, owing to the sensitivity to local structural changes provided by coherent X-rays. Initially, ACP undergoes a local microstructural rearrangement without losing its amorphous character. We established the catalytic role of the acid and found the time scale of this rearrangement strongly depends on the pH of the solution, which agrees with previous findings about ACP without the polymer matrix being present. In the second step, ACP is converted to an apatitic form with the crystallinity of the formed crystallites being poor. Separately, we also confirmed that in the regular Zr-modified ACP the rate of ACP conversion to hydroxyapatite is slowed significantly compared to unmodified ACP, which is beneficial for targeted slow release of functional calcium and phosphate ions from dental composite materials. Significantly, for the first time, we were able to follow the complete solution-mediated transition process from ACP to apatite in this class of dental composites in a controlled aqueous environment. A two-step process, suggested previously, was conclusively identified.

  18. Structural and dynamical studies of acid-mediated conversion in amorphous-calcium-phosphate based dental composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Skrtic, Drago; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Kathleen M.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2014-07-28

    Our objective was to investigate the complex structural and dynamical conversion process of the amorphous-calcium-phosphate (ACP)-to-apatite transition in ACP based dental composite materials. Composite disks were prepared using zirconia hybridized ACP fillers (0.4 mass fraction) and photo-activated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin (0.6 mass fraction). We performed an investigation of the solution-mediated ACP-to-apatite conversion mechanism in controlled acidic aqueous environment with in situ ultra-small angle X-ray scattering based coherent X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray diffraction, as well as other complementary techniques. We established that the ACP-to-apatite conversion in ACP composites is a two-step process, owing to the sensitivity to localmore » structural changes provided by coherent X-rays. Initially, ACP undergoes a local microstructural rearrangement without losing its amorphous character. We established the catalytic role of the acid and found the time scale of this rearrangement strongly depends on the pH of the solution, which agrees with previous findings about ACP without the polymer matrix being present. In the second step, ACP is converted to an apatitic form with the crystallinity of the formed crystallites being poor. Separately, we also confirmed that in the regular Zr-modified ACP the rate of ACP conversion to hydroxyapatite is slowed significantly compared to unmodified ACP, which is beneficial for targeted slow release of functional calcium and phosphate ions from dental composite materials. Significantly, for the first time, we were able to follow the complete solution-mediated transition process from ACP to apatite in this class of dental composites in a controlled aqueous environment. A two-step process, suggested previously, was conclusively identified.« less

  19. Structural and dynamical studies of acid-mediated conversion in amorphous-calcium-phosphate based dental composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Skrtic, Drago; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Kathleen M.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the complex structural and dynamical conversion process of the amorphous-calcium-phosphate (ACP) -to-apatite transition in ACP based dental composite materials. Methods Composite disks were prepared using zirconia hybridized ACP fillers (0.4 mass fraction) and photo-activated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin (0.6 mass fraction). We performed an investigation of the solution-mediated ACP-to-apatite conversion mechanism in controlled acidic aqueous environment with in situ ultra-small angle X-ray scattering based coherent X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and ex situ X-ray diffraction, as well as other complementary techniques. Results We established that the ACP-to-apatite conversion in ACP composites is a two-step process, owing to the sensitivity to local structural changes provided by coherent X-rays. Initially, ACP undergoes a local microstructural rearrangement without losing its amorphous character. We established the catalytic role of the acid and found the time scale of this rearrangement strongly depends on the pH of the solution, which agrees with previous findings about ACP without the polymer matrix being present. In the second step, ACP is converted to an apatitic form with the crystallinity of the formed crystallites being poor. Separately, we also confirmed that in the regular Zr-modified ACP the rate of ACP conversion to hydroxyapatite is slowed significantly compared to unmodified ACP, which is beneficial for targeted slow release of functional calcium and phosphate ions from dental composite materials. Significance For the first time, we were able to follow the complete solution-mediated transition process from ACP to apatite in this class of dental composites in a controlled aqueous environment. A two-step process, suggested previously, was conclusively identified. PMID:25082155

  20. Alkaline etch system qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the data from this qualification activity, the Atotech etch system, even with minimum characterization, was capable of etching production printed circuit products as good as those from the Chemcut system. Further characterization of the Atotech system will improve its etching capability. In addition to the improved etch quality expected from further characterization, the Atotech etch system has additional features that help reduce waste and provide for better consistency in the etching process. The programmable logic controller and computer will allow operators to operate the system manually or from pre-established recipes. The evidence and capabilities of the Atotech system made it as good as or better than the Chemcut system for etching WR products. The Printed Wiring Board Engineering Department recommended that the Atotech system be released for production. In December 1995, the Atotech system was formerly qualified for production.

  1. Regulation of Osteoblast Differentiation by Acid-Etched and/or Grit-Blasted Titanium Substrate Topography Is Enhanced by 1,25(OH)2D3 in a Sex-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed contributions of micron-scale topography on clinically relevant titanium (Ti) to differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts; the interaction of this effect with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3); and if the effects are sex-dependent. Male and female rat bone marrow cells (BMCs) were cultured on acid-etched (A, R a = 0.87 μm), grit-blasted (GB, R a = 3.90 μm), or grit-blasted/acid-etched (SLA, R a = 3.22 μm) Ti. BMCs were sensitive to surface topography and underwent osteoblast differentiation. This was greatest on SLA; acid etching and grit blasting contributed additively. Primary osteoblasts were also sensitive to SLA, with less effect from individual structural components, demonstrated by enhanced local factor production. Sex-dependent responses of BMCs to topography varied with parameter whereas male and female osteoblasts responded similarly to surface treatment. 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced cell responses on all surfaces similarly. Effects were sex-dependent and male cells grown on a complex microstructured surface were much more sensitive than female cells. These results indicate that effects of the complex SLA topography are greater than acid etching or grit blasting alone on multipotent BMCs and committed osteoblasts and that individual parameters are sex-specific. The effect of 1α,25(OH)2D3 was sex dependent. The results also suggest that levels of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the patient may be important in osseointegration. PMID:25945332

  2. Influence of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, K; Finger, W; Hannig, M

    1992-06-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the erosive effect of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. In order to standardize the specimens and to improve comparability the dental enamel and dentine were superficially abraded. The enamel and dentine specimens were therefore particularly sensitive to the influences of acid agents. Concentrated solution of buffered chewable ASA tablets (500 mg ASA and 300 mg calcium carbonate in 5 ml water) showed no changes in the enamel surface structure after exposure times of 1 min, 5 min and 60 min. In contrast, minimal corrosive effects were already seen after exposure of the enamel surface to the unbuffered ASA solutions for 1 min. After exposure times of 5 min and 60 min erosion of the enamel was more pronounced. Immersion in the unbuffered ASA solution led to clearly visible micromorphological changes on the dentine surfaces even after exposure for 1 min. Exposure of the dentine specimens to the buffered ASA solutions led to only very slight changes in the surface morphology. Therefore, the scanning electron micrograph after exposure to buffered ASA is comparable to the picture of untreated dentine. PMID:1513188

  3. Uptake and retention of aluminum by dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kleber, C J; Putt, M S

    1985-12-01

    The uptake, depth of penetration, and retention of aluminum (Al) in sound and acid-etched dental enamel were determined following in vitro applications of solutions containing 0.005 M or 0.037 M Al. Compared with controls, significant amounts of Al uptake (approximately 2000 to 6000 ppm) were detected in both sound and etched enamel, with significantly more Al deposited in the latter. Analysis of successive layers of treated enamel demonstrated that Al was located predominantly within the first 20 microns of surface enamel. Only slight reductions in Al retention occurred following one week of water-soaking or one minute of brushing with water or dentifrice, indicating that Al was firmly bound by enamel. PMID:3865947

  4. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  5. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  6. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  7. Sputtered gold mask for deep chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisciotta, B. P.; Gross, C.; Olive, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Sputtered mask resists chemical attack from acid and has adherence to withstand prolonged submergence in etch solution without lifting from silicon surface. Even under prolonged etch conditions with significant undercutting, gold mask maintained excellent adhesion to silicon surface and imperviousness to acid.

  8. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Howard; Duda, Anna; Ginley, David S.; Yost, Vernon; Meier, Daniel; Ward, James S.

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  9. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  10. Comparison of single-dose ibuprofen lysine, acetylsalicylic acid, and placebo for moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S L; Brahim, J S; Korn, S H; Greene, S S; Suchower, L J

    1994-01-01

    In a single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study, ibuprofen lysine 200 mg (IBL 200) was compared with acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg (ASA 500) and placebo in 183 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, duration and degree of analgesia, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, global evaluation, and requirement for additional analgesic medication; both IBL 200 and ASA 500 were significantly more effective than placebo. IBL 200 also had a significantly faster onset of action, greater peak and overall analgesic effect, and longer duration of analgesia than ASA 500. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:7923312

  11. Ion-Assisted Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Daniel; Abraham-Shrauner, Barbara

    1996-11-01

    We analyze plasma etching of two-dimensional, long trenches where directed ions modeled by drifted Maxwellian distribution functions and isotropic neutral molecules contribute to the etch rate. Analytic expressions for the etch rates enable the user to plot the etch profiles by using standard computer packages for nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations for the point and its slope. First, etch profiles are shown for ion-assisted etching where the thermal etching of the neutrals is enhanced by the ions. Second, we show etch profiles of a multiple layer device where one layer is n-type silicon (arsenic doped) that etches isotropically (G.S. Oehrlein, "Reactive Ion Etching," Handbook of Plasma Processing, Technology, Ed. S.M. Rossnagel, et al., Noyes Pub., NJ, 1990) The etch rates for the other layers are in the ion flux-limited regime. The lateral etching of the n-type silicon illustrates the necessity of sidewall passivation for this structure.

  12. In vitro bioactivity assessment of composite membrane containing antimicrobial lauric acid for guided bone regeneration in dental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Muhammad Jabir; Kalitheertha, Jamuna Thevi; Sabri, Siti Noorzidah

    2015-07-01

    The manuscript reflect research work in fabrication of a triple layered composite membrane and to perform an in vitro bioactivity evaluation on composite membrane containing antimicrobial lauric acid. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) matrix was incorporated with various amounts of nanoapatite (NAp) and lauric acid (LA) to form a triple-layered composite membrane. This membrane was prepared using a single step fabrication technique comprising of solvent casting, thermally induced phase separation and solvent leaching processes. Apatite mineralization was detected on the composite membranes within 30 days of exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) and showed increased apatite formation at 30-60wt% of NAp content in the PLGA matrix on layer 3 (L3), that has the highest amount of NAp compared with layer 1 (L1) and layer 2 (L2) of the membrane. However, apatite mineralization was not detected on pure PLGA membrane. In addition, incorporation of LA on L1 and L2 has no influence on apatite mineral formation as none detected on these surfaces. The presence of NAp determines the formation of apatite crystals on the composite membrane. These membranes with triple layered design and bioactive properties showed potential use for guided bone regeneration purposes in dental application.

  13. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  14. Excimer Laser Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Longmire, Hu Foster; Rouleau, Christopher M; Gray, Allison S

    2008-04-01

    Excimer laser radiation at a wavelength of = 248 nm represents a new etching method for the preparation of metallographic specimens. The method is shown to be particularly effective for enhancing the contrast between different phases in a multiphase metallographic specimen.

  15. Characterization of deep wet etching of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen, Bangtao; Tay, Francis E. H.; Xu, Guolin; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of wet etching of glass in HF-based solutions with a focus on etching rate, masking layers and quality of the generated surface. The first important factor that affects the deep wet etching process is the glass composition. The presence of oxides such as CaO, MgO or Al IIO 3 that give insoluble products after reaction with HF can generate rough surface and modify the etching rate. A second factor that influences especially the etch rate is the annealing process (560°C / 6 hours in N II environment). For annealed glass samples an increase of the etch rate with 50-60% was achieved. Another important factor is the concentration of the HF solution. For deep wet etching of Pyrex glass in hydrofluoric acid solution, different masking layers such as Cr/Au, PECVD amorphous silicon, LPCVD polysilicon and silicon carbide are analyzed. Detailed studies show that the stress in the masking layer is a critical factor for deep wet etching of glass. A low value of compressive stress is recommended. High value of tensile stress in the masking layer (200-300 MPa) can be an important factor in the generation of the pinholes. Another factor is the surface hydrophilicity. A hydrophobic surface of the masking layer will prevent the etching solution from flowing through the deposition defects (micro/nano channels or cracks) and the generation of pinholes is reduced. The stress gradient in the masking layer can also be an important factor in generation of the notching defects on the edges. Using these considerations a special multilayer masks Cr/Au/Photoresist (AZ7220) and amorphous silicon/silicon carbide/Photoresist were fabricated for deep wet etching of a 500 μm and 1mm-thick respectively Pyrex glass wafers. In both cases the etching was performed through wafer. From our knowledge these are the best results reported in the literature. The quality of the generated surface is another important factor in the fabrication process. We notice that the

  16. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  17. Surface treatment agent for dental metals using a thiirane monomer and a phosphoric acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2002-06-01

    To develop a new surface treatment agent which improves the bond strength of adhesive resin to both non-precious and precious metals, experimental treatment agents containing both an adhesive bonding promoter for precious metals and one for non-precious metals were prepared by dissolving epithioalkyl methacrylate (EP3MA or EP8MA) and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) in acetone. The surfaces of dental metals were treated by the treatment agents and metal specimens were butt-jointed together with MMA-PMMA resins. After 2,000 thermal cyclings in water at temperatures of 4 and 60 degrees C, tensile bond strengths were measured. The effectiveness of surface treatments was evaluated by tensile bond strengths and microscopic failure mode analysis after the tensile test. The combined treatment of EP3MA-MDP or EP8MA-MDP was used effectively for non-precious metals as well as precious metals, and was shown to be extremely effective compared with the single treatment of EP3MA, EP8MA, or MDP. PMID:12238784

  18. An investigation using atomic force microscopy nanoindentation of dental enamel demineralization as a function of undissociated acid concentration and differential buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michele E.; Shellis, R. Peter

    2007-02-01

    Acidic drinks and foodstuffs can demineralize dental hard tissues, leading to a pathological condition known as dental erosion, which is of increasing clinical concern. The first step in enamel dissolution is a demineralization of the outer few micrometres of tissue, which results in a softening of the structure. The primary determinant of dissolution rate is pH, but the concentration of undissociated acid, which is related to buffer capacity, also appears to be important. In this study, atomic force microscopy nanoindentation was used to measure the first initial demineralization (softening) induced within 1 min by exposure to solutions with a range of undissociated acid concentration and natural pH of 3.3 or with an undissociated acid concentration of 10 mmol l-1 and pH adjusted to 3.3. The results indicate that differential buffering capacity is a better determinant of softening than undissociated acid concentration. Under the conditions of these experiments, a buffer capacity of >3 mmol l-1 pH-1 does not have any further effect on dissolution rate. These results imply that differential buffering capacity should be used for preference over undissociated acid concentration or titratable acidity, which are more commonly employed in the literature.

  19. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  20. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. PMID:23266005

  1. Effect of organic acids in dental biofilm on microhardness of a silorane-based composite

    PubMed Central

    Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal; Talebi, Mohammad; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of lactic acid and acetic acid on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite compared to two methacrylate-based composite resins. Materials and Methods Thirty disc-shaped specimens each were fabricated of Filtek P90, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z350XT. After measuring of Vickers microhardness, they were randomly divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) and immersed in lactic acid, acetic acid or distilled water. Microhardness was measured after 48 hr and 7 day of immersion. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05). The surfaces of two additional specimens were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after immersion. Results All groups showed a reduction in microhardness after 7 day of immersion (p < 0.001). At baseline and 7 day, the microhardness of Z250 was the greatest, followed by Z350 and P90 (p < 0.001). At 48 hr, the microhardness values of Z250 and Z350 were greater than P90 (p < 0.001 for both), but those of Z250 and Z350 were not significantly different (p = 0.095). Also, the effect of storage media on microhardness was not significant at baseline, but significant at 48 hr and after 7 day (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Lactic acid had the greatest effect. Conclusions The microhardness of composites decreased after 7 day of immersion. The microhardness of P90 was lower than that of other composites. Lactic acid caused a greater reduction in microhardness compared to other solutions. PMID:26295021

  2. Influence of poly-L-lactic acid scaffold's pore size on the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Conde, Cristian Muniz; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Casagrande, Luciano; Alcazar, José Carlos; Nör, Jacques Eduardo; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA)-based scaffold's pore size on the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The scaffolds were prepared in pulp chambers of 1-mm-thick tooth slices from third molars using salt crystals (150-250 µm or 251-450 µm) as porogen. DPSC (1x105 cells) were seeded in the scaffolds with different pore sizes, and cultured in 24-well plates. The cell proliferation was evaluated using the WST-1 assay after 3-21 days. Furthermore, RT-PCR was used to assess the differentiation of the DPSCs into odontoblasts, using markers of odontoblastic differentiation (DSPP, DSP-1 and MEPE). RNA from human odontoblasts was used as control. Cell proliferation rate was similar in both scaffolds except at the 14th day period, in which the cells seeded in the scaffolds with larger pores showed higher proliferation (p<0.05). After 21 days DPSCs seeded in both evaluated scaffolds were able of expressing odontoblastic markers DMP-1, DSPP and MEPE. In summary, both scaffolds tested in this study allowed the proliferation and differentiation of DPSCs into odontoblast-like cells. PMID:25831096

  3. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries. PMID:24026951

  4. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  5. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). When enamel and dentin interfaces were evaluated separately, (1) for the Self-Etch adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P < 0.0001); (2) for the Etch and Rinse adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives. PMID:22675358

  6. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Patrícia T.; Ferreira, João C.; Oliveira, Sofia A.; Azevedo, Álvaro F.; Dias, Walter R.; Melo, Paulo R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Aims: Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. Subjects and Methods: One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15) and to enamel morphology analysis (n = 5) after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I – 37% phosphoric acid (PA)+ ExciTE®; Group II – ExciTE®; Group III – AdheSE® self-etching; Group IV – FuturaBond® no-rinse. NR; Group V – Xeno® V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (P < 0.05). For the morphology evaluation, specimens were immersed in Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the etching pattern analyzed under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Results: Mean bond strengths were Group I – 47.17 ± 1.61 MPa (type I etching pattern); Group II – 32.56 ± 1.64 MPa, Group III – 29.10 ± 1.34 MPa, Group IV – 23.32 ± 1.53 MPa (type III etching pattern); Group V – 24.43 MPa ± 1.55 (type II etching pattern). Conclusions: Different adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE® and ExciTE® without condition with PA. FuturaBond® NR and Xeno® V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used. PMID:23853447

  7. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  8. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  9. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  10. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  11. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Etching by the Total Etch and Self-etch Dentin Bonding Systems in the Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaugule, Vishwas; Katge, Farhin; Poojari, Manohar; Pujari, Prashant; Pammi, Thejokrishna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Early childhood caries is now affecting the children in dangerous proportions. There is a wide spread loss of the tooth material irrespective of the type of the carious lesion. Restoration of such lesions with a strong permanent bond between the dental tissues and the restorative dental materials would be a highly desirable requisite. Ultramorphological characterizations show that the interfacial morphology and the chemical characterization of the bonding systems appear to be strongly associated with each other and, therefore, observing and understanding the interfacial phenomenon and its quality would be of great importance in the selection of a dental adhesive for its use in pediatric restorative dentistry. Study design: Human primary molars, which were indicated for extraction, for an array of reasons like caries, normal exfoliation, pathological root resorption, over-retained and serial extraction, were collected for the study purpose. Total number of teeth was then equally distributed into two subgroups, each namely A1 (Prime and Bond NT) and A2 (Xeno III). Results: The type of etching pattern that was observed in group A1 (Prime and Bond NT) of Silverstone’s type II compared to the Silverstone’s type III observed in group A2 (Xeno III). Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the use of an etchant separately followed by the application of the bonding system–Prime and Bond NT–would provide a better quality of adhesion thus improving the quality and longevity of the restoration done within the limits of enamel in primary dentition. How to cite this article: Mithiborwala SH, Chaugule V, Katge F, Poojari M, Pujari P, Pammi T. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Etching by the Total Etch and Self-etch Dentin Bonding Systems in the Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):30-36. PMID:26124578

  13. Effect of additional etching and ethanol-wet bonding on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joonghee; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the effects of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives with different compositions and pH. The effect of ethanol wetting on etched dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives was also evaluated. Materials and Methods Forty-two human permanent molars were classified into 21 groups according to the adhesive types (Clearfil SE Bond [SE, control]; G-aenial Bond [GB]; Xeno V [XV]; Beauti Bond [BB]; Adper Easy Bond [AE]; Single Bond Universal [SU]; All Bond Universal [AU]), and the dentin conditioning methods. Composite resins were placed on the dentin surfaces, and the teeth were sectioned. The microtensile bond strength was measured, and the failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined. The data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test. Results In GB, XV and SE (pH ≤ 2), the bond strength was decreased significantly when the dentin was etched (p < 0.05). In BB, AE and SU (pH 2.4 - 2.7), additional etching did not affect the bond strength (p > 0.05). In AU (pH = 3.2), additional etching increased the bond strength significantly (p < 0.05). When adhesives were applied to the acid etched dentin with ethanol-wet bonding, the bond strength was significantly higher than that of the no ethanol-wet bonding groups, and the incidence of cohesive failure was increased. Conclusions The effect of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength was influenced by the pH of one-step self-etch adhesives. Ethanol wetting on etched dentin could create a stronger bonding performance of one-step self-etch adhesives for acid etched dentin. PMID:25671215

  14. Efficacy of tranexamic acid mouthwash as an alternative for factor replacement in gingival bleeding during dental scaling in cases of hemophilia: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Gaddam, Kumar Raja; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the following study is to evaluate freshly prepared tranexamic acid mouth wash (FTAMW) as an alternative to factor replacement therapy (FRT) in controlling gingival bleeding in hemophiliacs during dental scaling. Materials and Methods: Experimental treatment regime (ETR) involved saline transfusion followed by FTAMW and the control treatment regime (CTR) involved FRT followed by placebo mouthwash. A total of 22 hemophiliacs randomly received dental scaling under either CTR or ETR at two different visits, following a split mouth design. They were instructed to use the rendered mouthwash 4 times a day for 5 days and record the mouthwash usage and bleeding episodes in a logbook. The difference in the bleeding episodes was analyzed using Chi-square test with the level of significance predetermined at 0.05. Results: Totally 19 patients completed the study. Seven patients reported no bleeding either in ETR or CTR; five patients noticed bleeding in CTR, but not in ETR. Three patients noticed bleeding in ETR, but not in CTR. Patients reported ease in usage and cost-effectiveness of ETR. Conclusion: FTAMW was found to be an effective alternative to FRT in controlling gingival hemorrhage in hemophiliacs during dental scaling. PMID:24808695

  15. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. PMID:24268263

  16. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  17. In vivo effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine and zinc ions on acid formation by dental plaque and salivary mutans streptococcus counts in patients with irradiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Giertsen, E; Scheie, A A

    1993-10-01

    Irradiation therapy including major salivary glands may result in xerostomia and enhanced susceptibility to dental caries. The present aim was to assess the ability of mouthrinses with F-, Zn2+, and chlorhexidine (CH), in various combinations, to reduce acidogenic potential of dental plaque and salivary mutans streptococcus counts (SMSC) in 7 patients with xerostomia secondary to irradiation. The patients rinsed twice daily for 3 weeks with the following test solutions: (1) 12 mmol/l NaF (F; control), (2) NaF + 20 mmol/l ZnCl2 (F-Zn), and (3) NaF + 1.1 mmol/l CH (F-CH). Resting periods (F) of varying lengths were incorporated. Acid formation by dental plaque was monitored as plaque pH response to a sucrose mouthrinse, at the end of each test period, 4 h after mouthrinsing with test solution. Plaque pH was measured repeatedly at 2-8 sites in each patient before, and up to 60 min after the sucrose mouthrinse using touch microelectrodes. SMSC were determined using Dentocult SM-Strip mutans. Compared with F, F-CH significantly (P < or = 0.02) reduced acid formation by plaque and SMSC, whereas F-Zn did not affect acid formation or SMSC significantly. Pilot experiments in 4 patients showed mouthrinses with NaF + 0.55 mmol/l CH + 10 mmol/l Zn2+ to be ineffective, whereas NaF + 2.2 mmol/l CH was highly effective, but no better than F-CH. Twice daily mouthrinses with 12 mmol/l NaF in combination with 1.1 mmol/l CH may be an effective regimen to prevent post-irradiation caries. PMID:11706427

  18. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  19. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  20. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  1. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M. P.; Hihn, J. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  2. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  3. Effects of heating by steam autoclaving and Er:YAG laser etching on dentin components.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo S; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima A A; Santo, Ana Maria E; Martin, Airton A

    2011-09-01

    The simultaneous need for infection-control protocols in sample preparations and for safe laser irradiation parameters prompted this study about the effects of heat produced by both sample sterilization and laser etching on dentin components. The dentin was exposed on 30 bovine incisors, and then divided into two main groups: autoclaved (group A) or thymol treatment (group B). The surface of the dentin was schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control-CG) or irradiated with Er:YAG laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Elemental distribution maps were done by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (μ-EDXRF) on each treatment area. The dentin surface in depth was exposed and line-scan maps were performed. The B_CG treatment produced the best distribution of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content throughout the dentin surface. Er:YAG laser etching produced irregular patterns of elemental distribution in the dentin. Laser energies of 120 and 180 mJ produced the highest maximum calcium values. The Er:YAG laser energy of 180 mJ produced a localized increase in Ca and P content on the superficial layer of the dentin (∼ 0-0.10 mm). The autoclaving treatment of samples in experiments is not recommended since it produced damaging effects on dentin components. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced a heterogeneous Ca and P distribution throughout the dentin surface with areas of increased Ca concentration, and this may affect clinically the permeability, solubility, or adhesive characteristics of dental hard tissues with restorative procedures. PMID:20625787

  4. Evaluation of the CO2 laser for porcelain laminate etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypel, T. S.; Zakariasen, Kenneth L.

