Science.gov

Sample records for acid gases carbon

  1. Cryogenic process for removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-04-30

    Low temperature treatments are combined with solvent treatments using particularly selective solvents for stripping acidic gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide from natural gas or from synthetic gases. The preferred solvents are a wide range of compounds having an esteric or an etheric function in their molecule, but there are also examples of compounds which have the two functions simultaneously. The stripping process is comparatively simple, is efficient, especially for high contents of acidic gases in the raw gas streams, and is economically acceptable.

  2. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time. PMID:12935758

  3. Cryogenic process for fractionally removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-07-16

    A process is described for stripping acidic gases, mainly hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, from natural gas or synthesis gas, especially when the percentages of such acidic gases are high and the conventional processes become economically objectionable. The process is based on the use of a number of selective solvents, generally belonging to the class of esters, ethers, mixed ester-ethers and lactones, in combination with sequential absorbing cycles which start from the stripping of hydrogen sulphide, and comprise the regeneration of the solvents used by several expansion cycles: H2S and CO2 are recovered and the regenerated solvents recycled.

  4. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  5. Removal of acid gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a method for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a stream of a treating agent consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of N-methyldiethanolamine and imidazole or a methyl substituted imidazole to thereby remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified gas stream from the absorption zone, discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone; and subsequently regenerating the enriched treating agent.

  6. Clostridium stain which produces acetic acid from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

  7. Clostridium strain which produces acetic acid from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-01-14

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 4 figs.

  8. Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-09-20

    The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

  9. Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO.sub.2 ; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO.sub.2 with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0.degree. and 100.degree. C. at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environ-mentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed.

  10. Morphological and chemical modification of mineral dust: Observational insight into the heterogeneous uptake of acidic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Shi, Guangyu; Zhang, Daizhou; Trochkine, Dmitri; Yamada, Maromu; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Chen, Bin; Nagatani, Tetsuji; Miyazawa, Takeshi; Nagatani, Masahiro; Nakata, Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol samples were collected in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, China, by deploying a tethered balloon. Coarse particles (d > 1 μm) were individually analyzed using electron microscopes, to investigate the extent of dust modification by acidic gases in the atmosphere. Based on the elemental composition, irregularly shaped mineral dust was separated into carbonate and silicate groups. Both sulfate and nitrate were found to accumulate on carbonate more readily than silicate particles. Interestingly, spherical particles resembling Ca-carbonate in composition were spotted frequently in the samples. These Ca-rich spherical particles were more abundant under humid conditions, suggesting that they are deliquesced carbonate particles that formed in the atmosphere following the uptake of acidic gases. Sulfate and nitrate were more frequently detected in the Ca-rich spherical particles than in carbonate in the original solid form, indicating that the gas uptake efficiency of carbonate is further enhanced after the phase transition.

  11. Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Mudge, Lyle K.; Brown, Michael D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Baker, Eddie G.

    1989-01-01

    A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

  12. Method for removing acid gases from a gaseous stream

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett; Zielke, Clyde W.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking a heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating a gaseous stream containing hydrogen, at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases from the molten metal halide and regenerating the molten metal halide, thereby producing a purified molten metal halide stream for recycle to the hydrocracking zone, an improvement comprising; contacting the gaseous acid gas, hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels-containing stream with the feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to remove acid gases from the acid gas containing stream. Optionally at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels are separated from gaseous stream containing hydrogen, hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases prior to contacting the gaseous stream with the feedstock.

  13. Method of removing carbon monoxide from gases

    DOEpatents

    Gerstein, Bernard C.; Macaulay, David B.

    1976-06-01

    A process and catalyst are disclosed for purifying an atmosphere containing carbon monoxide by passing the atmosphere through a bed of a catalyst of TbO.sub.x, where x = 1.8 to 1.5, which oxidizes the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide.

  14. THE SOLUBILITY OF ACID GASES IN METHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a thermodynamic model developed to predict phase-equilibrium behavior in a methanol/carbon-dioxide/nitrogen/hydrogen-sulfide system based on parameters determined from binary vapor/liquid equilibrium data available in the literature. Model predictions are com...

  15. MULTIPOLLUTANT MERCURY AND ACID GASES CONTROL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plans are to continue testing for acid gas, mercury and NOx removal on baseline CFB operation with lime slurry, then use modified lime hydrates and slurries, and modified calcium silicates as additives for enhanced mercury and SO2 removal. Also, data from a coal-fired utility b...

  16. Carbon isotopic composition of deep carbon gases in an ombrogenous peatland, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, R. . Center for Groundwater Research and Wetlands Research Center); Warner, B.G. . Wetlands Research Center and Dept. of Geography); Charman, D.J. . Dept. of Geographical Sciences); Belyea, L.R. . School of Biological Sciences); Mathur, S.P. ); Dinel, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and carbon isotope analyses of deep peat and gases in a small ombrogenous peatland in northwestern Ontario reveals the presence of old gases at depth that are 1000-2000 yr younger than the enclosing peat. The authors suggest that the most likely explanation to account for this age discrepancy is the downward movement by advection of younger dissolved organic carbon for use by fermentation and methanogens bacteria. This study identifies a potentially large supply of old carbon gases in peatlands that should be considered in global carbon models of the terrestrial biosphere.

  17. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  18. Heat transfer of suspended carbon nanotube yarn to gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yukiko; Kita, Koji; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the pressure dependence of heat transfer to ambient gases for a suspended carbon nanotube yarn. The heat transport of the yarn including the heat exchange with surrounding gases is investigated using a simple one-dimensional heat transport model under Joule heating of the yarn. It is revealed that the effective diameter of the yarn for heat exchange is much smaller than the geometrical diameter of the yarn. This smaller effective diameter for heat exchange should contribute to realizing higher sensitivity and sensing over a wider range of pressures for heat-exchange-type vacuum gauges and flow sensors.

  19. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  20. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

    1982-09-03

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  1. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; MacKenzie, Patricia D.

    1985-01-01

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  2. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  3. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  4. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  5. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  6. 21 CFR 201.161 - Carbon dioxide and certain other gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. 201.161... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Other Exemptions § 201.161 Carbon dioxide and certain other gases. (a) Carbon dioxide, cyclopropane, ethylene, helium, and nitrous oxide gases intended for drug use...

  7. Arterial Blood Carbonic Acid Inversely Determines Lactic and Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish that arterial blood carbonic acid varies inversely with lactic acid in accordance with bicarbonate exchanging for lactate across cell membranes through the anion exchange mechanism to maintain the Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. Study Design: Over 5 years, lactate was measured on all blood gases taken from neonatal admissions, as well as organic acid whenever electrolytes were required. Results: Arterial blood gases from 63 infants given high calcium TPN were analyzed. Twenty two needed continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) only and 31 intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) and surfactant followed by CPAP to treat respiratory distress syndrome in 51 and meconium aspiration syndrome in 2. All survived and were free of infection. Excluded gases were those with high and falling lactate soon after delivery representing perinatal asphyxia, and those on dexamethasone. Strong inverse relations between carbonic and lactic acids were found at all gestational ages and, independent of glomerular filtration, between carbonic and organic acids. Lactate (mmol/L) = 62.53 X PCO2 -0.96(mmHg) r2 0.315, n 1232, p <0.001. Sixty divided by PCO2 is a convenient measure of physiological lactate at any given PCO2. In the first week, 9.13 ± 2.57% of arterial gases from infants on IPPV had lactates above 120/PCO2, significantly more than 4.74 ± 2.73% on CPAP (p<0.05) and 2.47 ± 2.39% on no support. Conclusion: Changes in arterial blood carbonic acid cause immediate inverse changes in lactic acid, because their anions interchange across cell membranes according to the Gibbs –Donnan equilibrium. Increasing PCO2 from 40 to 120 mmHg decreased lactate from 1.5 mmol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, so that the sum of carbonic and lactic acids increased from 2.72 mmol/L to only 4.17 mmol/L. This helps explain the neuroprotective effect of hypercapnoea and highlights the importance of avoiding any degree of hypocapnoea in infants on IPPV. PMID:24392387

  8. Tunnelling in carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Hirvonen, Viivi; Wu, Chia-Hua; Tyberg, Joseph L; Allen, Wesley D; Schreiner, Peter R

    2016-06-14

    The cis,trans-conformer of carbonic acid (H2CO3), generated by near-infrared radiation, undergoes an unreported quantum mechanical tunnelling rotamerization with half-lives in cryogenic matrices of 4-20 h, depending on temperature and host material. First-principles quantum chemistry at high levels of theory gives a tunnelling half-life of about 1 h, quite near those measured for the fastest rotamerizations. PMID:27248671

  9. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

  10. Treatment of gas streams for removal of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1987-09-29

    A method is described for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a treating agent to remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified hydrocarbon gas stream from the absorption zone, and discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone. The treating agent consists essentially of an aqueous solution of from about 40 to about 60 wt. % of N-methyldiethanolamine and from about 5 to about 15 wt. % of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine.

  11. Solubility calculations for acid gases in amine blends

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, T.

    1985-01-01

    Treating with alkanolamines is often used to sweeten gases containing only a few parts per million of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S. Primary amines such as monoethanolamine (MEA) have great affinity for acid gases and are able to produce high purity sweet gas; on the other hand, tertiary amines like methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) have large capacity and are easy to regenerate but, because they do not bind chemically with CO/sub 2/, they are unable to produce a sweetened gas low in this component. Recently, the use of amine blends has become a subject of potentially great commercial importance. Since, the range of possible amines and blend formulations is large, a method for predicting equilibrium solubility is needed. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been developed which uses the extended Debye-Huckel expression, is very similar to one developed for single-amine solutions, and involves the fitting of binary interaction parameters to experimental data. In this work the interaction parameters found to be important in the activity coefficient expression were fitted to each single-acid-gas single-amine subsystem using all published solubility data. The resulting model was then validated by comparing mixed-acid-gas single-amine solubility predictions with published VLE data. MEA-MDEA and DEA-MDEA blends have been studied in detail in this work. It is found that each amine contributes to the overall acid gas solubility in a nonlinear way and that the solubility curves can exhibit maxima and minima as a function of the relative concentrations of the amines.

  12. Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

  13. Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.

    1998-09-15

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 5 figs.

  14. Indoor exposures to fine aerosols and acid gases.

    PubMed Central

    Koutrakis, P; Brauer, M; Briggs, S L; Leaderer, B P

    1991-01-01

    Indoor exposures to aerosols and gases are associated with both indoor and outdoor air pollution sources. The identification of sources and the assessment of their relative contribution can be a complicated process due to a) the presence of numerous indoor sources, which can vary from building to building; b) the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the impact of outdoor sources on indoor air quality; c) the interactions between pollutants; and d) the importance of reactions between pollutants and indoor surfaces. It is well established that fine particles (diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microns) originating from outdoor sources such as automobiles, oil and coal combustion, incineration, and diverse industrial activities can penetrate into the indoor environment. Indoor/outdoor ratios, usually varying between 0.4 and 0.8, depend on parameters such as particle size and density, air exchange rate, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the indoor environment. Determining fine particle elemental composition makes it possible to identify the contribution of different outdoor sources. This paper focuses on the origin and the concentration of indoor aerosols and acid gases by highlighting the results from two indoor air quality studies. PMID:1821374

  15. Removal of mercury from stack gases by activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    On combustion, the trace elements in the incinerator feed stream are partitioned between the bottom ash (slag) stream, and a flue gas stream containing suspended fly ash and vapors of volatile elements or compounds. A further partitioning of the flue gas stream takes place in the particulate emission control devices that efficiently remove larger fly ash particles but are less efficient for vapors and finer particles. Environmental control agencies, researchers, and general public have become increasingly concerned with the mobilization of trace elements to the environment from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. Mercury is the trace element of particular concern since, during combustion, most of the mercury present in the influent stream is transferred into the vapor phase due to its high volatility. There is a considerable evidence in the literature that currently used pollution abatement technologies (flue gas clean-up and particulate control devices) are not capable of controlling gas phase mercury emissions. Activated carbon adsorption is a unit process that offers great promise for achieving high quality air emissions with respect to mercury and other trace elements that might be present in gases emitted from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. This study is designed to evaluate the rate of vapor-phase mercury removal by virgin and sulfur impregnated activated carbons under various process conditions. The specific process conditions that will be evaluated for their effect on the rate and mechanism of mercury uptake include temperature, moisture content, oxygen partial pressure, and presence of other compounds and trace elements in the vapor-phase. Accurate description of the kinetics of mercury removal by activated carbon is an essential component in establishing design procedures that would ensure successful application of this efficient technology for mercury control.

  16. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  17. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for

  18. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  19. Solubility of acid gases in a mixed solvent

    SciTech Connect

    MacGregor, R.J.; Mather, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide and their mixtures has been measured at 40/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C in a mixed solvent consisting of 20.9 wt% (2.0 M) MDEA (methyldiethanolamine), 30.5 wt% sulfolane, and 48.6 wt% water. The results have been compared with those for aqueous 2.0 M MDEA and an analogous mixed solvent, containing AMP (2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol), which are available in the literature. At solution loadings less than 1 mol acid gas/mol MDEA, the solubility of the acid gas was lower in the mixed solvent that in the corresponding aqueous MDEA solvent; at solution loadings greater than 1 mol acid gas/mol MDEA, the reverse was true. At all loadings and at both temperatures studied, the mixed MDEA solvent absorbed equal or lesser quantities of acid gas than the comparable mixed AMP solvent. However, the shapes of the solubility curves show that the mixed MDEA solvent would be a better choice for certain industrial applications. These data were used to modify the solubility model of Deshmukh and Mather to account for the mixed solvent effects on the system thermodynamics. Results show that the model is useful as a first approximation in predicting acid gas solubilities; agreement with experiment was generally found to be within +-15%.

  20. Experimental equilibrium between acid gases and ethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhairi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The general subject area of this study is equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in solutions of some common ethanolamines. The amines studied are most widely used in the area of gas sweetening. They include monoethanolamine, diglycolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine. Only limited data are available for some of these amines. The process involved developing simple apparatus and procedure for investigating the equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. The procedure uses a single equilibrium cell. No gas chromatograph nor liquid chemical analysis is required. Measurements of the solubility were made in different amine solution concentrations at acid gas partial pressures to 1000 psia and temperatures from 77 to 240{degree}F. The method used was found to be sound as indicated by the consistency and reproducibility of the data.

  1. Joseph Black, carbon dioxide, latent heat, and the beginnings of the discovery of the respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-06-15

    The discovery of carbon dioxide by Joseph Black (1728-1799) marked a new era of research on the respiratory gases. His initial interest was in alkalis such as limewater that were thought to be useful in the treatment of renal stone. When he studied magnesium carbonate, he found that when this was heated or exposed to acid, a gas was evolved that he called "fixed air" because it had been combined with a solid material. He showed that the new gas extinguished a flame, that it could not support life, and that it was present in gas exhaled from the lung. Within a few years of his discovery, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen were also isolated. Thus arguably Black's work started the avalanche of research on the respiratory gases carried out by Priestley, Scheele, Lavoisier, and Cavendish. Black then turned his attention to heat and he was the first person to describe latent heat, that is the heat added or lost when a liquid changes its state, for example when water changes to ice or steam. Latent heat is a key concept in thermal physiology because of the heat lost when sweat evaporates. Black was a friend of the young James Watt (1736-1819) who was responsible for the development of early steam engines. Watt was puzzled why so much cooling was necessary to condense steam into water, and Black realized that the answer was the latent heat. The resulting improvements in steam engines ushered in the Industrial Revolution. PMID:24682452

  2. Vapor-liquid equilibria in the system ethanethiol + methyldiethanolamine + water in the presence of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, F.Y.; Mather, A.E.; Schmidt, K.A.G.; Ng, H.J.

    1999-07-01

    This investigation was carried out to determine the solubility of ethanethiol in a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solution. Measurements were made in the absence of acid gases, H{sub 2}H and CO{sub 2}, with individual acid gases present, and with mixtures of acid gases present. Experiments with an aqueous solution of 50 mass % MDEA were carried out at 40 and 70 C. The total pressure for most of the experiments was 6,890 kPa, which was maintained by methane. Partial pressures of ethanethiol ranged from 0.2 to 15 kPa.

  3. Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

  4. Radiolysis gases from nitric acid solutions containing HSA and HAN

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-10-28

    The concentration of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the radiolytically produced off-gas from 2.76-4.25M HNO{sub 3}/PU solutions has been found to be greatly reduced in the presence of sulfamic acid (HSA) and hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN). The H{sub 2} concentration ([H{sub 2}]) is reduced from 35 percent to about 4 percent by dilution caused from an increase in the production rates of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and oxygen (O{sub 2}) gases. The generation rate of H{sub 2} was not affected by HSA or HAN giving a measured radiolytic yield, G(H{sub 2}), value of 0.201 molecules/100 eV for 2.765M NO{sub 3}{sup -} solution (a value of 0.213 is predicted from previous data). The G(H{sub 2}) values are dependent on the solution nitrate concentration ([NO{sub 3}{sup -}]). The generation rates of N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} are not dependent on the [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in this narrow range, but are dependent on the presence of HSA and the concentration of HAN. The percentage [H{sub 2}] for the 2.5 to 3.0M NO{sub 3}{sup -} range expected in the off- from the FB-Line Pu{sup +3} Hold Tanks is conservatively estimated to be about 3.5 to 4.5 % for Pu + 3 solutions initially containing 0.023M HAN/0.165M HSA. The upper limit [H{sub 2}] may actually be about 4.1 % (4.3 % at 90 % confidence limits) but more {open_quotes}initial{close_quotes} off-gas rate data is needed at about 2.9M [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in Pu{sup +3} solution for verification. Addition of ascorbic acid had no effect on the off-gas rate of Pu{sup +3} solutions containing HSA and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations higher than those expected in the hold tanks. The maximum {open_quotes}hold time{close_quotes} for 50 grams/liter Pu{sup +3}/0.165M HSA/0.023M HAN/2.5-3.0M HNO{sub 3} solution is 20.3{+-}2.1 days. After this time the HSA initially present will become exhausted and the [H{sub 2}] will increase to 35 %. This hold time may be longer in [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] < 3.0M, but again more study is needed.

  5. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.; Liu, D.K.

    1992-11-17

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50 C is attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2], alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] can be removed in an economic fashion. 9 figs.

  6. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. are attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO and SO.sub.2 can be removed in an economic fashion.

  7. Plasma-chemical waste treatment of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-09-01

    The research to date has shown that a H{sub 2}S waste-treatment process based on plasma-chemical dissociation technology is compatible with refinery and high-carbon-oxide acid-gas streams. The minor amounts of impurities produced in the plasma-chemical reactor should be treatable by an internal catalytic reduction step. Furthermore, the plasma-chemical technology appears to be more efficient and more economical than the current technology. The principal key to achieving high conversions with relatively low energies of dissociation is the concept of the high-velocity, cyclonic-flow pattern in the plasma reaction zone coupled with the recycling of unconverted hydrogen sulfide. Future work will include testing the effects of components that might be carried over to the plasma reactor by ``upset`` conditions in the amine purification system of a plant and testing the plasma-chemical process on other industrial wastes streams that contain potentially valuable chemical reagents. The strategy for the commercialization of this technology is to form a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Institute of Hydrogen Energy and Plasma Technology of the Russian Scientific Center/Kurchatov Institute and with an American start-up company to develop an ``American`` version of the process and to build a commercial-scale demonstration unit in the United States. The timetable proposed would involve building a ``field test`` facility which would test the plasma-chemical reactor and sulfur recovery unit operations on an industrial hydrogen sulfide waste s at a scale large enough to obtain the energy and material balance data required for a final analysis of the commercial potential of this technology. The field test would then be followed by construction of a commercial demonstration unit in two to three years. The commercial demonstration unit would be a fully integrated plant consisting of one commercial-scale module.

  8. Nanostructured carbon materials for adsorption of methane and other gases

    SciTech Connect

    Stadie, Nicholas P.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Murialdo, Maxwell

    2015-06-30

    Provided are methods for storing gases on porous adsorbents, methods for optimizing the storage of gases on porous adsorbents, methods of making porous adsorbents, and methods of gas storage of optimized compositions, as in systems containing porous adsorbents and gas adsorbed on the surface of the porous adsorbent. The disclosed methods and systems feature a constant or increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption as a function of uptake of the gas onto the exposed surface of a porous adsorbent. Adsorbents with a porous geometry and surface dimensions suited to a particular adsorbate are exposed to the gas at elevated pressures in the specific regime where n/V (density) is larger than predicted by the ideal gas law by more than several percent.

  9. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  10. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  11. Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases

    DOEpatents

    Towler, Gavin P.; Lynn, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

  12. Natural sources of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide emissions from volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, Terrence

    1990-01-01

    Volcanic degassing of carbon dioxide plays an important role in keeping the atmosphere-ocean portion of the carbon geochemical cycle in balance. The atmosphere-ocean carbon deficit requires replenishment of 6??1012 mol CO2/yr, and places an upper limit on the output of carbon dioxide from volcanoes. The CO2 output of the global mid-oceanic ridge system is ca. 0.7??1012 mol/yr, thus supplying only a fraction of the amount needed to balance the carbon deficit. The carbon dioxide flux from subaerial volcanoes is poorly known, but it appears to be at least as large as the mid-oceanic ridge flux. Much (perhaps most) of the CO2 emitted from volcanoes is degassed noneruptively. This mode of degassing may lead to impacts on the environment and biosphere that are fundamentally different in character from those envisioned in published scenarios, which are based on the assumption that CO2 degassing occurs predominantly by eruptive processes. Although the flux of carbon dioxide from volcanoes is poorly constrained at present, it is clearly two orders of magnitude lower than the anthropogenic output of CO2.

  13. Experimental Determination of the Partitioning Behavior of Noble Gases Between Carbonate and Silicate Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, P.; Koga, K. T.

    2010-12-01

    weeks) between quench and analysis. The second stage was designed to extract noble gases by thermal decarbonation of the carbonate glass. The metal of the capsule itself was also measured, but this never contained any noble gas above blank levels. Our preliminary results show that the noble gases do not preferentially partition into carbonate liquids compared to silicate liquids: DHe(carbonate/silicate)=0.3-1.4 and DAr(carbonate/silicate)=0.15-0.17 (at 1 GPa) In a two phase carbonate - silicate system, the noble gases will essentially reside in the silicate portion of the system (particularly given that carbonatite liquids will represent a small volume fraction of the two phase magma). This partitioning behavior could nevertheless separate - decouple - noble gas isotope systematics from lithophile isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb etc) as a significant fraction of these elements could partition into the carbonate phase while noble gases remain in the silicate portion of the magma. Further work investigating pressure, temperature and compositional effects on the noble gas partition coefficients is planned. References 1. Burnard, P., Toplis, M. J. and Medynski, S. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74: 1672-1683.

  14. Carbon and Conservation: Cropping systems and greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying and predicting soil carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural systems have been research goals for numerous institutions, especially since the turn of the millennium. Cost, time, and politics are variables that have limited the rapid development of robust quant...