    1994-09-01

    Research has shown that CO2 laser energy can both fuse and etch enamel, the effect being dependent on the exposure parameters utilized. Such energy can also fuse dental porcelains, but it is not known whether porcelain can be etched by CO2 laser. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether CO2 laser energy can be utilized to etch porcelain laminates, an effect necessary for resin bonding. Porcelain laminate disks 10 mm in diameter were prepared. The disks were each numbered and divided into quadrants with a small carbide high speed bur. Six disks were utilized, each quadrant receiving a single laser exposure for a total of 24 exposures. Each exposure was at either 10 or 15 W for .01, .05, or .10 seconds, with a focal spot of either 0.8 or 0.35 mm. This range of exposures includes those exposures which cause enamel etching. Two exposures were made at each combination of exposure parameters. Each disk was prepared for scanning electron microscopy and viewed at 75X to examine the exposure sites. All 24 exposure sites were examined and no definite etching was observed.

  5. Etching of enamel for direct bonding with a thulium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabaş Sarp, Ayşe S.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-03-01

    Background: Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding can decrease the risk of surface enamel loss and demineralization which are the adverse effects of acid etching technique. However, in excess of +5.5°C can cause irreversible pulpal responses. In this study, a 1940- nm Thulium Fiber Laser in CW mode was used for laser etching. Aim: Determination of the suitable Laser parameters of enamel surface etching for direct bonding of ceramic brackets and keeping that intrapulpal temperature changes below the threshold value. Material and Method: Polycrystalline ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded on bovine teeth by using 2 different kinds of etching techniques: Acid and Laser Etching. In addition to these 3 etched groups, there was also a group which was bonded without etching. Brackets were debonded with a material testing machine. Breaking time and the load at the breaking point were measured. Intrapulpal temperature changes were recorded by a K-type Thermocouple. For all laser groups, intrapulpal temperature rise was below the threshold value of 5.5°C. Results and Conclusion: Acid-etched group ( 11.73 MPa) significantly required more debonding force than 3- second- irradiated ( 5.03 MPa) and non-etched groups ( 3.4 MPa) but the results of acid etched group and 4- second- irradiated group (7.5 MPa) showed no significant difference. Moreover, 4- second irradiated group was over the minimum acceptable value for clinical use. Also, 3- second lasing caused a significant reduction in time according to acid-etch group. As a result, 1940- nm laser irradiation is a promising method for laser etching.

  6. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yae, Shinji; Morii, Yuma; Fukumuro, Naoki; Matsuda, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium.

  7. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium. PMID:22738277

  8. Selective Etching of Semiconductor Glassivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, N.

    1982-01-01

    Selective etching technique removes portions of glassivation on a semi-conductor die for failure analysis or repairs. A periodontal needle attached to a plastic syringe is moved by a microprobe. Syringe is filled with a glass etch. A drop of hexane and vacuum pump oil is placed on microcircuit die and hexane is allowed to evaporate leaving a thin film of oil. Microprobe brings needle into contact with area of die to be etched.

  9. Formation of nanostructured silicon surfaces by stain etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of ordered silicon structures by chemical etching of silicon in vanadium oxide (V2O5)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The effects of the different etching parameters including the solution concentration, temperature, and the presence of metal catalyst film deposition (Pd) on the morphologies and reflective properties of the etched Si surfaces were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to explore the morphologies of the etched surfaces with and without the presence of catalyst. In this case, the attack on the surfaces with a palladium deposit begins by creating uniform circular pores on silicon in which we distinguish the formation of pyramidal structures of silicon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrates that the surfaces are H-terminated. A UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer was used to study the reflectance of the structures obtained. A reflectance of 2.21% from the etched Si surfaces in the wavelength range of 400 to 1,000 nm was obtained after 120 min of etching while it is of 4.33% from the Pd/Si surfaces etched for 15 min. PMID:25435830

  10. Formation of nanostructured silicon surfaces by stain etching.

    PubMed

    Ayat, Maha; Belhousse, Samia; Boarino, Luca; Gabouze, Noureddine; Boukherroub, Rabah; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of ordered silicon structures by chemical etching of silicon in vanadium oxide (V2O5)/hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution. The effects of the different etching parameters including the solution concentration, temperature, and the presence of metal catalyst film deposition (Pd) on the morphologies and reflective properties of the etched Si surfaces were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to explore the morphologies of the etched surfaces with and without the presence of catalyst. In this case, the attack on the surfaces with a palladium deposit begins by creating uniform circular pores on silicon in which we distinguish the formation of pyramidal structures of silicon. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrates that the surfaces are H-terminated. A UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer was used to study the reflectance of the structures obtained. A reflectance of 2.21% from the etched Si surfaces in the wavelength range of 400 to 1,000 nm was obtained after 120 min of etching while it is of 4.33% from the Pd/Si surfaces etched for 15 min. PMID:25435830

  11. The odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells on nanofibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Xiaohua; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Haiyun; Hu, Jiang; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on nanofibrous (NF)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Highly porous NF-PLLA scaffolds which mimic the architecture of collagen type I fibers were fabricated by the combination of a phase-separation technique and a porogen-leaching method. The human DPSCs were then seeded onto the scaffolds and cultured in different media for odontogenic differentiation: "Control" medium without supplements; "DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M dexamethasone (DXM), 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid and 5mM beta-glycerophosphate; "BMP-7+DXM" medium containing 10(-8)M DXM, 50 microgml(-1) ascorbic acid, 5mM beta-glycerophosphate plus 50 ngml(-1) bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7). For odontogenic differentiation study in vitro, alkaline phosphatase activity quantification, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, scanning electron microscopy, von Kossa staining and calcium content quantification were carried out. While both "DXM" medium and "BMP-7+DXM" medium induced the DPSCs to odontoblast-like cells, the "BMP-7+DXM" medium had greater inducing capacity than the "DXM" medium. Consistent with the in vitro studies, the "BMP-7+DXM" group presented more extracellular matrix and hard tissue formation than the "DXM" group after 8 weeks of ectopic implantation in nude mice. Differentiation of DPSCs into odontoblast-like cells was identified by the positive immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs can be achieved on NF-PLLA scaffolds both in vitro and in vivo; the combination of BMP-7 and DXM induced the odontogenic differentiation more effectively than DXM alone. The NF-PLLA scaffold and the combined odontogenic inductive factors provide excellent environment for DPSCs to regenerate dental pulp and dentin. PMID:20406702

  12. Individualized Learning Package about Etching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Michael J.

    An individualized learning package provides step-by-step instruction in the fundamentals of the etching process. Thirteen specific behavioral objectives are listed. A pretest, consisting of matching 15 etching terms with their definitions, is provided along with an answer key. The remainder of the learning package teaches the 13 steps of the…

  13. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  14. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition with Valproic Acid Downregulates Osteocalcin Gene Expression in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Osteoblasts: Evidence for HDAC2 Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Francesca; la Noce, Marcel; Tirino, Virginia; Naddeo, Pasqualina; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; De Rosa, Alfredo; Laino, Luigi; Altucci, Lucia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells, are of great interest for cell-based tissue engineering strategies because they can differentiate into a variety of tissue-specific cells, above all, into osteoblasts. In recent years, epigenetic studies on stem cells have indicated that specific histone alterations and modifying enzymes play essential roles in cell differentiation. However, although several studies have reported that valproic acid (VPA)—a selective inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDAC)—enhances osteoblast differentiation, data on osteocalcin expression—a late-stage marker of differentiation—are limited. We therefore decided to study the effect of VPA on dental pulp stem cell differentiation. A low concentration of VPA did not reduce cell viability, proliferation, or cell cycle profile. However, it was sufficient to significantly enhance matrix mineralization by increasing osteopontin and bone sialoprotein expression. In contrast, osteocalcin levels were decreased, an effect induced at the transcriptional level, and were strongly correlated with inhibition of HDAC2. In fact, HDAC2 silencing with shRNA produced a similar effect to that of VPA treatment on the expression of osteoblast-related markers. We conclude that VPA does not induce terminal differentiation of osteoblasts, but stimulates the generation of less mature cells. Moreover, specific suppression of an individual HDAC by RNA interference could enhance only a single aspect of osteoblast differentiation, and thus produce selective effects. PMID:24105979

  16. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  17. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  18. Glucosyltransferase inactivation reduces dental caries.

    PubMed

    Devulapalle, K S; Mooser, G

    2001-02-01

    Dental caries has been an intractable disease in spite of intense dental research. The metabolic acids produced by mutans streptococci demineralize the tooth surface and lead to dental caries. The enzyme glucosyltransferase (GTF) produced by mutans streptococci is the key factor in this process. Oral bacterial GTFs use sucrose as a substrate in synthesis of either water-soluble or insoluble glucans. In this investigation, kinetic studies with divalent metal ions revealed their strong binding affinity to GTF. The metal ions also proved to be strong inhibitors of the enzyme. Here we describe a simple method of inactivating the enzyme that actively participates in dental caries by taking advantage of a Fenton reaction which requires metal ions such as iron or copper and peroxide. The hydroxyl radical ions produced via the Fenton reaction inactivate GTF, a factor in the production of dental caries. PMID:11332534

  19. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.; Contolini, Robert J.; Liberman, Vladimir; Morse, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  20. Improvement in etching rate for epilayer lift-off with surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan-Lei; Horng, Ray-Hua; Lu, Jian-Heng; Chen, Chun-Li; Kao, Yu-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the GaAs epilayer is quickly separated from GaAs substrate by epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process with mixture etchant solution. The HF solution mixes with surfactant as mixture etchant solution to etch AlAs sacrificial layer for the selective wet etching of AlAs sacrificial layer. Addiction surfactants etchant significantly enhance the etching rate in the hydrofluoric acid etching solution. It is because surfactant provides hydrophilicity to change the contact angle with enhances the fluid properties of the mixture etchant between GaAs epilayer and GaAs substrate. Arsine gas was released from the etchant solution because the critical reaction product in semiconductor etching is dissolved arsine gas. Arsine gas forms a bubble, which easily displaces the etchant solution, before the AlAs layer was undercut. The results showed that acetone and hydrofluoric acid ratio of about 1:1 for the fastest etching rate of 13.2 μm / min. The etching rate increases about 4 times compared with pure hydrofluoric acid, moreover can shorten the separation time about 70% of GaAs epilayer with GaAs substrate. The results indicate that etching ratio and stability are improved by mixture etchant solution. It is not only saving the epilayer and the etching solution exposure time, but also reducing the damage to the epilayer structure.

  1. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  2. Dentin bonding performance using Weibull statistics and evaluation of acid-base resistant zone formation of recently introduced adhesives.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Sato, Takaaki; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2016-07-30

    Dentin bonding durability of recently introduced dental adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond 2 (SE2), Optibond XTR (XTR), and Scotchbond Universal (SBU) was investigated using Weibull analysis as well as analysis of the micromorphological features of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) created for the adhesives. The bonding procedures of SBU were divided into three subgroups: self-etch (SBS), phosphoric acid (PA) etching on moist (SBM) or dry dentin (SBD). All groups were thermocycled for 0, 5,000 and 10,000 cycles followed by microtensile bond strength testing. Acid-base challenge was undertaken before SEM and TEM observations of the adhesive interface. The etch-and-rinse method with SBU (SBM and SBD) created inferior interfaces on the dentin surface which resulted in reduced bond durability. ABRZ formation was detected with the self-etch adhesive systems; SE2, XTR and SBS. In the PA etching protocols of SBM and SBD, a thick hybrid layer but no ABRZ was detected, which might affect dentin bond durability. PMID:27335136

  3. Bacteriostatic and anti-collagenolytic dental materials through the incorporation of polyacrylic acid modified CuI nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, Walter George; Mennito, Anthony Samuel; Schmidt, Michael Gerard; Vuthiganon, Jompobe; Chumanov, George

    2015-05-19

    Provided are antibacterial and antimicrobial surface coatings and dental materials by utilizing the antimicrobial properties of copper chalcogenide and/or copper halide (CuQ, where Q=chalcogens including oxygen, or halogens, or nothing). An antimicrobial barrier is created by incorporation of CuQ nanoparticles of an appropriate size and at a concentration necessary and sufficient to create a unique bioelectrical environment. The unique bioelectrical environment results in biocidal effectiveness through a multi-factorial mechanism comprising a combination of the intrinsic quantum flux of copper (Cu.sup.0, Cu.sup.1+, Cu.sup.2+) ions and the high surface-to-volume electron sink facilitated by the nanoparticle. The result is the constant quantum flux of copper which manifests and establishes the antimicrobial environment preventing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. The presence of CuQ results in inhibiting or delaying bacterial destruction and endogenous enzymatic breakdown of the zone of resin inter-diffusion, the integrity of which is essential for dental restoration longevity.

  4. Laser micro-grooved, Arginine-Glycine-Apspartic acid (RGD) coated dental implants, a 5 years radiographic follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This work has utilized laser direct writing to produce 10 microns wide uniform grooves on the surface of custom made titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) dental implants, and the tri-peptide RGD coating to produce a micromechanical and a chemical union with the tissues around the implant crest module and minimize crestal bone loss. The aim of this study was to follow these implants radiographically after five years of service under a mandibular overdenture. Methodology Standardized digital periapical radiographs and the computer software “Image J” were used to evaluate the bone density profile and vertical bone loss along the mesial and distal sides of the implants used in this study. Results The results of this study demonstrated less vertical bone loss and higher bone density profiles next to the laser microgrooved implants coated with the RGD than those only having the laser micro-grooves. Conclusion The RGD coating has improved the bone density profile and reduced the vertical bone loss around the studied dental implants. However, further studies are needed to compare the effects of the laser micro-grooves versus other uniform or non uniform surface features; also, the RGD coating should be compared to other biomimetic surface coating materials. PMID:25780355

  5. Photosensitive etch protection coating for silicon wet-etch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi-Malhotra, J.; Zhong, X. F.; Planje, C.

    2008-02-01

    A spin-on polymeric material has been developed to replace the silicon nitride mask used in the MEMS industry for silicon wet-etch processing. Built-in photosensitivity eliminates the need for additional photoresists in the system. The process consists of applying an organosilane-based primer layer onto a silicon wafer, followed by spin coating the photosensitive layer. After a soft bake, the coating is imaged by exposing it to ultraviolet light. After a post-exposure bake, the coating is developed by a solvent. After a final bake, the prepared wafer is then etched in a hot concentrated alkaline solution to complete the pattern transfer. The polymer-coated area remains protected with insignificant and controllable undercut after extended hours of wet etching. Etch protection performance was characterized as a ratio of undercut (u) to etch depth (h). The polymeric mask allows silicon substrates to be etched anisotropically in the same way as silicon nitride masks although more undercut occurs when KOH or NaOH are used as etchants. With use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as an etchant, a consistent 1-2% undercut ratio (u/h×100%) was obtained. The effects of various parameters such as use of different etchants and the effects of etchant concentration and delayed processing on undercut ratio are investigated.

  6. Bond strength with various etching times on young permanent teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.N.; Lu, T.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Tensile bond strengths of an orthodontic resin cement were compared for 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, or 120-second etching times, with a 37% phosphoric acid solution on the enamel surfaces of young permanent teeth. Fifty extracted premolars from 9- to 16-year-old children were used for testing. An orthodontic composite resin was used to bond the bracket directly onto the buccal surface of the enamel. The tensile bond strengths were tested with an Instron machine. Bond failure interfaces between bracket bases and teeth surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and calculated with mapping of energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The results of tensile bond strength for 15-, 30-, 60-, or 90-second etching times were not statistically different. For the 120-second etching time, the decrease was significant. Of the bond failures, 43%-49% occurred between bracket and resin interface, 12% to 24% within the resin itself, 32%-40% between resin and tooth interface, and 0% to 4% contained enamel fragments. There was no statistical difference in percentage of bond failure interface distribution between bracket base and resin, resin and enamel, or the enamel detachment. Cohesive failure within the resin itself at the 120-second etching time was less than at other etching times, with a statistical significance. To achieve good retention, to decrease enamel loss, and to reduce moisture contamination in the clinic, as well as to save chairside time, a 15-second etching time is suggested for teenage orthodontic patients.

  7. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  8. Sputter etching of hemispherical bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiesser, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Technique was developed for fabricating three dimensional pumping grooves on gas bearings by sputter etching. Method eliminates problems such as groove nonuniformity, profile, and finish, which are associated with normal grooving methods.

  9. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  10. XPS, AES and SEM analysis of recent dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Oh, Se-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2009-07-01

    Today, surface chemistry modifications of titanium implants have become a development strategy for dental implants. The present study investigated the chemistry and morphology of commercially available dental implants (Nobel biocare TiUnite, Astra AB OsseoSpeed, 3i Osseotite, ITI-SLA). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and auger electron spectroscopy were employed for the analysis of surface chemistry. The morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The present study demonstrated the major differences of surface properties, mainly dependent on the surface treatment used. The blasting and acid etching technique for the OsseoSpeed, Osseotite and SLA surfaces generally showed mainly TiO(2), but a varying surface morphology. In contrast, the electrochemical oxidation process for TiUnite implants not only produces microporous surface (pore size: 0.5-3.0microm), but also changes surface chemistry due to incorporation of anions of the used electrolyte. As a result, TiUnite implants contain more than 7at.% of P in oxide layer and higher amounts of hydroxides compared to the other implants in XPS analysis. F in OsseoSpeed implants was detected at 0.3% before as well as after sputter cleaning. PMID:19261554

  11. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  12. Effect of Postoperative Bleaching on Microleakage of Etch-and-Rinse and Self-etch Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Soltani, Fereidon

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bleaching the discoloured teeth may affect the tooth/composite interface. The aim of this in vitro experimental study was to evaluate the effect of vital tooth bleaching on microleakage of existent class V composite resin restorations bonded with three dental bonding agents. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 72 intact, extracted human anterior teeth with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal margins in enamel, and randomly divided into 3 groups. Cavities in the three groups were treated with Scotch bond Multi-Purpose, a total etch system and Prompt L-Pop and iBond, two self-etch adhesives. All teeth were restored with Z250 resin composite material and thermo-cycled. Each group was equally divided into the control and the bleached subgroups (n = 12). The bleached subgroups were bleached with 15% carbamide peroxide gel for 8 hours a day for 15 days. Microleakage scores were evaluated on the incisal and cervical walls. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Bonferroni post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). Results: Bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel significantly increased the microleakage of composite restorations in Prompt L-Pop group at dentinal walls (P = 0.001). Bleaching had no effect on microleakage of restorations in the Scotch bond Multi-Purpose and iBond groups. Conclusion: Vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel has an adverse effect on marginal seal of dentinal walls of existent composite resin restorations bonded with prompt L-Pop self-etch adhesive. PMID:22132010

  13. High aspect ratio silicon etch: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Pamarthy, Sharma

    2010-09-01

    High aspect ratio (HAR) silicon etch is reviewed, including commonly used terms, history, main applications, different technological methods, critical challenges, and main theories of the technologies. Chronologically, HAR silicon etch has been conducted using wet etch in solution, reactive ion etch (RIE) in low density plasma, single-step etch at cryogenic conditions in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) combined with RIE, time-multiplexed deep silicon etch in ICP-RIE configuration reactor, and single-step etch in high density plasma at room or near room temperature. Key specifications are HAR, high etch rate, good trench sidewall profile with smooth surface, low aspect ratio dependent etch, and low etch loading effects. Till now, time-multiplexed etch process is a popular industrial practice but the intrinsic scalloped profile of a time-multiplexed etch process, resulting from alternating between passivation and etch, poses a challenge. Previously, HAR silicon etch was an application associated primarily with microelectromechanical systems. In recent years, through-silicon-via (TSV) etch applications for three-dimensional integrated circuit stacking technology has spurred research and development of this enabling technology. This potential large scale application requires HAR etch with high and stable throughput, controllable profile and surface properties, and low costs.

  14. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  15. Etching and Growth of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seabaugh, A. C.; Mattauch, R., J.

    1983-01-01

    In-place process for etching and growth of gallium arsenide calls for presaturation of etch and growth melts by arsenic source crystal. Procedure allows precise control of thickness of etch and newly grown layer on substrate. Etching and deposition setup is expected to simplify processing and improve characteristics of gallium arsenide lasers, high-frequency amplifiers, and advanced integrated circuits.

  16. Influence of different etchants and etching times on shear bond strength.

    PubMed

    Holtan, J R; Nystrom, G P; Phelps, R A; Anderson, T B; Becker, W S

    1995-01-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength to enamel of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Dental Adhesive System's bonding resin following etching of enamel with 10% maleic, 1.6% oxalic, 10% phosphoric, and 35% phosphoric acids for 15, 30, and 60 seconds. Three hundred and sixty human molar teeth were used to create 12 groups of 30 enamel specimens per group (n = 30). Flattened enamel surfaces were treated with the different etchants for the time periods indicated, the surfaces primed, and adhesive resin applied according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were completed with Silux Plus resin and subjected to 1000 thermocycles (5-55 degrees C) followed by shear stress in an Instron Testing Machine to failure within a 24-hour period. A two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences for shear bond strength values by type of etchant (10% phosphoric, 35% phosphoric > 10% maleic > 1.6% oxalic acid) (P < 0.005) and by length of application time (P < 0.005). The interaction term for these two treatments was statistically significant (P < 0.005). PMID:7479192

  17. Distributed etched diffraction grating demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Amir

    This doctoral thesis studies the concept of a distributed etched diffraction grating (DEDG) and presents a methodology to engineer the spectral response of the device. The design which incorporates a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) at the facets of a conventional etched diffraction grating demultiplexer promises for a superior performance in multiple aspects. Where in a conventional etched diffraction grating, smooth vertical deep etched walls are required in order to realize a low insertion loss device; in the DEDG such requirement is significantly mitigated. Deep etched walls are replaced with shallowly etched diffraction grating facets followed by a DBR structure and as a result devices with significantly lower insertion loss are achievable. The feasibility of the application of DEDG as a wavelength demultiplexer was demonstrated through fabrication and characterization of a prototype device. The proof of concept device was fabricated using the state of the art deep UV optical lithography and reactive ion etching in a nano-photonic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material platform. The fabricated device was then characterized in the lab. Furthermore, incorporation of the DBR structure at the facets of the conventional etched diffraction grating decouples the reflection and diffraction functionalities, rendering the DEDG suitable for spectral response engineering. According to the application, the output spectral response of the device can be tailored through careful design and optimization of the incorporated DBR. In this thesis, through numerical simulations we have shown that functionalities such as polarization independent performance and at top insertion loss envelop are viable. A methodology to engineer the spectral response of the DEDG is discussed in details.

  18. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  19. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  20. Graphene-Assisted Chemical Etching of Silicon Using Anodic Aluminum Oxides as Patterning Templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2015-11-01

    We first report graphene-assisted chemical etching (GaCE) of silicon by using patterned graphene as an etching catalyst. Chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene transferred on a silicon substrate is patterned to a mesh with nanohole arrays by oxygen plasma etching using an anodic- aluminum-oxide etching mask. The prepared graphene mesh/silicon is immersed in a mixture solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydro peroxide with various molecular fractions at optimized temperatures. The silicon underneath graphene mesh is then selectively etched to form aligned nanopillar arrays. The morphology of the nanostructured silicon can be controlled to be smooth or porous depending on the etching conditions. The experimental results are systematically discussed based on possible mechanisms for GaCE of Si. PMID:26473800

  1. Serially etched shark enameloid observed by incident light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Risnes, S; Fosse, G

    1979-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse tooth sections of Isurus oxyrinchus were serially etched in 2.6% nitric acid. The changing optical properties of the etched surfaces were observed during the serial etchings, and the descent of the enameloid surfaces was measured. Shark enameloid seems to be less effectively etched by acid than human enamel; this difference may be due to differences in solubility between fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite. Most of the information regarding the structure of the enameloid was gained during the first five of ten etchings. The reflection of light from the surface was influenced by the orientation of the crystallites, longitudinally sectioned crystallites reflecting the light better than transversely sectioned crystallites. The dentinal extensions were continuous with and of the same structure as the underlying dentine. The radial fibers originated from the dentinal extensions, and they both contained organic material and were accompanied by crystallites. When the specimens were imbibed with water the distinctness of the dentinal extensions and radial fibers was improved. PMID:525241

  2. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  3. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  4. A Brief Historical Perspective on Dental Implants, Their Surface Coatings and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Celeste M

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights a brief, chronological sequence of the history of dental implants. This historical perspective begins with ancient civilizations and spotlights predominant dentists and their contributions to implant development through time. The physical, chemical and biologic properties of various dental implant surfaces and coatings are discussed, and specific surface treatments include an overview of machined implants, etched implants, and sand-blasted implants. Dental implant coatings such as hydroxyapatite, fluoride, and statin usage are further reviewed. PMID:24894638

  5. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  6. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  7. State of the art etch-and-rinse adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tjäderhane, Leo; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Carrilho, Marcela; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2013-01-01

    Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are the oldest of the multi-generation evolution of resin bonding systems. In the 3-step version, they involve acid-etching, priming and application of a separate adhesive. Each step can accomplish multiple goals. This review explores the therapeutic opportunities of each separate step. Acid-etching, using 32-37% phosphoric acid (pH 0.1-0.4) not only simultaneously etches enamel and dentin, but the low pH kills many residual bacteria. Some etchants include anti-microbial compounds such as benzalkonium chloride that also inhibits matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in dentin. Primers are usually water and HEMA-rich solutions that ensure complete expansion of the collagen fibril meshwork and wet the collagen with hydrophilic monomers. However, water alone can re-expand dried dentin and can also serve as a vehicle for protease inhibitors or protein cross-linking agents that may increase the durability of resin-dentin bonds. In the future, ethanol or other water-free solvents may serve as dehydrating primers that may also contain antibacterial quaternary ammonium methacrylates to inhibit dentin MMPs and increase the durability of resin-dentin bonds. The complete evaporation of solvents is nearly impossible. Manufacturers may need to optimize solvent concentrations. Solvent-free adhesives can seal resin-dentin interfaces with hydrophobic resins that may also contain fluoride and antimicrobial compounds. Etch-and-rinse adhesives produce higher resin-dentin bonds that are more durable than most 1 and 2-step adhesives. Incorporation of protease inhibitors in etchants and/or cross-linking agents in primers may increase the durability of resin-dentin bonds. The therapeutic potential of etch-and-rinse adhesives has yet to be fully exploited. PMID:21112620

  8. The effects of three different food acids on the attrition-corrosion wear of human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yichi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-07-01

    With increased consumption of acidic drinks and foods, the wear of human teeth due to attrition in acidic environments is an increasingly important issue. Accordingly, the present paper investigates in vitro the wear of human enamel in three different acidic environments. Reciprocating wear tests in which an enamel cusp slides on an enamel flat surface were carried out using acetic, citric and lactic acid lubricants (at pH 3-3.5). Distilled water was also included as a lubricant for comparison. Focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy imaging were then used to investigate the enamel subsurfaces following wear tests. Nanoindentation was used to ascertain the changes in enamel mechanical properties. The study reveals crack generation along the rod boundaries due to the exposure of enamel to the acidic environments. The wear mechanism changes from brittle fracture in distilled water to ploughing or shaving of the softened layer in acidic environments, generating a smooth surface with the progression of wear. Moreover, nanoindentation results of enamel samples which were exposed to the above acids up to a duration of the wear tests show decreasing hardness and Young’s modulus with exposure time.