  15. 75 FR 18575 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...EPA is proposing a rule to require reporting on carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and geologic sequestration (GS). The proposed rulemaking does not require control of greenhouse gases (GHGs), rather it requires only monitoring and reporting of CO2 injection and geologic sequestration. EPA first proposed that suppliers of CO2 be subject to mandatory GHG reporting......

  16. Exposure assessment of oxidant gases and acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Clearly the presence of high ozone and acidic species in North America is primarily dependent upon photochemical air pollution. Evidence shows, however, that high acid exposures may occur in specific types of areas of high sulfur fuel use during the winter. At the present time, our concerns about exposure to local populations and regional populations should be directed primarily toward the outdoor activity patterns of individuals in the summer, and how those activity patterns relate to the location, duration, and concentrations of ozone and acid aerosol in photochemical air pollution episodes. Lioy Dyba and Mage et al have examined the activity patterns of children in summer camps. Because they spend more time outside than the normal population, these children form an important group of exercising individuals subject to photochemical pollution exposures. The dose of ozone inhaled by the children in the two camps was within 50% and 25% of the dose inhaled by adults in controlled clinical situations that produced clinically significant decrements in pulmonary function and increased the symptoms after 6.6 hr exposure in a given day. The chamber studies have used only ozone, whereas in the environment this effect may be enhanced by the presence of a complex mixture. The work of Lioy et al in Mendham, New Jersey found that hydrogen ion seemed to play a role in the inability of the children to return immediately to their normal peak expiratory flow rate after exposure. The camp health study conducted in Dunsville, Ontario suggested that children participating in a summer camp where moderate levels of ozone (100 ppb) but high levels of acid (46 micrograms/m3) occurred during an episode had a similar response. Thus, for children or exercising adults who are outdoors for at least one hour or more during a given day, the presence and persistence of oxidants in the environment are of particular concern. 63 references.

  17. A Ni-Doped Carbon Nanotube Sensor for Detecting Oil-Dissolved Gases in Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinbin

    2015-01-01

    C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 are important oil-dissolved gases in power transformers. Detection of the composition and content of oil-dissolved gases in transformers is very significant in the diagnosis and assessment of the state of transformer operations. The commonly used oil-gas analysis methods have many disadvantages, so this paper proposes a Ni-doped carbon nanotube (Ni-CNT) gas sensor to effectively detect oil-dissolved gases in a transformer. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor to C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were studied using the test device. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) the adsorption behaviors of the three gases on intrinsic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Ni-CNTs were calculated. The adsorption energy, charge transfer, and molecular frontier orbital of the adsorption system were also analyzed. Results showed that the sensitivity of the CNT sensor to the three kinds of gases was in the following order: C2H2 > C2H4 > C2H6. Moreover, the doped Ni improved the sensor response, and the sensor response and gas concentration have a good linear relationship. PMID:26066989

  18. A Ni-Doped Carbon Nanotube Sensor for Detecting Oil-Dissolved Gases in Transformers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinbin

    2015-01-01

    C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 are important oil-dissolved gases in power transformers. Detection of the composition and content of oil-dissolved gases in transformers is very significant in the diagnosis and assessment of the state of transformer operations. The commonly used oil-gas analysis methods have many disadvantages, so this paper proposes a Ni-doped carbon nanotube (Ni-CNT) gas sensor to effectively detect oil-dissolved gases in a transformer. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor to C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were studied using the test device. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) the adsorption behaviors of the three gases on intrinsic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Ni-CNTs were calculated. The adsorption energy, charge transfer, and molecular frontier orbital of the adsorption system were also analyzed. Results showed that the sensitivity of the CNT sensor to the three kinds of gases was in the following order: C2H2 > C2H4 > C2H6. Moreover, the doped Ni improved the sensor response, and the sensor response and gas concentration have a good linear relationship. PMID:26066989

  19. ARM Carbon Cycle Gases Flasks at SGP Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    Data from flasks are sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ARM, Southern Great Plains Site and analyzed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory ESRL. The SGP site is included in the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. The surface samples are collected from a 60 m tower at the ARM SGP Central Facility, usually once per week in the afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. The samples are collected by the ARM and LBNL Carbon Project.

  20. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and on or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.54a Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases. (a)-(b) (c) On...

  1. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction Is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and On or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.54a Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases. (a)-(b) (c) On...

  2. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and on or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.54a Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases. (a)-(b) (c) On...

  3. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and on or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.54a Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases. (a)-(b) (c) On...

  4. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and on or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.54a Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases. (a)-(b) (c) On...

  5. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-06-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  6. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. II - Chromite and carbon. III - Sulfides, spinels, and other substances; on the origin of planetary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of noble gases by chromite and carbon, two putative carriers of primordial noble gases in meteorites, was studied by synthesizing 19 samples in a Ne-Ar-Kr-Xe atmosphere at 440-720 K. Noble gas contents are found to approximately obey Henry's Law, but only slight correlations are found with composition, surface area, or adsorption temperature. Geometric mean distribution coefficients for bulk samples and HCl residues in 10 cu cm STP/g atm are: Xe 100, Kr 15, Ar 3.5, and Ne 0.62. Elemental fractionation data support the suggestion of Lewis et al. (1977) that chromite and carbon in C2 and C3 chondrites were formed by the reaction: Fe, Cr + 4CO yields (Fe, Cr)3O4 + 4C + carbides. In contrast to meteoritic minerals, the synthetic specimens show no isotopic fractionation of noble gases. In a subsequent study, attention is given to the cases of sulfides and spinels, on the way to consideration of the origin of planetary gases. Sulfides showed three distinctive trends relative to chromite or magnetite. The elemental fractionation pattern of Ar, Kr and Xe in meteorites, terrestrial rocks and planets resembles the adsorption patterns on the carbons, spinels, sulfides, and other solids studied. The high release temperature of meteoritic noble gases may be explained by transformation of the physisorbed or chemisorbed gas. The ready loss of meteoritic heavy gases on surficial oxidation is consistent with adsorption, as is the high abundance.

  7. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  8. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.52b Section 60.52b Protection of Environment... § 60.52b Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a... (total mass), corrected to 7 percent oxygen. (d) The limits for nitrogen oxides are specified...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected...

  10. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.52b Section 60.52b Protection of Environment... § 60.52b Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a... (total mass), corrected to 7 percent oxygen. (d) The limits for nitrogen oxides are specified...

  11. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... limits for nitrogen oxides at least as protective as the emission limits listed in table 1 of...

  12. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... limits for nitrogen oxides at least as protective as the emission limits listed in table 1 of...

  13. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected...

  14. Parametric Study of ReaxFF Simulation Parameters for Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Reactive Carbon Gases.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Bandyopadhyay, Ananyo; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2012-09-11

    The development of innovative carbon-based materials can be greatly facilitated by molecular modeling techniques. Although the Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) can be used to simulate the chemical behavior of carbon-based systems, the simulation settings required for accurate predictions have not been fully explored. Using the ReaxFF, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to simulate the chemical behavior of pure carbon and hydrocarbon reactive gases that are involved in the formation of carbon structures such as graphite, buckyballs, amorphous carbon, and carbon nanotubes. It is determined that the maximum simulation time step that can be used in MD simulations with the ReaxFF is dependent on the simulated temperature and selected parameter set, as are the predicted reaction rates. It is also determined that different carbon-based reactive gases react at different rates, and that the predicted equilibrium structures are generally the same for the different ReaxFF parameter sets, except in the case of the predicted formation of large graphitic structures with the Chenoweth parameter set under specific conditions. PMID:26605713

  15. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  16. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  17. Flame Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Using Low Calorific Value Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Camacho; Mahesh Subramanya; Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2007-03-31

    Nanostructures formed in diffusion flames of pure fuels [CH{sub 4}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}] at different fuel flow rates have been analyzed. Synthesis samples have been also collected from diffusion flames of various fuel blends [H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}-CO, H{sub 2}-C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, H{sub 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}] at different combustion conditions. SEM images of particulate samples collected from H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} diffusion flames show formation of nanostructures. However, the formation of nanostructures only occurs at a narrow window of fuel compositions (< 10% H{sub 2} concentration in the mixture) and flow conditions (Jet Exit Reynolds number Re{sub j} = 200). At higher H{sub 2} concentration and flow velocity, formation of nanostructures diminishes and H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} flames produce amorphous carbon and soot particles.

  18. Molecular equilibria and condensation sequences in carbon rich gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical equilibria in stellar atmospheres have been investigated by many authors. Lattimer, Schramm, and Grossman presented calculations in both O rich and C rich environments and predicted possible presolar condensates. A recent paper by Cherchneff and Barker considered a C rich composition with PAH's included in the calculations. However, the condensation sequences of C bearing species have not been investigated in detail. In a carbon rich gas surrounding an AGB star, it is often assumed that graphite (or diamond) condenses out before TiC and SiC. However, Lattimer et al. found some conditions under which TiC condenses before graphite. We have performed molecular equilibrium calculations to establish the stability fields of C(s), TiC(s), and SiC(s) and other high temperature phases under conditions of different pressures and C/O. The preserved presolar interstellar dust grains so far discovered in meteorites are graphite, diamond, SiC, TiC, and possibly Al2O3.

  19. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Cinke, Martin; Wignarajab, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is the release of effluent gases and contaminants that are in gaseous formed from the processes. A number of other gases, in particular NO(x), SO2, NH3, Hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present hazards to the crew in space habitats. Reduction of mass, power, volume and resupply can be achieved by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes as compared to other catalytic systems. The development and characterization of an innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches. This is due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controllable pore size, high adsorptive capacity and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. For example, SWNTs have high adsorptive capacity for NO and the adsorbed NO can be decomposed to N2 and O2 . Experimental results showing the decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube technology for removing NO(x). The potential for methane decomposition using carbon nanotubes catalysts is also discussed.

  20. Carbon recovery by fermentation of CO-rich off gases - Turning steel mills into biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Bastian; Richter, Hanno; Martin, Michael E; Jensen, Rasmus O; Juminaga, Alex; Mihalcea, Christophe; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-09-01

    Technological solutions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from anthropogenic sources are required. Heavy industrial processes, such as steel making, contribute considerably to GHG emissions. Fermentation of carbon monoxide (CO)-rich off gases with wild-type acetogenic bacteria can be used to produce ethanol, acetate, and 2,3-butanediol, thereby, reducing the carbon footprint of heavy industries. Here, the processes for the production of ethanol from CO-rich off gases are discussed and a perspective on further routes towards an integrated biorefinery at a steel mill is given. Recent achievements in genetic engineering as well as integration of other biotechnology platforms to increase the product portfolio are summarized. Already, yields have been increased and the portfolio of products broadened. To develop a commercially viable process, however, the extraction from dilute product streams is a critical step and alternatives to distillation are discussed. Finally, another critical step is waste(water) treatment with the possibility to recover resources. PMID:27095410

  1. Isotopic geochemistry of acid thermal waters and volcanic gases from Zaō volcano in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosu, Yasuhiro; Kurahashi, Makoto

    1984-08-01

    The chemical composition and D/H, {18O }/{16O } and {34S }/{32S } ratios have been determined for the acid hot waters and volcanic gases discharging from Zaō volcano in Japan. The thermal springs in Zaō volcano issue acid sulfate-chloride type waters (Zaō) and acid sulfate type waters (Kamoshika). Gases emitted at Kamoshika fumaroles are rich in CO 2, SO 2 and N 2, exclusive of H 2O. Chloride concentrations and oxygen isotope data indicate that the Zaō thermal waters issue a fluid mixture from an acid thermal reservoir and meteoric waters from shallow aquifers. The waters in the Zaō volcanic system have slight isotopic shifts from the respective local meteoric values. The isotopic evidence indicates that most of the water in the system is meteoric in origin. Sulfates in Zaō acid sulfate-chloride waters with δ34S values of around +15‰, are enriched in 34S compared to Zaō H 2S, while the acid sulfate waters at Kamoshika contain supergene light sulfate ( δ 34S = ˜ + 4‰ ) derived from volcanic sulfur dioxide from the volcanic exhalations. The sulfur species in Zaō acid waters are lighter in δ34S than those of other volcanic areas, reflecting the difference in total pressure.

  2. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-07-20

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

  3. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

  4. Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V.; Rasmussen, R.A.

    1992-09-20

    Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions.

  6. Raman Scattering Sensor for On-Line Monitoring of Amines and Acid Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uibel, Rory; Smith, Lee

    2010-05-20

    Sulfur and CO2 removal from hydrocarbon streams and power plant effluents are a major problem. The sulfur is normally in the form of H2S. These two acid gases are scrubbed using aqueous amine solutions that are difficult to control with conventional technology. Process Instruments Inc. developed Raman scattering technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of amine streams to improve their efficiency in scrubbing H2S and CO2 from hydrocarbon streams and power plant effluents. Improved control of amine and acid gas concentrations will allow refineries, natural gas processes and power plants to more efficiently scrub Sulfur and CO2, saving energy, time and financial resources.

  7. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discharged into the atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that contain mercury in excess of 0.080 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter or 15 percent of the potential mercury emission concentration (85... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection...

  8. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustor acid gases, expressed as sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride, are specified in... include emission limits for hydrogen chloride at least as protective as the emission limits for hydrogen... hydrogen chloride contained in the gases discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is...

  9. Effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper examines the effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A theoretical model is developed incorporating the charging rate of the carbon nanotube, kinetics of all the plasma species, and the growth rate of the CNTs because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. The three different carrier gases, i.e., argon (Ar), ammonia, and nitrogen, are considered in the present investigation, and flow rates of all the three carrier gases are varied individually (keeping the flow rates of hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas constant) to investigate the variations in the number densities of hydrocarbon and hydrogen ions in the plasma and their consequent effects on the height and radius of CNT. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that Ar favors the formation of CNTs with larger height and radius whereas ammonia contributes to better height of CNT but decreases the radius of CNT, and nitrogen impedes both the height and radius of CNT. The present work can serve to the better understanding of process parameters during growth of CNTs by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  10. Effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-04-15

    The present paper examines the effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A theoretical model is developed incorporating the charging rate of the carbon nanotube, kinetics of all the plasma species, and the growth rate of the CNTs because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. The three different carrier gases, i.e., argon (Ar), ammonia, and nitrogen, are considered in the present investigation, and flow rates of all the three carrier gases are varied individually (keeping the flow rates of hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas constant) to investigate the variations in the number densities of hydrocarbon and hydrogen ions in the plasma and their consequent effects on the height and radius of CNT. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that Ar favors the formation of CNTs with larger height and radius whereas ammonia contributes to better height of CNT but decreases the radius of CNT, and nitrogen impedes both the height and radius of CNT. The present work can serve to the better understanding of process parameters during growth of CNTs by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  11. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing using Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Fisher, John; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is effluent contaminants that are released in gaseous forms from the processes. This is a concern in both biological as well as physicochemical solid waste processing. Carbon dioxide (CO2), the major gas released, does not present a serious problem and there are currently in place a number of flight-qualified technologies for CO2 removal. However, a number of other gases, in particular NOx, SO2, NH3, and various hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present health hazards to the crew members in space habitats. In the present configuration of solid waste processing in the International Space Station (ISS), some of these gases are removed by the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), demands a major resupply. Reduction of the resupply can be effective by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes. For example, NO decomposition to N2 and O2 is thermodynamically favored. Data showing decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube based technology for removing NOx based on mass/energy penalties.

  12. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    PubMed Central

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O.; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J.; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K.

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible. PMID:23112626

  13. Utilization of carbon dioxide in industrial flue gases for the cultivation of microalga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chien-Ya; Chen, Tsai-Yu; Chang, Yu-Bin; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Lin, Hsiun-Yu; Chen, Chun-Da; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The biomass and lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. MTF-15 cultivated using aeration with flue gases from a coke oven, hot stove or power plant in a steel plant of the China Steel Corporation in Taiwan were investigated. Using the flue gas from the coke oven, hot stove or power plant for cultivation, the microalgal strain obtained a maximum specific growth rate and lipid production of (0.827 d(-1), 0.688 g L(-1)), (0.762 d(-1), 0.961 g L(-1)), and (0.728 d(-1), 0.792 g L(-1)), respectively. This study demonstrated that Chlorella sp. MTF-15 could efficiently utilize the CO₂, NOX and SO₂ present in the different flue gases. The results also showed that the growth potential, lipid production and fatty acid composition of the microalgal strain were dependent on the composition of the flue gas and on the operating strategy deployed. PMID:24950094

  14. Survey of lunar carbon compounds. I - The presence of indigenous gases and hydrolysable carbon compounds in Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. I.; Cadogan, P. H.; Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1971-01-01

    Indigenous gases and hydrolyzable carbon compounds in Apollo 11 and 12 samples through gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric examination, noting meteoritic impact and solar wind implantation as probable origins

  15. Impact of carbon dioxide, trace gases, and climate change on global agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Global climate change is one of several important issues that will command the attention of policymakers and scientist in the 1990s. The evidence that concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and other gases are increasing in the atmosphere is irrefutable. The evidence, and the knowledge that CO{sub 2} and trace gases may absorb thermal radiation sufficient to warm the atmosphere, has prompted much speculation that ensuing atmospheric warming may lead to changes in the distribution of precipitation, and of crop adaptation and productivity, that would alter the world supply of food and fiber. The implications of this speculation are compelling for agronomists, because agronomists are stewards of the world's food supply and of the natural resources that are used to produce food. Agronomists have a pivotal role in conducting the research needed to anticipate crop response to climate changes, and in informing policymakers and the general public about the adequacy of our knowledge. In this publication agronomists assess the current status of scientific knowledge about the putative role of greenhouse gases in global climate change and report their findings.

  16. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. III - Sorption of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon on carbon - Elemental fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe was studied in carbon black, acridine carbon, and diamond in an attempt to understand the origin of trapped noble gases in meteorites. The results support a model in which gases are physically adsorbed on interior surfaces formed by a pore labyrinth within amorphous carbons. The data show that: (1) the adsorption/desorption times are controlled by choke points that restrict the movement of noble gas atoms within the pore labyrinth, and (2) the physical adsorption controls the temperature behavior and elemental fractionation patterns.

  17. Modeling the simultaneous transport of two acid gases in tertiary amines with reversible reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.; Sandall, O.C.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for the simultaneous mass transfer of two acid gases in tertiary amines accompanied by reversible chemical reactions. The model has been applied to the industrially important system of simultaneous absorption or desorption of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA). In most applications the treated gas must be virtually free of H/sub 2/S; however, it is often not necessary or economical to remove substantial amounts of CO/sub 2/. Hence, selective removal of H/sub 2/S from gas streams such as natural or synthetic gases which contain CO/sub 2/ is desirable. In this research a film theory model describing the simultaneous diffusion and reversible reaction of two gases into reactive liquid has been used to predict the mass transfer enhancement factors of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in aqueous MDEA solutions. The resulting unstable two point boundary value problem has been solved numerically for a range of the dimensionless parameters that characterize an important application for this system. In studying the simultaneous transport of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S, it is found that the reversibility of the reactions, under certain conditions, causes desorption to take place although absorption would be expected on the basis of overall driving forces. This showed that not only enhancement factors larger but also smaller than unity and even negative values are possible.

  18. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. I - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Trapping experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.; Zadnik, M. G.; Anders, E.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of Xe-127 at 5 x 10 to the -7th atm onto carbon black, pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride, and pyrolyzed acridine at 100-1000 C for 5 min-240 h is measured experimentally by gamma spectrometry. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The tightly bound Xe remaining in the samples after 4000 min pumping at temperatures above 100 C is found to comprise two components: a low-temperature component attributed to physisorption within an atomic-scale labyrinth of micropores, and a high-temperature component due to volume diffusion. The implications for the trapping of noble gases near grain surfaces of amorphous carbon in meteorites are considered.

  19. Analysis of Effluent Gases During the CCVD Growth of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, T. C.; Biris, A. S.; Miller, D. W.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition was used to grow multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a Fe:Co:CaCO3 catalyst from acetylene. The influent and effluent gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry at different time intervals during the nanotubes growth process in order to better understand and optimize the overall reaction. A large number of byproducts were identified and it was found that the number and the level for some of the carbon byproducts significantly increased over time. The CaCO3 catalytic support thermally decomposed into CaO and CO2 resulting in a mixture of two catalysts for growing the nanotubes, which were found to have outer diameters belonging to two main groups 8 to 35 nm and 40 to 60 nm, respectively.

  20. Noble Gases and Nitrogen Released from a Lunar Soil Pyroxene Separate by Acid Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, P. E.

    1993-07-01

    We report initial results from a series of experiments designed to measure recently implanted solar wind (SW) ions in lunar soil mineral grains [1]. An acid-etching technique similar to the CSSE method developed at ETH Zurich was used to make abundance and isotope measurements of the SW noble gas and nitrogen compositions. Among the samples examined was a pyroxene separate from soil 75081. It was first washed with H2O to remove contamination from the sample finger walls and grain surfaces. H2O also acted as a weak acid, releasing gases from near-surface sites. Treatment with H2SO3 followed the water washes. Acid pH (~1.8 to ~1.0) and temperature (~23 degrees C to ~90 degrees C) and duration of acid attack (several minutes to several days) were varied from step to step. Finally, the sample was pyrolyzed in several steps to remove the remaining gases, culminating with a high-temperature pyrolysis at 1200 degrees C. Measurements of the light noble gases were mostly consistent with those from previous CSSE experiments performed on pyroxene [2,3]. It should be noted, however, that the Zurich SEP component was not easily distinguishable in the steps where it was expected to be observed. We suspect our experimental protocol masked the SEP reservoir, preventing us from seeing its distinctive signature. The most interesting results from this sample are its Kr and Xe isotopic and elemental compositions. Pyroxene apparently retains heavy noble gases as well as ilmenite (and plagioclase [4]). The heavy noble gas element ratios from this sample along with those previously reported [5,6] are, however, considerably heavier than the theoretically determined "solar system" values [7,8]. Explanations for the difference include the possibility that the derivations are incorrect, that there is another component of lunar origin mixing with the solar component, or that some type of loss mechanism is altering the noble gas reservoirs of the grains. The Kr and Xe isotopic compositions for

  1. Role of acid diffusion in matrix acidizing of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.; Fogler, H.S.; Stenius, P.; Sjoblom, J.