  9. Wet Chemical Etching Survey of III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Hays, D.C.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-02-04

    Wet chemical etching of GaN, InN, AlN, InAlN and InGaN was investigated in various acid and base solutions at temperatures up to 75 C. Only KOH-based solutions were found to etch AlN and InAlN. No etchants were found for the other nitrides, emphasizing their extreme lack of chemical reactivity. The native oxide on most of the nitrides could be removed in potassium tetraborate at 75 C, or HCl/H{sub 2}O at 25 C.

  10. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of New Self-etching Primer with Conventional Self-etching Primers: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorake, Abhinay; Rai, Rohan; Hegde, Gautham; Suneja, Ridhima; Kumar, Naveena; Skaria, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the past few years, there has been a major research drive to increase bond strength between dental materials and dental hard tissue and to reduce the associated demineralization around fixed orthodontic appliances. Thus, a recent approach is to incorporate an antibacterial agent into the primer to reduce the demineralization and enhance bond strength. The objective of this study was: (1) To evaluate the shear bond strength of orthodontic preadjusted edgewise appliance brackets bonded to extracted premolar teeth with antimicrobial self-etch primer (Reliance self-etching primer, Clearfil Protect Bond) and self-etching primer without antimicrobial agent (Clearfil SE bond). (2) To compare the mean shear bond strength values of the tested materials to conventional self-etching primer Transbond Plus. Materials and Methods: A total of 125 extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into five groups of 25 teeth each. Each sample was embedded in an acrylic block of polymethyl meth acrylate resin till coronal portion. Instron testing machine model LR LOYD 50 K was used for testing the shear bond strength of individual samples. Results: The results of the study showed that all five groups had adequate clinically acceptable bond strength. In intergroup comparison, there was statistically significant difference in bond strength of Reliance self-etching primer, Promt L pop, Clearfil Protect Bond, clearfil SE bond and Transbond Plus. Conclusion: Reliance self-etching primer showed highest bond strength, followed by Clearfil Protect Bond, clearfil SE bond, and Transbond Plus. Clearfil Protect Bond primer containing methacryloxy dodecyl pyridium bromide have been demonstrated to kill Streptococcus mutans within a short time of contact and also exhibits an inhibitory effect on the growth of bacteria on its surface. PMID:26229365

  11. Chemical vapour deposition diamond coating on tungsten carbide dental cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, H.; Ahmed, W.; Rego, C. A.; Jones, A. N.; Amar, M.; Jackson, M.; Polini, R.

    2003-10-01

    Diamond coatings on Co cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal tools are widely used for cutting non-ferrous metals. It is difficult to deposit diamond onto cutting tools, which generally have a complex geometry, using a single step growth process. This paper focuses on the deposition of polycrystalline diamond films onto dental tools, which possess 3D complex or cylindrical shape, employing a novel single step chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth process. The diamond deposition is carried out in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a modified filament arrangement. The filament is mounted vertically with the drill held concentrically in between the filament coils, as opposed to the commonly used horizontal arrangement. This is a simple and inexpensive filament arrangement. In addition, the problems associated with adhesion of diamond films on WC-Co substrates are amplified in dental tools due to the very sharp edges and unpredictable cutting forces. The presence of Co, used as a binder in hard metals, generally causes poor adhesion. The amount of metallic Co on the surface can be reduced using a two step pre-treatment employing Murakami etching followed by an acid treatment. Diamond films are examined in terms of their growth rate, morphology, adhesion and cutting efficiency. We found that in the diamond coated dental tool the wear rate was reduced by a factor of three as compared to the uncoated tool.

  12. AgNO3-Dependent Morphological Change of Si Nanostructures Prepared by Single-Step Metal Assisted Etching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Inoue, Fumihiro; Inada, Mitsuru; Shingubara, Shoso

    2012-11-01

    The morphological changes of a nanostructured Si surface prepared by metal assisted etching were investigated. We used a mixture of silver nitrate (AgNO3) and hydrofluoric acid (HF) as an electroless plating bath of Ag, as well as an etching solution of Si. With a change in silver ion concentration in the etching solution, three types of etched Si nanostructures were observed: “nanowire”, “porous wall”, and “polished”. We developed a phase diagram of the morphology of the etched Si surface. With increasing concentration of AgNO3 in the etching solution, the surface morphology of etched Si changes from nanowire to porous wall, and finally, polished for regardless of Si resistivity.

  13. Adiabatic tapered optical fiber fabrication in two step etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenari, Z.; Latifi, H.; Ghamari, S.; Hashemi, R. S.; Doroodmand, F.

    2016-01-01

    A two-step etching method using HF acid and Buffered HF is proposed to fabricate adiabatic biconical optical fiber tapers. Due to the fact that the etching rate in second step is almost 3 times slower than the previous droplet etching method, terminating the fabrication process is controllable enough to achieve a desirable fiber diameter. By monitoring transmitted spectrum, final diameter and adiabaticity of tapers are deduced. Tapers with losses about 0.3 dB in air and 4.2 dB in water are produced. The biconical fiber taper fabricated using this method is used to excite whispering gallery modes (WGMs) on a microsphere surface in an aquatic environment. So that they are suitable to be used in applications like WGM biosensors.

  14. Tuning photonic crystal nanocavity modes by wet chemical digital etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, K.; Badolato, A.; Tamboli, A.; Petroff, P. M.; Hu, E.; Atatüre, M.; Dreiser, J.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a wet chemical digital etching technique for tuning the resonant wavelengths of photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities over a wide range of 80nm in precise 2-3nm steps while preserving high cavity quality factors. In one tuning step, a few monolayers of material are removed from the cavity surface by etching a self-formed native oxide in 1mol citric acid. Due to the self-limiting oxide thickness, total tuning range is based only on the number of etch steps, resulting in a highly controlled, digital tuning ability. We have characterized the tuning behavior of GaAs PC defect cavities of both square and triangular lattice symmetry and proven the effectiveness of this method by tuning a mode into resonance with the charged exciton, and then later the biexciton, transition of a single InAs /GaAs self-assembled quantum dot.

  15. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  16. Nanostructured porous silicon by laser assisted electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Lu, C.; Hu, X. K.; Yang, Xiujuan; Loboda, A. V.; Lipson, R. H.

    2009-08-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon (pSi) was fabricated by combining electrochemical etching with 355 nm laser processing. pSi prepared in this way proves to be an excellent substrate for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectrometry (MS). Surfaces prepared by electrochemical etching and laser irradiation exhibit strong quantum confinement as evidenced by the observation of a red shift in the Si Raman band at ~520-500 cm-1. The height of the nanostructured columns produced by electrochemical etching and laser processing is on the order of microns compared with tens of nanometers obtained without laser irradiation. The threshold for laser desorption and ionization of 12 mJ/cm2 using the pSi substrates prepared in this work is lower than that obtained for conventional matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MS using a standard matrix compound such as [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA; 30 mJ/cm2). Furthermore, the substrates prepared by etching and laser irradiation appear to resist laser damage better than those prepared by etching alone. These results enhance the capability of pSi for the detection of small molecular weight analytes by DIOS-MS.

  17. [Mefenamic acid and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in dental practice. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Künzel, André Rätzer; Haschke, Manuel; Surber, Christian; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2007-01-01

    There are no studies verifying that mefenamic acid is more effective than other NSAID (= non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). However, there are several notions in the literature that this drug is less well-tolerated than other NSAID because over a prolonged period of application more lesions of the upper gastro-intestinal tract are induced as well as occasionally renal insufficiency. Compared to other NSAID the systemic toxicity starts already with relatively low doses above the maximal daily dose. Considering current knowledge there is no reason to prefer mefenamic acid to other NSAID. PMID:17330662

  18. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  19. Osteogenesis from Dental Pulp Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Conditioned Medium Including Melatonin within a Mixture of Hyaluronic, Butyric, and Retinoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Margherita; Basoli, Valentina; Santaniello, Sara; Cruciani, Sara; Delitala, Alessandro Palmerio; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Muggironi, Roberta; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have shown relevant potential for cell therapy in the orthopedic and odontoiatric fields. The optimization of their osteogenic potential is currently a major challenge. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A) has been recently reported to act as a major conductor of osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we attempted to prime endogenous VEGF A expression without the need for viral vector mediated gene transfer technologies. We show that hDPSCs exposure to a mixture of hyaluronic, butyric, and retinoic acids (HA + BU + RA) induced the transcription of a gene program of osteogenesis and the acquirement of an osteogenic lineage. Such response was also elicited by cell exposure to melatonin, a pleiotropic agent that recently emerged as a remarkable osteogenic inducer. Interestingly, the commitment to the osteogenic fate was synergistically enhanced by the combinatorial exposure to a conditioned medium containing both melatonin and HA + BU + RA. These in vitro results suggest that in vivo osteogenesis might be improved and further studies are needed. PMID:26880937

  20. Etching conditions for resin-modified glass ionomer cement for orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Valente, Rudolfo M; De Rijk, Waldemar G; Drummond, James L; Evans, Carla A

    2002-05-01

    This study reports the tensile bond strength of orthodontic eyelets (RMO, Inc, Denver, Colo) bonded to human extracted teeth with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji Ortho LC, GC America, Alsip, Ill) and various acid etchants (Etch-37 and All-Etch, Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill; Ultra Etch, 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn) for enamel preparation before bonding. The enamel etch conditions were as follows: 37% phosphoric acid with silica; 37% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% polyacrylic acid; and unetched enamel. Bond strength was measured by pulling in tension on the eyelet with a 0.018-in steel wire perpendicular to the enamel surface with a testing machine (Instron model 1125, Canton, Mass) at a speed of 2 mm/min. A light-cured resin cement (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) applied to enamel etched with 37% phosphoric acid containing silica served as a control. Each group included 30 specimens. The Weibull distribution (m) was used for statistical analysis with a 90% CI. The different etchants used with RMGIC did not affect tensile bond strength. The resin cement group had the highest tensile strength. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed when glass ionomer cement was used to bond orthodontic attachments to nonetched teeth. However, unlike resin cement, RMGIC can bond effectively to etched teeth in a moist environment without an additional bonding agent. PMID:12045770

  1. Synthesis of poly(alkenoic acid) with L-leucine residue and methacrylate photopolymerizable groups useful in formulating dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Nechifor, Marioara; Melinte, Violeta; Podasca, Viorica; Buruiana, Emil C

    2014-01-01

    To develop resin-modified glass ionomer materials, we synthesized methacrylate-functionalized acrylic copolymer (PAlk-LeuM) derived from acrylic acid, itaconic acid and N-acryloyl-L-leucine using (N-methacryloyloxyethylcarbamoyl-N'-4-hydroxybutyl) urea as the modifying agent. The spectroscopic (proton/carbon nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) characteristics, and the gel permeation chromatography/Brookfield viscosity measurements were analysed and compared with those of the non-modified copolymer (PAlk-Leu). The photocurable copolymer (PAlk-LeuM, ~14 mol% methacrylate groups) and its precursor (PAlk-Leu) were incorporated in dental ionomer compositions besides diglycidyl methacrylate of bisphenol A (Bis-GMA) or an analogue of Bis-GMA (Bis-GMA-1), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The kinetic data obtained by photo-differential scanning calorimetry showed that both the degree of conversion (60.50-75.62%) and the polymerization rate (0.07-0.14 s(-1)) depend mainly on the amount of copolymer (40-50 wt.%), and conversions over 70% were attained in the formulations with 40 wt.% PAlk-LeuM. To formulate light-curable cements, each organic composition was mixed with filler (90 wt.% fluoroaluminosilicate/10 wt.% hydroxyapatite) into a 2.7:1 ratio (powder/liquid ratio). The light-cured specimens exhibited flexural strength (FS), compressive strength (CS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) varying between 28.08 and 64.79 MPa (FS), 103.68-147.13 MPa (CS) and 16.89-31.87 MPa (DTS). The best values for FS, CS and DTS were found for the materials with the lowest amount of PAlk-LeuM. Other properties such as the surface hardness, water sorption/water solubility, surface morphology and fluorescence caused by adding the fluorescein monomer were also evaluated. PMID:24701975

  2. ION BEAM ETCHING EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL MICROANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen ion beam sputter etching used in SIMS has been shown to produce morphologic effects which have similarities and differences in comparison to rf plasma etching of biological specimens. Sputter yield variations resulting from structural microheterogeneity are illustrated (e....

  3. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion. PMID:14741589

  4. Surface modification of Ti dental implants by Nd:YVO 4 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Francisco J. C.; Marques, Rodrigo F. C.; Filho, Edson de A.; Guastaldi, Antonio C.

    2007-09-01

    Surface modifications have been applied in endosteal bone devices in order to improve the osseointegration through direct contact between neoformed bone and the implant without an intervening soft tissue layer. Surface characteristics of titanium implants have been modified by addictive methods, such as metallic titanium, titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite powder plasma spray, as well as by subtractive methods, such as acid etching, acid etching associated with sandblasting by either AlO 2 or TiO 2, and recently by laser ablation. Surface modification for dental and medical implants can be obtained by using laser irradiation technique where its parameters like repetition rate, pulse energy, scanning speed and fluency must be taken into accounting to the appropriate surface topography. Surfaces of commercially pure Ti (cpTi) were modified by laser Nd:YVO 4 in nine different parameters configurations, all under normal atmosphere. The samples were characterized by SEM and XRD refined by Rietveld method. The crystalline phases αTi, βTi, Ti 6O, Ti 3O and TiO were formed by the melting and fast cooling processes during irradiation. The resulting phases on the irradiated surface were correlated with the laser beam parameters. The aim of the present work was to control titanium oxides formations in order to improve implants osseointegration by using a laser irradiation technique which is of great importance to biomaterial devices due to being a clean and reproducible process.

  5. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; CALASANS-MAIA, José; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). Material and Methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits’ tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Results Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion The surface chemistry and wettability implants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1. PMID:26221922

  6. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  7. Human dental plaque pH, and the organic acid and free amino acid profiles in plaque fluid, after sucrose rinsing.

    PubMed

    Higham, S M; Edgar, W M

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between these factors was studied in plaque and plaque fluid samples taken at intervals during the Stephan pH curve following a sucrose mouth rinse. Levels of lactate rose after the rinse, then fell during the pH recovery phase. Levels of acetate, propionate and phosphate fell after rinsing, then rose again. Amino acid concentrations also changed, with many showing a fall followed by a rise; others rising then falling; and some showing a more variable or complex pattern. In resting plaque fluid, only alanine, proline, glutamic acid, glycine and ammonia were present at concentrations above 1 mmol/l. Delta-aminovaleric acid was detected at levels below those that have been found in monkeys. Hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine were consistently detected, levels of arginine were generally low, and those of cystine consistently very low. The results may provide a basis for understanding the complex metabolic interrelations that occur in the course of the Stephan curve and which may reflect or produce the observed pH changes. They suggest that besides the amount of acid produced, the type of acid, buffering power and base production should be considered as determinants of plaque pH. PMID:2597027

  8. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  9. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  10. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  11. Nanoscrews: Asymmetrical Etching of Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rachel Lee Siew; Chong, Wen Han; Feng, Yuhua; Song, Xiaohui; Tham, Chu Long; Wei, Jun; Lin, Ming; Chen, Hongyu

    2016-08-31

    World's smallest screws with helical threads are synthesized via mild etching of Ag nanowires. With detailed characterization, we show that this nanostructure arises not from the transformation of the initial lattice, but the result of a unique etching mode. Three-dimensional printed models are used to illustrate the evolution of etch pits, from which a possible mechanism is postulated. PMID:27513181

  12. Apparatus for edge etching of semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casajus, A.

    1986-01-01

    A device for use in the production of semiconductors, characterized by etching in a rapidly rotating etching bath is described. The fast rotation causes the surface of the etching bath to assume the form of a paraboloid of revolution, so that the semiconductor wafer adjusted at a given height above the resting bath surface is only attacked by etchant at the edges.

  13. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  14. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG. PMID:26521000

  15. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG.

  16. The effect of additional etching and curing mechanism of composite resin on the dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Su; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional acid etching and curing mechanism (light-curing or self-curing) of a composite resin on the dentin bond strength and compatibility of one-step self-etching adhesives. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen human permanent molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to the adhesives used (All-Bond Universal: ABU, Clearfil S3 Bond: CS3), additional acid etching (additional acid etching performed: EO, no additional acid etching performed: EX), and composite resins (Filtek Z-250: Z250, Clearfil FII New Bond: CFNB). Group 1: ABU-EO-Z250, Group 2: ABU-EO-CFNB, Group 3: ABU-EX-Z250, Group 4: ABU-EX-CFNB, Group 5: CS3-EO-Z250, Group 6: CS3-EO-CFNB, Group 7: CS3-EX-Z250, Group 8: CS3-EX-CFNB. After bonding procedures, composite resins were built up on dentin surfaces. After 24-hour water storage, the teeth were sectioned to make 10 specimens for each group. The microtensile bond strength test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined by means of an optical microscope at ×20 magnification. The data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post-hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Additional etching groups showed significantly higher values than the no additional etching group when using All-Bond Universal. The light-cured composite resin groups showed significantly higher values than the self-cured composite resin groups in the Clearfil S3 Bond. CONCLUSION The additional acid etching is beneficial for the dentin bond strength when using low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives, and low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives are compatible with self-cured composite resin. The acidity of the one-step self-etch adhesives is an influencing factor in terms of the dentin bonding strength and incompatibility with a self-cured composite resin. PMID:24353889

  17. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  18. Dental erosion in children: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Linnett, V; Seow, W K

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that the prevalence of dental erosion in children varies widely between 2 and 57%. Changes seen in dental erosion range from removal of surface characteristics to extensive loss of tooth tissue with pulp exposure and abscess formation. Symptoms of dental erosion range from sensitivity to severe pain associated with pulp exposure. The etiology of dental erosion is dependent on the presence of extrinsic or intrinsic acid in the oral environment. Extrinsic sources of acids in children include frequent consumption of acidic foods and drinks, and acidic medications. Regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth, as occurs in gastroesophageal reflux, is the most common source of intrinsic acid in children. A multitude of factors may modify the erosion process, such as saliva, oral hygiene practices, and presence or absence of fluoride. When dental erosion is diagnosed, it is important to investigate and identify the acid source, and to determine if the process is ongoing. The aim of treatment is to eliminate the cause of acid exposure, and to minimize the effects of acid exposure where it is not possible to remove the acid source. Restoration of the dentition involves stainless steel crowns to restore lost vertical dimension, and composite resin for esthetics. PMID:11242729

  19. Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio silicon nanopores by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Torsten; Zhang, Miao; Linnros, Jan; Yu, Shun

    2014-09-22

    We report on the formation of ultra-high aspect ratio nanopores in silicon bulk material using photo-assisted electrochemical etching. Here, n-type silicon is used as anode in contact with hydrofluoric acid. Based on the local dissolution of surface atoms in pre-defined etching pits, pore growth and pore diameter are, respectively, driven and controlled by the supply of minority charge carriers generated by backside illumination. Thus, arrays with sub-100 nm wide pores were fabricated. Similar to macropore etching, it was found that the pore diameter is proportional to the etching current, i.e., smaller etching currents result in smaller pore diameters. To find the limits under which nanopores with controllable diameter still can be obtained, etching was performed at very low current densities (several μA cm{sup −2}). By local etching, straight nanopores with aspect ratios above 1000 (∼19 μm deep and ∼15 nm pore tip diameter) were achieved. However, inherent to the formation of such narrow pores is a radius of curvature of a few nanometers at the pore tip, which favors electrical breakdown resulting in rough pore wall morphologies. Lowering the applied bias is adequate to reduce spiking pores but in most cases also causes etch stop. Our findings on bulk silicon provide a realistic chance towards sub-10 nm pore arrays on silicon membranes, which are of great interest for molecular filtering and possibly DNA sequencing.

  20. Secret of formulating a selective etching or cleaning solution for boron nitride (BN) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wing C.

    2004-04-01

    Boron nitride thin film has a very unique characteristic of extremely high chemical inertness. Thus, it is a better hard mask than silicon nitride for aggressive etching solutions, such as the isotropic HF/HNO3/CH3COOH (or HNA) etchant for silicon. However, because of its high chemical inertness, it is also difficult to remove it. Plasma etching with Freon gases can etch the boron nitride film, but it is unselective to silicon, silicon dioxide or silicon nitride. Cleaning up the boron nitride film with plasma etching will usually leave a damaged or foggy surface. A special wet chemical solution has been developed for etching or cleaning boron nitride film selectively. It can etch boron nitride, but not the coatings or substrates of silicon, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide. It is a very strong oxidizing agent consisting of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but different from the common Piranha Etch. It may be even more interesting to understand the logic or secret behind of how to formulate a new selective etching solution. Various chemical and chemical engineering aspects were considered carefully in our development process. These included creating the right electrochemical potential for the etchant, ensuring large differences in chemical kinetics to make the reactions selective, providing proper mass transfer for removing the by products, etc.

  1. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  2. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  3. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  4. Plasmoids for etching and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this manuscript we show fascinating properties of plasmoids, which are known to be self-sustained plasma entities, and can exist without being in contact with any power supply. Plasmoids are produced in a filamentary discharge in a Ar/CH4 mixture with a high production rate of about 105 s-1. It is observed that plasmoids etch the solid amorphous hydrocarbon film with high efficiency. Energy density of the plasmoid, which is estimated on the basis of glowing area of plasmoids in the photographic image and sublimation enthalpy of the etched hydrocarbon film, amounts to about 90 J m-3. This value is much lower than the energy density of observed ball lightning (natural plasmoid). A very surprising property is an attraction between plasmoids, and the formation of plasmoid-groups. Because of this attractive force, carbon material, which is collected in plasmoids by etching of the hydrocarbon film or by propagation through a methane/argon gas mixture, is compressed into crystals.

  5. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota. PMID:25177549

  6. Polymer protective coating for wet deep silicon etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Mary; Ruben, Kim; Li, Chenghong; Williams, Paul; Flaim, Tony D.

    2003-01-01

    A need exists for spin-applied polymeric coatings to protect electronic circuitry and other sensitive structures on MEMS devices during deep silicon wet etching processes involving corrosive mixtures of aqueous acids and bases. The challenge exists in developing protective coatings that do not decompose or dissolve in the harsh etchants and, more importantly, that maintain good adhesion to the substrate during the sometimes long etching processes. We have developed a multilayer coating system that is stable and adheres well to silicon nitride and other semiconductor materials and affords chemical protection for at least eight hours in hot potassium hydroxide etchant. The same coating system is also compatible with concentrated hydrofluoric acid etchants, which can diffuse rapidly through many polymeric materials to attack the device substrate.

  7. Improved device reliability in organic light emitting devices by controlling the etching of indium zinc oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Jie; Lou, Yan-Hui; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    A controllable etching process for indium zinc oxide (IZO) films was developed by using a weak etchant of oxalic acid with a slow etching ratio. With controllable etching time and temperature, a patterned IZO electrode with smoothed surface morphology and slope edge was achieved. For the practical application in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), a suppression of the leak current in the current—voltage characteristics of OLEDs was observed. It resulted in a 1.6 times longer half lifetime in the IZO-based OLEDs compared to that using an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode etched by a conventional strong etchant of aqua regia.

  8. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  9. Reactive Ion Etching of Polymers in Oxygen Based Plasmas: a Study of Etch Mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Sandra Wolterman

    The reactive ion etching of polymers has been studied in oxygen-based plasmas in an effort to understand the contributions of various mechanisms to the etching of these materials. Of the four active etch mechanisms; surface damage promoted etching, chemical sputtering, chemically enhanced physical sputtering, and direct reactive ion etching; the emphasis of this work has been on determining the relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the overall etching process. The etching of photoresist, polyimide, and amorphous carbon in O_2-CF_4 plasmas was studied in an asymmetrical reactive ion etcher at pressures ranging from 5 to 100 mtorr. Etch yield, ion flux, and oxygen atom concentration data were collected. The fit of this data to a linear model proposed by Joubert et al. (J. Appl. Phys., 65, 1989, 5096) was compared to the fit of the data to a nonlinear model proposed by the author. The linear model accounts for contribution due to three of the four etch mechanisms, but does not include contributions due to direct reactive ion etching. The nonlinear model accounts for contributions due to all four etch mechanisms. Experimental results indicate that the nonlinear model provides a better fit to the data than does the linear model. The relative contribution of direct reactive ion etching to the etching of photoresist ranges from 27% to 81% as the pressure decreases from 100 to 5 mtorr. Similar results are obtained for polyimide and amorphous carbon.

  10. Direct observation of silicon surface etching by water with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, G. J.; Köhler, U.; Henzler, M.

    1992-09-01

    One of the key processes in wet chemical preparation of silicon surfaces for device fabrication is a final rinsing step with water after oxide removal and hydrogen-termination with hydrofluoric acid. On rinsing at elevated temperature (boiling water) the slow statistical oxidation of the surface known from conventional treatment with water at room temperature is replaced by a rapid anisotropic etching attack. On Si(111) scanning tunneling microscopy shows characteristic triangular etch defects and flat (111) terraces separated by monatomic steps along <0 overline11>. The resulting surface is chemically homogeneous without any oxide. Structure and removal mechanism are compared to NH 4F-etched samples.