    1987-02-01

    To increase the efficiency of matrix treatments in carbonates, a new type of retarded acid-in-oil microemulsion system has ben developed. The microemulsion is of low viscosity but can exhibit acid diffusion rates two orders of magnitude lower than aqueous HCl. Decreased acid diffusion delays spending and allows live acid to penetrate the rock matrix more uniformly and to greater distances. Coreflood results show that the microemulsion can stimulate cores in fewer PV's and under conditions of low injection rates where aqueous HCl fails completely. The microemulsion could also conceivably increase acid penetration along any natural fractures and fissures that may be present, thus increasing acidizing efficiency in this type of treatment. The relationship between the acid diffusion rate and the ability of the fluid to matrix-stimulate limestone is investigated.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-13-labeled tetradecanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, J T; Patel, K M; Morrisett, J D

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of tetradecanoic acid enriched with 13C at carbons 1, 3, or 6 is described. The label at the carbonyl carbon was introduced by treating 1-bromotridecane with K13CN (90% enriched) to form the 13C-labeled nitrile, which upon hydrolysis yielded the desired acid. The [3-13C]tetradecanoic acid was synthesized by alkylation of diethyl sodio-malonate with [1-13C]1-bromododecane; the acid was obtained upon saponification and decarboxylation. The label at the 6 position was introduced by coupling the appropriately labeled alkylcadmium chloride with the half acid chloride methyl ester of the appropriate dioic acid, giving the corresponding oxo fatty acid ester. Formation of the tosylhydrazone of the oxo-ester followed by reduction with sodium cyanoborohydride gave the labeled methyl tetradecanoate which, upon hydrolysis, yielded the desired tetradecanoic acid. All tetradecanoic acids were identical to unlabeled analogs as evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared or NMR spectroscopy. These labeled fatty acids were used subsequently to prepare the correspondingly labeled diacyl phosphatidylcholines. PMID:6631228

  3. Measurement and analysis of the relationship between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Baek, Bok Haeng; Aneja, Viney P

    2004-05-01

    An annular denuder system, which consisted of a cyclone separator; two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively; and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series, was used to measure acid gases, ammonia (NH3), and fine particles in the atmosphere from April 1998 to March 1999 in eastern North Carolina (i.e., an NH3-rich environment). The sodium carbonate denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 microg/m3 hydrochloric acid (standard deviation [SD] +/- 0.2 microg/m3); 1.14 microg/m3 nitric acid (SD +/- 0.81 microg/m3), and 1.61 microg/m3 sulfuric acid (SD +/- 1.58 microg/m3). The citric acid denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 microg/m3 NH3 (SD +/- 15.03 microg/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol concentrations of 1.64 microg/m3 ammonium (NH4+; SD +/- 1.26 microg/m3); 0.26 microg/m3 chloride (SD +/- 0.69 microg/m3), 1.92 microg/m3 nitrate (SD +/- 1.09 microg/m3), and 3.18 microg/m3 sulfate (SO4(2-); SD +/- 3.12 microg/m3). From seasonal variation, the measured particulates (NH4+, SO4(2-), and nitrate) showed larger peak concentrations during summer, suggesting that the gas-to-particle conversion was efficient during summer. The aerosol fraction in this study area indicated the domination of ammonium sulfate particles because of the local abundance of NH3, and the long-range transport of SO4(2-) based on back trajectory analysis. Relative humidity effects on gas-to-particle conversion processes were analyzed by particulate NH4+ concentration originally formed from the neutralization processes with the secondary pollutants in the atmosphere. PMID:15149049

  4. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay. PMID:23907148

  5. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay.

  6. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay. PMID:23907148

  7. Fundamental Understanding of the Interaction of Acid Gases with CeO2 : From Surface Science to Practical Catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tumuluri, Uma; Rother, Gernot; Wu, Zili

    2016-03-21

    Acid gases including CO2, SO2, and NOx are ubiquitous in large-scale energy applications including heterogeneous catalysis. The adverse environmental and health effects of these acid gases have resulted in high interest in the research and development of technologies to remove or convert these acid gases. The main challenge for the development of these technologies is to develop catalysts that are highly efficient, stable, and cost-effective, and many catalysts have been reported in this regard. CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have gained prominence in the removal and conversion of CO2, SO2, and NOx because of their structural robustness and redox and acid–basemore » properties. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the application of CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts for the removal of CO2, SO2, and NOx gases with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the interactions of these acid gases with CeO2. The studies summarized in this review range from surface science using single crystals and thin films with precise crystallographic planes to practical catalysis applications of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline CeO2 materials with defects and dopants. After an introduction to the properties of CeO2 surfaces, their catalytic properties for conversions of different acid gases are reviewed and discussed. Lastly, we find that the surface atomic structure, oxygen vacancies, and surface acid–base properties of CeO2 play vital roles in the surface chemistry and structure evolution during the interactions of acid gases with CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  8. Effect of Nitrogen and Hydrogen Gases on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanomaterials from Coal Waste Fly Ash as a Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hintsho, Nomso; Shaikjee, Ahmed; Triphati, Pranav K; Masenda, Hilary; Naidoo, Deena; Franklyn, Paul; Durbach, Shane

    2016-05-01

    Various reducing and inert gases have been used in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) synthesis of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs). In this paper we report on the effects that hydrogen and nitrogen gases have on the production of CNMs from acetylene on fly ash catalysts. Parameters such as temperature and gas environments were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that CNMs of various morphologies such as carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanospheres (CNSs) were formed. When hydrogen was used the carbonaceous products were formed in higher yields as compared to when nitrogen was used. This could be due to the multifunctional roles that hydrogen plays as compared to nitrogen. Laser Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements revealed that three types of products were formed, namely: amorphous carbon, graphitic carbon and iron carbide. Significantly cementite (Fe3C) was identified as the main intermediate carbide species in the catalytic growth of well-ordered CNMs. PMID:27483807

  9. Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C; Baker, Richard W.

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

  10. Greenhouse gases, climate change and the transition from coal to low-carbon electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhrvold, N. P.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-03-01

    A transition from the global system of coal-based electricity generation to low-greenhouse-gas-emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change in the long term. The use of current infrastructure to build this new low-emission system necessitates additional emissions of greenhouse gases, and the coal-based infrastructure will continue to emit substantial amounts of greenhouse gases as it is phased out. Furthermore, ocean thermal inertia delays the climate benefits of emissions reductions. By constructing a quantitative model of energy system transitions that includes life-cycle emissions and the central physics of greenhouse warming, we estimate the global warming expected to occur as a result of build-outs of new energy technologies ranging from 100 GWe to 10 TWe in size and 1-100 yr in duration. We show that rapid deployment of low-emission energy systems can do little to diminish the climate impacts in the first half of this century. Conservation, wind, solar, nuclear power, and possibly carbon capture and storage appear to be able to achieve substantial climate benefits in the second half of this century; however, natural gas cannot.

  11. Water-responsive carbon nanotubes for selective detection of toxic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Sakorikar, Tushar; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Misra, Abha

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia plays an important role in our daily lives and hence its quantitative and qualitative sensing has become necessary. Bulk structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been employed to detect the gas concentration of 10 ppm. Hydrophobic CNTs were turned to hydrophilic via the application of a ramp electric field that allowed confinement of a controlled amount of water inside CNT microstructure. These samples were then also used to detect different gases. A comparative study has been performed for sensing three reducing gases, namely, ammonia, sulphur-di-oxide, and hydrogen sulphide to elaborate the selectivity of the sensor. A considerable structural bending in the bulk CNT was observed on evaporation of the confined water, which can be accounted to the zipping of individual nanotubes. However, the rate of the stress induced on these bulk microstructures increased on the exposure of ammonia due to the change in the surface tension of the confined solvent. A prototype of an alarm system has been developed to illustrate sensing concept, wherein the generated stress in the bulk CNT induces a reversible loss in electrical contact that changes the equivalent resistance of the electrical circuit upon exposure to the gas.

  12. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of gas-to-particle conversion between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Bok-Haeng

    Since 1990, the population of hogs in eastern North Carolina has increased sharply resulting in increased emissions of ammonia. An Annular Denuder System (ADS) was used, which consisted of a cyclone separator, two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively, and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series. The ADS measured ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in ambient atmosphere at a commercial hog farm in Eastern North Carolina from April 1998 to March 1999. The sodium carbonate coated denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 mug/m 3 HCl (+/-0.20 mug/m3); 1.10 mug/m 3 HONO (+/-1.17 mug/m3); 1.14 mug/m 3 HNO3 (+/-0.81 mug/m3), and 1.61 mug/m 3 SO2 (+/-1.58 mug/m3). The citric acid coated denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 mug/m 3 NH3 (+/-15.03 mug/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol (i.e., fine particular matter, Dp ≤ 2.5 mum) concentrations of 1.64 mug/m3 NH4+ (+/-1.26 mug/m3); 0.26 mug/m3 Cl - (+/-0.69 mug/m3); 1.92 mug/m 3 NO3- (+/-1.09 mug/m 3), and 3.18 mug/m3 SO42- (+/-3.12 mug/m3). Using the data collected from the study sites, we evaluated the seasonal variations and the effects of relative humidity on fine particle species. Based on the measurements of ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles, the mean pseudo-first-order rate constant, kS, between NH3 and H2SO4 aerosol is estimated to be 3.70 (+/-2.99) x 10-3 sec-1. The rate constant was found to increase as temperature increases, and decrease with increasing relative humidity. The equilibrium time constant was determined based on the estimated kinetic rate constants and the observed inorganic components of atmospheric aerosols. The average value of equilibrium time constant was determined to be 17.01 (+/-12.19) minutes for ambient equilibrium time between ammonia, nitric acid gas and ammonium nitrate aerosol; and 10.83 (+/-8.97) minutes for ammonia, hydrochloric acid, and ammonium chloride. The aerosol

  13. Estimated flows of gases and carbon within CEEF ecosystem composed of human, crops and goats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tako, Y.; Komatsubara, O.; Honda, G.; Arai, R.; Nitta, K.

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) can be used as a test bed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS), because technologies developed for the CEEF system facilitate self-sufficient material circulation necessary for long term missions such as Lunar and Mars exploration. In the experiment conducted under closed condition in FY2003, rice and soybeans were cultivated sequentially in two chambers and a chamber, each having a cultivation area of 30 m2 and floor area of 43 m2, inside the Plantation Module with artificial lighting of the CEEF. In the chamber having a cultivation area of 60 m2 and floor area of 65 m2, inside the Plantation Module with natural and artificial lighting, peanuts and safflowers were also cultivated. Stable transplant (or seeding) and harvest of each crop were maintained during a month. Flows of CO2, O2 and carbon to and from the crops were analyzed during the stable cultivation period. Simulated works and stay in the CEEF lasting five days were conducted two times under ventilating condition in FY2003. Gas exchange of human was estimated using heart rate data collected during the experiments and correlation between gas exchange rate and heart rate. Gas exchange rate and carbon balance of female goats were determined using an open-flow measurement system with a gastight chamber. From these results, flows of gases and carbon in the CEEF were discussed.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gases: A Technological Review Emphasizing Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Songolzadeh, Mohammad; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Takht Ravanchi, Maryam; Songolzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as CO2 in the atmosphere is a global warming. Human activities are a major cause of increased CO2 concentration in atmosphere, as in recent decade, two-third of greenhouse effect was caused by human activities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a major strategy that can be used to reduce GHGs emission. There are three methods for CCS: pre-combustion capture, oxy-fuel process, and post-combustion capture. Among them, post-combustion capture is the most important one because it offers flexibility and it can be easily added to the operational units. Various technologies are used for CO2 capture, some of them include: absorption, adsorption, cryogenic distillation, and membrane separation. In this paper, various technologies for post-combustion are compared and the best condition for using each technology is identified. PMID:24696663

  15. Foliage plants for indoor removal of the primary combustion gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Mesick, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Foliage plants were evaluated for their ability to sorb carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, the two primary gases produced during the combustion of fossil fuels and tobacco. The spider plant (Chlorophytum elatum var. vittatum) could sorb 2.86 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in a 6 h photoperiod. The golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) sorbed 0.98 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in the same time period. In a system with the spider plant, greater than or equal to 99 percent of an initial concentration of 47 ppm NO2 could be removed in 6 h from a void volume of approximately 0.35 cu m. One spider plant potted in a 3.8 liter container can sorb 3300 micrograms CO and effect the removal of 8500 micrograms NO2/hour, recognizing the fact that a significant fraction of NO2 at high concentrations will be lost by surface sorption, dissolving in moisture, etc.

  16. Effect of gases on the temperature dependence of the electric conductivity of CVD multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buryakov, T. I. Romanenko, A. I.; Anikeeva, O. B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Usol'tseva, A. N.; Tkachev, E. N.

    2007-07-15

    The influence of various gaseous media on the temperature dependence of the electric conductivity {sigma} of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized using the method of catalytical chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been studied. The {sigma}(T) curves were measured in a temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K in helium and its mixtures with air, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen. The introduction of various gaseous components into a helium atmosphere leads to a significant decrease in the conductivity of MWNTs in the interval between the temperatures of condensation and melting of the corresponding gas. Upon a heating-cooling cycle, the conductivity restores on the initial level. It is concluded that a decrease in {sigma} is caused by the adsorption of gases on the surface of nanotubes.

  17. Collisions and Reactions of Protic Gases with Surfactant-Coated Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Chan; Glass, Samuel; Lawrence, Jennifer; Nathanson, Gilbert

    2004-03-01

    The presence of surfactant molecules on sulfuric acid droplets in the atmosphere may alter the rates of heterogeneous reactions by impeding gas entry. We perform molecular beam experiments with deuterated sulfuric acid solutions (60-68 wt % D_2SO4 at 213 K) with varying concentrations of surfactants including butanol, hexanol, and octanol. We direct a beam of a protic gas HX (X = Cl or Br) at a continuously renewed film of supercooled D_2SO_4/D_2O in vacuum and measure the fraction of thermalized HX that undergo HX→ DX exchange. Our results contradict the notion that surfactants impede gas transport. The presence of surface alcohol does not alter the rate of D_2O evaporation from the liquid surface. Our most striking result is that surface alcohol actually increases the HX→ DX exchange fraction, implying that HX dissociates more readily at the interface when alcohol is present. This enhancement may be caused by the dilution of the acid near the surface by segregated alcohol molecules, which provide additional OH groups for protonation by HX. We are now investigating other surfactants as well as other atmospheric gases.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  19. Combustion vs. Pyrolysis of Presolar Diamonds: Association of P3 and HL Noble Gases with Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Fisenko, A. V.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    Since it became clear that presolar diamonds are not identical and perhaps consist of several carriers of isotopically anomalous (like HL-Xe and light nitrogen) and isotopically normal (carbon and P3 noble gases) components, it is important to know how these components are related to the diamond carriers. Because of diamond grains are too small to be analyzed individually and the attempts to separate the diamonds [1] have had little, if any, success, the only method currently available to investigate the relationship between the carriers and corresponding components is the temperature dependence of their release pattern. The interpretation of the latter however is often not straight forward because the mechanism by which the gases are released is complicated and simultaneously involves several processes such as diffusion, chemical reactions between coexisting phases and/or their heating environment and phase transformations [2, 3]. To unravel this interdependent matrix we use several extraction methods applied to the same sample. In the present study we used a combination of stepped pyrolysis and combustion for investigation of the release pattern of Ar components for presolar diamonds concentrated from CI (Orgueil), and CV (Allende, Efremovka) meteorites. From the previous studies [2] it is known that Ar in the most primitive CI's and CM's meteorites consists mostly of P3 component while for CV3's like Allende and Efremovka it is represented mainly by HL component. This difference in the noble gas components composition probably reflects the thermal history of the corresponding parent bodies and the extreme sensitivity of the P3 component concentrations, in presolar diamonds, to the thermal metamorphism. Laboratory pyrolysis experiments show that most of the P3 argon is released at rather low temperature though some of the gas is still being liberated at temperatures as high as those usually associated with HL component [2]. The low release temperatures have led

  20. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  1. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  2. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  3. Oral drug delivery of therapeutic gases - carbon monoxide release for gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Christoph; Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2014-09-10

    Deploying the therapeutic potential of carbon monoxide (CO) in various gastrointestinal diseases is challenged by inappropriate oral delivery modes. It is for this challenge, that we developed an easy to use tablet referred to as oral carbon monoxide release system (OCORS) providing precise, controlled, tunable and targeted CO delivery for the treatment of sequelae of gastrointestinal diseases. OCORS is an oral tablet based on sulfite induced CO release from the CO releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2). OCORS performance was detailed as a function of the presence of buffer within the tablet core and the composition of a semipermeable cellulose acetate coating, shielding the tablet core. OCORS delivered CO for up to 10h with a nearly linear release profile between approximately 30 to 240min. This controlled release system delivered the therapeutic gas independent of environmental pH for reliable CO generation at gastric, intestinal or colonic sites. In vivo experiments and toxicological assessments particularly with respect to observed ruthenium release of OCORS are required to demonstrate the pharmacokinetics and clinical potential of this oral delivery platform for therapeutic gases. PMID:24969354

  4. SEPARATION OF CO2 FROM FLUE GASES BY CARBON-MULTIWALL CARBON NANOTUBE MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Andrews

    2001-03-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were found to be an effective separation media for removing CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. The separation mechanism favors the selective condensation of CO{sub 2} from the flowing gas stream. Significant uptakes of CO{sub 2} were measured at 30 C and 150 C over the pressure range 0.5 to 5 bar. No measurable uptake of nitrogen was found for this range of conditions. The mass uptake of CO{sub 2} by MWNT was found to increase with increasing temperature. A packed bed of MWNT completely removed CO{sub 2} from a flowing stream of CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, and exhibited rapid uptake kinetics for CO{sub 2}.

  5. Understanding the contribution of non-carbon dioxide gases in deep mitigation scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Gernaat, David; Calvin, Katherine V.; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; Otto, Sander; Rao, Shilpa; Strefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-07-01

    The combined 2010 emissions of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and the fluorinated gasses (F-gas) account for about 20-30% of total emissions and about 30% of radiative forcing. At the moment, most studies looking at reaching ambitious climate targets project the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) to be reduced to zero (or less) by the end of the century. As for non-CO2 gases, the mitigation potential seem to be more constrained, we find that by the end of the century in the current deep mitigation scenarios non-CO2 emissions could form the lion’s share of remaining greenhouse gas emissions. In order to support effective climate policy strategies, in this paper we provide a more in-depth look at the role of non-CO2¬ emission sources (CH4, N2O and F-gases) in achieving deep mitigation targets (radiative forcing target of 2.8 W/m2 in 2100). Specifically, we look at the sectorial mitigation potential and the remaining non-CO2 emissions. By including a set of different models, we provide some insights into the associated uncertainty. Most of the remaining methane emissions in 2100 in the climate mitigation scenario come from the livestock sector. Strong reductions are seen in the energy supply sector across all models. For N2O, less reduction potential is seen compared to methane and the sectoral differences are larger between the models. The paper shows that the assumptions on remaining non-CO2 emissions are critical for the feasibility of reaching ambitious climate targets and the associated costs.

  6. CARBONGASES: Retrieval and Analysis of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Greenhouse Gases from SCIAMACHY on Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneising, O.; Buchwitz, M.; Reuter, M.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases contributing to global climate change. Despite their importance our knowledge about their variable natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks has significant gaps. Satellite observations can add important global scale information on greenhouse gas sources and sinks provided the data are accurate and precise enough and are sensitive to the lowest atmospheric layers where the variability due to regional greenhouse gas sources and sinks are largest. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT was the first and is now besides TANSO onboard GOSAT the only satellite instrument which covers important absorption bands of both gases in the near-infrared/shortwave- infrared (NIR/SWIR) spectral region. In nadir mode SCIAMACHY observes reflected and backscattered solar radiation. The daytime measurements are therefore very sensitive to near-surface greenhouse gas concentration changes except in case of significant cloud cover. The atmospheric greenhouse gas information is extracted from the SCIAMACHY spectra using the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFM-DOAS or WFMD) algorithm developed at the Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP) of the University of Bremen, Germany. In the framework of the CARBONGASES project, which is part of the Changing Earth Science Network, the afore existing data set focussing on the first three full years of the ENVISAT mission (2003-2005) is improved and extended up to end of 2009 constituting seven years of greenhouse gas information derived from European Earth observation data and closing the gap to GOSAT. The status of this retrieval activity and first results are presented.

  7. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  8. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential

  9. Colloidally separated samples from Allende residues - Noble gases, carbon and an ESCA-study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Kronenbitter, J.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which strengthen the hypothesis of heterogeneity among the carbon- and nitrogen-bearing phases of the Allende meteorite. These data also highlight the possibility of performing physical separations yielding samples in which some of the noble gas- and carbon-bearing phases are extraordinarily predominant over others. The conclusion, based on mass and isotope balance arguments, that a significant portion of the carbonaceous matter in Allende is likely to be gas-poor or gas-free need not weaken the case for carbonaceous carriers for the major noble gas components. The concept that acid-soluble carbonaceous phases contain a multiplicity of components, each of which may have formed under a multiplicity of different physical-chemical conditions, is reemphasized by the results of the present study.

  10. Equivalent Circuit Modeling for Carbon Nanotube Schottky Barrier Modulation in Polarized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    2005-01-01

    We study the carbon nanotube Schottky barrier at the metallic electrode interface in polarized gases using an equivalent circuit model. The gas-nanotube interaction is often weak and very little charge transfer is expected [l]. This is the case with'oxygen, but the gas-electrode interaction is appreciable and makes the oxygen molecules negatively charged. In the closed circuit condition, screening positive charges appear in the nanotube as well as in the electrode, and the Schottky barrier is modulated due to the resultant electrostatic effects [2]. In the case of ammonia, both the gas-nanotube and gas-electrode interactions are weak, but the Schottky barrier can still be modulated since the molecules are polarized and align in the preferred orientation within the gap between the electrode and nanotube in the open circuit condition (dipole layer formation). In the closed circuit condition, an electric field appears in the gap and strengthens or weakens the preferred dipole alignment reflecting the nanotube Fermi level. The modulation is visible when the nanotube depletion mode is involved, and the required dipole density is as low as 2 x 10(exp 13) dipoles/sq cm, which is quite feasible experimentally,

  11. Contamination monitoring for ammonia, amines, and acid gases utilizing ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Tad; Webber, Kurt; Carpio, Ronald A.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of ammonia (NH3) and n-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) contamination on chemically amplified DUV resists is well documented. Other amines and related compounds are under suspicion as well. In addition, the concentration levels that are of concern have steadily decreased from approximately 10 ppbv down to levels as low as 0.1 ppbv. While some techniques such as ion chromotagraphy (IC) have been demonstrated to have limits of detection at these levels, the analysis times are rather long and cumbersome. This paper describes the use of IMS to perform these measurements, in a totally automated, continuous instrument. IMS is a simplified time-of-flight technique that requires no liquid reagents and has been demonstrated to be a reliable method for monitoring for ammonia and NMP in cleanrooms. This paper demonstrates the ability of the technique to monitor for amines such as dimethylamine, methylamine, methanolamine, ethanolamine, diethanolamine, butylamine and others. Detection limits of 0.1 ppbv and below are clearly demonstrated. Also discussed are methods of monitoring multiple points with a single analyzer. Ability to detect corrosive gases such as hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur trioxide (SO3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), chlorine (Cl2), bromine (Br2), phosphoric acid (H3PO4) are also demonstrated.

  12. Annular denuders for use in global climate and stratospheric measurements of acidic gases and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of acidic and basic gases that coexist with fine particle (less than 2.5 micron) may be useful for determining the impact of these species on global climate changes and determining species that influence stratospheric ozone levels. Annular denuders are well suited for this purpose. A new concentric annular denuder system, consisting of a three channel denuder, a Teflon coated cyclone preseparator, and a multistage filter pack was developed, evaluated, and shown to provide reliable atmospheric measurements of SO2, HNO2, HNO3, NH3, SO4(=), NH4(+), NO3(-), and H(+). For example, the precision of the annular denuder for the ambient measurements of HNO3 and nitrates at concentrations between 0.1 to 3 microgram/cu m was + or - 12 and 16 pct., respectively. The 120 x 25 mm three channel denuder is encased in a stainless steel sheath and has annular spaces that are 1 mm wide. This design was shown to have nearly identical capacity for removal of SO2 as conventional 210 x 25 mm single channel denuder configurations. The cyclone preseparator was designed and tested to have a D sub 50 cutoff diameter of 2.5 micron and minimal retention of HNO3.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  14. Sources of greenhouse gases and carbon monoxide in central London (UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja; Zazzeri, Giulia; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been on the scientific agenda for several decades and new technology now also allows for high-precision, continuous monitoring of fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Compared to the natural environment, flux measurements in the urban environment, which is home to over 50% of the population globally, are still rare despite high densities of anthropogenic sources of pollutants. We report on over three years of measurements atop a 192 m tower in central London (UK), Europe's largest city, which started in October 2011. Fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide are measured by eddy-covariance (EC) at the British Telecom tower (51° 31' 17.4' N 0° 8' 20.04' W). In addition to the long-term measurements, EC fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in February 2014. All four trace gases exhibit diurnal trends consistent with anthropogenic activities with minimum emissions at night and early afternoon maxima. Segregating emissions by wind direction reveals heterogeneous source distributions with temporal patterns and source strengths that differ between compounds. The lowest emissions for CO, CO2 and CH4 were recorded for NW winds. The highest emissions of methane were in the SE sector, in the NE for CO2 and in the W for CO. Fluxes of all 3 gases exhibited marked seasonal trends characterised by a decrease in emissions in summer (63% reduction for CO, 36% for CO2 and 22% for CH4). Monthly fluxes of CO and CO2 were linearly correlated to air temperature (R2 = 0.7 and 0.59 respectively); a weaker dependence upon temperature was also observed for CH4 (R2 = 0.31). Diurnal and seasonal emissions of CO and CO2 are mainly controlled by local fossil fuel combustion and vehicle cold starts are thought to account for 20-30% of additional emissions of CO during the winter. Fugitive emissions of CH4 from the natural gas distribution network are thought to be substantial, which is consistent

  15. Black carbon and trace gases over South Asia: Measurements and Regional Climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Pathak, Binita; Parottil, Ajay

    2016-07-01

    Trace gases and aerosols are simulated with 50 km spatial resolution over South Asian CORDEX domain enclosing the Indian sub-continent and North-East India for the year 2012 using two regional climate models RegCM4 coupled with CLM4.5 and WRF-Chem 3.5. Both models are found to capture the seasonality in the simulated O3 and its precursors, NOx and CO and black carbon concentrations together with the meteorological variables over the Indian Subcontinent as well as over the sub-Himalayan North-Eastern region of India including Bangladesh. The model simulations are compared with the measurements made at Dibrugarh (27.3°N, 94.6°E, 111 m amsl). Both the models are found to capture the observed diurnal and seasonal variations in O3 concentrations with maximum in spring and minimum in monsoon, the correlation being better for WRF-Chem (R~0.77) than RegCM (R~0.54). Simulated NOx and CO is underestimated in all the seasons by both the models, the performance being better in the case of WRF-Chem. The observed difference may be contributed by the bias in the estimation of the O3 precursors NOx and CO in the emission inventories or the error in the simulation of the meteorological variables which influences O3 concentration in both the models. For example, in the pre-monsoon and winter season, the WRF-Chem model simulated shortwave flux overestimates the observation by ~500 Wm-2 while in the monsoon and post monsoon season, simulated shortwave flux is equivalent to the observation. The model predicts higher wind speed in all the seasons especially during night-time. In the post-monsoon and winter season, the simulated wind pattern is reverse to observation with daytime low and night-time high values. Rainfall is overestimated in all the seasons. RegCM-CLM4.5 is found to underestimate rainfall and other meteorological parameters. The WRF-Chem model closely captured the observed values of black carbon mass concentrations during pre-monsoon and summer monsoon seasons, but

  16. STABILITY EVALUATION OF SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE AND CARBON MONOXIDE GASES IN CYLINDERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA recommends in their EPA Traceability Protocol 1 and 2 that reactive gases be reanalyzed every six months. The purpose of this study was to assess the stability of selected reactive gases as a function of time to determine the feasibility of extending the recertificatio...

  17. Impact of oxy-fuel combustion gases on mercury retention in activated carbons from a macroalgae waste: effect of water.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Anton, M A; Ferrera-Lorenzo, N; Fuente, E; Díaz-Somoano, M; Suarez-Ruíz, I; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Ruiz, B

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the different sorption behaviors of mercury species on activated carbons in the oxy-fuel combustion of coal and the effect of high quantities of water vapor on the retention process. The work evaluates the interactions between the mercury species and a series of activated carbons prepared from a macroalgae waste (algae meal) from the agar-agar industry in oxy-combustion atmospheres, focussing on the role that the high concentration of water in the flue gases plays in mercury retention. Two novel aspects are considered in this work (i) the impact of oxy-combustion gases on the retention of mercury by activated carbons and (ii) the performance of activated carbons prepared from biomass algae wastes for this application. The results obtained at laboratory scale indicate that the effect of the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons on mercury capture is not as important as that of reactive gases, such as the SOx and water vapor present in the flue gas. Mercury retention was found to be much lower in the oxy-combustion atmosphere than in the O2+N2 (12.6% O2) atmosphere. However, the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) to form oxidized mercury (Hg2+) amounted to 60%, resulting in an enhancement of mercury retention in the flue gas desulfurization units and a reduction in the amalgamation of Hg0 in the CO2 compression unit. This result is of considerable importance for the development of technologies based on activated carbon sorbents for mercury control in oxy-combustion processes. PMID:25585865

  18. Low to middle tropospheric profiles and biosphere/troposphere fluxes of acidic gases in the summertime Canadian taiga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, O.; Talbot, R. W.; Fitzgerald, D. R.; Klemm, K. I.; Lefer, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    We report features of acidic gases in the troposphere from 9 to 5000 m altitude above ground over the Canadian taiga in the summer of 1990. The measurements were conducted at a 30-m meteorological tower and from the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft as part of the joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B Northern Wetland Studies (NOWES). We sampled air for acidic gases using the mist chamber collector coupled with subsequent analysis using ion chromatography. At the tower we collected samples at two heights during a 13-day period, including diurnal studies. Using eddy flux and profile data, we estimated the biosphere/troposphere fluxes of nitric, formic, and acetic acids and sulfur dioxide. For the organic acids, emissions from the taiga in the afternoon hours and deposition during the predawn morning hours were observed. The flux intensities alone were however not high enough to explain the observed changes in mixing ratios. The measured deposition fluxes of nitric acid were high enough to have a significant influence on its mixing ratio in the boundary layer. On three days we measured vertical profiles of nitric, formic, and acetic acids through the lower to midtroposphere. We found that the chemical composition of the troposphere was extremely heterogenous. Pronounced layers of polluted air were readily apparent from our measurements. Local photochemical production and episodic long-range transport of trace components, originating from biomass burning and possibly industrial emissions, appear to have a strong influence on the composition of the troposphere and biosphere/troposphere fluxes of acidic gases at this site.

  19. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-03

    Advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions useful in adsorbing gases; and having vastly improved fire resistance are provided, and methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard. They also have superior performance to Mordenites in both adsorption capacities and kinetics. In addition, the advanced compositions do not pose the fibrous inhalation hazard that exists with use of Mordenites. The fire-resistant compositions combine activated carbon mixed with one or more hydrated and/or carbonate-containing minerals that release H.sub.2O and/or CO.sub.2 when heated. This effect raises the spontaneous ignition temperature to over 500.degree. C. in most examples, and over 800.degree. C. in some examples. Also provided are methods for removing and/or separating target gases, such as Krypton or Argon, from a gas stream by using such advanced activated carbons.

  20. Detection of a CO and NH3 gas mixture using carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are extremely sensitive to environmental gases. However, detection of mixture gas is still a challenge. Here, we report that 10 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) can be electrically detected using a carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT). CO and NH3 gases were mixed carefully with the same concentrations of 10 ppm. Our sensor showed faster response to the CO gas than the NH3 gas. The sensing properties and effect of carboxylic acid group were demonstrated, and C-SWCNT sensors with good repeatability and fast responses over a range of concentrations may be used as a simple and effective detection method of CO and NH3 mixture gas. PMID:23286690

  1. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part I: experimental tests in full scale plants.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Rigamonti, Lucia; Marras, Roberto; Grosso, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several waste-to-energy plants in Italy have experienced an increase of the concentration of acid gases (HCl, SO2 and HF) in the raw gas. This is likely an indirect effect of the progressive decrease of the amount of treated municipal waste, which is partially replaced by commercial waste. The latter is characterised by a higher variability of its chemical composition because of the different origins, with possible increase of the load of halogen elements such as chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F), as well as of sulphur (S). A new dolomitic sorbent was then tested in four waste-to-energy plants during standard operation as a pre-cleaning stage, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber. For a sorbent injection of about 6 kg per tonne of waste, the decrease of acid gases concentration downstream the boiler was in the range of 7-37% (mean 23%) for HCl, 34-95% (mean 71%) for SO2 and 39-80% (mean 63%) for HF. This pre-abatement of acid gases allowed to decrease the feeding rate of the traditional low temperature sorbent (sodium bicarbonate in all four plants) by about 30%. Furthermore, it was observed by the plant operators that the sorbent helps to keep the boiler surfaces cleaner, with a possible reduction of the fouling phenomena and a consequent increase of the specific energy production. A preliminary quantitative estimate was carried out in one of the four plants. PMID:25465511

  2. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The δ13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  3. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy δ13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in δ2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a δ13C1 vs. δ13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  4. The origins and concentrations of water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gases on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    elements and of noble gases is also chondritic, with two notable exceptions. Nitrogen is depleted by one order of magnitude relative to water, carbon and most noble gases, which is consistent with either N retention in a mantle phase during magma generation, or trapping of N in the core. Xenon is also depleted by one order of magnitude, and enriched in heavy isotopes relative to chondritic or solar Xe (the so-called "xenon paradox"). This depletion and isotope fractionation might have taken place due to preferential ionization of xenon by UV light from the early Sun, either before Earth's formation on parent material, or during irradiation of the ancient atmosphere. The second possibility is consistent with a recent report of chondritic-like Xe in Archean sedimentary rocks that suggests that this process was still ongoing during the Archean eon (Pujol et al., 2011). If the depletion of Xe in the atmosphere was a long-term process that took place after the Earth-building events, then the amounts of atmospheric 129Xe and 131-136Xe, produced by the short-lived radioactivities of 129I (T 1/2 = 16 Ma) and 244Pu (T 1/2 = 82 Ma), respectively, need to be corrected for subsequent loss. Doing so, the I-Pu-Xe age of the Earth becomes ≤ 50 Ma after start of solar system formation, instead of ~ 120 Ma as computed with the present-day atmospheric Xe inventory.

  5. The Perils of Carbonic Acid and Equilibrium Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, William P.; Altura, Rachel A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects caused by small amounts of carbon dioxide usually present in water and acid-base equilibria of dilute solutions. Notes that dilute solutions of most weak acids and bases undergo significant dissociation or protonation. (MVL)

  6. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  7. Making Carbon Emissions Remotely Sensible: Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL), its Near-Surface Survey of Carbon Gases and Isotopologues on Alaska's North Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosy, R.; Dumas, E. J.; Sayres, D. S.; Healy, C. E.; Munster, J. B.; Baker, B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed process-oriented study of the mechanisms of conversion in the Arctic of fossil carbon to atmospheric gas is progressing, but necessarily limited to a few point locations and requiring detailed subsurface measurements inaccessible to remote sensing. Airborne measurements of concentration, transport and flux of these carbon gases at sufficiently low altitude to reflect surface variations can tie such local measurements to remotely observable features of the landscape. Carbon dioxide and water vapor have been observable for over 20 years from low-altitude small aircraft in the Arctic and elsewhere. Methane has been more difficult, requiring large powerful aircraft or limited flask samples. Recent developments in spectroscopy, however, have reduced the power and weight required to measure methane at rates suitable for eddy-covariance flux estimates. The Flux Observations of Carbon from an Airborne Laboratory (FOCAL) takes advantage of Integrated Cavity-Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) to measure CH4, CO2, and water vapor in a new airborne system. The system, moreover, measures these gases' stable isotopologues every two seconds or faster helping to separate thermogenic from biogenic emissions. Paired with the Best Airborne Turbulence (BAT) probe developed for small aircraft by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and a light twin-engine aircraft adapted by Aurora Flight Sciences Inc., the FOCAL measures at 6 m spacing, covering 100 km in less than 30 minutes. It flies between 10 m and 50 m above ground interspersed with profiles to the top of the boundary layer and beyond. This presentation gives an overview of the magnitude and variation in fluxes and concentrations of CH4, CO2, and H2O with space, time, and time of day in a spatially extensive survey, more than 7500 km total in 15 flights over roughly a 100 km square during the month of August 2013. An extensive data set such as this at low altitude with high-rate sampling addresses features that repeat on 1 km scale

  8. In-vivo measurement of intrauterine gases and acid-base values early in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Watson, A; Ozturk, O; Quick, D; Burton, G

    1999-11-01

    A new multiparameter sensor that combines electrochemical and fibre-optic technology was used for continuous in-vivo investigation of pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO(2)), oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)), bicarbonate concentration (HCO(3)(-)), base excess, and oxygen saturation (O(2)Sat) early in human pregnancy. The sensor was inserted into the amniotic cavity and the placental bed of 16 pregnancies at 10-15 weeks gestation, before termination under general anaesthesia. Amniotic fluid and retroplacental blood from the same site were also aspirated and analysed by means of cartridges and a portable blood gas analyser. Eleven series of measurements were obtained. The variation in measurements over the 5 min of monitoring was acid-base with a sensor is stable and accurate. Such technology will be helpful in improving our understanding of the fetoplacental metabolism in normal and complicated pregnancies. PMID:10548645

  9. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  10. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-06-01

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275°C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases. PMID:21334872

  11. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2011-06-15

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275 deg. C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases.

  12. Removal of NO sub x from flue gases using the urea acidic process; Kinetics of the chemical reaction of nitrous acid with urea

    SciTech Connect

    Lasalle, A.; Roizard, C.; Midoux, N.; Bourret, P.; Dyens, P.J. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper deals with the removal of nitrogen oxides from flue gases using the acidic urea process. The chemical hydrolysis of nitrous acid, which leads to NO formation, is avoided by nitrous acid reaction with urea. Products of this reaction are gases, e.g. CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} which can then be directly released into the atmosphere. The aim here is to determine the kinetic parameters of the chemical reaction of nitrous acid with urea. Experiments are performed in a closed stirred reactor. The manometric method (measurement of the pressure versus time curve) leads to the determination of the concentration of HNO{sub 2} and then to the chemical rate versus time. Operating parameters are the concentration of urea (333-3330 mol m{sup {minus}3}), the pH (0.75-1.25), and the temperature (3-40{degrees}C). The experimental results are as follows: the order relative to nitrous acid is 1; the rate constant decreases with pH; the influence of temperature on the rate constant can be expressed by (pH = 1) k = 1.82 {times} 10{sup 8} exp ({minus}(60400/RT)) (SI units).

  13. Solubility selective membrane materials for carbon dioxide removal from mixtures with light gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haiqing

    Membrane technology has attracted interest for the selective removal of carbon dioxide from mixtures with light gases such as H2, CH4 and N2. While conventional structure-property correlations have focused mainly on improving the separation performance by increasing polymer size sieving ability (i.e., diffusivity selectivity), this project explores the possibility of harnessing favorable interactions between CO 2 and polymers containing polar groups to improve permeability/selectivity properties. Ether oxide groups are discovered to be among the best moieties known to interact with CO2, leading to high CO2 solubility and CO2/light gas solubility selectivity, while still providing polymer chain flexibility, leading to high CO2 diffusivity and favorable CO2/H2 diffusivity selectivity. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) has a high concentration of ether oxygen groups and exhibits high CO2/light gas selectivities. However, gas permeability is low due to the high crystallinity in PEO. Crosslinking and introduction of short chain branching are efficient methods to inhibit crystallization. Three series of crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) rubbers have been prepared using prepolymer solutions containing: (1) poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and H2O, (2) PEGDA and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGMEA), and (3) PEGDA and poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEGA). Independent of the prepolymer composition, all of these polymers have similar ethylene oxide (EO) content (approximately 82 wt.%). Crosslink density decreases with decreasing PEGDA content in the prepolymer solution, which is estimated from water swelling experiments and/or dynamic mechanical testing and has essentially no effect on gas transport properties. Increasing PEGMEA content increases the average size of free volume elements, resulting in a decreased glass transition temperature, and increased CO 2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity. In contrast, the presence of PEGA or water has a negligible

  14. The hyporheic zone as a source of dissolved organic carbon and carbon gases to a temperate forested stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schindler, J.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine chemical changes in porewaters that occur over small scales (cm) as groundwater flows through the hyporheic zone and discharges to a stream in a temperate forest of northern Wisconsin. Hyporheic-zone porewaters were sampled at discrete depths of 2, 10, 15, 61, and 183 cm at three study sites in the study basin. Chemical profiles of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, CH4, and pH show dramatic changes between 61 cm sediment depth and the water-sediment interface. Unless discrete samples at small depth intervals are taken, these chemical profiles are not accounted for. Similar trends were observed at the three study locations, despite each site having very different hydraulic-flow regimes. Increases in DOC concentration by an order of magnitude from 61 to 15 cm depth with a corresponding decrease in pH and rapid decreases in the molecular weight of the DOC suggest that aliphatic compounds (likely organic acids) are being generated in the hyporheic zone. Estimated efflux rates of DOC, CO2, and CH4 to the stream are 6.2, 0.79, 0.13 moles m2 d-1, respectively, with the vast majority of these materials produced in the hyporheic zone. Very little of these materials are accounted for by sampling stream water, suggesting rapid uptake and/or volatilization.

  15. Apparatus for purifying arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and inert gases to remove Lewis acid and oxidant impurities therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1991-01-08

    An apparatus for purifying a gaseous mixture comprising arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and/or inert gases, to remove Lewis acid and/or oxidant impurities therefrom, comprising a vessel containing a bed of a scavenger, the scavenger including a support having associated therewith an anion which is effective to remove such impurities, such anion being selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) carbanions whose corresponding protonated compounds have a pK.sub.a value of from about 22 to about 36; and (ii) anions formed by reaction of such carbanions with the primary component of the mixture.

  16. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  17. Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  18. Opportunities for Coordinated Observations of CO2 with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2008-01-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) are the first two satellites designed to make global measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the precision and sampling needed identify and monitor surface sources and sinks of this important greenhouse gas. Because the operational phases of the OCO and GOSAT missions overlap in time, there are numerous opportunities for comparing and combining the data from these two satellites to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that control the atmospheric CO2 and it variability over time. Opportunities for cross-calibration, cross-validation, and coordinated observations that are currently under consideration are summarized here.

  19. Potential effects of clean coal technologies on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, and solid waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was initially funded by Congress to demonstrate more efficient, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable coal technologies. Although the environmental focus at first was on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) because their relationship to acid precipitation, the CCTDP may also lead to reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions and in the volume of solid waste produced, compared with conventional technologies. The environmental effects of clean coal technologies (CCTs) depend upon which (if any) specific technologies eventually achieve high acceptance in the marketplace. In general, the repowering technologies and a small group of retrofit technologies show the most promise for reducing C0{sub 2} emissions and solid waste. These technologies also compare favorably with other CCTs in terms of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} reductions. The upper bound for CO{sup 2} reductions in the year 2010 is only enough to reduce global ``greenhouse`` warming potential by about 1%. However, CO{sub 2} emissions come from such variety of sources around the globe that no single technological innovation or national policy change could realistically be expected to reduce these emissions by more than a few percent. Particular CCTs can lead to either increases or decreases in the amount of solid waste produced. However, even if decreases are not achieved, much of the solid waste from clean coal technologies would be dry and therefore easier to dispose of than scrubber sludge.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  1. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  2. Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

    1980-01-25

    The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

  3. Simultaneous control of acid gases and PAHs using a spray dryer combined with a fabric filter using different additives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Shu; Wey, Ming Yen; Lin, Chiou Liang

    2002-04-26

    The purpose of this research was to simultaneously evaluate the removal efficiency of acid gases and PAHs from the flue gas emitted by a laboratory incinerator. This flue gas contained dust, acid gases, organics and heavy metals. A spray dryer combined with a fabric filter was used as the air pollution control device (APCD) in this study. The operating conditions investigated included different feedstock additives (polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and NaCl) and spray dryer additives (SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3). The removal efficiency for SO2 could be enhanced by adding inorganic additives, such as SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3. The presence of PVC in the incinerator feedstock also increased the removal efficiency of SO2in the spray dryer. The improved removal of PAHs could be attributed to the addition of feedstock additives (PVC and NaCl) and spray dryer additives (SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3). PMID:11900910

  4. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  5. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  6. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the Arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-10-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the Arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes in physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased, the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C- line scan further shows that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces likely determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA as reactive surfaces adsorbing inorganic and organic acidic gases can shorten acidic gas lifetime and influence the possible gaseous reactions in the Arctic atmosphere, which need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models in the Arctic troposphere.

  7. Separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas using activated carbon adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harihastuti, Nani; Purwanto, P.; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Research on the separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas has been conducted to improve the content of CH4 of biogas in order to increase calorific value. Biogas from tofu waste water contained many kinds of gases such as: CH4 of 53-64%, CO2 of 36-45%, H2S of 3,724-5,880 mg/Nm3, NH3 of 0.19-70.36 mg/Nm3, and H2O of 33,800-19,770,000 mg/Nm3. In fact, CO2, H2S, NH3, and moisture are impurities that have disturbance to human and environment, so that they are necessary to be separated from biogas. Particularly, H2S and NH3 have high toxicity to people, particularly the workers in the tofu industry. Therefore, separation of H2S and NH3 from biogas to increase calorific value is the focus of this research. The method used in this research is by adsorption of H2S and NH3 gases using activated carbon as adsorbent. It also used condensation as pretreatment to remove moisture content in biogas. Biogas was flowed to adsorption column (70 cm height and 9 cm diameter containing activated carbon as much as 500 g) so that the H2S and NH3 gases were adsorbed. This research was conducted by varying flow rate and flow time of biogas. From this experiment, it was found that the optimum adsorption conditions were flow rate of 3.5 l/min and 4 hours flow time. This condition could reach 99.95% adsorption efficiency of H2S from 5,879.50 mg/Nm3 to 0.67 mg/Nm3, and 74.96% adsorption efficiency of NH3 from 2.93 mg/Nm3 to 0.73 mg/Nm3. The concentration of CH4 increased from 63.88% to 76.24% in the biogas.