  11. Evaluation of over-etching technique in the endodontically treated tooth restoration

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main purpose of a post-endodontic restoration with posts is to guarantee the retention of the restorative material. The aim of the study was to examine, through the push-out test, how bond strength between the post and the dentin varied with etching time with 37% orthophosphoric acid, before cementation of a glass fiber post. Moreover, it has been examined if over-etching (application time of the acid: 2 minutes) was an effective technique to improve the adhesion to the endodontic substrate, after highlighting the problems of adhesion concerning its anatomical characteristics and the changes after the endodontic treatment. Highest bond strength values were found by etching the substrate for 30 sec., while over-etching didn’t improve bond strength to the endodontic substrate. PMID:26161247

  12. Surface modification via wet chemical etching of single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Reshak, A H; Shahimin, M M; Shaari, S; Johan, N

    2013-11-01

    The potential of solar cells have not been fully tapped due to the lack of energy conversion efficiency. There are three important mechanisms in producing high efficiency cells to harvest solar energy; reduction of light reflectance, enhancement of light trapping in the cell and increment of light absorption. The current work represent studies conducted in surface modification of single-crystalline silicon solar cells using wet chemical etching techniques. Two etching types are applied; alkaline etching (KOH:IPA:DI) and acidic etching (HF:HNO3:DI). The alkaline solution resulted in anisotropic profile that leads to the formation of inverted pyramids. While acidic solution formed circular craters along the front surface of silicon wafer. This surface modification will leads to the reduction of light reflectance via texturizing the surface and thereby increases the short circuit current and conversion rate of the solar cells. PMID:24139943

  13. Method for etching thin films of niobium and niobium-containing compounds for preparing superconductive circuits

    DOEpatents

    Kampwirth, Robert T.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Falco, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of preparing thin film superconducting electrical circuits of niobium or niobium compounds in which a thin film of the niobium or niobium compound is applied to a nonconductive substrate, and covered with a layer of photosensitive material. The sensitive material is in turn covered with a circuit pattern exposed and developed to form a mask of the circuit in photoresistive material on the surface of the film. The unmasked excess niobium film is removed by contacting the substrate with an aqueous etching solution of nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrogen fluoride, which will rapidly etch the niobium compound without undercutting the photoresist. A modification of the etching solution will permit thin films to be lifted from the substrate without further etching.

  14. Method for etching thin films of niboium and niobium-containing compounds for preparing superconductive circuits

    DOEpatents

    Kampwirth, R.T.; Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1979-11-23

    An improved method of preparing thin film superconducting electrical circuits of niobium or niobium compounds is provided in which a thin film of the niobium or niobium compound is applied to a nonconductive substrate and covered with a layer of photosensitive material. The sensitive material is in turn covered with a circuit pattern exposed and developed to form a mask of the circuit in photoresistive material on the surface of the film. The unmasked excess niobium film is removed by contacting the substrate with an aqueous etching solution of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrogen fluoride, which will rapidly etch the niobium compound without undercutting the photoresist. A modification of the etching solution will permit thin films to be lifted from the substrate without further etching.

  15. Effect of enamel etching time on roughness and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Kimmes, Nicole S; Latta, Mark A; Wilwerding, Terry M

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of different enamel conditioning times on surface roughness and bond strength using an etch-and-rinse system and four self-etch adhesives. Surface roughness (Ra) and composite to enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined following the treatment of flat ground human enamel (4000 grit) with five adhesive systems: (1) Adper Single Bond Plus (SBP), (2) Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP), (3) Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), (4) Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) and (5) Xeno IV (X4), using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Control groups were also included for Ra (4000 grit surface) and SBS (no enamel treatment and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive). For surface roughness measurements, the phosphoric acid conditioner of the SBP etch-and-rinse system was rinsed from the surface with an air-water spray, and the other four self-etch adhesive agents were removed with alternating rinses of water and acetone. A Proscan 2000 non-contact profilometer was used to determine Ra values. Composite (Z100) to enamel bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and they were debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher's LSD post-hoc test. The etch-and- rinse system (SBP) produced the highest Ra (microm) and SBS (MPa) using both the recommended treatment time (0.352 +/- 0.028 microm and 40.5 +/- 6.1 MPa) and the extended treatment time (0.733 +/- 0.122 microm and 44.2 +/- 8.2 MPa). The Ra and SBS of the etch-and-rinse system were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than all the self-etch systems and controls. Increasing the treatment time with phosphoric acid (SBP) and PLP produced greater surface roughness (p < 0.05) but did not result in significantly higher bond strengths (p > 0.05). PMID:19363978

  16. In-Plasma Photo-Assisted Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to precisely control the ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate allowed the study of silicon etching as a function of ion energy at near-threshold energies. Surprisingly, a substantial etching rate was observed, independent of ion energy, when the ion energy was below the ion-assisted etching threshold (~ 16 eV for etching silicon with chlorine plasma). Careful experiments led to the conclusion that this ``sub-threshold'' etching was due to photons, predominately at wavelengths <1700 Å. Among the plasmas investigated, photo-assisted etching (PAE) was lowest in Br2/Ar gas mixtures and highest in HBr/Cl2/Ar. Above threshold etching rates scaled with the square root of ion energy. PAE rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM) revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. In-plasma PAE may be be a complicating factor for processes that require low ion energies, such as atomic layer etching. On the other hand PAE could produce sub-10 nm high aspect ratio (6:1) features by highly selective plasma etching to transfer nascent nanopatterns in silicon. Work supported by DOE Plasma Science Center and NSF.

  17. Restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surfaces by chemical etching reagent.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    Chemical etching technique is widely used for restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surface in the field of public security. The consumed thickness of steel surface during restoration process is considered as a major criterion for evaluating the efficiency of the chemical etching reagent. The thinner the consumed thickness, the higher the restoration efficiency. According to chemical principles, maintaining the continuous oxidative capabilities of etching reagents and increasing the kinetic rate difference of the reaction between the engraved and non-engraved area with the chemical etching reagent can effectively reduce the consumed steel thickness. The study employed steel surface from the engine case of motorcycle and the car frame of automobile. The chemical etching reagents are composed of nitric acid as the oxidizer, hydrofluoric acid as the coordination agent and mixed with glacial acetic acid or acetone as the solvents. Based on the performance evaluation of three different etching reagents, the one composed of HNO3, HF and acetone gave the best result. PMID:25771134

  18. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  19. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  20. Etching method for photoresists or polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R. (Inventor); Wydeven, Theodore J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for etching or removing polymers, photoresists, and organic contaminants from a substrate is disclosed. The method includes creating a more reactive gas species by producing a plasma discharge in a reactive gas such as oxygen and contacting the resulting gas species with a sacrificial solid organic material such as polyethylene or polyvinyl fluoride, reproducing a highly reactive gas species, which in turn etches the starting polymer, organic contaminant, or photoresist. The sample to be etched is located away from the plasma glow discharge region so as to avoid damaging the substrate by exposure to high energy particles and electric fields encountered in that region. Greatly increased etching rates are obtained. This method is highly effective for etching polymers such as polyimides and photoresists that are otherwise difficult or slow to etch downstream from an electric discharge in a reactive gas.

  1. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  2. Salivary biomarkers for dental caries.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Shan; Koh, David; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen

    2016-02-01

    As a highly prevalent multifactorial disease, dental caries afflicts a large proportion of the world's population. As teeth are constantly bathed in saliva, the constituents and properties of this oral fluid play an essential role in the occurrence and progression of dental caries. Various inorganic (water and electrolytes) and organic (proteins and peptides) components may protect teeth from dental caries. This occurs via several functions, such as clearance of food debris and sugar, aggregation and elimination of microorganisms, buffering actions to neutralize acid, maintaining supersaturation with respect to tooth mineral, participation in formation of the acquired pellicle and antimicrobial defense. Modest evidence is available on the associations between dental caries and several salivary parameters, including flow rate, buffering capacity and abundance of mutans streptococci. Despite some controversial findings, the main body of the literature supports an elevated caries prevalence and/or incidence among people with a pathologically low saliva flow rate, compromised buffering capacity and early colonization or high titer of mutans streptococci in saliva. The evidence remains weak and/or inconsistent on the association between dental caries and other saliva parameters, such as other possible cariogenic species (Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus sanguis group, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces spp. and Candida albicans), diversity of saliva microbiomes, inorganic and organic constituents (electrolytes, immunoglobulins, other proteins and peptides) and some functional properties (sugar clearance rate, etc.). The complex interactions between salivary components and functions suggest that saliva has to be considered in its entirety to account for its total effects on teeth. PMID:26662487

  3. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  4. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  5. Dental cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth. These bacteria change foods -- especially sugar and starch -- into acids. Bacteria, acid, food pieces, and saliva ... case removal of the tooth. Carbohydrates (sugars and starches) increase the risk of tooth decay. Sticky foods ...

  6. Etching anisotropy mechanisms lead to morphology-controlled silicon nanoporous structures by metal assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Meicheng; Liang, Yu; Bai, Yang; Song, Dandan; Li, Yingfeng; Luo, Jian

    2016-02-01

    The etching anisotropy induced by the morphology and rotation of silver particles controls the morphology of silicon nanoporous structures, through various underlying complex etching mechanisms. The level of etching anisotropy can be modulated by controlling the morphology of the silver catalyst to obtain silicon nanoporous structures with straight pores, cone-shaped pores and pyramid-shaped pores. In addition, the structures with helical pores are obtained by taking advantage of the special anisotropic etching, which is induced by the rotation and revolution of silver particles during the etching process. An investigation of the etching anisotropy during metal assisted chemical etching will promote a deep understanding of the chemical etching mechanism of silicon, and provide a feasible approach to fabricate Si nanoporous structures with special morphologies. PMID:26785718

  7. Etch challenges for DSA implementation in CMOS via patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Gharbi, A.; Argoud, M.; Servin, I.; Tiron, R.; Chevalier, X.; Navarro, C.; Nicolet, C.; Lapeyre, C.; Monget, C.; Martinez, E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the etch challenges to overcome for the implementation of PS-b-PMMA block copolymer's Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) in CMOS via patterning level. Our process is based on a graphoepitaxy approach, employing an industrial PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) from Arkema with a cylindrical morphology. The process consists in the following steps: a) DSA of block copolymers inside guiding patterns, b) PMMA removal, c) brush layer opening and finally d) PS pattern transfer into typical MEOL or BEOL stacks. All results presented here have been performed on the DSA Leti's 300mm pilot line. The first etch challenge to overcome for BCP transfer involves in removing all PMMA selectively to PS block. In our process baseline, an acetic acid treatment is carried out to develop PMMA domains. However, this wet development has shown some limitations in terms of resists compatibility and will not be appropriated for lamellar BCPs. That is why we also investigate the possibility to remove PMMA by only dry etching. In this work the potential of a dry PMMA removal by using CO based chemistries is shown and compared to wet development. The advantages and limitations of each approach are reported. The second crucial step is the etching of brush layer (PS-r-PMMA) through a PS mask. We have optimized this step in order to preserve the PS patterns in terms of CD, holes features and film thickness. Several integrations flow with complex stacks are explored for contact shrinking by DSA. A study of CD uniformity has been addressed to evaluate the capabilities of DSA approach after graphoepitaxy and after etching.

  8. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  9. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  10. Dry etching technologies for reflective multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshinori; Karyu, Makoto; Ita, Hirotsugu; Kase, Yoshihisa; Yoshimori, Tomoaki; Muto, Makoto; Nonaka, Mikio; Iwami, Munenori

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a highly integrated methodology for patterning Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) mask, which has been highlighted for the lithography technique at the 14nm half-pitch generation and beyond. The EUV mask is characterized as a reflective-type mask which is completely different compared with conventional transparent-type of photo mask. And it requires not only patterning of absorber layer without damaging the underlying multi reflective layers (40 Si/Mo layers) but also etching multi reflective layers. In this case, the dry etch process has generally faced technical challenges such as the difficulties in CD control, etch damage to quartz substrate and low selectivity to the mask resist. Shibaura Mechatronics ARESTM mask etch system and its optimized etch process has already achieved the maximal etch performance at patterning two-layered absorber. And in this study, our process technologies of multi reflective layers will be evaluated by means of optimal combination of process gases and our optimized plasma produced by certain source power and bias power. When our ARES™ is used for multilayer etching, the user can choose to etch the absorber layer at the same time or etch only the multilayer.

  11. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  12. Functionalization of polycaprolactone scaffolds with hyaluronic acid and β-TCP facilitates migration and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Lysdahl, Helle; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Chen, Muwan; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we sought to assess the osteogenic potential of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on three different polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds. The backbone structure of the scaffolds was manufactured by fused deposition modeling (PCL scaffold). The composition and morphology was functionalized in two of the scaffolds. The first underwent thermal induced phase separation of PCL infused into the pores of the PCL scaffold. This procedure resulted in a highly variable micro- and nanostructured porous (NSP), interconnected, and isotropic tubular morphology (NSP-PCL scaffold). The second scaffold type was functionalized by dip-coating the PCL scaffold with a mixture of hyaluronic acid and β-TCP (HT-PCL scaffold). The scaffolds were cylindrical and measured 5 mm in height and 10 mm in diameter. They were seeded with 1×10(6) human DPSCs, a cell type known to express bone-related markers, differentiate into osteoblasts-like cells, and to produce a mineralized bone-like extracellular matrix. DPSCs were phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry for CD90(+), CD73(+), CD105(+), and CD14(-). DNA, ALP, and Ca(2+) assays and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for genes involved in osteogenic differentiation were analyzed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21. Cell viability and distribution were assessed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21 by fluorescent-, scanning electron-, and confocal microscopy. The results revealed that the DPSCs expressed relevant gene expression consistent with osteogenic differentiation. The NSP-PCL and HT-PCL scaffolds promoted osteogenic differentiation and Ca(2+) deposition after 21 days of cultivation. Different gene expressions associated with mature osteoblasts were upregulated in these two scaffold types, suggesting that the methods in which the scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation, depends on functionalization approaches. However, only the HT-PCL scaffold was also able to support cell proliferation and cell migration resulting in

  13. Functionalization of Polycaprolactone Scaffolds with Hyaluronic Acid and β-TCP Facilitates Migration and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, David Christian Evar; Lysdahl, Helle; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Chen, Muwan; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sought to assess the osteogenic potential of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on three different polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds. The backbone structure of the scaffolds was manufactured by fused deposition modeling (PCL scaffold). The composition and morphology was functionalized in two of the scaffolds. The first underwent thermal induced phase separation of PCL infused into the pores of the PCL scaffold. This procedure resulted in a highly variable micro- and nanostructured porous (NSP), interconnected, and isotropic tubular morphology (NSP-PCL scaffold). The second scaffold type was functionalized by dip-coating the PCL scaffold with a mixture of hyaluronic acid and β-TCP (HT-PCL scaffold). The scaffolds were cylindrical and measured 5 mm in height and 10 mm in diameter. They were seeded with 1×106 human DPSCs, a cell type known to express bone-related markers, differentiate into osteoblasts-like cells, and to produce a mineralized bone-like extracellular matrix. DPSCs were phenotypically characterized by flow cytometry for CD90+, CD73+, CD105+, and CD14−. DNA, ALP, and Ca2+ assays and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for genes involved in osteogenic differentiation were analyzed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21. Cell viability and distribution were assessed on day 1, 7, 14, and 21 by fluorescent-, scanning electron-, and confocal microscopy. The results revealed that the DPSCs expressed relevant gene expression consistent with osteogenic differentiation. The NSP-PCL and HT-PCL scaffolds promoted osteogenic differentiation and Ca2+ deposition after 21 days of cultivation. Different gene expressions associated with mature osteoblasts were upregulated in these two scaffold types, suggesting that the methods in which the scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation, depends on functionalization approaches. However, only the HT-PCL scaffold was also able to support cell proliferation and cell migration resulting in even cell

  14. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  15. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  16. Nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon through friction-induced selective etching of Si3N4 mask

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new fabrication method is proposed to produce nanostructures on monocrystalline silicon based on the friction-induced selective etching of its Si3N4 mask. With low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si3N4 film as etching mask on Si(100) surface, the fabrication can be realized by nanoscratching on the Si3N4 mask and post-etching in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution in sequence. Scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis indicated that the HF solution could selectively etch the scratched Si3N4 mask and then provide the gap for post-etching of silicon substrate in KOH solution. Experimental results suggested that the fabrication depth increased with the increase of the scratching load or KOH etching period. Because of the excellent masking ability of the Si3N4 film, the maximum fabrication depth of nanostructure on silicon can reach several microns. Compared to the traditional friction-induced selective etching technique, the present method can fabricate structures with lesser damage and deeper depths. Since the proposed method has been demonstrated to be a less destructive and flexible way to fabricate a large-area texture structure, it will provide new opportunities for Si-based nanofabrication. PMID:24940174

  17. Ultradeep fused silica glass etching with an HF-resistant photosensitive resist for optical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarah, John M.; Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2012-03-01

    Microfluidic and optical sensing platforms are commonly fabricated in glass and fused silica (quartz) because of their optical transparency and chemical inertness. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions are the etching media of choice for deep etching into silicon dioxide substrates, but processing schemes become complicated and expensive for etching times greater than 1 h due to the aggressiveness of HF migration through most masking materials. We present here etching into fused silica more than 600 µm deep while keeping the substrate free of pits and maintaining a polished etched surface suitable for biological imaging. We utilize an HF-resistant photosensitive resist (HFPR) which is not attacked in 49% HF solution. Etching characteristics are compared for substrates masked with the HFPR alone and the HFPR patterned on top of Cr/Au and polysilicon masks. We used this etching process to fabricate suspended fused silica membranes, 8-16 µm thick, and show that imaging through the membranes does not negatively affect image quality of fluorescence microscopy of biological tissue. Finally, we realize small through-pore arrays in the suspended membranes. Such devices will have applications in planar electrophysiology platforms, especially where optical imaging is required.

  18. Polymeric protective coatings for MEMS wet-etch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruben, Kimberly A.; Flaim, Tony D.; Li, Chenghong

    2004-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device manufacturers today are faced with the challenge of protecting electronic circuitry and other sensitive device structures during deep silicon wet-etch processes. Etch processes of this nature require prolonged exposure of the device to harsh corrosive mixtures of aqueous acids and bases at higher than ambient temperatures. A need exists for a spin-applied polymeric coating to prevent the exposure of such circuitry against the corrosive etchants. The challenge exists in developing protective coatings that will not decompose or dissolve in the etchants during the etch process. Such coatings require superior adhesion to the substrate without destroying the sensitive features below. Brewer Science, Inc., has developed a multilayer coating system for basic etchants which is compatible with a variety of semiconductor materials and offers protection against concentrated potassium hydroxide (KOH) etchants at prolonged exposure times of more than 8 hours. In addition, a second multilayer coating system is being developed for use with strong hydrofluoric and other various mixed acid etchants (MAEs) for exposures of 30 minutes or longer. These materials are specifically designed to protect circuitry subjected to concentrated MAEs during the wafer thinning processes used by MEMS device manufacturers.

  19. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  20. A Comparison of Epithelial Cells, Fibroblasts, and Osteoblasts in Dental Implant Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fu-Yuan; Ko, Chia-Ling; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Hu, Jin-Jia; Lin, Jia-Horng; Lou, Ching-Wen; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Yin-Lai; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The major challenge for dental implants is achieving optimal esthetic appearance and a concept to fulfill this criterion is evaluated. The key to an esthetically pleasing appearance lies in the properly manage the soft tissue profile around dental implants. A novel implant restoration technique on the surface was proposed as a way to augment both soft- and hard-tissue profiles at potential implant sites. Different levels of roughness can be attained by sandblasting and acid etching, and a tetracalcium phosphate was used to supply the ions. In particular, the early stage attaching and repopulating abilities of bone cell osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), fibroblasts (NIH 3T3), and epithelial cells (XB-2) were evaluated. The results showed that XB-2 cell adhesive qualities of a smooth surface were better than those of the roughened surfaces, the proliferative properties were reversed. The effects of roughness on the characteristics of 3T3 cells were opposite to the result for XB-2 cells. E1 proliferative ability did not differ with any statistical significance. These results suggest that a rougher surface which provided calcium and phosphate ions have the ability to enhance the proliferation of osteoblast and the inhibition of fibroblast growth that enhance implant success ratios. PMID:22287942

  1. Analysis methods for meso- and macroporous silicon etching baths

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Analysis methods for electrochemical etching baths consisting of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and an additional organic surface wetting agent are presented. These electrolytes are used for the formation of meso- and macroporous silicon. Monitoring the etching bath composition requires at least one method each for the determination of the HF concentration and the organic content of the bath. However, it is a precondition that the analysis equipment withstands the aggressive HF. Titration and a fluoride ion-selective electrode are used for the determination of the HF and a cuvette test method for the analysis of the organic content, respectively. The most suitable analysis method is identified depending on the components in the electrolyte with the focus on capability of resistance against the aggressive HF. PMID:22805742

  2. Surface engineering on CeO2 nanorods by chemical redox etching and their enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Li, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications.Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Diameter distributions of as-prepared and etched samples, optical images, specific catalytic data of CO oxidation and comparison of CO oxidation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01846c

  3. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  4. Silver ion mediated shape control of platinum nanoparticles: Removal of silver by selective etching leads to increased catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Yue, Yao; Habas, Susan E.; Rioux, Robert M.; Teall, Chelsea I.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-01-09

    A procedure has been developed for the selective etching of Ag from Pt nanoparticles of well-defined shape, resulting in the formation of elementally-pure Pt cubes, cuboctahedra, or octahedra, with a largest vertex-to-vertex distance of {approx}9.5 nm from Ag-modified Pt nanoparticles. A nitric acid etching process was applied Pt nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica, as well as nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution. The characterization of the silica-supported particles by XRD, TEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements demonstrated that the structure of the nanoparticles and the mesoporous support remained conserved during etching in concentrated nitric acid. Both elemental analysis and ethylene hydrogenation indicated etching of Ag is only effective when [HNO{sub 3}] {ge} 7 M; below this concentration, the removal of Ag is only {approx}10%. Ethylene hydrogenation activity increased by four orders of magnitude after the etching of Pt octahedra that contained the highest fraction of silver. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the unsupported particles after etching demonstrated that etching does not alter the surface structure of the Pt nanoparticles. High [HNO{sub 3}] led to the decomposition of the capping agent, polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP); infrared spectroscopy confirmed that many decomposition products were present on the surface during etching, including carbon monoxide.

  5. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  6. Strongly reduced Si surface recombination by charge injection during etching in diluted HF/HNO3.

    PubMed

    Greil, Stefanie M; Schöpke, Andreas; Rappich, Jörg

    2012-08-27

    Herein, we investigate the behaviour of the surface recombination of light-induced charge carriers during the etching of Si in alkaline (KOH) and acidic etching solutions of HF/HNO(3)/CH(3)COOH (HNA) or HF/HNO(3)/H(3)PO(4) (HNP) at different concentration ratios of HF and HNO(3) by means of photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The surface recombination velocity is strongly reduced during the first stages of etching in HF/HNO(3)-containing solutions pointing to a interface well passivated by the etching process, where a positive surface charge is induced by hole injection from NO-related surface species into the Si near-surface region (back surface field effect). This injected charge leads to a change in band bending by about 150 mV that repulses the light-induced charge carriers from the surface and therefore enhances the photoluminescence intensity, since non-radiative surface recombination is reduced. PMID:22761060

  7. Optimal conditions for the preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces on al substrates using a simple etching approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Min; Li, Wen; Wang, Baoshan; Luo, Qiang; Ma, Fumin; Yu, Zhanlong

    2012-07-01

    Many methods have been proposed to develop the fabrication techniques for superhydrophobic surfaces. However, such techniques are still at their infant stage and suffer many shortcomings. In this paper, the superhydrophobic surfaces on an Al substrate were prepared by a simple etching method. Effects of etching time, modifiers, and modification concentration and time were investigated, and optimal conditions for the best superhydrophobicity were studied. It was demonstrated that for etching the aluminum plate in Beck's dislocation, if the etching time was 15 s, modifier was Lauric acid-ethanol solution, and modification concentration and time was 5% and 1.5 h, respectively, the surface exhibited a water contact angle as high as 167.5° and a contact angle hysteresis as low as 2.3°.

  8. Etching with electron beam generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S.G.; Muratore, C.; Fernsler, R.F.; Meger, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    A modulated electron beam generated plasma has been used to dry etch standard photoresist materials and silicon. Oxygen-argon mixtures were used to etch organic resist material and sulfur hexafluoride mixed with argon or oxygen was used for the silicon etching. Etch rates and anisotropy were determined with respect to gas compositions, incident ion energy (from an applied rf bias) and plasma duty factor. For 1818 negative resist and i-line resists the removal rate increased nearly linearly with ion energy (up to 220 nm/min at 100 eV), with reasonable anisotropic pattern transfer above 50 eV. Little change in etch rate was seen as gas composition went from pure oxygen to 70% argon, implying the resist removal mechanism in this system required the additional energy supplied by the ions. With silicon substrates at room temperature, mixtures of argon and sulfur hexafluoride etched approximately seven times faster (1375 nm/min) than mixtures of oxygen and sulfur hexafluoride ({approx}200 nm/min) with 200 eV ions, the difference is attributed to the passivation of the silicon by involatile silicon oxyfluoride (SiO{sub x}F{sub y}) compounds. At low incident ion energies, the Ar-SF{sub 6} mixtures showed a strong chemical (lateral) etch component before an ion-assisted regime, which started at {approx}75 eV. Etch rates were independent of the 0.5%-50% duty factors studied in this work.