  8. Influence of inert gases on the reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering process of carbon-nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Susann; Czigany, Zsolt; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars

    2013-01-15

    The influence of inert gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) on the sputter process of carbon and carbon-nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films was studied using reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Thin solid films were synthesized in an industrial deposition chamber from a graphite target. The peak target current during HiPIMS processing was found to decrease with increasing inert gas mass. Time averaged and time resolved ion mass spectroscopy showed that the addition of nitrogen, as reactive gas, resulted in less energetic ion species for processes employing Ne, whereas the opposite was noticed when Ar or Kr were employed as inert gas. Processes in nonreactive ambient showed generally lower total ion fluxes for the three different inert gases. As soon as N{sub 2} was introduced into the process, the deposition rates for Ne and Ar-containing processes increased significantly. The reactive Kr-process, in contrast, showed slightly lower deposition rates than the nonreactive. The resulting thin films were characterized regarding their bonding and microstructure by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Reactively deposited CN{sub x} thin films in Ar and Kr ambient exhibited an ordering toward a fullerene-like structure, whereas carbon and CN{sub x} films deposited in Ne atmosphere were found to be amorphous. This is attributed to an elevated amount of highly energetic particles observed during ion mass spectrometry and indicated by high peak target currents in Ne-containing processes. These results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of the structural evolution of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films.

  9. Nature of the carbon and sulfur phases and inorganic gases in the Kenna ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Abundances of carbon and sulfur in the Kenna ureilite are 2.219 plus or minus 0.060 wt. % C and 0.179 plus or minus 0.008 wt. % S. Secondary carbonates resulting from terrestrial weathering account for 0.25 plus or minus 0.02 wt. % C. No hydrocarbons were detected during gas release measurements. Most of the carbon is in graphite, diamond, or lonsdaleite. The sample of Kenna contained 0.95 plus or minus 0.05 wt.% H2O. Total carbon and sulfur measurements were made on three additional ureilites: Havero, Dingo Pup Donga, and North Haig. Ureilite carbon abundances are similar to those of C-2 chondrites, whereas sulfur abundances are a factor of 10 less than C-2 chondrites and ordinary chondrites. The elemental abundances, ratios, and phases present in the ureilites rule out a direct genetic relationship between the ureilites and the carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Measurements of Acetic Acid and its Relationships with Trace Gases on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Sive, B. C.; White, M. L.; Russo, R. S.; Ambrose, J. L.; Zhou, Y.; Talbot, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Acetic acid is ubiquitously present in the ambient atmosphere. Acetic acid, along with formic acid, is the one of the most abundant gas phase organic acids with mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range, and can influence the pH of aerosols and precipitation. The magnitude of the sources and sinks of acetic acid in the environment is not well understood (~24 Tg/yr of missing emissions globally), as they are widely dispersed and measurements are relatively challenging to accomplish using established techniques. Here, the application of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is explored as a technique for quantification of ambient acetic acid. Direct calibrations of PTR-MS instruments at low ppbv levels show good linearity and fast response, and during the ICARTT campaign, a PTR-MS measured acetic acid and a suite of other volatile organic compounds on Appledore Island, ME over a period of 6 weeks. During the campaign, the average mixing ratio of acetic acid on the island was 607.9 ± 341.8 (1σ) pptv with a median of 530 pptv. Mixing ratios of acetic acid observed on the island showed diurnal variations corresponding land breeze/sea breeze transport, similar to other pollutants including ozone and carbon monoxide, indicating that acetic acid was advected to the sample site, and not a product of local emissions. Additionally, no mixing ratio dependence on wind speed was found, indicating that at this location, loss due to dry deposition to the ocean during transport was minimal. Over the course of the campaign, acetic acid showed complex relationships with a range of other VOCs, indicating a diverse set of sources and further showing the utility of the PTR-MS technique for monitoring acetic acid. Mixing ratios of acetic acid showed correlations with different compounds at different times, indicating a complex source signature comprised of (1) anthropogenic emissions, (2) biomass burning, and (3) photochemical

  11. Sorption of noble gases by solids, with reference to meteorites. I - Magnetite and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    The trapping of meteoritic noble gases by solids is simulated through the synthesis of 18 Fe3O4 samples at 350-720 K in a noble gas atmosphere, by means of the reactions: (1) 3Fe + 4H2O yields Fe3O4 + 4H2, using Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe; and (2) 3Fe + 4CO yields Fe3O4 + 4C + carbides, using Xe. Etching experiments suggest an analogy with 'Phase Q' in meteorites. Adsorbed atmospheric gases are present in all samples, and dominate whenever the noble gas partial pressure in the atmosphere is greater than that in the synthesis. While many of the results of Lancet and Anders (1973) appear to have been dominated by such an atmospheric component, others are suspect. When the doubtful samples of Lancet and Anders are corrected or eliminated, the fractionation pattern no longer peaks at Ar, but rather, as in the present sample, rises monotonically from Ne to Xe. No evidence is found for the earlier study's claim of a strong temperature dependence.

  12. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  13. FIELD METHOD COMPARISON FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ACID AEROSOLS AND GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents findings from two intercomparison studies of acid aerosol measurement systems, which were conducted in Uniontown and State College, PA, during the summers of 1990 and 1991, respectively. s part of these studies, acid aerosol and gas concentrations (NH3, HNO3, ...

  14. Sea salt aerosols as a reactive surface for inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J. W.; Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Zhang, J. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-06-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are dominant particles in the arctic atmosphere and determine the polar radiative balance. SSA react with acidic pollutants that lead to changes of physical and chemical properties of their surface, which in turn alter their hygroscopic and optical properties. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was used to analyze morphology, composition, size, and mixing state of individual SSA at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in summertime. Individual fresh SSA contained cubic NaCl coated by certain amounts of MgCl2 and CaSO4. Individual partially aged SSA contained irregular NaCl coated by a mixture of NaNO3, Na2SO4, Mg(NO3)2, and MgSO4. The comparison suggests the hydrophilic MgCl2 coating in fresh SSA likely intrigued the heterogeneous reactions at the beginning of SSA and acidic gases. Individual fully aged SSA normally had Na2SO4 cores and an amorphous coating of NaNO3. Elemental mappings of individual SSA particles revealed that as the particles ageing Cl gradually decreased but the C, N, O, and S content increased. 12C14N- mapping from nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates that organic matter increased in the aged SSA compared with the fresh SSA. 12C14N- line scans further show that organic matter was mainly concentrated on the aged SSA surface. These new findings indicate that this mixture of organic matter and NaNO3 on particle surfaces determines their hygroscopic and optical properties. These abundant SSA, whose reactive surfaces absorb inorganic and organic acidic gases in the arctic troposphere, need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemical models.

  15. Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

  16. The Strongest Acid: Protonation of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Steven; Hratchian, Hrant P; Reed, Christopher A

    2016-01-22

    The strongest carborane acid, H(CHB11F11), protonates CO2 while traditional mixed Lewis/Brønsted superacids do not. The product is deduced from IR spectroscopy and calculation to be the proton disolvate, H(CO2)2(+). The carborane acid H(CHB11F11) is therefore the strongest known acid. The failure of traditional mixed superacids to protonate weak bases such as CO2 can be traced to a competition between the proton and the Lewis acid for the added base. The high protic acidity promised by large absolute values of the Hammett acidity function (H0) is not realized in practice because the basicity of an added base is suppressed by Lewis acid/base adduct formation. PMID:26663640

  17. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made up of three groups: Data

  18. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information

  19. Determination of the acidic sites of purified single-walled carbon nanotubes by acid base titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Bhowmik, P.; Zhao, B.; Hamon, M. A.; Itkis, M. E.; Haddon, R. C.

    2001-09-01

    We report the measurement of the acidic sites in three different samples of commercially available full-length purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) - as obtained from CarboLex (CLI), Carbon Solutions (CSI) and Tubes@Rice (TAR) - by simple acid-base titration methods. Titration of the purified SWNTs with NaOH and NaHCO 3 solutions was used to determine the total percentage of acidic sites and carboxylic acid groups, respectively. The total percentage of acidic sites in full length purified SWNTs from TAR, CLI and CSI are about 1-3%.

  20. Massive impact-induced release of carbon and sulfur gases in the early Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bottke, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions to our understanding of the collisional history of the Hadean and early-Archean Earth indicate that large collisions may have been an important geophysical process. In this work we show that the early bombardment flux of large impactors (>100 km) facilitated the atmospheric release of greenhouse gases (particularly CO2) from Earth's mantle. Depending on the timescale for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2, the Earth's surface could have been subject to prolonged clement surface conditions or multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The bombardment also delivered and redistributed to the surface large quantities of sulfur, one of the most important elements for life. The stochastic occurrence of large collisions could provide insights on why the Earth and Venus, considered Earth's twin planet, exhibit radically different atmospheres.

  1. Carbon dioxide and helium dissolved gases in groundwater at central Tenerife Island, Canary Islands: chemical and isotopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Diaz, Rayco; López, Dina; Perez, Nemesio M.; Custodio, Emilio; Sumino, Hirochika; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernandez, Pedro A.; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Sortino, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Seismic-volcanic unrest was detected between 2004 and 2005 in the central and northwest zones of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). With the aim of strengthening the program of geochemical and seismic-volcanic surveillance, a study of the origin, characteristics, and spatial distribution of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and helium (He) gases in the volcanic aquifer of central Tenerife Island and around Teide volcano was carried out. This work also improves the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conceptual model of groundwater flow. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in sampled groundwater are several orders of magnitude higher than that of air-saturated water (ASW) suggesting a significant contribution of non-atmospheric CO2, mainly magmatic, confirmed through measurement of isotopic compositions (δ13CTDIC) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) concentrations. A vertical stratification of dissolved CO2 and δ13CTDIC values was observed in the volcanic aquifer at the eastern region of Las Cañadas Caldera. Stratification seems to be controlled by both degree of magmatic CO2-water interaction and CO2 degassing and the original δ13Cco2(g) isotopic composition. The highest dissolved helium (4He) concentrations in groundwater seem to be related to radiogenic contributions resulting from water-rock interactions, and increase with residence time, instead of with endogenous magmatic inputs. Isotopic systematics show that the dissolved gases in groundwater of central Tenerife are variable mixtures of CO2-3He-rich fluids of volcanic-hydrothermal origin with both organic and atmospheric components. The results suggest that the eastern area of Las Cañadas Caldera, the South Volcanic Ridge, and the Teide summit cone are the areas most affected by degassing of the volcanic-hydrothermal system, and they are therefore the most suitable zones for future geochemical monitoring.

  2. Evaluation of carbon dioxide mass transfer in raceway reactors for microalgae culture using flue gases.

    PubMed

    de Godos, I; Mendoza, J L; Acién, F G; Molina, E; Banks, C J; Heaven, S; Rogalla, F

    2014-02-01

    Mass transfer of CO2 from flue gas was quantified in a 100m(2) raceway. The carbonation sump was operated with and without a baffle at different liquid/gas ratios, with the latter having the greatest influence on CO2 recovery from the flue gas. A rate of mass transfer sufficient to meet the demands of an actively growing algal culture was best achieved by maintaining pH at ∼8. Full optimisation of the process required both pH control and selection of the best liquid/gas flow ratio. A carbon transfer rate of 10gCmin(-1) supporting an algal productivity of 17gm(-2)day(-1) was achieved with only 4% direct loss of CO2 in the sump. 66% of the carbon was incorporated into biomass, while 6% was lost by outgassing and the remainder as dissolved carbon in the liquid phase. Use of a sump baffle required additional power without significantly improving carbon mass transfer. PMID:24374031

  3. Partitioning and removal of dioxin-like congeners in flue gases treated with activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kai Hsien; Chang, Shu Hao; Huang, Chia Hua; Huang, Hung Chi; Chang, Moo Been

    2006-08-01

    Activated carbon adsorption is commonly used to control dioxin-like congener (PCDD/Fs and PCBs) emissions. Partitioning of PCDD/Fs and PCBs between vapor and solid phases and their removal efficiencies achieved with existing air pollution control devices (APCDs) at a large-scale municipal waste incinerator (MWI) and an industrial waste incinerator (IWI) are evaluated via intensive stack sampling and analysis. Those two facilities investigated are equipped with activated carbon injection (ACI) with bag filter (BF) and fixed activated carbon bed (FACB) as major PCDD/F control devices, respectively. Average PCDD/F and PCB concentrations of stack gas with ACI+BF as APCDs are 0.031 and 0.006ng-TEQ/Nm(3), and that achieved with FACB are 1.74 and 0.19ng-TEQ/Nm(3) in MWI and IWI, respectively. The results show that FACB could reduce vapor-phase PCDD/Fs and PCBs concentrations in flue gas, while the ACI+BF can effectively adsorb the vapor-phase dioxin-like congener and collect the solid-phase PCDD/Fs and PCBs in the meantime. Additionally, the results of the pilot-scale adsorption system (PAS) experimentation indicate that each gram activated carbon adsorbs 105-115ng-PCDD/Fs and each surface area (m(2)) of activated carbon adsorbs 10-25ng-PCDD/Fs. Based on the results of PAS experimentation, this study confirms that the surface area of mesopore+macropore (20-200A) of the activated carbon is a critical factor affecting PCDD/F adsorption capacity. PMID:16488462

  4. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  5. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  6. Laboratory studies of interaction between trace gases and sulphuric acid or sulphate aerosols using flow-tube reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    Stratospheric ozone provides a protective shield for humanity and the global biosphere from harmful ultraviolet solar radiation. In past decades, theoretical models for the calculation of ozone balance frequently used gas-phase reactions alone in their studies. Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, however, it has been demonstrated that knowledge of heterogeneous reactions is needed to understand this significant natural event owing to the anthropogenic emission of chlorofluorocarbons. In this review I will briefly discuss the experimental techniques for the research of heterogeneous chemistry carried out in our laboratory. These experimental instruments include flow-tube reactors, an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer, a chemical ionization mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle spectrometer. Numerous measurements of uptake coefficient (or reaction probability) and solubility of trace gases in liquid sulphuric acid have been performed under the ambient conditions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, mainly 190-250 K and 40-80 wt% of H

  7. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-12-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in the west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and Oklahoma areas. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in several carbonate formations. Several types of acidizing techniques were employed. These treatments vary from one to nine stages, with and without diverting agents. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information. 5 refs.

  8. A Pilot-Scale Evaluation of a New Technology to Control NO(x) Emissions from Boilers at KSC: Hydrogen Peroxide Injection into Boiler Flue Gases Followed by Wet Scrubbing of Acid Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. David

    1997-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides NO(x) are a significant problem in the United States. NO(x) are formed in any combustion process, therefore it is not surprising that NO(x) are emitted from the boilers at KSC. Research at UCF has shown (in the laboratory) that injecting H2O2 into hot simulated flue gases can oxidize the NO and NO2 to their acid gas forms, HNO2 and HNO3, respectively. These acid gases are much more water soluble than their counterparts, and theoretically can be removed easily by wet scrubbing. This technology was of interest to NASA, both for their boilers at KSC, and for their combustion sources elsewhere. However, it was necessary to field test the technology and to provide pilot-scale data to aid in design of full-scale facilities. Hence this project was initiated in May of 1996.

  9. Coal fly ash based carbons for SO2 removal from flue gases.

    PubMed

    Rubio, B; Izquierdo, M T

    2010-07-01

    Two different coal fly ashes coming from the burning of two coals of different rank have been used as a precursor for the preparation of steam activated carbons. The performance of these activated carbons in the SO(2) removal was evaluated at flue gas conditions (100 degrees C, 1000 ppmv SO(2), 5% O(2), 6% H(2)O). Different techniques were used to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the samples in order to explain the differences found in their behaviour. A superior SO(2) removal capacity was shown by the activated carbon obtained using the fly ash coming from a sub-bituminous-lignite blend. Experimental results indicated that the presence of higher amount of certain metallic oxides (Ca, Fe) in the carbon-rich fraction of this fly ash probably has promoted a deeper gasification in the activation with steam. A more suitable surface chemistry and textural properties have been obtained in this case which explains the higher efficiency shown by this sample in the SO(2) removal. PMID:20167465

  10. Shock-tube thermochemistry tables for high-temperature gases. Volume 5: Carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menard, W. A.; Horton, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties and species concentrations for carbon dioxide are tabulated for moving, standing, and reflected shock waves. Initial pressures range from 6.665 to 6665 N/sq m (0.05 to 50.0 torr), and temperatures from 2,000 to over 80,000K. In this study, 20 molecular and atomic species were considered.

  11. Characterization of carbon black modified by maleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Kosinski, Pawel; Skodvin, Tore; Myrseth, Velaug

    2013-09-01

    We present here a method for modifying the surface of carbon black (CB) using a simple heat treatment in the presence of a carboxylic acid as well as water or ethylene glycol as a solvent. CB was mixed with maleic acid and either water or ethylene glycol, and heated at 250°C. Unlike the traditional surface modification processes which use heat treatment of carbon with mineral acids the present modification method using a carboxylic acid proved to be simple and time efficient. CB from two different vendors was used, and the modified samples were characterized by TGA, BET surface area measurement, XRD, particle size and zeta potential measurements, and FTIR. It was found that several material properties, including thermal stability and surface area, of the modified CB are significantly altered relative to the parental carbon samples. This method provides a rapid and simple route to tailor new materials with desired properties.

  12. Characterization of the flow of the CO/CO 2 gases through carbon nanotube junctions using molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Tavangar, Zahra

    2009-08-01

    A detailed study of the gas flow in carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanotube junctions (CNTJ) can open the way towards the study of the reaction mixture flow in prospective nano-reactors. In this work, flow of the pure and mixed CO/CO 2 gases through some selected CNTs and three types of CNT1- J-CNT2 CNTJs, ( 12, 12)- J-( 3, 8), ( 12, 8)- J-( 8, 12) and ( 8, 8)- J-( 13, 0), are studied using molecular dynamic simulations. Results of this study show that regardless of the diameter and helicity type of the CNT1 and CNT2, when the flow starts with the molecules in the CNT1, the number density of molecules in the CNT2 is higher than that in the CNT1. Projected radial distribution of the molecules are calculated and analyzed in terms of the molecule-molecule and molecule-wall interactions. The well-structured projected radial distribution results show that the CNT radius and helicity as well as the type of molecules determine the lateral distribution of the gas molecules along the flow.

  13. CO(2) capture from dilute gases as a component of modern global carbon management.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    The growing atmospheric CO(2) concentration and its impact on climate have motivated widespread research and development aimed at slowing or stemming anthropogenic carbon emissions. Technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) employing mass separating agents that extract and purify CO(2) from flue gas emanating from large point sources such as fossil fuel-fired electricity-generating power plants are under development. Recent advances in solvents, adsorbents, and membranes for postcombust- ion CO(2) capture are described here. Specifically, room-temperature ionic liquids, supported amine materials, mixed matrix and facilitated transport membranes, and metal-organic framework materials are highlighted. In addition, the concept of extracting CO(2) directly from ambient air (air capture) as a means of reducing the global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is reviewed. For both conventional CCS from large point sources and air capture, critical research needs are identified and discussed. PMID:22432609

  14. Oxidation of low carbon steel in multicomponent gases. Part 2: Reaction mechanisms during reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Abuluwefa, H.T.; Guthrie, R.I.L.; Ajersch, F.

    1997-08-01

    Oxidation behavior of low carbon steel during reheating in an industrial walking-beam steel reheat furnace was investigated. It was observed that scaling (oxidation) rates were reduced by reducing the input air/fuel ratio to the furnace, thereby lowering concentrations of free oxygen in the combustion products from about 3 to 1.5 pct. Laboratory experiments involving isothermal and nonisothermal oxidation were carried out in atmospheres consisting of oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrogen. A general equation for the prediction of weight gains due to oxidation during reheating, using isothermal oxidation rate constants, was developed. The prediction of weight gains from nonisothermal oxidation conducted in the laboratory was poor, owing to a separation of the scale from the metal substrate which took place at about 900 C. The predicted weight gains during reheating in the industrial reheat furnace indicated that oxidation rats during reheating were intermediate between linear and parabolic, especially during reheating with high air/fuel ratio. However, the linear mechanism predominated. Laboratory isothermal experiments for oxidation in atmospheres containing fee oxygen showed that the magnitude of the linear oxidation rates were determined by the oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. It was concluded that the observed reduction in scaling rates during reheating of low carbon steel in the industrial reheat furnace was a result of the lower free oxygen level in the furnace atmosphere.

  15. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  16. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  17. Enhancement of acidic gases in biomass burning impacted air masses over Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefer, B. L.; Talbot, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Olson, J. O.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J.; Shipham, M. A.; Blake, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Biomass-burning impacted air masses sampled over central and eastern Canada during the summer of 1990 as part of ABLE 3B contained enhanced mixing ratios of gaseous HNO3, HCOOH, CH3COOH, and what appears to be (COOH)2. These aircraft-based samples were collected from a variety of fresh burning plumes and more aged haze layers from different source regions. Values of the enhancement factor, delta X/delta CO, where X represents an acidic gas, for combustion-impacted air masses sampled both near and farther away from the fires, were relatively uniform. However, comparison of carboxylic acid emission ratios measured in laboratory fires to field plume enhancement factors indicates significant in-plume production of HCOOH. Biomass-burning appears to be an important source of HNO3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH to the troposphere over subarctic Canada.

  18. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  19. Sulfuric acid vapor and other cloud-related gases in the Venus atmosphere - Abundances inferred from observed radio opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile what had been thought to be an inconsistency among measurements and deductions regarding the constituents of the Venus atmosphere and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. Laboratory measurements of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are used to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height in a way that is consistent with observations of the constituents and absorbing properties of the atmosphere. It is concluded that sulfuric acid vapor is likely to be the principal microwave absorber in the 30-50 km altitude range of the middle atmosphere of Venus.

  20. Separation and identification of carboxylic acids in MALT samples from the headspace gases in Hanford tank 103C

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Lucke, R.B.

    1993-08-01

    Samples of headspace gases from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) waste storage tank 103C were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry by Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff. The samples were obtained using a cryo-trap sampler designed by WHC and known as the Mobile Analytical Laboratory Trap (MALT). The samples, which were obtained in September 1989, were available in large amounts (200 mi). The specific targets for this analysis were n-butyric, i-butyric, n-valeric, and i-valeric organic acids. Of the acids targeted, only n-butyric was found, and only trace amounts of it were detected with a detection limit below 1 ppM in the extract. The levels found were so low as to cause difficulty in quantitation. All concentrations reported here are for the methanol extract solutions and not the concentrations in the headspace of tank 103C. To calculate concentrations in the headspace, the MALT sampling volume and the methanol rinse volume must be obtained from the MALT personnel at WHC.

  1. Acid composition of particles and gases in a ponderosa pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Yatavelli, L.; Thompson, S.; Kimmel, J. R.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Cubison, M. J.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Thornton, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the high mass-resolution analysis of gas-phase and aerosol spectra collected with a chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer, equipped with a micro-orifice volatilization impactor ("MOVI-HRToF-CIMS", Yatavelli and Thornton AS&T, 2010; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2012) during the 2011 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study ("BEACHON-RoMBAS"). The study was conducted during July - August 2011 in a ponderosa pine forest in Colorado. Choosing acetate (CH3C(O)O-) as the reagent ion and developing analysis tools for formula identification and elemental analysis allowed us to identify hundreds of individual acids in aerosol spectra. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the ion time series is useful to account for backgrounds in the different modes of operation and to separate several gas-phase and particulate factors with different volatility and composition. Results on aerosol composition, including nitrogen- and sulfur-containing species as well as information about elemental ratios (e.g. O:C, H:C) and average carbon oxidation state are presented. Most of the acids detected have between 1 and 10 carbons and average carbon oxidation states (OsC) between -1 and 1. This suggests the importance of monoterpenes and MBO as precursors of the measured acids. We will discuss these results with special consideration of fragmentation on the heated surfaces of the instrument.

  2. Separation of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide gases using room-temperature ionic liquid (hmim)(Tf2N)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Yokozeki; Mark B. Shiflett

    2009-09-15

    To understand capturing and/or enhanced gaseous selectivity of industrial flue gases containing CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} using room-temperature ionic liquids, we have developed a ternary equation of state (EOS) model for a CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2}/1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((hmim)(Tf2N)) system. The present model is based on a generic RK (Redlich-Kwong) EOS, with empirical binary interaction parameters of each binary system. These interaction parameters have been determined using our measured VLE (vapor-liquid-equilibrium) data for SO{sub 2}/(hmim)(Tf2N) and CO{sub 2}/(hmim)(Tf2N) and literature data for CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2}. The validity of the present EOS has been checked by conducting ternary VLE experiments for the present system. With this EOS, isothermal ternary phase diagrams and solubility (VLE) behaviors have been calculated for various (T, P, and feed compositions) conditions. For large and equimolar CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2} mole ratios, the gaseous selectivity is nearly independent of the amount of the ionic liquid addition. However, for small CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2} mole ratios the addition of the ionic liquid significantly increases the selectivity. The strong absorption of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in this ionic liquid may be practical for the simultaneous capture of these acid gases. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Surface tension of water and acid gases from Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, A.; Goujon, F.; Lachet, V.; Malfreyt, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report direct Monte Carlo (MC) simulations on the liquid-vapor interfaces of pure water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. In the case of water, the recent TIP4P/2005 potential model used with the MC method is shown to reproduce the experimental surface tension and to accurately describe the coexistence curves. The agreement with experiments is also excellent for CO2 and H2S with standard nonpolarizable models. The surface tensions are calculated by using the mechanical and the thermodynamic definitions via profiles along the direction normal to the surface. We also discuss the different contributions to the surface tension due to the repulsion-dispersion and electrostatic interactions. The different profiles of these contributions are proposed in the case of water.

  4. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  5. Understanding the fluvial loss of carbon from UK watersheds - implications for terrestrial carbon; greenhouse gases and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Moody, C.; Burt, T. P.; Howden, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    This study develops a number of methods for estimating the fate of fluvial carbon through UK watersheds. The study considers dissolved organic carbon (DOC); particulate organic carbon (POC); and dissolved CO2. The study considers the loss from the terrestrial source; in-stream losses and production; and export to the continental shelf. The study used multiple approaches, including: mass balance studies; modelling and experimentation. i) Mass balance studies suggest that the UK losses 5 Mtonnes C/yr (21.8 tonnes C/km2/yr) from soils in the proportion of 7:22:4 (POC:DOC:diss. CO2). The mass balance studies suggest 3.5 Mtonnes C/yr (15.2 tonnes C/km2/yr) is lost to the atmosphere in the proportion 8:75:17 (POC:DOC:diss. CO2). ii) UK rivers have short residence times (typically 1-2 days) and so the diurnal cycle becomes critical. Experiments show that turnover rates are close to zero overnight but that these can be periods of DOC production from turnover of POC. iii) Development and modelling using physical rate showed that the loss of the DOC was between 24 and 37% - lower than that estimated from mass balance studies, but that the loss rate of TOC (DOC + POC) was between 57 and 80% - close to that estimated from mass balance studies. iv) Studies of molecular change suggest that nutrient supply is the limiting factor on turnover and that a position of 'pseudo-equilibirum' is achieved that limits the net effect of the fluvial processes.

  6. Laboratory simulation of meteoritic noble gases. II - Sorption of xenon on carbon: Etching and heating experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadnik, M. G.; Wacker, J. F.; Lewis, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The release of trapped Xe from amorphous-C phases of meteorites is simulated experimentally by HNO3 etching of carbon-black and pyrolyzed polyvinylidene chloride samples exposed to Xe-127 for 0.5-240 h at 100-1000 C and then degassed for 9 h or more at the same temperatures, as reported by Wacker et al. (1985). The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Samples exposed at 100-200 C are found to lose most of their Xe after etching to a depth of only about 20 pm, while those exposed at 800-1000 C exhibit a second more tightly bound component extending to a depth of 3 nm, indicative of diffusion of Xe during exposure and resembling planetary Xe. The higher noble-gas concentrations measured in meteorites are attributed to rate-controlled Xe uptake over a long period in the solar nebula.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gases emissions in constructed wetlands: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, M. M. R.; Fenton, O.; Gill, L.; Müller, C.; Johnston, P.; Richards, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs) is very inconsistent and does not alone explain if the removed species are reduced by physical attenuation or if they are transformed to other reactive forms (pollution swapping). There are many pathways for the removed N to remain in the system: accumulation in the sediments, leaching to groundwater (nitrate-NO3- and ammonium-NH4+), emission to atmosphere via nitrous oxide- N2O and ammonia and/or conversion to N2 gas and adsorption to sediments. The kinetics of these pathways/processes varies with CWs management and therefore needs to be studied quantitatively for the sustainable use of CWs. For example, the quality of groundwater underlying CWs with regards to the reactive N (Nr) species is largely unknown. Equally, there is a dearth of information on the extent of Nr accumulation in soils and discharge to surface waters and air. Moreover, CWs are rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and produce substantial amounts of CO2 and CH4. These dissolved carbon (C) species drain out to ground and surface waters and emit to the atmosphere. The dynamics of dissolved N2O, CO2 and CH4 in CWs is a key "missing piece" in our understanding of global greenhouse gas budgets. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge and discussion about the dynamics of C and N in CWs and their likely impacts on aquatic and atmospheric environments. We suggest that the fate of various N species in CWs and their surface emissions and subsurface drainage fluxes need to be evaluated in a holistic way to better understand their potential for pollution swapping. Research on the process based N removal and balancing the end products into reactive and benign forms are critical to assess environmental impacts of CWs. Thus we strongly suggest that in situ N transformation and fate of the transformation products with regards to pollution swapping requires further detailed examination.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes. PMID:26842324

  9. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  10. Efficient recovery of carbon dioxide from flue gases of coal-fired power plants by cyclic fixed-bed operations over K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-on-carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiromu; Taniuchi, Jun; Furuyashiki, Nobuyoshi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Hirano, Shinichi; Shigemoto, Naoya; Nonaka, Takazumi

    1998-01-01

    An efficient chemical absorption method capable of cyclic fixed-bed operations under moist conditions for the recovery of carbon dioxide from flue gases has been proposed employing K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-on-carbon. Carbon dioxide was chemically absorbed by the reaction K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {r_equilibrium} 2KHCO{sub 3} to form potassium hydrogen carbonate. Moisture, usually contained as high as 8--17% in flue gases, badly affects the capacity of conventional adsorbents such as zeolites, but the present technology has no concern with moisture; water is rather necessary in principle as shown in the equation above. Deliquescent potassium carbonate should be supported on an appropriate porous material to adapt for fixed-bed operations. After breakthrough of carbon dioxide, the entrapped carbon dioxide was released by the decomposition of hydrogen carbonate to shift the reaction in reverse on flushing with steam, which could be condensed by cooling to afford carbon dioxide in high purity. Among various preparations of alkaline-earth carbonates (X{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, X = Li, Na, K) on porous materials, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-on-activated carbon revealed excellent properties for the present purpose. Preparation and characterization of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-on-carbon and illustrative fixed-bed operations under flue gas conditions in laboratory columns and a bench-scale plant are described.

  11. Fluorescent carbon dots capped with PEG200 and mercaptosuccinic acid.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Helena; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis and functionalization of carbon nanoparticles with PEG(200) and mercaptosuccinic acid, rendering fluorescent carbon dots, is described. Fluorescent carbon dots (maximum excitation and emission at 320 and 430 nm, respectively) with average dimension 267 nm were obtained. The lifetime decay of the functionalized carbon dots is complex and a three component decay time model originated a good fit with the following lifetimes: τ(1) = 2.71 ns; τ(2) = 7.36 ns; τ(3) = 0.38 ns. The fluorescence intensity of the carbon dots is affected by the solvent, pH (apparent pK(a) of 7.4 ± 0.2) and iodide (Stern-Volmer constant of 78 ± 2 M(-1)). PMID:20352303

  12. Robust IR Remote Sensing Technique of the Total Column of Trace Gases Including Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.

    2011-01-01

    Progress on the development of a differential radiometer based upon the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (C02) detection in the atmosphere is presented. Methane measurements are becoming increasingly important as a component of NASA's programs to understand the global carbon cycle and quantifY the threat of global warming. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the Earth's radiation budget (after water vapor and carbon dioxide) and the second most important anthropogenic contributor to global warming. The importance of global warming and air quality to society caused the National Research Council to recommend that NASA develop the following missions [1]: ASCENDS (Active Sensing of C02 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons), GEOCAPE (Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events), and GACM (Global Atmosphere Composition Mission). Though methane measurements are not specifically called out in these missions, ongoing environmental changes have raised the importance of understanding the methane budget. In the decadal survey is stated that "to close the carbon budget, we would also address methane, but the required technology is not obvious at this time. If appropriate and cost-effective methane technology becomes available, we strongly recommend adding a methane capability". In its 2007 report the International Panel on Climate Change identified methane as a key uncertainty in our understanding saying that the causes of recent changes in the growth rate of atmospheric CH4 are not well understood. What we do know is that methane arises from a number of natural sources including wet lands and the oceans plus man made sources from agriculture, as well as coal and petroleum production and distribution. It has recently been pointed out that large amount of methane are frozen in the permafrost of Canada and Siberia. There is a fear that melting of this permafrost driven by global warming may release large amounts of

  13. The utilization of catalyst sorbent in scrubbing acid gases from incineration flue gas.

    PubMed

    Wey, Ming-Yen; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Fu, Cheng-Hao

    2002-04-01

    Catalyst sorbents based on alumina-supported CuO, CeO2, and CuO-CeO2 were applied to a dry scrubber to clean up the SO2/HCl/NO simultaneously from pilot-scale fluidized-bed incineration flue gas. In the presence of organic compounds, CO and the submicron particles SO2 and HCI removed by the fresh catalyst sorbents and NO reduced to N2 by NH3 under the catalysis of fresh and spent desulfurization/dechloridization (DeSO2/DeHCl) catalyst sorbents (copper compounds, Cu, CuO, and CuSO4) were evaluated in this paper. The fresh and spent catalyst sorbents were characterized by the Brunner-Emmett-Teller method (BET), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the elemental analyzer (EA). The study showed that the performances of CuO, CeO2, and CuO-CeO2/gamma-Al2O3 were better than that of Ca(OH)2. The removal efficiency of SO2 and HCl was 80-95% in the dry scrubber system. Under NH3/NO = 1, NO could not be reduced to N2 because it was difficult to control the ratio of air/fuel in the flue gas. For estimating the feasibility of regenerating the spent catalyst sorbents, BET and EA analyses were used. They indicated that the pore structures were nearly maintained and a small amount of carbon accumulated on their surface. PMID:12002190

  14. Use of Molecular Modeling to Determine the Interaction and Competition of Gases within Coal for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura

    2003-02-23

    A 3-dimensional coal structural model for the Argonne Premium Coal Pocahontas No. 3 has been generated. The model was constructed based on the wealth of structural information available in the literature with the enhancement that the structural diversity within the structure was represented implicitly (for the first time) based on image analysis of HRTEM in combination with LDMS data. The complex and large structural model (>10,000 carbon atoms) will serve as a basis for examining the interaction of gases within this low volatile bituminous coal. Simulations are of interest to permit reasonable simulations of the host-guest interactions with regard to carbon dioxide sequestration within coal and methane displacement from coal. The molecular structure will also prove useful in examining other coal related behavior such as solvent swelling, liquefaction and other properties. Molecular models of CO{sub 2} have been evaluated with water to analyze which classical molecular force-field parameters are the most reasonable to predict the interactions of CO{sub 2} with water. The comparison of the molecular force field models was for a single CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O complex and was compared against first principles quantum mechanical calculations. The interaction energies and the electrostatic interaction distances were used as criteria in the comparison. The ab initio calculations included Hartree-Fock, B3LYP, and Moeller-Plesset 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order perturbation theories with basis sets up to the aug-cc-pvtz basis set. The Steele model was the best literature model, when compared to the ab initio data, however, our new CO{sub 2} model reproduces the QM data significantly better than the Steele force-field model.

  15. Quantum cascade laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide in high-pressure gases using wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spearrin, R M; Goldenstein, C S; Jeffries, J B; Hanson, R K

    2014-03-20

    A tunable quantum cascade laser sensor, based on wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy near 4.8 μm, was developed to measure CO concentration in harsh, high-pressure combustion gases. The sensor employs a normalized second harmonic detection technique (WMS-2f/1f) at a modulation frequency of 50 kHz. Wavelength selection at 2059.91  cm⁻¹ targets the P(20) transition within the fundamental vibrational band of CO, chosen for absorption strength and relative isolation from infrared water and carbon dioxide absorption. The CO spectral model is defined by the Voigt line-shape function, and key line-strength and line-broadening spectroscopic parameters were taken from the literature or measured. Sensitivity analysis identified the CO-N₂ collisional broadening coefficient as most critical for uncertainty mitigation in hydrocarbon/air combustion exhaust measurements, and this parameter was experimentally derived over a range of combustion temperatures (1100-2600 K) produced in a shock tube. Accuracy of the wavelength-modulation-spectroscopy-based sensor, using the refined spectral model, was validated at pressures greater than 40 atm in nonreactive shock-heated gas mixtures. The laser was then free-space coupled to an indium-fluoride single-mode fiber for remote light delivery. The fiber-coupled sensor was demonstrated on an ethylene/air pulse detonation combustor, providing time-resolved (~20  kHz), in situ measurements of CO concentration in a harsh flow field. PMID:24663473

  16. Structural and chemical degradation mechanisms of pure YSZ and its components ZrO2 and Y2O3 in carbon-rich fuel gases.

    PubMed

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Götsch, Thomas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2016-05-25

    Structural and chemical degradation mechanisms of metal-free yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ-8, 8 mol% Y2O3 in ZrO2) in comparison to its pure oxidic components ZrO2 and Y2O3 have been studied in carbon-rich fuel gases with respect to coking/graphitization and (oxy)carbide formation. By combining operando electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), operando Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the removal and suppression of CH4- and CO-induced carbon deposits and of those generated in more realistic fuel gas mixtures (syngas, mixtures of CH4 or CO with CO2 and H2O) was examined under SOFC-relevant conditions up to 1273 K and ambient pressures. Surface-near carbidization is a major problem already on the "isolated" (i.e. Nickel-free) cermet components, leading to irreversible changes of the conduction properties. Graphitic carbon deposition takes place already on the "isolated" oxides under sufficiently fuel-rich conditions, most pronounced in the pure gases CH4 and CO, but also significantly in fuel gas mixtures containing H2O and CO2. For YSZ, a comparative quantification of the total amount of deposited carbon in all gases and mixtures is provided and thus yields favorable and detrimental experimental approaches to suppress the carbon formation. In addition, the effectivity and reversibility of removal of the coke/graphite layers was comparably studied in the pure oxidants O2, CO2 and H2O and their effective contribution upon addition to the pure fuel gases CO and CH4 verified. PMID:27165763

  17. Acid dew and the role of chemistry in the dry deposition of reactive gases to wetted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the dry deposition of soluble reactive gases to wetted surfaces in terms of the relevant meteorological conditions, the surface roughness, the total amount of liquid water present on the surface, the rate of accumulation of this water, and the species' solubility and reactivity in the surface water. This formulation is then incorporated into a model designed to simulate the generation of acidic dew from the deposition of HNO3, SO2, S(IV) oxidants, H2O2, and O3. Similar to the observations of dew in the continental U.S., the model generates a dewdrop pH of about 4 by the end of the night; the pH can rapidly fall to toxic levels due to rapid evaporation after sunrise. Relatively low deposition velocities are predicted for the SO2 and O3 because of their lower solubilities and hence larger surface resistances than those of the other oxidants. Because the chemical lifetime of the SO2 in the dew is influenced by the atmospheric levels of H2O2, O3, and SO2, the SO2 deposition velocity is a strong function of these species' atmospheric abundances.

  18. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  19. Helium and carbon isotope systematics of Rungwe geothermal gases and fluids; southern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    P. H. BARRY1*, D. R. HILTON1, T. P. FISCHER2, J. M. DE MOOR2, F. MANGASINI3 C. RAMIREZ4 1 Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093-0244, USA (*Correspondence: pbarry@ucsd.edu) 2 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC 03 2040, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001, USA. 3 Department of Mining and Mineral Processing Engineering, University of Dar Es Salaam, PO Box 35131, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. 4 Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias Geologicas, Escuela Centroamericana de Geologia, Universidad de Costa Rica. The East African Rift (EAR) is the largest modern example of continental rifting, extending from the Afar depression in the north to the Rungwe region in southern Tanzania. EAR volcanism is attributed to the presence of one or more mantle plumes [1]. Late Miocene to recent volcanism and geothermal activity mark the Rungwe region [2], with mafic eruptions as recently as 200 years ago. Our aim is to delineate the southern geographical extent of plume influence on the propagating EAR by investigating the He-CO2 characteristics of geothermal fluids in the Rungwe region. We report new helium (He) and carbon (C) isotopes (3He/4He, δ13C) and relative abundance (CO2/3He) characteristics for a suite of 20 geothermal gas and fluid samples from 11 different localities in the Rungwe region. He-isotopes are in good agreement with previous reports [3], and range from ~1 RA to ~7 RA (MORB-like values), indicating admixture between upper mantle He and variable proportions of radiogenic He. C-isotopes ranges from -2.8 to -6.5 ‰ (vs. PDB) with all falling in the MORB range (~4.5 ± 2‰). CO2/3He ratios vary over 5 orders of magnitude from ~3 x 10^9 (MORB-like) to higher values (up to ~3 x 10^13) normally associated with crustal lithologies. Taken together, the He-CO2 data can be explained by 2-component mixing of a deep-seated mantle source with crustal component(s). There are no

  20. Suicidal chemistry: combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a rare case of suicidal intoxication with carbon monoxide produced via reaction of formic and sulphuric acid with additional toxic effect of formic acid. The deceased was a 22-year-old men found dead in the bathroom locked from the inside. A bucket filled with liquid was found next to him, together with an almost empty canister labeled "formic acid" and another empty unlabeled canister. The postmortem examination revealed corrosive burns of the face, neck and chest, cherry-pink livor mortis, corrosive injury to the oropharyngeal area and trachea, subpleural petechiae, 100 mL of blood in stomach and superficial erosions of stomach mucosa. Toxicology analysis revealed 30% of carboxyhemoglobin in the femoral blood and the presence of the formic acid in various samples. Quantitative analysis of formic acid was performed by measuring methyl ester derivative of formic acid by using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The highest concentration of formic acid was measured in the lungs (0.55 g/kg), gastric content (0.39 g/L), and blood (0.28 g/L). In addition, it was established that content of the unlabeled canister had a pH value of 0.79 and contained sulphuric ions. Morphological and toxicology findings suggested that the main route of exposure to formic acid was inhalation of vapors with a possible ingestion of only small amount of liquid acid. The cause of death was determined to be combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid. PMID:26041513

  1. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  2. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 27 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter... contained in the gases discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 25 milligrams per dry... the gases discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 10 percent (6-minute average)....

  3. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that contain cadmium in excess of the limits specified...

  4. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 27 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter... contained in the gases discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 25 milligrams per dry... the gases discharged to the atmosphere from a designated facility is 10 percent (6-minute average)....

  5. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facility shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that contain cadmium in excess of the limits specified...

  6. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  7. CARBON CONTRIBUTION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMIC ACID, FULVIC ACID, PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER AND GLOMALIN IN DIVERSE ECOSYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change and soil carbon sequestration issues are entering the forefront of public policy, and emphasis is growing for research on carbon sinks and long-term terrestrial carbon stabilization. Humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), humin and particulate organic matter (POM) have traditionall...

  8. Direct synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide by hydrogenation in acidic media

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Séverine; Dyson, Paul J.; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important as CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to rise as a consequence of human activities. In this article we describe the direct hydrogenation of CO2 into formic acid using a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst, in aqueous solution and in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), without any additives. In water, at 40 °C, 0.2 M formic acid can be obtained under 200 bar, however, in DMSO the same catalyst affords 1.9 M formic acid. In both solvents the catalysts can be reused multiple times without a decrease in activity. Worldwide demand for formic acid continues to grow, especially in the context of a renewable energy hydrogen carrier, and its production from CO2 without base, via the direct catalytic carbon dioxide hydrogenation, is considerably more sustainable than the existing routes. PMID:24886955

  9. Carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids: tools and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Zheng, Ming; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Diner, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    Nucleic acids, with their intrinsic structural properties as well as their high specificity, are playing an important role in the rapid development of nano-technologies. In turn, these new technologies and their efficient performance enable fast and precise methods for detection of nucleic acids, improving the diagnosis of diseases and identification of pathogens. We discuss the use of nucleic acids to disperse and sort single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) to electrically detect specific nucleic acid sequences. Both DNA and RNA are efficient agents for dispersion and separation of SWNTs by diameter and chirality. Fractions enriched in a narrow band gap distribution of DNA:SWNT hybrids do not alter the electronic performance of field effect transistors. A CNT-FET fulfills the requirements for a nanosensing device that can greatly exceed the existing technologies. Electrical detection of specific nucleic acid sequence could potentially overcome the current limitations of optical detection, by increasing sensitivity and speed, while reducing sample manipulation, size, and cost.

  10. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  11. Karstification without carbonic acid: bedrock dissolution by gypsum- driven dedolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Julia, R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary karst-forming process at Lake Banyoles is dedolomitization of basement rocks driven by gypsum dissolution. Karstification takes place along the subsurface contact between the gypsiferous Beuda Formation and the dolomitic Perafita Formation. This process is here recognized for the first time to cause karstification on a large scale; this is significant because it proceeds without the addition of soil-generated carbonic acid. -from Authors

  12. Acid neutralisation capacity of accelerated carbonated stainless steel slag.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; MacLeod, C L; Hills, C D

    2003-05-01

    The acid neutralisation capacity test is widely used to assess the long-term performance of waste materials prior to disposal. Samples of fixed mass are exposed to increasing additions of nitric add in sealed containers and the resultant pH is plotted as a titration curve. In this work, the add neutralisation capacity test was used in the assessment of an accelerated carbonated stainless steel slag. Difficulties arose in applying the test procedure to this material. This was largely because of the raised pressure from significant volumes of released carbon dioxide trapped in the sealed sample containers, causing an alteration to leachate pH values. Consequently, the add neutralisation capacity test was modified to enable testing of samples in equilibrium with the atmosphere. No adverse effects on the results from testing of a carbonate free material were recorded. PMID:12803247

  13. Fullerenes: A New Carrier Phase for Noble Gases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The major focus of our research effort has been to measure the noble gases encapsulated within fullerenes, a new carbon carrier phase and compare it to the myriad of components found in the bulk meteorite acid residues. We have concentrated on the carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Tagish Lake) since they have abundant noble gases, typically with a planetary signature that dominates the stepped-release of the meteorite bulk acid residue. They also contain an extractable fullerene component that can be isolated and purified from the same bulk material.