  9. Graphene nanoribbons: Relevance of etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Simonet, P. Bischoff, D.; Moser, A.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2015-05-14

    Most graphene nanoribbons in the experimental literature are patterned using plasma etching. Various etching processes induce different types of defects and do not necessarily result in the same electronic and structural ribbon properties. This study focuses on two frequently used etching techniques, namely, O{sub 2} plasma ashing and O{sub 2 }+ Ar reactive ion etching (RIE). O{sub 2} plasma ashing represents an alternative to RIE physical etching for sensitive substrates, as it is a more gentle chemical process. We find that plasma ashing creates defective graphene in the exposed trenches, resulting in instabilities in the ribbon transport. These are probably caused by more or larger localized states at the edges of the ashed device compared to the RIE defined device.

  10. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  11. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  12. Etching characteristics of LiNbO3 in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.; Yu, S.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO3 single crystals including doped LiNbO3 and proton-changed LiNbO3 have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO3 have been fabricated and optically measured.

  13. Correlation between surface chemistry and ion energy dependence of the etch yield in multicomponent oxides etching

    SciTech Connect

    Berube, P.-M.; Poirier, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Stafford, L.; Ndione, P. F.; Chaker, M.; Morandotti, R.

    2009-09-15

    The influence of surface chemistry in plasma etching of multicomponent oxides was investigated through measurements of the ion energy dependence of the etch yield. Using pulsed-laser-deposited Ca{sub x}Ba{sub (1-x)}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (CBN) and SrTiO{sub 3} thin films as examples, it was found that the etching energy threshold shifts toward values larger or smaller than the sputtering threshold depending on whether or not ion-assisted chemical etching is the dominant etching pathway and whether surface chemistry is enhancing or inhibiting desorption of the film atoms. In the case of CBN films etched in an inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasma, it is found that the chlorine uptake is inhibiting the etching reaction, with the desorption of nonvolatile NbCl{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} compounds being the rate-limiting step.

  14. Characteristics of Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Film Etched by Reactive Ion Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Meiso; Li, Jiin; Su, Shui; Su, Yan

    1994-12-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) films coated on glass have been etched by reactive ion etching (RIE) with a gas mixture of Ar and Cl2. The etching rates of ITO films depend strongly on power density, gas pressure, the composition of reactive gases, and the total flow rate of etchants. According to the results from the study, we can postulate that the ITO films' etching follows the ion-assisted chemical etching. A high etching rate above 100 Å/min can be achieved, and an etching mechanism will be proposed. The selectivity of ITO films to glass reaches 35 with a 30 line/mm pattern. After exposure of ITO films to an Ar/Cl2 mixed gas plasma discharge, their sheet resistance does not markedly change. The residue of Cl atoms exists only in the region near the surface. By means of parameter control, we can obtain good pattern images of ITO films measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Etch-a-Sketch Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    2009-10-01

    The popular children's toy Etch-a-Sketch has motivated the invention of a new material capable of writing and erasing wires so small they approach the spacing between atoms. The interface between two normally insulating materials, strontium titanate and lanthanum aluminate, can be switched between the insulating and conducting state with the use of the sharp metallic probe of an atomic-force microscope. By ``sketching'' this probe in various patterns, one can create electronic materials with remarkably diverse properties. This material system shows promise both for ultra-high density storage and as possible replacements for silicon-based logic (CMOS). This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Army Research Office and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. [Dental records and responsibility].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G

    2006-03-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist is responsible for the mistakes of his assistant. Contrary to their American colleagues, Dutch dental assistants and dental hygienists cannot be summoned before a disciplinary court. As these para-medics perform more and more dental treatment, independently or after delegation, they should be assigned there own disciplinary responsibility. PMID:16566401

  17. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  18. High density plasma etching of magnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kee Bum

    Magnetic materials such as NiFe (permalloy) or NiFeCo are widely used in the data storage industry. Techniques for submicron patterning are required to develop next generation magnetic devices. The relative chemical inertness of most magnetic materials means they are hard to etch using conventional RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). Therefore ion milling has generally been used across the industry, but this has limitations for magnetic structures with submicron dimensions. In this dissertation, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) for the etching of magnetic materials (NiFe, NiFeCo, CoFeB, CoSm, CoZr) and other related materials (TaN, CrSi, FeMn), which are employed for magnetic devices like magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), magnetic read/write heads, magnetic sensors and microactuators. This research examined the fundamental etch mechanisms occurring in high density plasma processing of magnetic materials by measuring etch rate, surface morphology and surface stoichiometry. However, one concern with using Cl2-based plasma chemistry is the effect of residual chlorine or chlorinated etch residues remaining on the sidewalls of etched features, leading to a degradation of the magnetic properties. To avoid this problem, we employed two different processing methods. The first one is applying several different cleaning procedures, including de-ionized water rinsing or in-situ exposure to H2, O2 or SF6 plasmas. Very stable magnetic properties were achieved over a period of ˜6 months except O2 plasma treated structures, with no evidence of corrosion, provided chlorinated etch residues were removed by post-etch cleaning. The second method is using non-corrosive gas chemistries such as CO/NH3 or CO2/NH3. There is a small chemical contribution to the etch mechanism (i.e. formation of metal carbonyls) as determined by a comparison with Ar and N2 physical sputtering. The discharge should be NH3

  19. Galvanic etch stop for Si in KOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, E. J.; French, P. J.; Xia, X. H.; Kelly, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    Etch stops and etch-stopping techniques are essential 'tools' for 2D and 3D MEMS devices. Until now, use of a galvanic etch stop (ES) for micromachining in alkaline solutions was usually prohibited due to the large Au:Si area needed and/or high oxygen content required to achieve the ES. We report a new galvanic ES which requires a Au:exposed silicon area ratio of only ~1. Thus for the first time a practical galvanic ES for KOH has been achieved. The ES works by adding small amounts of sodium hypochlorite, NaOCl, to KOH solutions. Essentially the NaOCl increases the oxygen content in the KOH etchant. The dependancy of the galvanic ES on KOH concentration and temperature is investigated. Also, we report on the effects of the added NaOCl on etch rates. SEM images are used to examine the galvanically etch-stopped membranes and their surface morphology. For 33% KOH solutions the galvanic etch stop worked well, producing membranes with uniform thickness ~6 µm (i.e. slightly greater than the deposited epilayer). For 20% KOH solutions, the galvanic etch stop still worked, but the resulting membranes were a little thicker (~10 µm).

  20. Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela; PML, NIST Team

    We investigate the Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers in forming gas. Fe thin films are deposited by sputtering onto mechanically exfoliated graphene, few-layer graphene (FLG), and graphite flakes on a Si/SiO2 substrate. When the sample is rapidly annealed in forming gas, particles are produced due to the dewetting of the Fe thin film and those particles catalyze the etching of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene and FLG regions are severely damaged and that the particles catalytically etch channels in graphite. No etching is observed on graphite for the Fe thin film annealed in nitrogen. The critical role of hydrogen indicates that this graphite etching process is catalyzed by Fe particles through the carbon hydrogenation reaction. By comparing with the etched monolayer and FLG observed for the Fe film annealed in nitrogen, our Raman spectroscopy measurements identify that, in forming gas, the catalytic etching of monolayer and FLG is through carbon hydrogenation. During this process, Fe particles are catalytically active in the dissociation of hydrogen into hydrogen atoms and in the production of hydrogenated amorphous carbon through hydrogen spillover.

  1. Selective emitter using a screen printed etch barrier in crystalline silicon solar cell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The low level doping of a selective emitter by etch back is an easy and low cost process to obtain a better blue response from a solar cell. This work suggests that the contact resistance of the selective emitter can be controlled by wet etching with the commercial acid barrier paste that is commonly applied in screen printing. Wet etching conditions such as acid barrier curing time, etchant concentration, and etching time have been optimized for the process, which is controllable as well as fast. The acid barrier formed by screen printing was etched with HF and HNO3 (1:200) solution for 15 s, resulting in high sheet contact resistance of 90 Ω/sq. Doping concentrations of the electrode contact portion were 2 × 1021 cm−3 in the low sheet resistance (Rs) region and 7 × 1019 cm−3 in the high Rs region. Solar cells of 12.5 × 12.5 cm2 in dimensions with a wet etch back selective emitter Jsc of 37 mAcm−2, open circuit voltage (Voc) of 638.3 mV and efficiency of 18.13% were fabricated. The result showed an improvement of about 13 mV on Voc compared to those of the reference solar cell fabricated with the reactive-ion etching back selective emitter and with Jsc of 36.90 mAcm−2, Voc of 625.7 mV, and efficiency of 17.60%. PMID:22823978

  2. Etching-limiting process and origin of loading effects in silicon etching with hydrogen chloride gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Naoya; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2014-01-01

    The etching-limiting step in slow Si etching with HCl/H2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated. The etching was performed at a low etching rate below 10 nm/min in the temperature range of 1000-1100 °C. In the case of bare Si etching, it was confirmed that the etching rate showed little temperature dependence and was proportional to the equilibrium pressure of the etching by-product SiCl2 calculated by thermochemical analysis. In addition, the etching rates of Si(100) and (110) faces were almost the same. These results indicate that SiCl2 diffusion in the gas phase is the rate-limiting step. In the etching of the Si surface with SiO2 mask patterns, a strong loading effect (mask/opening pattern dependence of the etching rate) was observed. The simulation of the diffusion of gas species immediately above the Si surface revealed that the loading effect was attributed to the pattern-dependent diffusion of SiCl2.

  3. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-). Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O), and dinitrogen (N2) using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions. PMID:20307293

  4. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  5. Dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem. PMID:24984634

  6. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  7. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  8. Effect of taphonomic processes on dental microwear.

    PubMed

    King, T; Andrews, P; Boz, B

    1999-03-01

    Taphonomic processes have the potential to affect microscopic wear on teeth and to modify the wear patterns so as to confound dietary reconstructions based on dental microwear which was formed during the lifetime of an animal. This study describes a series of experiments which were conducted to simulate various taphonomic agents and to record their effect on dental microwear. Three types of experiment were carried out in order to explain anomalous microscopic wear that had been found on the dentition of several hominoid specimens from the 15 M.a. site of Pasalar in Turkey. The effect of two different acids-citric and hydrochloric acid-on dental microwear was investigated. Modification to microscopic wear caused by alkali (carbonatite ash) was examined in the second set of experiments. Lastly, the effect of abrasion by three different size classes of sediment from the site of Pasalar-quartz pebbles (grain size varied from 2,000-11,000 microm), coarse sand (grain size ranged from 500-1,000 microm), and medium-sized sand (grain diameters were between 250 and 500 microm)-was investigated. Results confirm previous findings that the taphonomic modification of dental microwear is readily identifiable and causes the obliteration rather than secondary alteration of microwear features. The experiments show that both citric and hydrochloric acid affect dental microwear but to varying degrees, whereas alkali did not cause any modification of microscopic features. The different size classes of sediment also had different effects on the dental microwear. The largest size sediment (quartz pebbles) polished the enamel and removed finer microwear features. The coarse sand, however, did not have any effect on the microwear. The greatest amount of abrasion was caused by the smallest sediment particles -the medium-sized sand. Several hominoid dental specimens from Pasalar display similar microscopic wear to the two types of acid erosion and the abrasion caused by the medium

  9. Etiology of dental erosion--intrinsic factors.

    PubMed

    Scheutzel, P

    1996-04-01

    Dental erosion due to intrinsic factors is caused by gastric acid reaching the oral cavity and the teeth as a result of vomiting or gastroesophageal reflux. Since clinical manifestation of dental erosion does not occur until gastric acid has acted on the dental hard tissues regularly over a period of several years, dental erosion caused by intrinsic factors has been observed only in those diseases which are associated with chronic vomiting or persistent gastroesophageal reflux over a long period. Examples of such conditions include disorders of the upper alimentary tract, specific metabolic and endocrine disorders, cases of medication side-effects and drug abuse, and certain psychosomatic disorders, e.g. stress-induced psychosomatic vomiting, anorexia and bulimia nervosa or rumination. Based on a review of the medical and dental literature, the main symptoms of all disorders which must be taken into account as possible intrinsic etiological factors of dental erosion are thoroughly discussed with respect to the clinical picture, prevalence and risk of erosion. PMID:8804885

  10. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, Randy J.; Constantine, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  11. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  12. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion.

  13. Electroless epitaxial etching for semiconductor applications

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon on insulator substrates using electroless etching for achieving efficient etch stopping on epitaxial silicon substrates. Microelectric circuits and devices are prepared on epitaxial silicon wafers in a standard fabrication facility. The wafers are bonded to a holding substrate. The silicon bulk is removed using electroless etching leaving the circuit contained within the epitaxial layer remaining on the holding substrate. A photolithographic operation is then performed to define streets and wire bond pad areas for electrical access to the circuit.

  14. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-02-14

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion. 4 figs.

  15. Etching Semiconductors With Beams Of Reactive Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Moore, Teresa A.

    1995-01-01

    Method of etching semiconductors with energetic beams of electrically neutral, but chemically reactive, species undergoing development. Enables etching of straight walls into semiconductor substrates at edges of masks without damage to underlying semiconductor material. In addition to elimination of charge damage, technique reduces substrate bombardment damage because translational energy of neutral species in range 2-12 eV, below damage threshold of many semiconductor materials. Furthermore, low-energy neutrals cause no mask erosion allowing for etching features with very high aspect ratios.

  16. Etiology and pathogenesis of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Kanzow, Philipp; Wegehaupt, Florian J; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The condition of dental erosion is defined as acid-related loss of tooth structure which does not involve microorganisms. Depending on the origin of the acid, extrinsic (usually caused by acids in food) and intrinsic (caused by endogenous acid) erosion can be distinguished. The presence and severity of erosive defects depend on various parameters such as nutrition, saliva, general diseases, and mechanical stress by abrasion and attrition. As an example, dietary habits which involve frequent intake of acidic food and beverages, occupational acid exposure, as well as certain drugs or diseases that affect saliva flow rate are accompanied by an increased risk of erosive dental hard tissue defects. By a thorough clinical examination and an accurate anamnesis, various erosion-related risk factors can be identified and strategies to reduce or eliminate these factors be identified. PMID:27022647

  17. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  18. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  19. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  20. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  1. Synergistic etch rates during low-energetic plasma etching of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T. A. R.; Weber, J. W.; Colsters, P. G. J.; Mestrom, D. M. H. G.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Engeln, R.

    2012-07-01

    The etch mechanisms of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films in low-energetic (<2 eV) high flux plasmas are investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results indicate a synergistic effect for the etch rate between argon ions and atomic hydrogen, even at these extremely low kinetic energies. Ion-assisted chemical sputtering is the primary etch mechanism in both Ar/H{sub 2} and pure H{sub 2} plasmas, although a contribution of swift chemical sputtering to the total etch rate is not excluded. Furthermore, ions determine to a large extent the surface morphology during plasma etching. A high influx of ions enhances the etch rate and limits the surface roughness, whereas a low ion flux promotes graphitization and leads to a large surface roughness (up to 60 nm).

  2. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  3. Dry Etching of Organic Low Dielectric Constant Film without Etch Stop Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumura, Michinobu; Fukuyama, Ryouji; Oomoto, Yutaka

    2002-04-01

    We investigated the trade-off between the increase of etch rate and the control of subtrenching in H2/N2 etching of a SiLK film (SiLK is a trademark of The Dow Chemical Company) without an etch stop layer for a Cu/low-k dual damascene structure. Based on our results, it is clear that the re-incident distribution of the reaction product influenced the mechanism of subtrenching strongly. As H etchant had the ability to remove the reaction product efficiently, we have successfully obtained good etching performance (an average etch rate of 128 nm/min, no subtrenching, and an etch rate uniformity of 8.9% within a 200 mm wafer) using an H2 high-flow-rate process in order to increase the amount of H etchant.

  4. Reversal of dental fluorosis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Dhaval N.; Shah, Jigna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical reversal of dental fluorosis with various combinations of calcium, vitamin D3, and ascorbic acid, along with changes in levels of certain biochemical parameters concerned with dental fluorosis. The role of fluoride level of drinking water in the etiology of dental fluorosis and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in both dentitions and teeth were also assessed. Materials and Methods: A total number of 50 patients with clinical features of dental fluorosis without trauma and any adverse habits were selected. Of these, in 30 co-operative patients, estimation of water fluoride level and pretreatment and post-treatment serum and urine fluoride levels were done with ion selective electrode method. The selected 30 patients were divided into three groups, that is, group A, group B, and group C, and were given various combinations of medications like calcium with vitamin D3 supplements, ascorbic acid with vitamin D3 supplements, and chlorhexidine mouthwash (placebo) for three months, respectively. These 30 patients were assessed for any change in the clinical grading of dental fluorosis. Results: No change in clinical grading of dental fluorosis was noted. Considerable reduction in serum and urine fluoride levels was noted in both group A and group B patients. Dental fluorosis was noted in permanent teeth more commonly than deciduous teeth, and permanent maxillary central incisors had the highest prevalence rate. Conclusion: This study comprises only 30 patients with three months of follow-up. So, this sample of patients and duration of follow-up period are conclusive to observe changes in biochemical parameters but not sufficient to observe changes in clinical grading. PMID:23633850

  5. Back-etch method for plan view transmission electron microscopy sample preparation of optically opaque films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Coffey, Kevin R

    2008-04-01

    Back-etch methods have been widely used to prepare plan view transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of thin films on membranes by removal of the Si substrate below the membrane by backside etching. The conventional means to determine when to stop the etch process is to observe the color of the light transmitted through the sample, which is sensitive to the remaining Si thickness. However, most metallic films thicker than 75 nm are opaque, and there is no detectable color change prior to film perforation. In this paper, a back-etch method based on the observation of an abrupt change of optical reflection contrast is introduced as a means to determine the etch endpoint to prepare TEM samples for these films. As the acid etchant removes the Si substrate material a rough interface is generated. This interface becomes a relatively smooth and featureless region when the etchant reaches the membrane (film/SiO2). This featureless region is caused by the mirror reflection of the film plane (film/SiO2 interface) through the optically transparent SiO2 layer. The lower etch rate of SiO2 (compared with Si) gives the operator enough time to stop the etching without perforating the film. A clear view of the morphology and control of Si roughness during etching are critical to this method, which are discussed in detail. The procedures of mounting wax removal and sample rinsing are also described in detail, as during these steps damage to the membrane may easily occur without appropriate consideration. As examples, the preparation of 100-nm-thick Fe-based amorphous alloy thin film and 160-nm-thick Cu-thin film samples for TEM imaging is described. PMID:18227137

  6. Annual review of selected dental literature: report of the Committee on Scientific Investigation of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, M D; Allen, E P; Bayne, S C; Donovan, T E; Hansson, T L; Klooster, J; Preston, J D

    1993-07-01

    The annual review of selected dental literature this year cites 384 published papers and reports. This year's review contains more editorial comment than reviews of years passed. New data on the biological responses to materials is emphasized in several sections. Observations on new compounds able to prevent plaque formation are presented. Clinically relevant advances in knowledge concerning the etching of different tooth structures are reported along with the effect of etching procedures on the dental pulp. Evaluation of periodontal diseases in all age groups is a topic. Limitations of current diagnostic techniques in periodontal disease, temporomandibular disorders, and implant therapy are included. There are new views on the use of dental amalgam. The future use of dental mercury is predicted. Interest in new ceramic systems is indicated as the demand for esthetics continues. Clinical information is emphasized over scientific information throughout this year's review. PMID:8366458

  7. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  8. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W. K.; Thompson, Carl V.

    2015-06-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P+-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N+-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si.Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed

  9. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  10. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  11. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  12. Optimization of inductively coupled plasma deep etching of GaN and etching damage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rongfu; Lu, Hai; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2011-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of GaN with an etching depth up to 4 μm is systemically studied by varying ICP power, RF power and chamber pressure, respectively, which results in etch rates ranging from ∼370 nm/min to 900 nm/min. The surface morphology and damages of the etched surface are characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, cathodoluminescence mapping and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Sub-micrometer-scale hexagonal pits and pillars originating from part of the structural defects within the original GaN layer are observed on the etched surface. The density of these surface features varies with etching conditions. Considerable reduction of PL band-edge emission from the etched GaN surface indicates that high-density non-radiative recombination centers are created by ICP etching. The density of these non-radiative recombination centers is found largely dependent on the degree of physical bombardments, which is a strong function of the RF power applied. Finally, a low-surface-damage etch recipe with high ICP power, low RF power, high chamber pressure is suggested.

  13. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W K; Thompson, Carl V

    2015-07-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P(+)-type and N(+)-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P(+)-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N(+)-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si. PMID:26059556

  14. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  15. Plasma etching: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kornblit, Avinoam

    2013-09-15

    The field of plasma etching is reviewed. Plasma etching, a revolutionary extension of the technique of physical sputtering, was introduced to integrated circuit manufacturing as early as the mid 1960s and more widely in the early 1970s, in an effort to reduce liquid waste disposal in manufacturing and achieve selectivities that were difficult to obtain with wet chemistry. Quickly, the ability to anisotropically etch silicon, aluminum, and silicon dioxide in plasmas became the breakthrough that allowed the features in integrated circuits to continue to shrink over the next 40 years. Some of this early history is reviewed, and a discussion of the evolution in plasma reactor design is included. Some basic principles related to plasma etching such as evaporation rates and Langmuir–Hinshelwood adsorption are introduced. Etching mechanisms of selected materials, silicon, silicon dioxide, and low dielectric-constant materials are discussed in detail. A detailed treatment is presented of applications in current silicon integrated circuit fabrication. Finally, some predictions are offered for future needs and advances in plasma etching for silicon and nonsilicon-based devices.

  16. Peculiarities of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with Ar, Kr and Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'zhanova, A.; Dauletbekova, A.; Komarov, F.; Vlasukova, L.; Yuvchenko, V.; Akilbekov, A.; Zdorovets, M.

    2016-05-01

    The process of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with 40Ar (38 MeV), 84Kr (59 MeV) and 132Xe (133 and 200 MeV) ions has been investigated. The experimental results of SiO2 etching in a hydrofluoric acid solution have been compared with the results of computer simulation based on the thermal spike model. It has been confirmed that the formation of a molten region along the swift ion trajectory with minimum radius of 3 nm can serve as a theoretical criterion for the reproducible latent track etching tracks in SiO2.

  17. Etching studies on lutetium yttrium orthosilicate LuxY2-xSiO5:Ce (LYSO) scintillator crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péter, Á.; Berze, N.; Lengyel, K.; Lörincz, E.

    2010-11-01

    Surface dissolution has been investigated on {100}, {010}, {001}, {110} and {101} oriented Lu1.6Y0.4SiO5:Ce crystal samples by using orthophosphoric acid up to 180°C. Depending on the etching temperature and surface orientation smooth or bunched surfaces were produced. In order to study the effect of the etching process on the scintillation properties temperature dependent optical absorption measurements were carried out up to 236°C. It was found that depending on the post-growth history of the sample, etching may influence the scintillation mechanism by modifying the concentration of shallow traps.

  18. Investigation of Nitride Morphology After Self-Aligned Contact Etch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Keil, J.; Helmer, B. A.; Chien, T.; Gopaladasu, P.; Kim, J.; Shon, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Self-Aligned Contact (SAC) etch has emerged as a key enabling technology for the fabrication of very large-scale memory devices. However, this is also a very challenging technology to implement from an etch viewpoint. The issues that arise range from poor oxide etch selectivity to nitride to problems with post etch nitride surface morphology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that drive nitride loss and surface behavior remain poorly understood. Using a simple langmuir site balance model, SAC nitride etch simulations have been performed and compared to actual etched results. This approach permits the study of various etch mechanisms that may play a role in determining nitride loss and surface morphology. Particle trajectories and fluxes are computed using Monte-Carlo techniques and initial data obtained from double Langmuir probe measurements. Etched surface advancement is implemented using a shock tracking algorithm. Sticking coefficients and etch yields are adjusted to obtain the best agreement between actual etched results and simulated profiles.

  19. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  20. Chemically Etched Open Tubular and Monolithic Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Luo, Quanzhou; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a new procedure for fabricating fused silica emitters for electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in which the end of a bare fused silica capillary is immersed into aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and water is pumped through the capillary to prevent etching of the interior. Surface tension causes the etchant to climb the capillary exterior, and the etch rate in the resulting meniscus decreases as a function of distance from the bulk solution. Etching continues until the silica touching the hydrofluoric acid reservoir is completely removed, essentially stopping the etch process. The resulting emitters have no internal taper, making them much less prone to clogging compared to e.g. pulled emitters. The high aspect ratios and extremely thin walls at the orifice facilitate very low flow rate operation; stable ESI-MS signals were obtained for model analytes from 5-μm-diameter emitters at a flow rate of 5 nL/min with a high degree of inter-emitter reproducibility. In extensive evaluation, the etched emitters were found to enable approximately four times as many LC-MS analyses of proteomic samples before failing compared with conventional pulled emitters. The fabrication procedure was also employed to taper the ends of polymer monolith-containing silica capillaries for use as ESI emitters. In contrast to previous work, the monolithic material protrudes beyond the fused silica capillaries, improving the monolith-assisted electrospray process.

  1. UV laser activated digital etching of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Meguro, T.; Aoyagi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The self-limited etching characteristics of digital etching employing an UV laser/Cl{sub 2}/GaAs system are presented. The self-limiting nature is the key mechanism and plays an important role in digital etching for obtaining etch rates independent of etching parameters. Surface processes based on photodissociation of physisorbed chlorine on GaAs with diffusion of negatively charged Cl into GaAs are also discussed.

  2. Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.

    This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that non-thermal atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.

  3. Plasma etching of chromium films in the fabrication of photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas P.; Buck, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    To meet the advanced CD uniformity and resolution requirements of state-of-the-art maskmaking, dry chrome etch processing may be required. Dry etching is a more anisotropic process, significantly reducing etch undercut. The absence of undercutting allows the lithographer to image the resist at the iso-focal point, eliminating the need to underexpose to maintain CDs. Also, dry etch parameters can be precisely controlled via a microprocessor- controlled etch system with a highly accurate parameter-metering system that ensures greater process control. Using design-of-experiment methodologies, a chrome plasma etch process (using OCG-895i) was developed. This work proves the feasibility of plasma etching chromium patterns on photomasks. The results show an etch that has excellent uniformity, is anisotropic, and has excellent edge quality. Also, resist selectivity is high for the etching of thin chrome films. SEM results show a significant reduction in the bias needed to achieve nominal CDs. As with many dry etch processes, loading and microloading effects (i.e., localized pattern density effect on etch rates) are a concern. Initial investigations of loading and microloading effects were conducted. Results suggest that due to the high anisotropy of the etch, microloading is not an issue. However, plate loading (or the amount of chrome removed) increases etch times and can result in radial etch patterns. Loading effects must be minimized or eliminated to optimize etch uniformity.

  4. In-office technique for selectively etching titanium abutments to improve bonding for interim implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2016-03-01

    A technique is described for increasing the surface area of a titanium abutment with hydrofluoric acid etching. This provides mechanical retention for acrylic resin and composite resins and can be easily and rapidly accomplished in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26553255

  5. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  6. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  7. Ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, Laura S; Dobney, Keith; Cooper, Alan

    2015-02-01

    Dental calculus (calcified tartar or plaque) is today widespread on modern human teeth around the world. A combination of soft starchy foods, changing acidity of the oral environment, genetic pre-disposition, and the absence of dental hygiene all lead to the build-up of microorganisms and food debris on the tooth crown, which eventually calcifies through a complex process of mineralisation. Millions of oral microbes are trapped and preserved within this mineralised matrix, including pathogens associated with the oral cavity and airways, masticated food debris, and other types of extraneous particles that enter the mouth. As a result, archaeologists and anthropologists are increasingly using ancient human dental calculus to explore broad aspects of past human diet and health. Most recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing of ancient dental calculus has provided valuable insights into the evolution of the oral microbiome and shed new light on the impacts of some of the major biocultural transitions on human health throughout history and prehistory. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of archaeological dental calculus research, and discuss the current approaches to ancient DNA sampling and sequencing. Novel applications of ancient DNA from dental calculus are discussed, highlighting the considerable scope of this new research field for evolutionary biology and modern medicine. PMID:25476244

  8. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque of Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Butt, A K; Khan, A A; Bedi, R

    1999-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is now generally accepted to play a key role in acid related and neoplastic pathology of gastroduodenal diseases. Recent reports have concluded that dental plaque is not an important reservoir for Helicobacter pylori, however, these studies did not consider the ethnic background of their subjects nor the amounts of dental plaque present. The aim of this study was to explore the association of Helicobacter pylori dental plaque colonisation in 125 males and 53 females (group I) attending a dental clinic in Pakistan. A simultaneous sample of 30 healthy volunteers with good orodental hygiene consisting of 17 males and 13 females was included as a control group (group II). Six dental plaque specimens were obtained from each subject with a sickle scaler; two were inoculated into CLO test gel and the remaining four were used to prepare cytology slides stained with Giemsa's stain. CLO test was positive in all specimens from group I, while cytology for Helicobacter pylori was positive in 173 cases in this group. One hundred and forty two cases had heavy plaque deposits and all of them were positive on cytology. In group II CLO test was positive in 20 and dental plaque cytology was positive in 7 cases. In conclusion, it is important that future studies into the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity should take into account the levels of oral cleanliness and the ethnic background of the subjects. PMID:10833287

  9. Evaluation of MMA-4-META-TBB resin as a dental adhesive material.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y S

    1984-04-01

    A new adhesive resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) was prepared, and its application to hard tooth tissues and metals was studied. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the average length of 4-META resin tags in enamel and dentin was 22 mu and 40 mu respectively. The tensile adhesive strength between 4-META resin and enamel was about 130 kg/cm2 after etching with 65% phosphoric acid. Its bond strength to dentin treated with a cleaning solution of 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride was about 190 kg/cm2. In precious alloys heated at 500 degrees C for 5-10 minutes, a bond strength of more than 100 kg/cm2 was obtained. The precious alloys containing Au, Ag, Pt and Cu should be selected especially for dental restorations. In polished non-precious alloys, the bond strength was greater than 100 kg/cm2. If non-precious alloys were oxidized with HNO3, the bond strength increased to 150-200 kg/cm2. The results suggest that the nickel-chromium alloy used in fixed prosthodontics must be treated chemically before adhesion with 4-META resin, but cobalt-chromium alloy used in removable partial dentures bonds well with 4-META resin without chemical treatment. In conclusion, MMA-4-META-TBB resin seems to be a promising adhesive material in dentistry. PMID:6571588

  10. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  11. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  12. Polymer etching in the oxygen afterglow - Increased etch rates with increased reactor loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1989-01-01

    Reactor loading has an effect on the etch rate (rate of decrease of film thickness) of films of polyvinylfluoride (Tedlar) and polyethylene exposed in the afterglow of an RF discharge in oxygen. The etch rate is found to increase with the total surface area of the polymer exposed in the reactor. The etch rates of polypyromellitimide (Kapton H) and polystyrene under these conditions are very low. However, the etch rate of these polymers is greatly enhanced by adding either Tedlar or polyethylene to the reactor. A kinetic model is proposed based on the premise that the oxygen atoms produced by the RF discharge react with Tedlar or polyethylene to produce a much more reactive species, which dominates the etching of the polymers studied.

  13. Reactive Ion Etching for Randomly Distributed Texturing of Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    ZAIDI, SALEEM H

    2002-05-01

    The quality of low-cost multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) has improved to the point that it forms approximately 50% of the worldwide photovoltaic (PV) power production. The performance of commercial mc-Si solar cells still lags behind c-Si due in part to the inability to texture it effectively and inexpensively. Surface texturing of mc-Si has been an active field of research. Several techniques including anodic etching [1], wet acidic etching [2], lithographic patterning [3], and mechanical texturing [4] have been investigated with varying degrees of success. To date, a cost-effective technique has not emerged.

  14. A relative humidity sensing probe based on etched thin-core fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zaihang; Zhou, Libin; Liu, Nan; Gang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Hu, Manli

    2015-12-01

    A relative humidity (RH) sensing probe based on etched thin-core fiber (TCF) coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated.This sensor is constructed by splicing a section of TCF with a single mode fiber (SMF), then part of the TCF's cladding is etched by hydrofluoric acid solution and finally the tip of TCF is coated with PVA. Experimental results demonstrate that this sensor can measure the ambient RH by demodulating the power variation of reflection spectrum. The power demodulation method make this sensor can ignore the temperature cross-sensitivity and have an extensive application prospect.

  15. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  16. Two modes of surface roughening during plasma etching of silicon: Role of ionized etch products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazaki, Nobuya; Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-01

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening has been investigated during Si etching in inductively coupled Cl2 plasmas, as a function of rf bias power or ion incident energy Ei, by varying feed gas flow rate, wafer stage temperature, and etching time. The experiments revealed two modes of surface roughening which occur depending on Ei: one is the roughening mode at low Ei < 200-300 eV, where the root-mean-square (rms) roughness of etched surfaces increases with increasing Ei, exhibiting an almost linear increase with time during etching (t < 20 min). The other is the smoothing mode at higher Ei, where the rms surface roughness decreases substantially with Ei down to a low level < 0.4 nm, exhibiting a quasi-steady state after some increase at the initial stage (t < 1 min). Correspondingly, two different behaviors depending on Ei were also observed in the etch rate versus √{Ei } curve, and in the evolution of the power spectral density distribution of surfaces. Such changes from the roughening to smoothing modes with increasing Ei were found to correspond to changes in the predominant ion flux from feed gas ions Clx+ to ionized etch products SiClx+ caused by the increased etch rates at increased Ei, in view of the results of several plasma diagnostics. Possible mechanisms for the formation and evolution of surface roughness during plasma etching are discussed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations of the surface feature evolution and classical molecular dynamics simulations of etch fundamentals, including stochastic roughening and effects of ion reflection and etch inhibitors.

  17. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-04-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  18. Process capability of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kosuke; Iida nee Sakurai, Noriko; Kamo, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Hayashi, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    With shrinking pattern size at 0.33NA EUV lithography systems, mask 3D effects are expected to become stronger, such as horizontal/vertical shadowing, best focus shifts through pitch and pattern shift through focus. Etched multilayer EUV mask structures have been proposed in order to reduce mask 3D effects. It is estimated that etched multilayer type mask is also effective in reducing mask 3D effects at 0.33NA with lithographic simulation, and it is experimentally demonstrated with NXE3300 EUV Lithography system. We obtained cross-sectional TEM image of etched multilayer EUV mask pattern. It is observed that patterned multilayer width differs from pattern physical width. This means that effective reflecting width of etched multilayer pattern is smaller than pattern width measured by CD-SEM. In this work, we evaluate mask durability against both chemical and physical cleaning process to check the feasibility of etched multilayer EUV mask patterning against mask cleaning for 0.33NA EUV extension. As a result, effective width can be controlled by suitable cleaning chemicals because sidewall film works as a passivation film. And line and space pattern collapse is not detected by DUV mask pattern inspection tool after mask physical cleaning that includes both megasonic and binary spray steps with sufficient particle removal efficiency.

  19. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  20. Pulsed plasma etching for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-07-01

    Power-modulated (pulsed) plasmas have demonstrated several advantages compared to continuous wave (CW) plasmas. Specifically, pulsed plasmas can result in a higher etching rate, better uniformity, and less structural, electrical or radiation (e.g. vacuum ultraviolet) damage. Pulsed plasmas can also ameliorate unwanted artefacts in etched micro-features such as notching, bowing, micro-trenching and aspect ratio dependent etching. As such, pulsed plasmas may be indispensable in etching of the next generation of micro-devices with a characteristic feature size in the sub-10 nm regime. This work provides an overview of principles and applications of pulsed plasmas in both electropositive (e.g. argon) and electronegative (e.g. chlorine) gases. The effect of pulsing the plasma source power (source pulsing), the electrode bias power (bias pulsing), or both source and bias power (synchronous pulsing), on the time evolution of species densities, electron energy distribution function and ion energy and angular distributions on the substrate is discussed. The resulting pulsed plasma process output (etching rate, uniformity, damage, etc) is compared, whenever possible, to that of CW plasma, under otherwise the same or similar conditions.

  1. Patterning enhancement techniques by reactive ion etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Masanobu; Yatsuda, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    The root causes of issues in state-of-the-arts resist mask are low plasma tolerance in etch and resolution limit in lithography. This paper introduces patterning enhancement techniques (PETs) by reactive ion etch (RIE) that solve the above root causes. Plasma tolerance of resist is determined by the chemical structure of resin. We investigated a hybrid direct current (DC) / radio frequency (RF) RIE to enhance the plasma tolerance with several gas chemistries. The DC/RF hybrid RIE is a capacitive coupled plasma etcher with a superimposed DC voltage, which generates a ballistic electron beam. We clarified the mechanism of resist modification, which resulted in higher plasma tolerance[1]. By applying an appropriate gas to DC superimposed (DCS) plasma, etch resistance and line width roughness (LWR) of resist were improved. On the other hand, RIE can patch resist mask. RIE does not only etch but also deposits polymer onto the sidewall with sedimentary type gases. In order to put the deposition technique by RIE in practical use, it is very important to select an appropriate gas chemistry, which can shrink CD and etch BARC. By applying this new technique, we successfully fabricated a 35-nm hole pattern with a minimum CD variation.

  2. Low radio frequency biased electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukawa, Seiji; Toyosato, Tomohiko; Wani, Etsuo

    1991-03-01

    A radio frequency (rf) biased electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etching technology has been developed to realize an efficient ion acceleration in high density and uniform ECR plasma for accurate Al-Si-Cu alloy film etching. In this technology, the substrate is located at the ECR position (875 G position) and the etching is carried out with a 400 kHz rf bias power. This Al-Si-Cu etching technology achieves a high etching rate (more than 5000 A/min), excellent etching uniformity (within ±5%), highly anisotropic etching, and Cu residue-free etching in only Cl2 gas plasma. These etching characteristics are accomplished by the combination of the dense and uniform ECR plasma generation at the ECR position with the efficient accelerated ion flux at the ECR position by using 400 kHz rf bias.

  3. Laser etching of enamel for direct bonding with an Er,Cr:YSGG hydrokinetic laser system.

    PubMed

    Uşümez, Serdar; Orhan, Metin; Uşümez, Aslihan

    2002-12-01

    Irradiation of enamel with laser energy changes the physical and chemical characteristics of the enamel surface, and these alterations hold promise for the conditioning of enamel for bonding procedures. This laboratory study examined the influence of laser irradiation of enamel at 2 different power settings with an erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) hydrokinetic laser system (Millennium System, Biolase Technology, Inc; San Clemente, Calif) on the shear bond strength of orthodontic appliances and compared these with that of acid-etching. The prepared surfaces of 40 noncarious, intact, extracted premolars were exposed to laser energy: 20 teeth at 2-W setting (5.6 J/cm(2)) and 20 teeth at 1-W setting (2.7 J/cm(2)) of the commercial laser unit. Twenty teeth were etched with 37% orthophosphoric acid. Brackets were bonded with an orthodontic no-mix adhesive, and shear bond strength was determined with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Etched and restored surfaces of an acid-etched tooth and a 2-W laser-irradiated tooth were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Laser treatment under 2 W resulted in bond strengths of 7.11 +/- 4.56 megapascals (MPa), which was not significantly different from that of acid etching (8.23 +/- 2.30 MPa). Laser irradiation at 1 W resulted in bond strengths of 5.64 +/- 3.19 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P <.05). However, large SD and coefficient of variation values of both laser groups made reliability of this method as an enamel conditioner questionable. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the restored irradiated surfaces showed good surface characteristics, whereas the lased surface was still more irregular than the restored acid-etched sample. Although laser devices are effectively used in some other areas of dentistry, enamel conditioning with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser cannot be considered a successful

  4. Effect of sustained release of rhBMP-2 from dried and wet hyaluronic acid hydrogel carriers compared with direct dip coating of rhBMP-2 on peri-implant osteogenesis of dental implants in canine mandibles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui; Han, Jeong Joon; Park, Yong-Doo; Cho, Tae Hyung; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel has been used as a carrier of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 for sustained delivery. To enhance peri-implant osteogenesis, a dried coating of rhBMP-2 HA hydrogel (BMP-HAH) on dental implants was designed; this approach provides the advantage of omitting in situ preparation of wet HA hydrogel. Sustained release of rhBMP-2 was more efficient for dried hydrogel over wet hydrogel. For both types, the released rhBMP-2 consistently led to enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and osterix expression in human mesenchymal stromal cells. Histomorphometric analysis 4 weeks after placement of a dental implant in canine mandibles showed that the dried coating of BMP-HAH (10 μg/ml, n = 6) resulted in a significantly greater bone area (BA) than the wet BMP-HAH (10 μg/ml, n = 6) (p = 0.006) and implants without any coating (n = 6) (p = 0.022), while simple dip coating with rhBMP-2 (10 μg/ml, n = 6) resulted in significantly greater BA than the other three groups (p < 0.0005). Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was significantly different only between the dried and wet coating of BMP-HAH (p = 0.014). Our results suggest that a simple dip coating of rhBMP-2 is more effective for increased peri-implant osteogenesis compared to a coating of BMP-HAH with sustained release. PMID:26732636

  5. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  6. A theoretical analysis of the effects of plaque thickness and initial salivary sucrose concentration on diffusion of sucrose into dental plaque and its conversion to acid during salivary clearance.

    PubMed

    Dawes, C; Dibdin, G H

    1986-02-01

    A mathematical model, written in FORTRAN, has been developed to simulate the interrelated processes of salivary sucrose clearance from the mouth, diffusion of sucrose into dental plaque, and conversion of sucrose to acid and glucan. Reaction of acid with enamel is not included in the model. A total of 28 parameters can be varied by the user, and the relative importance of the different factors affecting acid formation can be assessed. The output of the program gives sucrose and acid concentrations and pH at different depths within the plaque. The initial variables studied were plaque thickness, the salivary sucrose concentration, and the duration of exposure of the plaque to sucrose. Stephan curves typical of those recorded in vivo were generated by the model. With any particular salivary sucrose concentration, there was an optimum plaque thickness at which a minimum pH was achieved at the enamel surface, with very thin or thick plaque samples producing a smaller pH fall. With thick plaque, the minimum pH was often not achieved at the inner surface but at some intermediate depth, which may explain the location of early caries lesions in fissures. The extent of the pH fall at the inner surface and the duration of the pH-minimum region of the Stephan curve were directly related to the initial salivary sucrose concentration and to the duration of exposure to sucrose prior to normal salivary clearance. Simulation of a water rinse at as short a time as two min after the beginning of normal salivary sugar clearance showed that this procedure had only a very small effect on the shape of the Stephan curve.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3455974

  7. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  8. Solderability enhancement of copper through chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.O.; Guilinger, T.R.; Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with consortium members of the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to develop fundamental generic technology in the area of printed wiring board materials and surface finishes. Improved solderability of copper substrates is an important component of the Sandia-NCMS program. The authors are investigating the effects of surface roughness on the wettability and solderability behavior of several different types of copper board finishes. In this paper, the authors present roughness and solderability characterizations for a variety of chemically-etched copper substrates. Initial testing on six chemical etches demonstrate that surface roughness can be greatly enhanced through chemical etching. Noticeable improvements in solder wettability were observed to accompany increases in roughness. A number of different algorithms and measures of roughness were used to gain insight into surface morphologies that lead to improved solderability.

  9. Distinguishing shocked from tectonically deformed quartz by the use of the SEM and chemical etching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gratz, A.J.; Fisler, D.K.; Bohor, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sets of crystallographically-oriented planar deformation features (PDFs) are generated by high-strain-rate shock waves at pressures of > 12 GPa in naturally shocked quartz samples. On surfaces, PDFs appear as narrow (50-500 nm) lamellae filled with amorphosed quartz (diaplectic glass) which can be etched with hydrofluoric acid or with hydrothermal alkaline solutions. In contrast, slow-strain-rate tectonic deformation pressure produces wider, semi-linear and widely spaced arrays of dislocation loops that are not glass filled. Etching samples with HF before examination in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for unambiguous visual distinction between glass-filled PDFs and glass-free tectonic deformation arrays in quartz. This etching also reveals the internal 'pillaring' often characteristic of shock-induced PDFs. This technique is useful for easily distinguishing between shock and tectonic deformation in quartz, but does not replace optical techniques for characterizing the shock features.

  10. Maskless micro/nanofabrication on GaAs surface by friction-induced selective etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peng; Yu, Bingjun; Guo, Jian; Song, Chenfei; Qian, Linmao

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, a friction-induced selective etching method was developed to produce nanostructures on GaAs surface. Without any resist mask, the nanofabrication can be achieved by scratching and post-etching in sulfuric acid solution. The effects of the applied normal load and etching period on the formation of the nanostructure were studied. Results showed that the height of the nanostructure increased with the normal load or the etching period. XPS and Raman detection demonstrated that residual compressive stress and lattice densification were probably the main reason for selective etching, which eventually led to the protrusive nanostructures from the scratched area on the GaAs surface. Through a homemade multi-probe instrument, the capability of this fabrication method was demonstrated by producing various nanostructures on the GaAs surface, such as linear array, intersecting parallel, surface mesas, and special letters. In summary, the proposed method provided a straightforward and more maneuverable micro/nanofabrication method on the GaAs surface.

  11. Maskless micro/nanofabrication on GaAs surface by friction-induced selective etching.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peng; Yu, Bingjun; Guo, Jian; Song, Chenfei; Qian, Linmao

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a friction-induced selective etching method was developed to produce nanostructures on GaAs surface. Without any resist mask, the nanofabrication can be achieved by scratching and post-etching in sulfuric acid solution. The effects of the applied normal load and etching period on the formation of the nanostructure were studied. Results showed that the height of the nanostructure increased with the normal load or the etching period. XPS and Raman detection demonstrated that residual compressive stress and lattice densification were probably the main reason for selective etching, which eventually led to the protrusive nanostructures from the scratched area on the GaAs surface. Through a homemade multi-probe instrument, the capability of this fabrication method was demonstrated by producing various nanostructures on the GaAs surface, such as linear array, intersecting parallel, surface mesas, and special letters. In summary, the proposed method provided a straightforward and more maneuverable micro/nanofabrication method on the GaAs surface. PMID:24495647

  12. Formation of Mach angle profiles during wet etching of silica and silicon nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulinyan, M.; Bernard, M.; Bartali, R.; Pucker, G.

    2015-12-01

    In integrated circuit technology peeling of masking photoresist films is a major drawback during the long-timed wet etching of materials. It causes an undesired film underetching, which is often accompanied by a formation of complex etch profiles. Here we report on a detailed study of wedge-shaped profile formation in a series of silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride materials during wet etching in a buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution. The shape of etched profiles reflects the time-dependent adhesion properties of the photoresist to a particular material and can be perfectly circular, purely linear or a combination of both, separated by a knee feature. Starting from a formal analogy between the sonic boom propagation and the wet underetching process, we model the wedge formation mechanism analytically. This model predicts the final form of the profile as a function of time and fits the experimental data perfectly. We discuss how this knowledge can be extended to the design and the realization of optical components such as highly efficient etch-less vertical tapers for passive silicon photonics.

  13. Maskless micro/nanofabrication on GaAs surface by friction-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a friction-induced selective etching method was developed to produce nanostructures on GaAs surface. Without any resist mask, the nanofabrication can be achieved by scratching and post-etching in sulfuric acid solution. The effects of the applied normal load and etching period on the formation of the nanostructure were studied. Results showed that the height of the nanostructure increased with the normal load or the etching period. XPS and Raman detection demonstrated that residual compressive stress and lattice densification were probably the main reason for selective etching, which eventually led to the protrusive nanostructures from the scratched area on the GaAs surface. Through a homemade multi-probe instrument, the capability of this fabrication method was demonstrated by producing various nanostructures on the GaAs surface, such as linear array, intersecting parallel, surface mesas, and special letters. In summary, the proposed method provided a straightforward and more maneuverable micro/nanofabrication method on the GaAs surface. PMID:24495647

  14. Purified water etching of native oxides on heteroepitaxial CdTe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Carvalho, Jessica L.; Miki, Carley; Rideout, Joshua; Jovanovic, Stephen M.; Devenyi, Gabriel A.; Preston, John S.

    2014-12-01

    The etching of native oxides on compound semiconductors is an important step in the production of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although it is known that the native oxide on CdTe can be etched through a rinsing in purified water, a deeper investigation into this process has not been done. Here we present results on both surface morphology changes and reaction rates for purified water etching of the native oxide on heteroepitaxial CdTe thin films, as studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Together with a characterization of both the structure and stoichiometry of the initial native oxide, we show how an altering of the pH-level of the etchant will affect the etching rates. If oxide regrowth was allowed, constant etching rates could be observed for all etchants, while a logarithmic decrease in oxide thickness was observed if regrowth was inhibited. Both acidic and basic etchants proved to be more efficient than neutral water.

  15. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  16. Dental biothermophotonics: How photothermal methods are winning the race with X-rays for dental caries diagnostic needs of clinical dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, A.; Jeon, R.; Matvienko, A.; Abrams, S. H.; Amaechi, B. T.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in biothermophotonics of teeth are presented. The presentation is centered on the development of clinical-level frequency-domain photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence to address issues associated with the early diagnosis of demineralization caries in human teeth. Biothermophotonic principles and applications to the detection of the carious state in human teeth as embodied by laser photothermal radiometry are presented and further supported by modulated luminescence. The emphasis is on recent developments with regard to abilities of these techniques to diagnose interproximal lesions between teeth, etching with phosphoric acid and with an artificial demineralization gel in order to simulate early demineralization, as well as demineralization and remineralization of dental crown enamel and root dentin. These are lesions which normally go undetected by X-ray radiographs. Comparisons with X rays, Micro-Computed Tomography (μ-CT) and Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) are discussed. A theoretical model involving coupled diffuse photon density and thermal-wave fields is developed and applied to frequency scans from demineralized artificial lesions to produce quantitative values for optical and thermophysical parameters of teeth as well as the thickness of the induced lesion.

  17. Effect of ceramic etching protocols on resin bond strength to a feldspar ceramic.

    PubMed

    Bottino, M A; Snellaert, A; Bergoli, C D; Özcan, M; Bottino, M C; Valandro, L F

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) stability of a leucite-reinforced ceramic after different ceramic etching protocols. The microtensile test had 40 ceramic blocks (5×5×6 mm) assigned to five groups (n=8), in accordance with the following surface etching protocols: NE nonetched (control); 9HF: hydrofluoric (HF) acid etching (9%HF)+wash/dry; 4HF: 4%HF+wash/dry; 5HF: 5%HF+wash/dry; and 5HF+N: 5%HF+neutralizer+wash/dry+ultrasonic-cleaning. Etched ceramic surfaces were treated with a silane agent. Next, resin cement blocks were built on the prepared ceramic surface and stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain microtensile beams (32/block), which were randomly assigned to the following conditions, nonaged (immediate test) and aged (water storage for 150 days plus 12,000 thermal cycles), before the microtensile test. Bond strength data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). Additional ceramic samples were subjected to the different ceramic etching protocols and evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (n=2) and atomic force microscopy (n=2). Aging led to a statistically significant decrease in the MTBS for all groups, except the untreated one (NE). Among the groups submitted to the same aging conditions, the untreated (NE) revealed inferior MTBS values compared to the 9HF and 4HF groups. The 5HF and 5HF+N groups had intermediate mean values, being statistically similar to the higher values presented by the 9HF and 4HF groups and to the lower value associated with the NE group. The neutralization procedure did not enhance the ceramic/resin cement bond strength. HF acid etching is a crucial step in resin/ceramic bonding. PMID:25535782

  18. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  19. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  20. Deep wet etching of borosilicate glass and fused silica with dehydrated AZ4330 and a Cr/Au mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Joo-Young; Yoo, Sunghyun; Bae, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights a superior glass-wet-etch technique which enables a glass wafer to be etched for more than 20 h in 49 wt% hydrofluoric acid (HF) only with Cr/Au film and a common positive photoresist, AZ4330. We demonstrated that pits on the wet-etched glass wafer were generated not only due to HF diffusion through the Cr/Au film but also due to pinholes on the Cr/Au films created by the diffusion of the Cr/Au etchant through a photoresist etching-mask during the Cr/Au wet etching process. These two types of diffusion, HF diffusion and Cr/Au etchant diffusion, were eliminated by the thermal curing of a photoresist (PR), AZ4330, before the Cr/Au wet etching process. The curing process allowed the PR to dehydrate, increased the hydrophobicity, and prevented the diffusion of the hydrophilic HF and Cr/Au etchant. Optimization of the curing process was performed, showing that curing at 130 °C for 20 min was the proper condition. With the optimized process, a 525 µm thick borosilicate glass wafer was penetrated with 49%wt HF. A fused silica wafer 525 µm thick was also wet-etched and penetrated with 49 wt% HF at 10 h. Moreover, no pits were found in wet etching of the fused silica for 20 h in 49 wt% HF. These findings demonstrate that the proposed technique allows the wet etching of a glass wafer for more than 20 h in 49%wt HF, the best result thus far. We fabricated a glass substrate with a 217.0 µm deep cavity and a penetrating through-via using the proposed technique, proving the feasibility of the product as an optical component with a surface roughness of 45.5 Å in the cavity.