  14. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  15. Biosynthesis of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA) from renewable carbon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays a growing demand for green chemicals and cleantech solutions is motivating the industry to strive for biobased building blocks. We have identified the tertiary carbon atom-containing 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA) as an interesting building block for polymer synthesis. Starting from this carboxylic acid, practically all compounds possessing the isobutane structure are accessible by simple chemical conversions, e. g. the commodity methacrylic acid as well as isobutylene glycol and oxide. During recent years, biotechnological routes to 2-HIBA acid have been proposed and significant progress in elucidating the underlying biochemistry has been made. Besides biohydrolysis and biooxidation, now a bioisomerization reaction can be employed, converting the common metabolite 3-hydroxybutyric acid to 2-HIBA by a novel cobalamin-dependent CoA-carbonyl mutase. The latter reaction has recently been discovered in the course of elucidating the degradation pathway of the groundwater pollutant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the new bacterial species Aquincola tertiaricarbonis. This discovery opens the ground for developing a completely biotechnological process for producing 2-HIBA. The mutase enzyme has to be active in a suitable biological system producing 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, which is the precursor of the well-known bacterial bioplastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This connection to the PHB metabolism is a great advantage as its underlying biochemistry and physiology is well understood and can easily be adopted towards producing 2-HIBA. This review highlights the potential of these discoveries for a large-scale 2-HIBA biosynthesis from renewable carbon, replacing conventional chemistry as synthesis route and petrochemicals as carbon source. PMID:20184738

  16. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  17. Acetylene-mediated alkylation of monoalkyl carbonates and carbamic acids with tert-amines

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yoshiyuki

    1996-12-31

    Carbonic acid diesters and carbamic acid esters are useful organic substances as intermediates for the syntheses of several chemicals. They are currently synthesized in industry using the processes based on phosgene or carbon monoxide. On the other hand, since carbon dioxide is an abundant and cheap carbonyl carbon source, and is much less toxic than those raw materials, substantial efforts have been focused on its fixation into carbonyl compounds including carbonic acid diesters and carbamic acid esters. However, their syntheses based on carbon dioxide reported so far require rather expensive substrates like alkyl halides, and are not competitive with the currently adopted industrial processes.

  18. Suicidal carbon monoxide poisoning by combining formic acid and sulfuric acid within a confined space.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter T; Dunn, William A

    2014-01-01

    Suicide by inhalation of carbon monoxide produced by mixing formic acid and sulfuric acid within a confined space is a rare method of suicide. This method is similar to the so-called "detergent suicide" method where an acid-based detergent is mixed with a sulfur source to produce hydrogen sulfide. Both methods produce a toxic gas that poses significant hazards for death investigators, first responders and bystanders. Carbon monoxide is an odorless gas, while hydrogen sulfide has a characteristic rotten eggs odor, so the risks associated with carbon monoxide are potentially greater due to lack of an important warning signal. While detergent suicides have become increasingly common in the USA, suicide with formic acid and sulfuric acid is rare with only three prior cases being reported. Greater awareness of this method among death investigators is warranted because of the special risks of accidental intoxication by toxic gas and the possibility that this method of suicide will become more common in the future. PMID:24328850

  19. Black Carbon in Sedimentary Organic Carbon in the Northeast Pacific using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, A. I.; Ziolkowski, L. A.; Druffel, E. R.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) in the Northeast Pacific ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (UDOM) was found to be surprisingly old with a 14C age of 18,000 +/-3,000 14C years (Ziolkowski and Druffel, 2010) using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) method, while BC in sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) was found to be 2,400-12,900 14C years older than non-BC SOC (Masiello and Druffel, 1998) with a different method. Using the dichromate-sulfuric acid oxidation method (Wolbach and Anders, 1989), Masiello and Druffel (1998) estimated that 12-31% of SOC in the Northeast Pacific and the Southern Ocean surface sediments was black carbon (BC). However, the dichromate-sulfuric acid oxidation may over-estimate the concentration of BC, because this method is more biased toward modern (char) material (Currie et al., 2002). Alternatively, the BPCA method isolates aromatic components of BC as benzene rings substituted with carboxylic acid groups, and provides structural information about the BC. Recent modifications to the BPCA method by Ziolkowski and Druffel (2009) involve few biases in quantifying BC in the continuum between char and soot in UDOM. Here we use the BPCA method to determine the concentrations and 14C values of BC in sediments from three sites in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Constraining the difference between non-BC SOC and BC-SOC using the BPCA method allows for a more precise estimate of how much BC is present in the sediments and its 14C age. Presumably, the intermediate reservoir of BC is oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and is, in part, responsible for DOC’s great 14C age. These results can be utilized to better constrain the oceanic carbon budget as a possible sink of BC. References: Currie, L. A., Benner Jr., B. A., Kessler, J.D., et al (2002), A critical evaluation of interlaboratory data on total, elemental, and isotopic carbon in the carbonaceous particle reference material, nist srm 1649a, J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol., 107, 279-298. Masiello, C

  20. A bio-inspired two-layer sensing structure of polypeptide and multiple-walled carbon nanotube to sense small molecular gases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Ho, Cheng-Long; Yang, Shang-Ren; Chiu, Shih-Wen; Kuo, Han-Wen; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a bio-inspired, two-layer, multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-polypeptide composite sensing device. The MWCNT serves as a responsive and conductive layer, and the nonselective polypeptide (40 mer) coating the top of the MWCNT acts as a filter into which small molecular gases pass. Instead of using selective peptides to sense specific odorants, we propose using nonselective, peptide-based sensors to monitor various types of volatile organic compounds. In this study, depending on gas interaction and molecular sizes, the randomly selected polypeptide enabled the recognition of certain polar volatile chemical vapors, such as amines, and the improved discernment of low-concentration gases. The results of our investigation demonstrated that the polypeptide-coated sensors can detect ammonia at a level of several hundred ppm and barely responded to triethylamine. PMID:25751078

  1. A Bio-Inspired Two-Layer Sensing Structure of Polypeptide and Multiple-Walled Carbon Nanotube to Sense Small Molecular Gases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chun; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Ho, Cheng-Long; Yang, Shang-Ren; Chiu, Shih-Wen; Kuo, Han-Wen; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a bio-inspired, two-layer, multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-polypeptide composite sensing device. The MWCNT serves as a responsive and conductive layer, and the nonselective polypeptide (40 mer) coating the top of the MWCNT acts as a filter into which small molecular gases pass. Instead of using selective peptides to sense specific odorants, we propose using nonselective, peptide-based sensors to monitor various types of volatile organic compounds. In this study, depending on gas interaction and molecular sizes, the randomly selected polypeptide enabled the recognition of certain polar volatile chemical vapors, such as amines, and the improved discernment of low-concentration gases. The results of our investigation demonstrated that the polypeptide-coated sensors can detect ammonia at a level of several hundred ppm and barely responded to triethylamine. PMID:25751078

  2. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  3. Remote Sensing Observations of Greenhouse Gases from space based and airborne platforms: from SCIAMACHY and MaMap to CarbonSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, John P.; Schneising, Oliver; Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Heymann, Jens; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krings, Thomas; Krautwurst, Sven; Dickerson, Russ

    2015-04-01

    Methane, CH4, e and carbon dioxide, CO2, play an important role in the earth carbon cycle. They are the two most important long lived greenhouse gases produced by anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion. In order to assess accurately the surface fluxes of CH4 or CO2. The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY, SCIAMACHY, was a national contribution to the ESA Envisat platform: the latter being launched on the 28th February 2002 and operating successfully until April 2012. The SCIAMACHY measurements of the up-welling radiation have been used to retrieve the dry mole fraction of XCH4 and XCO2, providing a unique 10 year record at the spatial resolution of 60 kmx30 km. This data has been used to observe the changing CH4 abundance in the atmosphere and identify anthropogenic such as Fracking and natural sources such as wetlands. The Methane and carbon dioxide Mapper, MaMap, was developed as an aircraft demonstration instrument for our CarbonSat and CarbonSat Constellation concepts. CarbonSat is in Phase A B1 studies as one of two candidate missions for ESA's Earth Explorer 8 Mission. Selected results from SCIAMACHY and Mamap will be presented with a focus on methane and the perspective for CarbonSat.

  4. Removal of Particles and Acid Gases (SO2 or HCl) with a Ceramic Filter by Addition of Dry Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.; Wang, J.; Schaub, G.

    2002-09-20

    The present investigation intends to add to the fundamental process design know-how for dry flue gas cleaning, especially with respect to process flexibility, in cases where variations in the type of fuel and thus in concentration of contaminants in the flue gas require optimization of operating conditions. In particular, temperature effects of the physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously in the gas-particle dispersion and in the filter cake/filter medium are investigated in order to improve the predictive capabilities for identifying optimum operating conditions. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) are known as efficient sorbents for neutralizing acid flue gas components such as HCl, HF, and SO{sub 2}. According to their physical properties (e.g. porosity, pore size) and chemical behavior (e.g. thermal decomposition, reactivity for gas-solid reactions), optimum conditions for their application vary widely. The results presented concentrate on the development of quantitative data for filtration stability and overall removal efficiency as affected by operating temperature. Experiments were performed in a small pilot unit with a ceramic filter disk of the type Dia-Schumalith 10-20 (Fig. 1, described in more detail in Hemmer 2002 and Hemmer et al. 1999), using model flue gases containing SO{sub 2} and HCl, flyash from wood bark combustion, and NaHCO{sub 3} as well as Ca(OH){sub 2} as sorbent material (particle size d{sub 50}/d{sub 84} : 35/192 {micro}m, and 3.5/16, respectively). The pilot unit consists of an entrained flow reactor (gas duct) representing the raw gas volume of a filter house and the filter disk with a filter cake, operating continuously, simulating filter cake build-up and cleaning of the filter medium by jet pulse. Temperatures varied from 200 to 600 C, sorbent stoichiometric ratios from zero to 2, inlet concentrations were on the order of 500 to 700 mg/m{sup 3}, water vapor contents ranged from

  5. Carbon dioxide generated from carbonates and acids for sampling blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Blosser, Erik M; Young, Ryan M; Toé, Laurent D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is utilized to attract mosquitoes and other blood-feeding arthropods to traps around the world. Commercial forms of CO2 (e.g., dry ice and compressed gas) are often unavailable or extremely expensive in developing nations, where vector surveillance is essential to make life-saving decisions. We developed and tested inexpensive and reproducible methods of CO2 production from the combination of acids and carbonates, ranging from very basic (crushed seashells and vinegar) to relatively elaborate (a device that controls the timing of the acid-carbonate reaction and extends the reaction over several hours). When utilized with mosquito traps in Florida, USA and black fly traps in Region des Cascades, Burkina Faso, these carbonate-acid CO2 sources attracted significantly greater numbers of both vector groups, than did unbaited traps. CO2 was generated for more than four hours at levels sufficient to attract vectors over the entire period. The utility of this simple methodology in developing nations should be further evaluated. PMID:26103427

  6. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  7. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discharged into the atmosphere from the affected facility any gases that contain mercury in excess of the... potential mercury emission concentration (85-percent reduction by weight), corrected to 7 percent oxygen... percent of the potential mercury emission concentration (85-percent reduction by weight), corrected to...

  8. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility must not cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... operator of an affected facility must not cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... discharged into the atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that contain mercury in excess of...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility must not cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... operator of an affected facility must not cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from that affected... discharged into the atmosphere from that affected facility any gases that contain mercury in excess of...

  10. 77 FR 74852 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Certification of Designated Medical Gases; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... medical gases. Specifically, section 575 provides that oxygen, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, helium, carbon monoxide, and medical air are designated medical gases. Section 576 permits any...

  11. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh; Novinrooz, Abdul; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs' diameter.

  12. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Z.; Novinrooz, Abdul J.; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs’ diameter.

  13. Tuning the Carbon Dioxide Absorption in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Firaha, Dzmitry S; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    One of the possible solutions to prevent global climate change is the reduction of CO2 emissions, which is highly desired for the sustainable development of our society. In this work, the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide in amino acid ionic liquids was studied through first-principles methods. The use of readily accessible and biodegradable amino acids as building blocks for ionic liquids makes them highly promising replacements for the widely applied hazardous aqueous solutions of amines. A detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of the CO2 absorption was obtained through state-of-the-art theoretical methods. This allowed us to determine the reason for the specific CO2 capacities found experimentally. Moreover, we have also conducted a theoretical design of ionic liquids to provide valuable insights into the precise tuning of the energetic and kinetic parameters of the CO2 absorption. PMID:27214652

  14. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  15. Respiratory CO(2) as Carbon Source for Nocturnal Acid Synthesis at High Temperatures in Three Species Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Winter, K; Schröppel-Meier, G; Caldwell, M M

    1986-06-01

    TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOCTURNAL CARBON GAIN AND NOCTURNAL ACID ACCUMULATION WERE STUDIED IN THREE SPECIES OF PLANTS EXHIBITING CRASSULACEAN ACID METABOLISM: Mamillaria woodsii, Opuntia vulgaris, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Under conditions of high soil moisture, nocturnal CO(2) gain and acid accumulation had temperature optima at 15 to 20 degrees C. Between 5 and 15 degrees C, uptake of atmospheric CO(2) largely accounted for acid accumulation. At higher tissue temperatures, acid accumulation exceeded net carbon gain indicating that acid synthesis was partly due to recycling of respiratory CO(2). When plants were kept in CO(2)-free air, acid accumulation based on respiratory CO(2) was highest at 25 to 35 degrees C. Net acid synthesis occurred up to 45 degrees C, although the nocturnal carbon balance became largely negative above 25 to 35 degrees C. Under conditions of water stress, net CO(2) exchange and nocturnal acid accumulation were reduced. Acid accumulation was proportionally more decreased at low than at high temperatures. Acid accumulation was either similar over the whole temperature range (5-45 degrees C) or showed an optimum at high temperatures, although net carbon balance became very negative with increasing tissue temperatures. Conservation of carbon by recycling respiratory CO(2) was temperature dependent. At 30 degrees C, about 80% of the dark respiratory CO(2) was conserved by dark CO(2) fixation, in both well irrigated and water stressed plants. PMID:16664827

  16. Measurements of Acidic Gases and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the Pacific Exploratory Mission in the Tropics (PEM-Tropics A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    We received funding to provide measurements of nitric acid (HNO3), formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and the chemical composition of aerosols aboard the NASA Ames DC-8 research aircraft during the PEM-Tropics A mission. These measurements were successfully completed and the final data resides in the electronic archive (ftp-gte.larc.nasa.gov) at NASA Langley Research Center. For the PEM-Tropics A mission the University of New Hampshire group was first author of four different manuscripts. Three of these have now appeared in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, included in the two section sections on PEM-Tropics A. The fourth manuscript has just recently been submitted to this same journal as a stand alone paper. All four of these papers are included in this report. The first paper (Influence of biomass combustion emissions on the distribution of acidic trace gases over the Southern Pacific basin during austral springtime) describes the large-scale distributions of HNO3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH. Arguments were presented to show, particularly in the middle tropospheric region, that biomass burning emissions from South America and Africa were a major source of acidic gases over the South Pacific basin. The second paper (Aerosol chemical composition and distribution during the Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM) Tropics) covers the aerosol aspects of our measurement package. Compared to acidic gases, O3, and selected hydrocarbons, the aerosol chemistry showed little influence from biomass burning emissions. The data collected in the marine boundary layer showed a possible marine source of NH3 to the troposphere in equatorial areas. This source had been speculated on previously, but our data was the first collected from an airborne platform to show its large-scale features. The third paper (Constraints on the age and dilution of Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics biomass burning plumes from the natural radionuclide tracer Pb-210) utilized the unexpectedly

  17. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  18. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Greenhouse Gases Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products ... Power Wave Power Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Biomass Wood and Wood Waste Waste-to-Energy (MSW) Landfill ...

  19. Determination of the energy potential of gases produced in the pyrolysis processes of the vegetal carbon manufacture industry.

    PubMed

    Gañan, J; González, J F; González-García, C M; Cuerda-Correa, E M; Macías-García, A

    2006-03-01

    In this work, a pyrolysis plant located in Valverde de Leganes, Badajoz (SW Spain) was studied. At present, only the solid phase obtained by pyrolysis finds an application as domestic fuel. In order to analyze the feasibility of a further energetic exploitation of the plant under study, the gases flowing through the chimneys were collected at different times throughout the pyrolysis process. Next, they were characterized and quantified by gas chromatography, the energy potential of each of the gases being determined. According to the results obtained in this study, a total energy potential of 5.6 x 10(7) MJ (i.e., 1.78 MW(t)) might be generated yearly. Hence, considering an overall process yield equal to 20%, up to 358 KW(e) would be produced. This power would supply enough electric energy to the industry, the remaining being added to the common electric network. PMID:15953721

  20. Easy modification of glassy carbon electrode for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Soundappan; Tsai, Tsung-Hsuan; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2009-04-15

    A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been modified by electrochemical oxidation in mild acidic media (0.1 mol l(-1) H(2)SO(4)) and could be applied for individual and simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). Oxidized GCE shows a single redox couple (E(0)'=-2.5 mV) which is based on the formation functional groups during the electrochemical pretreatment process. Proposed GCE successfully decreases the over potentials for the oxidation process of these species (AA, DA and UA) comparing with bare GCE. The oxidized GCE has its own simplicity, stability, high sensitivity and possesses the potential for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:19162467

  1. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  2. Validation of the i-STAT system for the analysis of blood gases and acid-base status in juvenile sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus).

    PubMed

    Harter, T S; Morrison, P R; Mandelman, J W; Rummer, J L; Farrell, A P; Brill, R W; Brauner, C J

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurements of blood gases and acid-base status require an array of sophisticated laboratory equipment that is typically not available during field research; such is the case for many studies on the stress physiology, ecology and conservation of elasmobranch fish species. Consequently, researchers have adopted portable clinical analysers that were developed for the analysis of human blood characteristics, but often without thoroughly validating these systems for their use on fish. The aim of our study was to test the suitability of the i-STAT system, the most commonly used portable clinical analyser in studies on fish, for analysing blood gases and acid-base status in elasmobranchs, over a broad range of conditions and using the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) as a model organism. Our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate useful measurements of whole blood pH, and the use of appropriate correction factors may increase the accuracy of results. The i-STAT system was, however, unable to generate reliable results for measurements of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) and the derived parameter of haemoglobin O2 saturation. This is probably due to the effect of a closed-system temperature change on PO2 within the i-STAT cartridge and the fact that the temperature correction algorithms used by i-STAT assume a human temperature dependency of haemoglobin-O2 binding; in many ectotherms, this assumption will lead to equivocal i-STAT PO2 results. The in vivo partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) in resting sandbar sharks is probably below the detection limit for PCO2 in the i-STAT system, and the measurement of higher PCO2 tensions was associated with a large measurement error. In agreement with previous work, our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate useful data on whole blood pH in fishes, but not blood gases. PMID:27293687

  3. Carbon composite micro- and nano-tubes-based electrodes for detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to fabricate vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs were successfully prepared by using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Further, three carbon composite electrodes with different content of carbon particles with various shapes and sizes were prepared and tested on measuring of nucleic acids. The dependences of adenine peak height on the concentration of nucleic acid sample were measured. Carbon composite electrode prepared from a mixture of glassy and spherical carbon powder and MWCNTs had the highest sensitivity to nucleic acids. Other interesting result is the fact that we were able to distinguish signals for all bases using this electrode. PMID:21711910

  4. Carbon composite micro- and nano-tubes-based electrodes for detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Prasek, Jan; Huska, Dalibor; Jasek, Ondrej; Zajickova, Lenka; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Hubalek, Jaromir

    2011-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to fabricate vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs were successfully prepared by using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Further, three carbon composite electrodes with different content of carbon particles with various shapes and sizes were prepared and tested on measuring of nucleic acids. The dependences of adenine peak height on the concentration of nucleic acid sample were measured. Carbon composite electrode prepared from a mixture of glassy and spherical carbon powder and MWCNTs had the highest sensitivity to nucleic acids. Other interesting result is the fact that we were able to distinguish signals for all bases using this electrode. PMID:21711910

  5. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  6. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  7. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  8. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  9. The natural flux of greenhouse gases in the case of monitoring the flux of juvenile carbon dioxide in the Hranice Karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Milan; Stepišnik, Uroš; Mareček, Jan; Geršlová, Eva; Hammerschmiedt, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Located in the Teplice nad Bečvou district 40 km SE of Olomouc (Czech Republic), the hydrothermal Hranice Karst with the Zbrašov Aragonite Caves has been developed in the sequence of Palaeozoic limestones as a result of deep influx of thermal water charged with subcrustal carbon dioxide (CO2). This area of discharge of juvenile carbon dioxide is a unique place where one can study the long-term natural production of a greenhouse gas and confront it with the anthropogenic production. As a result, the continuous measurements of the properties of the cave microclimate with additional seasonal measurements of flux of carbon dioxide give rise to a rare pool of data that cover natural routes of greenhouse gases. Repeated seasonal analysis of the ratio of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide (d13C around -5 ) (Meyberg - Rinne, 1995)has suggested the juvenile (mantle) origin of this gas. Isotopic analyses in the mineral water of dissolved gases (He) show that some part of these gases come from the upper mantle of the Earth. The lower floors of the caves are filled with carbon dioxide producing so-called gas lakes in the area. Concentrations of the gas commonly reach 40 % by volume. In 1999, for example, the average concentration in the Gallas dome was 84.9 % by volume. Flux of CO2 (g.m-2.d-1) was measured on the surface and in the cave. The homogenisation chamber and the pumping test were applied to evaluate the CO2 flux. The average CO2 flux in the soil ranged from 74 to 125 g.m-2.d-1, reflecting the venting of subcrustal CO2 in the Hranice area (Geršl et al., 2012). In the Zbrašov Aragonite Caves the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere fluctuates from 0,X to 85 % with the measured constant flux being 32 894 g.m-2.d-1. Since 2005, the CO2 concentrations in the cave area have been reported by an automatic monitoring system at 10 cave sites. CO2 concentrations are recorded in 5-min intervals. Interpretation can be put into the context of measuring concentrations of

  10. Thermal device and method for production of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by thermal dissociation of hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is produced in a fast quench reactor. The production of carbon monoxide includes injecting carbon dioxide and some air into a reactor chamber having a high temperature at its inlet and a rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Carbon dioxide and other reactants such as methane and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons are injected into the reactor chamber. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  11. A Simple Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Acid Production in CAM Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R. L.; McWha, James A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an experiment investigating carbon dioxide fixation in the dark and the diurnal rhythm of acid production in plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism. Included are suggestions for four further investigations. (SL)

  12. Increased fracture penetration and productivity using xanthan gelled acid in massive carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Molon, J.P.; Fox, K.B.