  1. Characterization of electric discharge machining, subsequent etching and shot-peening as a surface treatment for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stráský, Josef; Havlíková, Jana; Bačáková, Lucie; Harcuba, Petr; Mhaede, Mansour; Janeček, Miloš

    2013-09-01

    Presented work aims at multi-method characterization of combined surface treatment of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for biomedical use. Surface treatment consists of consequent use of electric discharge machining (EDM), acid etching and shot peening. Surface layers are analyzed employing scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Acid etching by strong Kroll's reagent is capable of removing surface layer of transformed material created by EDM. Acid etching also creates partly nanostructured surface and significantly contributes to the enhanced proliferation of the bone cells. The cell growth could be positively affected by the superimposed bone-inspired structure of the surface with the morphological features in macro-, micro- and nano-range. Shot peening significantly improves poor fatigue performance after EDM. Final fatigue performance is comparable to benchmark electropolished material without any adverse surface effect. The proposed three-step surface treatment is a low-cost process capable of producing material that is applicable in orthopedics.

  2. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  3. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  4. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  5. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  6. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  7. Wettability investigating on the wet etching textured multicrystalline silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangju; Niu, Yuchao; Zhai, Tongguang; Ma, Yuying; Zhen, Yongtai; Ma, Xiaoyu; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the wettability properties of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si), the different surface structures were fabricated on the as-cut p-type multi-wire slurry sawn mc-Si wafers, such as as-cut, polished and etched in various acid solutions. The contact angles and the XRD spectra of these samples were measured. It was noted that both the surface structures and the use of surfactant, such as Tween 80, made a stronger effect on wettability of the Si wafer. Due to the lipophilic groups of Tween 80 combined with the Si atoms while the hydrophilic groups of it were outward, a lipophilic surface of Si changed into a hydrophilic one and the rougher the surface, the stronger the hydrophily. Thus, it is feasible to add an appropriate surfactant into the etching solution during black-Si wafer fabrication for solar cells. In addition, different crystal plains of Si had different dangling bond density, so that their surface energies were different. A surface with higher surface energy could attract more water atoms and its wettability was better. However, the effect of crystal plain on the surface wettability was much weaker than surface morphology.

  8. Dynamic observation of electrochemical etching in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, F.M.; Searson, P.C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors have designed and constructed a TEM specimen holder in order to observe the process of pore formation in silicon. The holder incorporates electrical feedthroughs and a sealed reservoir for the electrolyte and accepts lithographically patterned silicon specimens. The authors describe the system and present preliminary, ex situ observations of the etching process.

  9. Dry etching of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; McLane, G.F.; Constantine, C.

    1995-12-01

    The chemical inertness and high bond strengths of the III-V nitrides lead to slower plasma etching rates than for more conventional III-V semiconductors under the same conditions. High ion density conditions (>3{times}l0{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3}) such as those obtained in ECR or magnetron reactors produce etch rates up to an order of magnitude higher than for RIE, where the ion densities are in the 10{sup 9}cm{sup {minus}3} range. We have developed smooth anisotropic dry etches for GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys based on Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar, Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}, HBr/H{sub 2} and HI/H{sub 2} plasma chemistries achieving etch rates up to {approximately}4,000{angstrom}/min at moderate dc bias voltages ({le}-150V). Ion-induced damage in the nitrides appears to be less apparent than in other III-V`s. One of the key remaining issues is the achievement of high selectivities for removal of one layer from another.

  10. Technique for etching monolayer and multilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Conley, Raymond P.; Divan, Ralu; Macrander, Albert

    2015-10-06

    A process is disclosed for sectioning by etching of monolayers and multilayers using an RIE technique with fluorine-based chemistry. In one embodiment, the process uses Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) alone or in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) using fluorine-based chemistry alone and using sufficient power to provide high ion energy to increase the etching rate and to obtain deeper anisotropic etching. In a second embodiment, a process is provided for sectioning of WSi.sub.2/Si multilayers using RIE in combination with ICP using a combination of fluorine-based and chlorine-based chemistries and using RF power and ICP power. According to the second embodiment, a high level of vertical anisotropy is achieved by a ratio of three gases; namely, CHF.sub.3, Cl.sub.2, and O.sub.2 with RF and ICP. Additionally, in conjunction with the second embodiment, a passivation layer can be formed on the surface of the multilayer which aids in anisotropic profile generation.

  11. Etch Profile Simulation Using Level Set Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Etching and deposition of materials are critical steps in semiconductor processing for device manufacturing. Both etching and deposition may have isotropic and anisotropic components, due to directional sputtering and redeposition of materials, for example. Previous attempts at modeling profile evolution have used so-called "string theory" to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma. One complication of this method is that extensive de-looping schemes are required at the profile corners. We will present a 2D profile evolution simulation using level set theory to model the surface. (1) By embedding the location of the interface in a field variable, the need for de-looping schemes is eliminated and profile corners are more accurately modeled. This level set profile evolution model will calculate both isotropic and anisotropic etch and deposition rates of a substrate in low pressure (10s mTorr) plasmas, considering the incident ion energy angular distribution functions and neutral fluxes. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in Ar/Cl2 discharges for various incident ion energies and trench geometries.

  12. Marginal Microleakage and Morphological Characteristics of a Solvent-Free One-Step Self-Etch Adhesive (B1SF)

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Shirban, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In recent years, newly developed solvent-free dental adhesives have been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal integrity of a new one-step solvent-free self-etch adhesive and to compare it with a commonly used two-step self-etch adhesive as the gold standard. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities (2×4×1.5 mm) were prepared on the buccal aspects of 28 human premolars. The cervical margins of the cavity preparations were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) (two-step self-etch adhesive) and Bond 1SF (B1SF) (one-step self-etch adhesive) were applied to the cavities in groups 1 and 2 (n=14), respectively. Then, the specimens were restored with A2 shade of APX composite resin. Each group was evaluated for dye penetration under a stereomicroscope at ×32 after 24 hours and 500 rounds of thermocycling. Statistical analyses were carried out using Mann Whitney test (α=0.05). In addition, in each experimental group, two specimens were prepared for analysis under SEM. Results: There were no significant differences in enamel margin microleakage between the two adhesives used (P=0.24(; whereas, there were significant differences in dentin margin microleakage between CSEB and B1SF (P=0.004). Dentin microleakage of B1SF was higher than that of CSEB. Conclusion: Results showed that the enamel marginal integrity of B1SF as a newly developed one-step solvent-free self-etch adhesive was similar to that of CSEB as a commonly used two-step self-etch; however, dentinal sealing of CSEB was better than that of B1SF. PMID:23724201

  13. Multilayer Badges Indicate Depths Of Ion Sputter Etches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.; Garvin, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer badges devised to provide rapid, in-place indications of ion sputter etch rates. Badges conceived for use in estimating ion erosion of molybdenum electrodes used in inert-gas ion thrustors. Concept adapted to measure ion erosion in industrial sputter etching processes used for manufacturing of magnetic, electronic, and optical devices. Badge etched when bombarded by energetic ions. Badge layers exposed using mask. Contrast between layers facilitates counting of layers to determine etch depth.

  14. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  15. High index contrast polysiloxane waveguides fabricated by dry etching

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, S. J.; Zhang, M. Y.; Choi, D.-Y.; Luther-Davies, B.; Charters, R.

    2009-05-15

    The authors demonstrate the production of low loss enhanced index contrast waveguides by reactive ion etching of IPG trade mark sign polysiloxane thin films. The use of a silica mask and CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} etch gas led to large etch selectivity between the silica and IPG trade mark sign of >20 and etch rates of >100 nm/min. This work indicates that compact optical circuits could be successfully fabricated for telecommunication applications using polysiloxane films.

  16. Optimization of Track Etched Makrofol Etching Conditions for Short-term Exposure Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, V.; Font, Ll.

    Exposure time of nuclear track detectors at humid environments is normally limited to a few weeks because filter used to avoid humidity is not completely waterproof and, after several months, some parts of detector start to degrade. In other really extreme measurement conditions, like high aerosol content, high or low temperatures, etc., the exposure time also requires a reduction. Then detector detection limit becomes a problem, unless radon concentrations were high. In those cases where radon levels are not high enough a better detection efficiency is required. In our laboratory we use passive detectors based on the track etched Makrofol DE foil covered with aluminized Mylar and they are analyzed by means of an electrochemical etching. Our standard etching conditions allow analyzing detectors generally exposed for periods between three and six months. We have optimized our etching conditions to reduce the exposure time down to a month for common radon concentration values.

  17. Resonance frequency analysis of 208 Straumann dental implants during the healing period.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ahmet Umut; Sumer, Mahmut; Duran, Ibrahim; Sandikci, Elif Ozen; Telcioglu, Nazife Tuba

    2013-04-01

    The most important prerequisite for the success of an osseointegrated dental implant is achievement and maintenance of implant stability. The aim of the study was to measure the 208 Straumann dental implant stability quotient (ISQ) values during the osseointegration period and determine the factors that affect implant stability. A total of 164 of the implants inserted were standard surface, and 44 of them were SLActive surface. To determine implant stability as ISQ values, measurements were performed at the stage of implant placement and healing periods by the Osstell mentor. The ISQ value ranges showed a significant increase during the healing period. Except for the initial measurement, the posterior maxilla had the lowest ISQ values, and there was no significant difference among anterior mandible, posterior mandible, and anterior maxilla (P < .05). Implant length did not have a significant influence on ISQ value (P > .05). The second measurement was significantly higher in men compared with women (P < .05). The second measurement was significantly higher than the others at 4.8 mm, and for the final measurement, there were no significant differences between 4.8 and 4.1 mm, which were higher than 3.3 mm (P < .05). When comparing sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) and SLActive surface implants, there were no significant differences for insertion measurements, but for second measurements, SLActive was significantly higher (P = 0), and for the final measurement, there was no significant difference. It appears that repeated ISQ measurements of a specific implant have some diagnostic benefit, and the factors that affect implant stability during the healing period are presented. PMID:22103915

  18. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Shichong; Wang, Manle; Gu, Yingxin; Luo, Huiwen; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA) titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the immobilized Ag NPs had no apparent toxic influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results demonstrated that good bactericidal activity could be obtained with very small quantities of immobilized Ag NPs, which were not detrimental to the mammalian cells involved in the osseointegration process, and promising for titanium-based dental implants with commercial SLA surfaces. PMID:26604743

  19. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hossein; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Materials and Methods: Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as follows: 1) machined finish as control, 2) machined finish and sandblasting with alumina, and 3) machined finish and hydrofluoric acid etching for the leucite and lithium disilicate-based ceramics, and for the zirconia; 1) machined finish and post-sintered as control, 2) machined finish, post-sintered, and sandblasting, and 3) machined finish, post-sintered, and Nd;YAG laser irradiation. The BFS were measured in a universal testing machine. Data based were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparisons post-hoc test (α=0.05). Results: The mean BFS of machined finish only surfaces for leucite ceramic was significantly higher than that of sandblasted (P=0.001) and acid etched surfaces (P=0.005). A significantly lower BFS was found after sandblasting for lithium disilicate compared with that of other groups (P<0.05). Sandblasting significantly increased the BFS for the zirconia (P<0.05), but the BFS was significantly decreased after laser irradiation (P<0.05). Conclusions: The BFS of the machinable ceramics was affected by the type of ceramic material and surface treatment method. Sandblasting with alumina was detrimental to the strength of only silica-based ceramics. Nd:YAG laser irradiation may lead to substantial strength degradation of zirconia. PMID:27148372

  20. CR-39 track etching and blow-up method

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    This invention is a method of etching tracks in CR-39 foil to obtain uniformly sized tracks. The invention comprises a step of electrochemically etching the foil at a low frequency and a "blow-up" step of electrochemically etching the foil at a high frequency.

  1. New phase formation in titanium aluminide during chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaki, Akito; Ojima, Kozo; Taneda, Youji . Dept. of Mathematics and Physics)

    1994-05-01

    A chemical etching technique is widely used for metallographic observation. Because this technique is based on a local corrosion phenomenon on a sample, the etching mechanism, particularly for two-phase alloys, can be understood by electrochemical consideration. This paper describes formation of a new phase in a Ti-45Al (at.%) titanium aluminide during chemical etching, and the experimental results are discussed electrochemically.

  2. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  3. Etched profile control in anisotropic etching of silicon by TMAH+Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Gosálvez, M. A.; Sato, K.

    2012-06-01

    The adverse effect of mechanical agitation (magnetic bead stirring) as well as galvanic interaction between the evolving facets of the etch front on the amount of undercutting during anisotropic etching of Si{1 0 0} wafers in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is studied by etching different mask patterns in magnetically stirred and nonstirred solutions. Triton X-100, with formula C14H22O(C2H4O)n, where n = 9-10, is used as the surfactant. The stirring results conclude that the adsorption of the surfactant on the etched silicon surfaces is predominantly physical in nature rather than chemical (physisorption versus chemisorption). The proposed model to account for the galvanic interaction between the evolving facets indicates that the underlying chemical etching process can be significantly surpassed by the onset of an electrochemical etching contribution when the relative area of the exposed {1 0 0} surface becomes relatively small in comparison to that of the developed {1 1 1} sidewalls. This study is useful for engineering applications where surfactant-added TMAH is used for the fabrication of silicon MEMS structures that should contain negligible undercutting.

  4. Vertical etching with isolated catalysts in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lianto, Prayudi; Yu, Sihang; Wu, Jiaxin; Thompson, C V; Choi, W K

    2012-12-01

    Metal assisted chemical etching with interconnected catalyst structures has been used to create a wide array of organized nanostructures. However, when patterned catalysts are not interconnected, but are isolated instead, vertical etching to form controlled features is difficult. A systematic study of the mechanism and catalyst stability of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si in HF and H(2)O(2) using Au catalysts has been carried out. The effects of the etchants on the stability of Au catalysts were examined in detail. The role of excess electronic holes as a result of MACE was investigated via pit formation as a function of catalyst proximity and H(2)O(2) concentration. We show that a suppression of excess holes can be achieved by either adding NaCl to or increasing the HF concentration of the etching solution. We demonstrate that an electric field can direct most of the excess holes to the back of the Si wafer and thus reduce pit formation at the surface of Si between the Au catalysts. The effect of hydrogen bubbles, generated as a consequence of MACE, on the stability of Au catalysts has also been investigated. We define a regime of etch chemistry and catalyst spacing for which catalyst stability and vertical etching can be achieved. PMID:23099475

  5. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial activity of total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems: An ex vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Swathi; Shetty, Harish K.; Varma, Ravi K.; Amin, Vivek; Nair, Prathap M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the antibacterial activity of total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces viscosus through disk diffusion method. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial effects of Single Bond (SB) and Adper Prompt (AP) and aqueous solution of chlorhexidine 0.2% (positive control) were tested against standard strain of S. mutans, L. acidophilus, and A. viscosus using the disk diffusion method. The diameters of inhibition zones were measured in millimeters. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparison. Result: Of all the materials tested, AP showed the maximum inhibitory action against S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Aqueous solution of chlorhexidine 0.2% showed the maximum inhibitory action against A. viscosus. Very minimal antibacterial effect was noted for SB. Conclusion: The antibacterial effects observed for the tested different dentin bonding systems may be related to the acidic nature of the materials. PMID:24944452

  6. [Microbial corrosion of dental alloy].

    PubMed

    Li, Lele; Liu, Li

    2004-10-01

    There is a very complicated electrolytical environment in oral cavity with plenty of microorganisms existing there. Various forms of corrosion would develop when metallic prosthesis functions in mouth. One important corrosive form is microbial corrosion. The metabolic products, including organic acid and inorganic acid, will affect the pH of the surface or interface of metallic prosthesis and make a change in composition of the medium, thus influencing the electron-chemical reaction and promoting the development of corrosion. The problem of develpoment of microbial corrosion on dental alloy in the oral environment lies in the primary condition that the bacteria adhere to the surface of alloy and form a relatively independent environment that promotes corrosion. PMID:15553877

  7. Novel strategy for the design of highly transparent ArF resists with excellent dry etch resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwei; Ohfuji, Takeshi; Sasago, Masaru; Tagawa, Seiichi

    1998-06-01

    To circumvent the difficulty in seeking a balance between dry etch resistance and the transparency at 193 nm in the design of a single-layer-resist for ArF lithography, a new strategy based on the de-coupling of these two criteria from each other is presented. The possibility of the de-coupling has been demonstrated by imparting dry etch resistance to resist matrix after the exposure step. Imparting of dry etch resistance can be achieved with the utilization of thermal- activated reactions during post exposure bake or plasma- activated reactions during etching. Specifically, copolymers containing acrylonitrile were synthesized and evaluated as a demonstration. Chemical reactions, especially cyclization reaction, in the copolymers upon heating were investigated. Intramolecular cyclization of the nitrile groups, which is electrophilic reagent catalyzed, starts at about 130 degree(s)C in a copolymer of acrylonitrile containing 50 mol% methacrylic acid. The reaction results in rigid ring structures with satisfying dry etch resistance. Dry etch resistance of the copolymer after thermal treatment was measured to be up to the same level of a poly(hydroxystyrene)-based commercial resist. Partially protection of the acid component by introducing tertiary- butyl ester groups provides new chemically amplified resist candidates. The materials based on terpolymers of acrylonitrile, tertiary-butyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid well satisfy the basic requirements for ArF resists with high transparency at 193 nm and excellent dry etch resistance after prolonged post exposure bake. Lithographic performance of the newly designed materials are currently under further assessments..

  8. Development of Wet-Etching Tools for Precision Optical Figuring

    SciTech Connect

    Rushford, M C; Dixit, S N; Hyde, R; Britten, J A; Nissen, J; Aasen, M; Toeppen, J; Hoaglan, C; Nelson, C; Summers, L; Thomas, I

    2004-01-27

    This FY03 final report on Wet Etch Figuring involves a 2D thermal tool. Its purpose is to flatten (0.3 to 1 mm thickness) sheets of glass faster thus cheaper than conventional sub aperture tools. An array of resistors on a circuit board was used to heat acid over the glass Optical Path Difference (OPD) thick spots and at times this heating extended over the most of the glass aperture. Where the acid is heated on the glass it dissolves faster. A self-referencing interferometer measured the glass thickness, its design taking advantage of the parallel nature and thinness of these glass sheets. This measurement is used in close loop control of the heating patterns of the circuit board thus glass and acid. Only the glass and acid were to be moved to make the tool logistically simple to use in mass production. A set of 4-circuit board, covering 80 x 80-cm aperture was ordered, but only one 40 x 40-cm board was put together and tested for this report. The interferometer measurement of glass OPD was slower than needed on some glass profiles. Sometimes the interference fringes were too fine to resolve which would alias the sign of the glass thickness profile. This also caused the phase unwrapping code (FLYNN) to struggle thus run slowly at times taking hours, for a 10 inch square area. We did extensive work to improve the speed of this code. We tried many different phase unwrapping codes. Eventually running (FLYNN) on a farm of networked computers. Most of the work reported here is therefore limited to a 10-inch square aperture. Researched into fabricating a better interferometer lens from Plexiglas so to have less of the scattered light issues of Fresnel lens groves near field scattering patterns, this set the Nyquest limit. There was also a problem with the initial concept of wetting the 1737 glass on its bottom side with acid. The wetted 1737 glass developed an Achromatic AR coating, spoiling the reflection needed to see glass thickness interference fringes. In response

  9. Effect of application mode on interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentin and self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of application mode on the interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentin and self-etch adhesives with different aggressiveness. Methods The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from un-erupted human third molars, followed by abrading with 600 grit SiC under water. Rectangular dentin slabs were prepared by sectioning the tooth specimens perpendicular to the abraded surfaces. The obtained dentin slabs were treated with one of the two one-step self-etch adhesives: Adper Easy Bond (AEB, PH~2.5) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, PH~0.8) with (15s, active application) or without (15s, inactive application) agitation. The dentin slabs were fractured and the exposed adhesive/dentin (A/D) interfaces were examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The interfacial morphology, degree of dentin demineralization (DD) and degree of conversion (DC) of the strong self-etch adhesive APLP showed more significant dependence on the application mode than the mild AEB. APLP exhibited inferior bonding at the A/D interface if applied without agitation, evidenced by debonding from the dentin substrate. The DDs and DCs of the APLP with agitation were higher than those of without agitation in the interface, in contrast to the comparable DD and DC values of two AEB specimen groups with different application modes. Raman spectral analysis revealed the important role of chemical interaction between acid monomers of self-etch adhesives and dentin in the above observations. Conclusion The chemical interaction with dentin is especially important for improving the DC of the strong self-etching adhesive at the A/D interface. Agitation could benefit polymerization efficacy of the strong self-etch adhesive through enhancing the chemical interaction with tooth substrate. PMID:23153573

  10. Patterning of platinum (Pt) thin films by chemical wet etching in Aqua Regia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köllensperger, P. A.; Karl, W. J.; Ahmad, M. M.; Pike, W. T.; Green, M.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical and physical properties of platinum (Pt) make it a useful material for microelectromechanical systems and microfluidic applications such as lab-on-a-chip devices. Platinum thin-films are frequently employed in applications where electrodes with high chemical stability, low electrical resistance or a high melting point are needed. Due to its chemical inertness it is however also one of the most difficult metals to pattern. The gold standard for patterning is chlorine RIE etching, a capital-intensive process not available in all labs. Here we present simple fabrication protocols for wet etching Pt thin-films in hot Aqua Regia based on sputtered Ti/Pt/Cr and Cr/Pt/Cr metal multilayers. Chromium (Cr) or titanium (Ti) is used as an adhesion layer for the Pt. Cr is used as a hard masking layer during the Pt etch as it can be easily and accurately patterned with photoresist and withstands the Aqua Regia. The Cr pattern is transferred into the Pt and the Cr mask later removed. Only standard chemicals and cleanroom equipment/tools are required. Prior to the Aqua Regia etch any surface passivation on the Pt is needs to be removed. This is usually achieved by a quick dip in dilute hydrofluoric acid (HF). HF is usually also used for wet-etching the Ti adhesion layer. We avoid the use of HF for both steps by replacing the HF-dip with an argon (Ar) plasma treatment and etching the Ti layer with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based etchant.

  11. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of dental composites by an optical method.

    PubMed

    Weig, K M; Magalhães Filho, T R; Costa Neto, C A; Costa, M F

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes an alternative methodology for evaluating polymerization shrinkage of dental composites using an advanced video extensometer (AVE) system. This equipment measures the displacement between two points drawn on a tooth's wall without requiring physical contact with the tooth. By doing so, the polymerization process was monitored by the cusp deflection. This technique was used in human and bovine teeth, where the cavities were prepared under controlled conditions so that the volume of the composite used was the same in both types of teeth. After the cavity preparation, the specimens were acid etched, washed and dried, and then the adhesive was applied and polymerized. The composite was then inserted into the cavity. Polymerization was performed with two different light polymerizing units (LD Max and Optilight Max - Gnatus do Brasil), and the displacement curve of the tooth cusp was recorded for a period of 400 s. After a statistical analysis, it was concluded that the technique was capable of evaluating shrinkage by the deflection from the cusps and that the human and bovine teeth do not react in a similar manner towards the polymerization shrinkage of composites. PMID:25492174

  12. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Martin, Jr., Samuel B.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  13. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  14. Research on wet etching at MEMS torsion mirror optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jifeng; Luo, Yuan

    2002-10-01

    Etching is a very important technique at MEMS micromachining. There are two kinds of etching processing, the one is wet etching and the other is dry etching. In this paper, wet selective etching with KOH and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) etchants is researched in order to make a torsion mirror optical switch. The experiments results show that TMAH with superphosphate is more suitable at MEMS torsion mirror optical switch micromachining than KOH, and it also has good compatibility with IC processing. Also our experiments results show some different with other reported research data. More work will be done to improve the yield rate of MEMS optical switch.

  15. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  16. Improved method using a bubble-free adhesion technique for the preparation of semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kihara, A; Morimoto, K; Suetsugu, T

    1989-01-01

    The preparation technique, with the minimum of artifacts for the semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants, is presented in this study. The sections enabled finer light-microscopic observations to be made. A formalin-fixed tissue block containing a dental implant was dehydrated in ethanol and acetone, and then embedded in polyester resin under 76 cm Hg reduced pressure. The embedded block was trimmed by a cutter and ground by abrasive paper. In a 1.5 Kg f/cm2 pressurized chamber, its polished surface was bonded to a methacrylate slide by means of ethylcyanoacrylate used in an adhesion loading device. This meant that no bubbles could arise in the interface between the slide and the block. The slide-block was then attached to an adsorptive specimen-holder of a hard-tissue cutting machine and cut to a thickness of approximately 50 microns, with use of a diamond blade. The slide-section was ground to 15-40 microns with wet-type abrasive paper and film on a polishing table. Etching with weak acid and surface staining with toluidine blue and methylene blue/basic fuchsin/light green were performed on the section. PMID:2701107

  17. Time-varying wetting behavior on copper wafer treated by wet-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Sheng-Hung; Wu, Chuan-Chang; Wu, Hsing-Chen; Cheng, Shao-Liang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-06-01

    The wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication often involves the immersion of the copper wafer into etching solutions and thereby its surface properties are significantly altered. The wetting behavior of a copper film deposited on silicon wafer is investigated after a short dip in various etching solutions. The etchants include glacial acetic acid and dilute solutions of nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and tetramethylammonium hydroxide. It was found that in most cases a thin oxide layer still remains on the surface of as-received Cu wafers when they are subject to etching treatments. However, a pure Cu wafer can be obtained by the glacial acetic acid treatment and its water contact angle (CA) is about 45°. As the pure Cu wafer is placed in the ambient condition, the oxide thickness grows rapidly to the range of 10-20 Å within 3 h and the CA on the hydrophilic surface also rises. In the vacuum, it is surprising to find that the CA and surface roughness of the pure Cu wafer can grow significantly. These interesting results may be attributed to the rearrangement of surface Cu atoms to reduce the surface free energy.

  18. Effect of a functional monomer (MDP) on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsubota, Keishi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of the functional monomer, 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives through integrating fatigue testing and long-term water storage. An MDP-containing self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE (SE), and an experimental adhesive, MDP-free (MF), which comprised the same ingredients as SE apart from MDP, were used. Shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) were measured with or without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr. Although similar SBS and SFS values were obtained for SE with pre-etching and for MF after 24 h of storage in distilled water, SE with pre-etching showed higher SBS and SFS values than MF after storage in water for 6 months or 1 yr. Regardless of the pre-etching procedure, SE showed higher SBS and SFS values after 6 months of storage in distilled water than after 24 h or 1 yr. To conclude, MDP might play an important role in enhancing not only bond strength but also bond durability with respect to repeated subcritical loading after long-term water storage. PMID:26620762

  19. Selective wet etching of Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change thin films in thermal lithography with tetramethylammonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Changmeng; Geng, Yongyou; Wu, Yiqun

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we study Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change film as a promising inorganic photoresist using organic alkaline: tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution, instead of inorganic alkali or acid as etchant. The basic etching properties are investigated by prior and posterior annealing Ge2Sb2Te5 films. Selectivity is found to be dependent on concentration of TMAH. There is a good selectivity in the 25% TMAH solution, in which the amorphous state is etched away, whereas the crystalline state remains. The etching rate decreases when the concentration of TMAH is diluted; and an opposite selectivity, compared with 25% TMAH solution, is observed in the 0.125% TMAH solution. Selective etching with laser crystallization in different power levels is also studied, and an excellent wet selectivity in the 25% TMAH solution is obtained. The remaining crystalline lines are observed by atomic force microscopy. The surface roughness after etching is at a good level. The selective wet-etching mechanism is also discussed.

  20. TMAH wet etching of silicon micro- and nano-fins for selective sidewall epitaxy of III-Nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianci; Myasishchev, Denis; Kuryatkov, Vladimir; Nikishin, Sergey; Holtz, Mark; Harris, Rusty

    2011-10-01

    We describe formation of silicon micro- and nano-fins, with (111)-plane sidewall facets, for selective sidewall epitaxy of III-Nitride semiconductors. The fins are produced by wet etching (110)-oriented silicon wafers. Silicon dioxide is deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for producing a hard mask. The silicon dioxide is patterned using photo- and electron-beam lithography for micro- and nano-fins, respectively, followed by wet etching in hydrofluoric acid. Wet etching to produce the silicon fins is carried out using tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) diluted with isopropyl alcohol (IPA). Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to determine morphology including the surface roughness of the area between fins and the etching rate of silicon. We tune the etching time, temperature, and percentage of IPA in order to get the best surface on both (111) and (110) planes. Adding IPA is found to alter the etch rate and improve the surface between the fins without adversely affecting the sidewall morphology.

  1. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  2. INSIGHTS INTO PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR DENTAL EROSION

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette; Rios, Daniela; Honório, Heitor Marques; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Dental erosion is defined as the loss of tooth substance by acid exposure not involving bacteria. The etiology of erosion is related to different behavioral, biological and chemical factors. Based on an overview of the current literature, this paper presents a summary of the preventive strategies relevant for patients suffering from dental erosion. Behavioral factors, such as special drinking habits, unhealthy lifestyle factors or occupational acid exposure, might modify the extent of dental erosion. Thus, preventive strategies have to include measures to reduce the frequency and duration of acid exposure as well as adequate oral hygiene measures, as it is known that eroded surfaces are more susceptible to abrasion. Biological factors, such as saliva or acquired pellicle, act protectively against erosive demineralization. Therefore, the production of saliva should be enhanced, especially in patients with hyposalivation or xerostomia. With regard to chemical factors, the modification of acidic solutions with ions, especially calcium, was shown to reduce the demineralization, but the efficacy depends on the other chemical factors, such as the type of acid. To enhance the remineralization of eroded surfaces and to prevent further progression of dental wear, high-concentrated fluoride applications are recommended. Currently, little information is available about the efficacy of other preventive strategies, such as calcium and laser application, as well as the use of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. Further studies considering these factors are required. In conclusion, preventive strategies for patients suffering from erosion are mainly obtained from in vitro and in situ studies and include dietary counseling, stimulation of salivary flow, optimization of fluoride regimens, modification of erosive beverages and adequate oral hygiene measures. PMID:19274390

  3. Micromorphology of ceramic etching pattern for two CAD-CAM and one conventional feldspathic porcelain and need for post-etching cleaning.

    PubMed

    Onisor, Ioana; Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to observe the effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface of two glass ceramics for Cerec and to compare it with the effect on a conventional glass ceramic. Discs were cut from a feldspathic ceramic block (VitaMKII) and from a leucite reinforced glass ceramic (IPS EMPRESS CAD) for Cerec. 5% and 9% HF concentrations were used during 1 min and 2 min each. Afterwards samples were thoroughly water rinsed for 30 s. Half of the 9% HF 1 min samples were subsequently submitted to a complex post-etching cleaning. All samples were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The conventional feldspathic ceramic samples were built up on a refractory die and a platinum foil. They were treated with 9% HF for 2 min and water rinsed for 30 s. Half of the samples were submitted to the same post-etching cleaning protocol. All samples were examined under SEM and EDX. The Cerec ceramic samples and the platinum foil ones were clean and free of any precipitate after 30 s of water rinsing. Acid concentration, times of application and the postetching cleaning treatment did not influence the cleanliness of the samples. A thick layer of deposit was observed only on the refractory die samples. This was only diminished after the post-etching treatment. The EDX analysis detected the presence of fluoride (F) only on the refractory die samples. PMID:24757699

  4. Photonic devices based on preferential etching.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Bob; Larchanché, Jean-François; Vilcot, Jean-Pierre; Decoster, Didier; Beccherelli, Romeo; d'Alessandro, Antonio

    2005-11-20

    We introduce a design concept of optical waveguides characterized by a practical and reproducible process based on preferential etching of crystalline silicon substrates. Low-loss waveguides, spot-size converters, and power dividers have been obtained with polymers. We have also aligned liquid crystals in the waveguides and demonstrated guided propagation. Therefore this technology is a suitable platform for soft-matter photonics and heterogeneous integration. PMID:16318190

  5. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  6. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  7. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Topics ADVERTISEMENT Advocacy Advocacy Advocacy Issues Health Care Reform ADA Positions, Policies and Statements Legal Advocacy and ... Children's Dental Health Month ADA Seal of Acceptance Fluoride in Water Advocating for the Public Prevention Summit ...

  8. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  9. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  10. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  11. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantor A, Zakher B, et al. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... nih.gov/pubmed/15606059 . Ng MW. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  12. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  13. Etching of moldavities under natural conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobloch, V.; Knoblochova, Z.; Urbanec, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that a part of the lechatellierites which originated by etching from a basic moldavite mass became broken off after deposition of moldavite in the sedimentation layer is advanced. Those found close to the original moldavite were measured for statistical averaging of length. The average length of lechatelierite fibers per cubic mm of moldavite mass volume was determined by measurement under a microscope in toluene. The data were used to calculate the depth of the moldavite layer that had to be etched to produce the corresponding amount of lechatelierite fragments. The calculations from five "fields" of moldavite surface, where layers of fixed lechatelierite fragments were preserved, produced values of 2.0, 3.1, 3.5, 3.9 and 4.5. Due to inadvertent loss of some fragments the determined values are somewhat lower than those found in references. The difference may be explained by the fact that the depth of the layer is only that caused by etching after moldavite deposition.

  14. Assembly Methods for Etched Foil Regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Matthew P.

    2004-06-01

    Etched foil appears to offer substantial advantages over other regenerator materials, especially for annular regenerators. However, assembly of etched foil regenerators has been difficult because etching regenerator patterns in foil is most satisfactorily accomplished using pieces too small for a complete, spiral-wrapped regenerator. Two techniques have been developed to deal with that problem: For spiral-wrapped regenerators, a new technique for joining pieces of foil using tabs has been successfully employed. The joints are no thicker than the parent material. The tabs substantially fill the holes into which they are locked, virtually eliminating any undesired leak path through the regenerator. The holes constitute breaks in the conductive path through the regenerator. A patent is pending. An alternate method is to insert pieces of foil in a cylindrical housing one at a time. An inflatable bladder presses each newly-inserted piece of foil against the previous layer until both edges slip past each other and contact the previously-installed piece. When the bladder is deflated, the natural springiness of the foil causes the cut edges to seek the wall and meet each other in a butt joint. A patent on the method has been issued; a patent on the resulting regenerator is pending.

  15. Sb (111) Abnormal Behavior under Ion Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. A.; Bozhko, S. I.; Ionov, A. M.; Protasova, S. G.; Chekmazov, S. V.; Kapustin, A. A.

    Due to a strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI), the surface states of Sb (111) are similar to those for topological insulators (TI) Sugawara et al. (2006). The surface states are protected by time-reversal symmetry and energy dispersion is a linear function of momentum. Defects in crystal structure lead to a local break of the surface translational symmetry and can modify surface states. It is the primary reason to study defects of Sb crystal structure and their effect on the surface states dispersion. Etching of the Sb (111) surface using Ar+ ions is a common way to create defects both in a bulk and on the surface of the crystal. Sb (111) ion etching at room temperature reveals anomalous behavior of surface crystal structure. It results in formation of flat terraces of 2 nm in size. Investigation of electronic structure of the etched Sb (111) surface has demonstrated increase of density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level. The results are discussed in terms of local break of conditions of Peierls transition.

  16. Laser etching of polymer masked leadframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. K.; Man, H. C.; Yue, T. M.; Yuen, C. W.

    1997-02-01

    A typical electroplating production line for the deposition of silver pattern on copper leadframes in the semiconductor industry involves twenty to twenty five steps of cleaning, pickling, plating, stripping etc. This complex production process occupies large floor space and has also a number of problems such as difficulty in the production of rubber masks and alignment, generation of toxic fumes, high cost of water consumption and sometimes uncertainty on the cleanliness of the surfaces to be plated. A novel laser patterning process is proposed in this paper which can replace many steps in the existing electroplating line. The proposed process involves the application of high speed laser etching techniques on leadframes which were protected with polymer coating. The desired pattern for silver electroplating is produced by laser ablation of the polymer coating. Excimer laser was found to be most effective for this process as it can expose a pattern of clean copper substrate which can be silver plated successfully. Previous working of Nd:YAG laser ablation showed that 1.06 μm radiation was not suitable for this etching process because a thin organic and transparent film remained on the laser etched region. The effect of excimer pulse frequency and energy density upon the removal rate of the polymer coating was studied.

  17. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  18. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  19. Wet etching and chemical polishing of InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaghi, R.; Cervera, C.; Aït-Kaci, H.; Grech, P.; Rodriguez, J. B.; Christol, P.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we studied wet chemical etching fabrication of the InAs/GaSb superlattice mesa photodiode for the mid-infrared region. The details of the wet chemical etchants used for the device process are presented. The etching solution is based on orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4), citric acid (C6H8O7) and H2O2, followed by chemical polishing with the sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution and protection with photoresist polymerized. The photodiode performance is evaluated by current-voltage measurements. The zero-bias resistance area product R0A above 4 × 105 Ω cm2 at 77 K is reported. The device did not show dark current degradation at 77 K after exposition during 3 weeks to the ambient air.

  20. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  1. Optimization of etching and reading procedures for the Autoscan 60 track etch system

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, R.; Devine, R.; Coennen, C.

    1997-02-11

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is charged with measuring the occupational exposure to radiological workers and contractors throughout the Laboratory, which includes many different sites with multiple and varied radiation fields. Of concern here are the high energy neutrons such as those generated during accelerator operations at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory purchased an Autoscan 60 automated reader for use with chemically etched CR39 detectors. The dosimeter design employed at LANL uses a plastic, hemispherical case, encompassing a polystyrene pyramidal detector holder. The pyramidal holder supports three detectors at a 35{degree} angle. Averaging the results of the three detectors minimizes the angular dependence normally associated with a planar dosimeter. The Autoscan 60 is an automated reading system for use with CR39 chemical etch detectors. The detectors are immersed in an etch solution to enhance the visibility of the damage sites caused by recoil proton impact with the hydrogen atoms in the detector. The authors decided to increase the etch time from six hours to 15 hours, while retaining the 70 C temperature. The reason for the change in the etch is to enhance the sensitivity and precision of the CR39 detector as indicated by this study.

  2. Etching characteristics of LiNbO{sub 3} in reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Z.; Yu, S.; Heard, P. J.; Marshall, J. M.; Thomas, P. A.

    2008-02-01

    The etching characteristics of congruent LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals including doped LiNbO{sub 3} and proton-changed LiNbO{sub 3} have been studied in reactive ion etching (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching tools, using different recipes of gas mixtures. The effects of parameters including working pressure, RIE power, and ICP power are investigated and analyzed by measurement of etching depth, selectivity, uniformity, etched surface state, and sidewall profile by means of focused ion beam etching, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. The effects of a sample carrier wafer coating have also been investigated. Optimized processes with high etching rates, good mask selectivity, and a near-vertical profile have been achieved. Ridge waveguides on proton-exchanged LiNbO{sub 3} have been fabricated and optically measured.

  3. Spontaneous Differentiation of Dental Pulp stem cells on Dental polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bherwani, Aneel; Suarato, Giulia; Qin, Sisi; Chang, Chung-Cheh; Akhavan, Aaron; Spiegel, Joseph; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp stem cells were plated on two dentally relevant materials i.e. PMMA commonly used for denture and Titanium used for implants. In both cases, we probed for the role of surface interaction and substrate morphology. Different films of PMMA were spun cast directly onto Si wafers; PMMA fibers of different diameters were electro spun onto some of these substrates. Titanium metal was evaporated onto Si surfaces using an electron beam evaporator. In addition, on some surfaces, P4VP nanofibers were spun cast. DPSC were grown in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.2mM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, 2mm glutamine and 10mM beta-glycerol phosphate either with or without 10nM dexamethasone. After 21 days samples were examined using confocal microscopy of cells and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). In the case of Titanium biomineralization was observed independent of dexamethasone, where the deposits were templated along the fibers. Minimal biomineralization was observed on flat Titanium and PMMA samples. Markers of osteogenesis and specific signaling pathways are being evaluated by RT-PCR, which are up regulated on each surface, to understand the fundamental manner in which surfaces interact with cell differentiation.

  4. Influence of Interface Structure on Chemical Etching Process for Air Gap of Microelectromechanical System Based on Surface Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young; Kim, Joon; Polla, Dennis.; Shin, Young

    1998-12-01

    This paper analyses the problems posed by the interface structure during chemical etching by Hydro-fluoric (HF) acid for creating air gaps in microelectromechnical system (MEMS) devices using PZT(53/47) films and surface micromachining techniques. In order to investigate the influence of interface structure on the HF chemical etching process, Pt/PZT/Pt/Ti/TiO2/polysilicon/Si3N4/PSG/Si (Samples A and C) and Pt/PZT/RuO2/Ru/Si3N4/PSG/Si (Sample B) structures were fabricated. These structures are selected for a microcantilever beam and/or an uncooled IR detectors fabricated with PZT piezoelectric/pyroelectric films based on the surface micromachining technique. Both need etching for the removal of phosphor silicate glass (PSG) to create an air gap. If the devices had a poor interface structure, they would fail during the HF chemical etching process because the poor interface structure would act as a kind of penetration path for etching acid leading to unwanted etching. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the interface structure to fabricate efficient MEMS devices. In this study two different solutions have been suggested to improve the interface structure. The first is post thermal annealing at 900°C for 30 min. after deposition of polycrystalline silicon for sample A. Secondly, a RuO2/Ru hybrid electrode was deposited on Si3N4 directly instead of on the Pt/Ti/TiO2/Polysilicon electrode, which has Pt/PZT/RuO2/Ru/Si3N4/PSG/Si as the device structure. These two solutions suggest that a dense interface structure increases enhances of success of the chemical etching process of MEMS devices fabricated using PZT films and surface micromachining techniques.

  5. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, p<0.01) for ablated/acid-etched samples, 5.2 MPa (s.d.=2.4, p<0.001) for ablated/non-etched samples, and 37.0 MPa (s.d.=3.6) for control. The results indicate that a rapid-scanning 300 Hz CO2 laser can effectively ablate dentin and enamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal

  6. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  8. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  9. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  11. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    PubMed

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  12. Improving UV laser damage threshold of fused silica optics by wet chemical etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao; Yang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Fused silica is widely used in high-power laser systems because of its good optical performance and mechanical properties. However, laser damage initiation and growth induced by 355 nm laser illumination in optical elements have become a bottleneck in the development of high energy laser system. In order to improve the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), the fused silica optics were treated by two types of HF-based etchants: 1.7%wt. HF acid and buffer oxide etchant (BOE: the mixture of 0.4%wt. HF and 12%wt. NH4F), respectively, for varied etching time. Damage testing shows that both the etchants increase the damage threshold at a certain depth of material removal, but further removal of material lowers the LIDT markedly. The etching rates of both etchants keep steady in our processing procedure, ~58 μg/min and ~85 μg/min, respectively. The micro-surface roughness (RMS and PV) increases as etching time extends. The hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) of the fused silica etched for diverse time, measured by nano-indenter, show no solid evidence that LIDT can be related to hardness or Young's modulus.

  13. Morphological evolution of silver nanoparticles and its effect on metal-induced chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong-Ho; Kong, Bo Hyun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2013-05-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated the morphological evolution of the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by controlling the growth conditions and its effect on morphology of silicon (Si) during metal-induced electroless etching (MICE). Self-organized AgNPs with peculiarly shape were synthesized by an electroless plating method in a conventional aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. AgNP nuclei were densely created on Si wafer surface, and they had a strong tendency to merge and form continuous metal films with increasing AgNO3 concentrations. Also, we have demonstrated that the fabrication of aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) arrays in large area of p-Si (111) substrates by MICE in a mixture of HF and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. We have found that the morphology of the initial AgNPs and oxidant concentration (H2O2) greatly influence on the shape of the SiNW etching profile. The morphological results showed that AgNP shapes were closely related to the etching direction of SiNWs, that is, the spherical AgNPs preferred to move vertical to the Si substrate, whereas non-spherical AgNPs changed their movement to the [100] directions. In addition, as the etching activity was increased at higher H2O2 concentrations, AgNPs had a tendency to move from the original [111] direction to the energetically preferred [100] direction. PMID:23858934

  14. Comparison of wet and dry chrome etching with the CORE-2564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Peter D.; Grenon, Brian J.

    1994-02-01

    Chrome masks have traditionally been wet etched in an acidic solution of cerric ammonium nitrate. The etchant is commonly sprayed on the mask while the mask is slowly rotated, using an APT-914 or equivalent processor. While this process is well-understood, relatively trouble- free and inexpensive, the isotropic nature of wet etching results in an undercut of the chrome relative to the resist etch mask of approximately equals 150 nm per edge. Compensation for the undercut, in order to maintain control of the mean critical dimension (CD), is done by adjusting the printed feature size such that the undercut grows the printed feature to the desired final size. This sizing can be performed by manipulating the computer aided design database, which can be expensive and time consuming. In this paper, we present a comparison of wet and dry chrome etch processes using plates printed with the CORE-2564 in OCG-895 i resist. The differences in CD performance and resolution are illustrated.

  15. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  16. NiCr etching in a reactive gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.; Boucher, R.; Morgenroth, W.; Meyer, H. G.

    2007-05-15

    The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)

  17. Ion-induced chlorination of titanium leading to enhanced etching

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, W.L.; Rhodin, T.N.; Rathbun, L.C.

    1988-10-15

    The ion-induced chemical etching of titanium with chlorine has been studied. Quartz crystal microbalance studies show that the ion beam etch rate of Ti is enhanced upon addition of molecular chlorine, whereas molecular chlorine does not etch Ti in the absence of ion stimulation. This is very similar to the etching behavior of silicon in the presence of argon stimulation and chlorine gas. The etching of titanium is compared to a generalized version of the ion-assisted chemical etching model first proposed by Winters and Coburn. In this model the ion beam either enhances or induces one of the following chemical etching steps: initial adsorption, product formation, or product removal. The ion beam effect on product formation was determined by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy after sample etching. Ion beam effects on product removal were studied by measuring product distributions using modulated ion beam and time-of-flight techniques. It is found that the energetic ions induce formation of a chemically altered surface containing TiCl/sub x/ compounds. It is the ion-induced formation of this altered surface which leads to enhanced etching. Discussion in terms of the general model provides a comparison of the ion-assisted chemical etching mechanisms of titanium to silicon.

  18. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  19. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  4. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  5. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  6. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  7. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  8. [Two cases of personal identification from dental information].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Yamada, Y; Ohtani, S; Kogure, T; Nagao, M; Takatori, T; Ohira, H; Yamamoto, I; Watanabe, A

    1997-08-01

    We describe two cases in which unknown bodies were positively identified from dental information and biochemical examination using tooth materials. In one case, a charred body was positively identified with little effort by comparison of antemortem dental records (dental chart and dental X-ray film) with postmortem data. In the other case, although the unknown individual had dental treatment, the police were unable to obtain the antemortem dental records of the victim. We then conducted biochemical analysis of teeth, facilitating personal identification using DNA analysis and age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization. The mutation obtained from the sequence of mtDNA and the genotypes of HLADQ alpha, HPRTB and ABO blood groups including the data for estimated age supported the kinship between the unknown individual and his mother. The data for maternally inherited mtDNA were of great importance in this case, since it was possible to obtain DNA from the mother. Dental identification in one of the most accurate methods of personal identification if suitable antemortem records are available. In the absence of such records, biochemical analysis of teeth also makes it possible to increase the probability of correct personal identification. PMID:9366140

  9. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  10. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  11. Infection Control in Dental Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Based Dental Sealant Programs Dental Sealant FAQs Sealant Efficiency Assessment for Locals and States ... of infection control remain unchanged, new technologies, materials, equipment, and data require continuous evaluation of current ...

  12. Particle reduction and control in EUV etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, JeaYoung; Ha, TaeJoong; Kim, SangPyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2014-10-01

    As the device design rule shrinks, photomask manufacturers need to have advanced defect controllability during the ARC (Anti-Reflection Coating) and ABS (Absorber) etch in an EUV (extreme ultraviolet) mask. Therefore we studied etching techniques of EUV absorber film to find out the evasion method of particle generation. Usually, Particles are generated by plasma ignition step in etching process. When we use the standard etching process, ARC and ABS films are etched step by step. To reduce the particle generation, the number of ignition steps need to decrease. In this paper, we present the experimental results of in-situ EUV dry etching process technique for ARC and ABS, which reduces the defect level significantly. Analysis tools used for this study are as follows; TEM (for cross-sectional inspection) , SEM (for in-line monitoring ) and OES (for checking optical emission spectrum)

  13. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Vuskovic, Leposova; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electropolished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  14. HF-(NH₄)₂S₂O₈-HCl Mixtures for HNO₃- and NOx-free Etching of Diamond Wire- and SiC-Slurry-Sawn Silicon Wafers: Reactivity Studies, Surface Chemistry, and Unexpected Pyramidal Surface Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Stapf, André; Gondek, Christoph; Lippold, Marcus; Kroke, Edwin

    2015-04-29

    The wet-chemical treatment of silicon wafers is an important production step in photovoltaic and semiconductor industries. Solutions containing hydrofluoric acid, ammonium peroxodisulfate, and hydrochloric acid were investigated as novel acidic, NOx-free etching mixtures for texturization and polishing of monocrystalline silicon wafers. Etching rates as well as generated surface morphologies and properties are discussed in terms of the composition of the etching mixture. The solutions were analyzed with Raman and UV/vis spectroscopy as well as ion chromatography (IC). The silicon surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surprisingly, pyramidal surface structures were found after etching SiC-slurry as well as diamond wire-sawn monocrystalline Si(100) wafers with hydrochloric acid-rich HF-(NH4)2S2O8-HCl mixtures. Acidic etching solutions are generally not known for anisotropic etching. Thus, the HNO3-free mixtures might allow to replace KOH/i-propanol and similar alkaline solutions for texturization of monosilicon wafers at room temperature with less surface contamination. Besides, common HNO3-based etching mixtures may be replaced by the nitrate-free system, leading to significant economic and ecological advantages. PMID:25826145

  15. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  16. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  17. Correlated crystallographic etching of graphene and nanoribbon formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Hunley, D. Patrick; Stieha, Joseph; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Kar, Arunita; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Strachan, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    Catalytic etching is a promising method for constructing crystallographically defined graphene structures such as nanoribbons. Catalytic etching experiments are performed and shown to contain significant correlation yielding crystallographic graphene nanoribbons. This correlation is investigated as a function of etching conditions and compared to simulations with possible sources discussed. Supported in part by NSF Award No. DMR-0805136, the Kentucky NSF EPSCoR program, the University of Kentucky Center for Advanced Materials, and the University of Kentucky Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering.

  18. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  19. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanisms and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  20. A new back-etch for silicon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Malberti, P.; Ciappa, M.; Scacco, P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on a new application of tetramethylammonium-hydroxide in aqueous solution (TMAHW) as back-etch for silicon integrated circuits. TMAHW has many advantages upon traditional back-etch solutions: it is selective, safe, non-toxic, inexpensive, and fully compatible with materials used in semiconductor device technology. The efficiency of this backside etching technique is demonstrated by a case history concerning aluminum silicon interdiffusion.