    1983-03-01

    A measurable improvement in productivity can be achieved using xanthan gelled acid to stimulate carbonate formations. Well productivity results were compared to conventional acid fracture treatments. The significant improvements over classical acid fracturing techniques are due to the improved control of acid leakoff rates, retarded reaction rate and improved fracture width maintenance. The difficulties involved in acid fracturing massive Middle East carbonate formations are discussed and solutions are proposed using gelled acid technology. Some limitations in computer predictions of acid fracturing results are also discussed.

  13. Hydrophobic Catalysts For Removal Of NOx From Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Improved catalysts for removal of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) from combustion flue gases formulated as composites of vanadium pentoxide in carbon molecular sieves. Promotes highly efficient selective catalytic reduction of NOx at relatively low temperatures while not being adversely affected by presence of water vapor and sulfur oxide gases in flue gas. Apparatus utilizing catalyst of this type easily integrated into exhaust stream of power plant to remove nitrogen oxides, generated in combustion of fossil fuels and contribute to formation of acid rain and photochemical smog.

  14. Cleaning of exhaust gases in the mold core industry

    SciTech Connect

    Balabanov, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    Methods for detoxifying the exhaust gases in the core-making sections of the casting industry were studied. The gases generated when making cores from sand-resin mixtures based on oil-free binders and synthetic resins were evaluated. Tests were conducted on activated carbon AR-3, catalysts containing precious and nonprecious metals, and on solutions of sulfuric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorate. The absorption, adsorption, and catalytic methods of cleaning the gas discharges from toxic substances were comparatively assessed. Results show that sorption methods were unsuitable while catalytic methods achieved near-total detoxification.

  15. An investigation of the effect of carbon support on ruthenium/carbon catalysts for lactic acid and butanone hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel R; Iqbal, Sarwat; Kondrat, Simon A; Lari, Giacomo M; Miedziak, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-06-29

    A series of ruthenium catalysts supported on two different carbons were tested for the hydrogenation of lactic acid to 1,2-propanediol and butanone to 2-butanol. The properties of the carbon supports were investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and correlated with the properties of the ruthenium deposited onto the carbons by wet impregnation or sol-immobilisation. It was noted that the rate of butanone hydrogenation was highly dependent on the carbon support, while no noticeable difference in rates was observed between different catalysts for the hydrogenation of lactic acid. PMID:27079275

  16. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    DOEpatents

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-19

    A method of removing a target gas from a gas stream is disclosed. The method uses advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions having vastly improved fire resistance. Methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard.

  17. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

    1988-07-19

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  18. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOEpatents

    Swedo, Raymond J.; Kurek, Paul R.

    1988-01-01

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  19. Biofilters remove VOCs from stack gases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Weyerhaeuser's strandboard plant in Grayling, Mich., is using biofiltration to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the site. Primary constituents in the Weyerhaeuser stack gases are alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, benzene and toluene. The alternative to biofiltration is incineration, but because the concentration of VOCs in the stack gases is so dilute, natural gas would be required. Incineration would be costly, and could introduce pollution problems by generating excess carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) and possibly nitrogen oxides. Two pilot biofilters, each about 20ft by 100ft in area, with 4-ft thick media of bark and ground trim ends, are using naturally occurring bacteria to destroy VOCs emanating from a wood panel press and a wood flake dryer. The press offgas biofilter, activated February 1993, had risen to 93% efficiency in removing VOCs by mid-May. The flake dryer exhaust biofilter, placed in service in April, already was more than 80% efficient.

  20. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). PMID:26046278

  1. Electrochemical Determination of Glycoalkaloids Using a Carbon Nanotubes-Phenylboronic Acid Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiying; Liu, Mingyue; Hu, Xinxi; Li, Mei; Xiong, Xingyao

    2013-01-01

    A versatile strategy for electrochemical determination of glycoalkaloids (GAs) was developed by using a carbon nanotubes-phenylboronic acid (CNTs-PBA) modified glassy carbon electrode. PBA reacts with α-solanine and α-chaconine to form a cyclic ester, which could be utilized to detect GAs. This method allowed GA detection from 1 μM to 28 μM and the detection limit was 0.3 μM. Affinity interaction of GAs and immobilized PBA caused an essential change of the peak current. The CNT-PBA modified electrodes were sensitive for detection of GAs, and the peak current values were in quite good agreement with those measured by the sensors. PMID:24287539

  2. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center - A for atmospheric trace gases. Fiscal year 1996, annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.

    1997-02-01

    Fiscal year 1996 was especially productive for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes publications and statistical data from the CDIAC.

  4. Dissociation and hydrolysis of ammonia-borane with solid acids and carbon dioxide: An efficient hydrogen generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Manish; Xu, Qiang

    Pure hydrogen generation under mild conditions in a controllable way is important for portable devices. Recently, we have found that an aq. ammonia-borane (NH 3BH 3) solution is a potential hydrogen source with noble metal catalysts. For practical use, the development of a low-cost, efficient and safe system is desired. In this study, we found that solid acids such as cation exchange resins and zeolites, which are low-cost and safe, also exhibit high activities for the dissociation and hydrolysis of NH 3BH 3 to generate hydrogen with an H 2 to NH 3BH 3 ratio up to 3.0 at room temperature. The reaction rate depends on the type of solid acid. Especially, Dowex and Amberlyst, the two low-cost solid acids often used as catalysts in a variety of reactions, exhibit reaction kinetics higher than the noble metal catalysts. Carbon dioxide is also active as an acid for this reaction. The reaction products in solution have been identified by 11B NMR, and the evolved gases have been analyzed by mass spectrometry which indicates high purity hydrogen. This new system may have a high potential for application in fuel cells.

  5. Measurement of fossil fuel carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gases from MEGAPOLI intensive campaign in Paris during winter 2010.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Gros, V.; Mondelain, D.; Lehman, S. J.; Ramonet, M.; Vuillemin, C.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Paris agglomeration is the third biggest megacity in Europe (12 million inhabitants) and according to national emission inventories, is responsible for 15 % of the French anthropogenic CO2 emissions mainly originating from road transport, and residential and industrial energy consumption. The objective of our feasibility study was to design an efficient monitoring strategy in order to quantify future trends in anthropogenic CO2 emission in Paris area. During the winter campaign of the European project MEGAPOLI and the French project CO2-MEGAPARIS, we performed measurements of CO2 and related trace gases from January to February 2010. The RAMCES (Atmospheric Network for Greenhouse Gases Monitoring) team at LSCE monitored CO2 and CO mixing ratio with high temporal resolution using instruments based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) in the thirteenth arrondissement of Paris (south). We also sampled air in more than fifty flasks covering three full days at the same place. Flask were analysed in the RAMCES central laboratory with a Gas Chromatograph system for CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, SF6 and H2 mixing ratios and also by Mass Spectroscopy for CO2 isotopic ratios (δ13C and δ18O). In order to quantify the fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) most flasks were analysed at INSTAAR for Δ14C in CO2. In addition, 13CO2 isotopic ratio and total CO2 concentration were measured at high temporal resolution (< 1 min) over three days at Paris with the SIMCO instrument developed at LPMAA. In parallel with the Paris measurements, in-situ CO2, CO and other trace gases were monitored at Gif-sur-Yvette, a semi urban station 20km south west of Paris and also at the Trainou tower, 100 km south of Paris. Similar synoptic variations of CO2and CO mixing ratios were found in Paris and Gif with maximum mixing ratio up to 495 ppm CO2 and 1000 ppb CO downtown Paris. The mean diurnal variation during this winter period shows a peak to peak amplitude of 15 ppm CO2 and 150 ppb CO at Paris and 10 ppm CO2

  6. Measurement of fossil fuel carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gases from MEGAPOLI intensive campaign in Paris during winter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Gros, V.; Mondelain, D.; Lehman, S.; Ramonet, M.; Vuillemin, C.; Xueref-remy, I. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Paris agglomeration is the third biggest megacity in Europe (12 million inhabitants) and according to national emission inventories, is responsible for 15 % of the French anthropogenic CO2 emissions mainly originating from road transport, residential and industrial energy consumption. The objective of our feasibility study was to design an efficient monitoring strategy in order to quantify future trends in anthropogenic CO2 emission in Paris area. During the winter campaign of the European project MEGAPOLI and French project CO2-MEGAPARIS, we performed measurements of CO2 and related trace gases from January to February 2010. The RAMCES (Atmospheric Network for Greenhouse Gases Monitoring) team at LSCE monitored CO2 and CO mixing ratio with high temporal resolution using instruments based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) in the thirteenth arrondissement of Paris (south). We also sampled air in more than fifty flasks covering three full days at the same place. Flasks were analysed in the RAMCES central laboratory with a Gas Chromatograph system for CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, SF6 and H2 mixing ratios and also by Mass Spectroscopy for CO2 isotopic ratios (δ13C and δ18O). In order to quantify the fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) most flasks were analysed at INSTAAR for Δ14C in CO2. In addition, 13CO2 isotopic ratio and total CO2 concentration were measured at high temporal resolution (< 1 min) over three days at Paris with Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscope developed at LPMAA. In parallel with the Paris measurements, in-situ CO2, CO and other trace gases were monitored at Gif-sur-Yvette, a semi urban station 20km south west of Paris. Similar synoptic variations of CO2 and CO mixing ratios were found in Paris and Gif with maximum mixing ratio up to 495 ppm CO2 and 1000 ppb CO downtown Paris. The mean diurnal variation during this winter period shows peak to peak amplitude of 15 ppm CO2 and 150 ppb CO at Paris and 10 ppm CO2 and 40 CO ppb at Gif station. We focused on CO and

  7. An improved back-flush-to-vent gas chromatographic method for determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia.

    PubMed

    Trubyanov, Maxim M; Mochalov, Georgy M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Suvorov, Sergey S; Smirnov, Konstantin Y; Vorotyntsev, Vladimir M

    2016-05-20

    A novel method for rapid, quantitative determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia by dual-channel two-dimensional GC-PDHID is presented. An improved matrix back-flush-to-vent approach combining back-flush column switching technique with auxiliary NaHSO4 ammonia trap is described. The NaHSO4 trap prevents traces of ammonia from entering the analytical column and is shown not to affect the impurity content of the sample. The approach allows shortening the analysis time and increasing the amount of measurements without extensive maintenance of the GC-system. The performance of the configuration has been evaluated utilizing ammonia- and helium-based calibration standards. The method has been applied for the analysis of 99.9999+% ammonia purified by high-pressure distillation at the production site. PMID:27083259

  8. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  9. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  10. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  11. Novel graphene flowers modified carbon fibers for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiao; Yue, Ruirui; Ren, Fangfang; Yao, Zhangquan; Jiang, Fengxing; Yang, Ping; Du, Yukou

    2014-03-15

    A novel and sensitive carbon fiber electrode (CFE) modified by graphene flowers was prepared and used to simultaneously determine ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). SEM images showed that beautiful and layer-petal graphene flowers homogeneously bloomed on the surface of CFE. Moreover, sharp and obvious oxidation peaks were found at the obtained electrode when compared with CFE and glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the oxidation of AA, DA and UA. Also, the linear calibration plots for AA, DA and UA were observed, respectively, in the ranges of 45.4-1489.23 μM, 0.7-45.21 μM and 3.78-183.87 μM in the individual detection of each component. By simultaneously changing the concentrations of AA, DA and UA, their oxidation peaks appeared at -0.05 V, 0.16 V and 2.6 V, and the good linear responses ranges were 73.52-2305.53 μM, 1.36-125.69 μM and 3.98-371.49 μM, respectively. In addition, the obtained electrode showed satisfactory results when applied to the determination of AA, DA and UA in urine and serum samples. PMID:24140872

  12. Fate of microbial nitrogen, carbon, hydrolysable amino acids, monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, Bart; van Oevelen, Dick; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of microbial carbon, nitrogen, hydrolysable amino acids (HAAs), monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment was investigated experimentally. The microbial community of a tidal flat sediment was labeled with 13C-enriched glucose and 15N-enriched ammonium, and sediment was incubated for up to 371 days. Analysis of total concentrations and 13C- and 15N content of bulk sediment, hydrolysable amino acids (including D-alanine), monosaccharides, total fatty acids (TFAs), and phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) allowed us to trace the fate of microbial biomass and -detritus and the major biochemical groups therein (proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) over intermediate time scales (weeks-months). Moreover, the unidentified fraction of the labeled material (i.e. not analyzed as HAA, FA, or carbohydrate) provided information on the formation and fate of molecularly uncharacterizable organic matter. Loss of 13C and 15N from the sediment was slow (half live of 433 days) which may have been due to the permanently anoxic conditions in the experiment. Loss rates for the different biochemical groups were also low with the following order of loss rate constants: PLFA > TFA > HAA > monosaccharides. The unidentified 13C-pool was rapidly formed (within days) and then decreased relatively slowly, resulting in a gradual relative accumulation of this pool over time. Degradation and microbial reworking of the labeled material resulted in subtle, yet consistent, diagenetic changes within the different biochemical groups. In the HAA pool, glycine, lysine, and proline were lost relatively slowly (i.e. best preserved) while there was no accumulation of D-alanine relative to L-alanine, indicating no relative accumulation of bacterial macromolecules rich in D-alanine. In the fatty acid pool, there was very little difference between PLFAs and TFAs, indicating a very similar lability of these pools. Differences between individual fatty acids included a relatively slow loss of i15

  13. Acidity of vapor plume from cooling tower mixed with flue gases emitted from coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Hlawiczka, Stanislaw; Korszun, Katarzyna; Fudala, Janina

    2016-06-01

    Acidity of products resulting from the reaction of flue gas components emitted from a coal-fired power plant with water contained in a vapor plume from a wet cooling tower was analyzed in a close vicinity of a power plant (710 m from the stack and 315 m from the cooling tower). Samples of this mixture were collected using a precipitation funnel where components of the mixed plumes were discharged from the atmosphere with the rainfall. To identify situations when the precipitation occurred at the same time as the wind directed the mixed vapor and flue gas plumes above the precipitation funnel, an ultrasound anemometer designed for 3D measurements of the wind field located near the funnel was used. Precipitation samples of extremely high acidity were identified - about 5% of samples collected during 12 months showed the acidity below pH=3 and the lowest recorded pH was 1.4. During the measurement period the value of pH characterizing the background acidity of the precipitation was about 6. The main outcome of this study was to demonstrate a very high, and so far completely underestimated, potential of occurrence of episodes of extremely acid depositions in the immediate vicinity of a coal-fired power plant. PMID:26950639

  14. Simultaneous inhibition of carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a forest soil by simulated acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Novick, N.J.; Kreitinger, J.P.; Alexander, M.

    1984-06-01

    One method to simulate the long-term exposure of soil to acid rain involves the addition of single doses of concentrated acid. The inhibition of carbon mineralization accompanied by a stimulation of nitrogen mineralization may result from this severe, unnatural treatment. The present study was designed to determine whether the inhibition of carbon mineralization and the accompanying enhanced nitrogen mineralization would occur when soils are treated with more dilute acid for long periods of time, as takes place in nature.

  15. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  16. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: Fiscal year 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    Fiscal year 1995 was both a very productive year for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and a year of significant change. This document presents information about the most notable accomplishments made during the year. Topics include: high-lights; statistics; future plans; publications, presentations, and awards; and change in organization and staff.

  17. Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1999-03-01

    Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

  18. Cyclic carbonation calcination studies of limestone and dolomite for CO{sub 2} separation from combustion flue gases - article no. 011801

    SciTech Connect

    Senthoorselvan, S.; Gleis, S.; Hartmut, S.; Yrjas, P.; Hupa, M.

    2009-01-15

    Naturally occurring limestone and dolomite samples, originating from different geographical locations, were tested as potential sorbents for carbonation/calcination based CO{sub 2} capture from combustion flue gases. Samples have been studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer under simulated flue gas conditions at three calcination temperatures, viz., 750{sup o}C, 875{sup o}C, and 930{sup o}C for four carbonation calcination reaction (CCR) cycles. The dolomite sample exhibited the highest rate of carbonation than the tested limestones. At the third cycle, its CO{sub 2} capture capacity per kilogram of the sample was nearly equal to that of Gotland, the highest reacting limestone tested. At the fourth cycle it surpassed Gotland, despite the fact that the CaCO{sub 3} content of the Sibbo dolomite was only 2/3 of that of the Gotland. Decay coefficients were calculated by a curve fitting exercise and its value is lowest for the Sibbo dolomite. That means, most probably its capture capacity per kilogram of the sample would remain higher well beyond the fourth cycle. There was a strong correlation between the calcination temperature, the specific surface area of the calcined samples, and the degree of carbonation. It was observed that the higher the calcination temperature, the lower the sorbent reactivity. For a given limestone/dolomite sample, sorbents CO{sub 2} capture capacity depended on the number of CCR cycles and the calcination temperature. According to the equilibrium thermodynamics, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the calciner should be lowered to lower the calcination temperature. This can be achieved by additional steam supply into the calciner. Steam could then be condensed in an external condenser to single out the CO{sub 2} stream from the exit gas mixture of the calciner. A calciner design based on this concept is illustrated.

  19. Screen printing of nucleic acid detecting carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Dequaire, Murielle; Heller, Adam

    2002-09-01

    A large fraction of the presently mass-manufactured (> 10(8) units/year) electrochemical biosensors, used mostly by diabetic people to monitor their blood glucose levels, have screen-printed carbon working electrodes. An earlier study (Campbell, C. N., et al. Anal. Chem. 2002, 74, 158-162) showed that nucleic acids can be assayed at 1 nM concentrations by a sandwich-type amperometric method. The assay was performed with vitreous carbon working electrodes on which an electron-conducting polycationic redox polymer and avidin were coelectrodeposited. Because the rate of the electrodeposition increases with the surface density of the polycationic redox polymer, its practicality depends on pretreatment of the surface, which adds anionic functions. (Gao, Z., et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2002, 41, 810-813). Here it is shown that the required conducting redox polymer films can be electrodeposited on potentially mass manufacturable electrodes made by screen-printing hydrophilic carbon inks on polyester sheets. The modified electrodes are made in two steps. First a polycationic electron-conducting redox polymer is cross-linked and electrodeposited by applying a negative potential. Next, an amine-terminated 20-base single-stranded oligonucleotide is electrodeposited by ligand-exchange. Both steps involve exchange of a labile inner sphere chloride ligand of the polymer-bound osmium-complex: Cross-linking and electrodeposition of the redox polymer result when inner-sphere chloride anions of the osmium complexes are exchanged by imidazole functions of neighboring chains. Incorporation of the oligonucleotide in the redox polymer results in the formation of a coordinative bond between the terminal amine (attached through a spacer to the oligonucleotide) and the osmium complex. In testing for the presence of a 38-base oligonucleotide, the analyte, in a 15- or 25-microL droplet of hybridization solution, is hybridized with and captured by the 20-base electrode-bound sequence; then

  20. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered. PMID:20199068

  1. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  2. Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    The noble gases are the group of elements - helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon - in the rightmost column of the periodic table of the elements, those which have "filled" outermost shells of electrons (two for helium, eight for the others). This configuration of electrons results in a neutral atom that has relatively low electron affinity and relatively high ionization energy. In consequence, in most natural circumstances these elements do not form chemical compounds, whence they are called "noble." Similarly, much more so than other elements in most circumstances, they partition strongly into a gas phase (as monatomic gas), so that they are called the "noble gases" (also, "inert gases"). (It should be noted, of course, that there is a sixth noble gas, radon, but all isotopes of radon are radioactive, with maximum half-life a few days, so that radon occurs in nature only because of recent production in the U-Th decay chains. The factors that govern the distribution of radon isotopes are thus quite different from those for the five gases cited. There are interesting stories about radon, but they are very different from those about the first five noble gases, and are thus outside the scope of this chapter.)In the nuclear fires in which the elements are forged, the creation and destruction of a given nuclear species depends on its nuclear properties, not on whether it will have a filled outermost shell when things cool off and nuclei begin to gather electrons. The numerology of nuclear physics is different from that of chemistry, so that in the cosmos at large there is nothing systematically special about the abundances of the noble gases as compared to other elements. We live in a very nonrepresentative part of the cosmos, however. As is discussed elsewhere in this volume, the outstanding generalization about the geo-/cosmochemistry of the terrestrial planets is that at some point thermodynamic conditions dictated phase separation of solids from gases, and that the

  3. Teacher's Resource Book for Balloons and Gases. Grade 6. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage School District, AK.

    This resource book introduces sixth-grade children to the physical and chemical properties of gases. The unit begins with an investigation of acids and bases. Students then generate carbon dioxide, oxygen, and hydrogen, and investigate the properties of each. The unit culminates with an activity involving an unknown gas. Students conduct tests to…

  4. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  5. Isotopic composition of gases from mud volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Valysaev, B.M.; Erokhin, V.E.; Grinchenko, Y.I.; Prokhorov, V.S.; Titkov, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the isotopic composition of the carbon in methane and carbon dioxide, as well as hydrogen in the methane, in the gases of mud volcanoes, for all main mud volcano areas in the USSR. The isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in methane shows that the gases resemble those of oil and gas deposits, while carbon dioxide of these volcanoes has a heavier isotopic composition with a greater presence of ''ultraheavy'' carbon dioxide. By the chemical and isotopic composition of gases, Azerbaidzhan and South Sakhalin types of mud volcano gases have been identified, as well as Bulganak subtypes and Akhtala and Kobystan varieties. Correlations are seen between the isotopic composition of gases and the geological build of mud volcano areas.

  6. Using carbon and water isotopes and noble gases to assess the origin of methane in fresh water aquifers in the south of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, Hans Peter; de Weert, Jasperien; Vonhof, Hubert; Janssen, Renee; Sueltenfuss, Juergen; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Castelijns, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater in the Dutch subsurface is known to contain substantial concentrations of methane of which the origin is not always clear. The Dutch subsurface contains relatively high organic matter contents which makes a biogenic origin plausible, however few studies have used water and carbon isotopes to deduce the origin of methane. In relation to possible future exploitation of deep shale gas resources, it is now considered important to assess base line quality of fresh groundwater in overlying aquifers from which drinking water is produced. Therefore, we sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields in the south of the Netherlands which represents a mixture of groundwater of different ages and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13C-DIC and 13C-CH4 and the full range of noble gases. 13C-CH4 measurements were carried out using a Picarro G2201-i CRDS analyser. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources and included carbonate dissolution and methanogenesis as the defining processes. The 13C-CH4 measurements showed a range of δ-values between -70 and -100‰, which give a clear indication for biogenic methane. No clear relations between 13C-CH4 and 13C-DIC or the 4He/CH4 ratio were observed. However, clear spatial patterns indicated that more depleted values are grouped in specific areas. The 13δCH4 values did not show a clear relation with the age distribution of the pumped water, even though a large range of age distributions was observed including old water with an age of > 25 k yrs. We believe that spatial differences in organic matter contents, origin of the geological deposits and/or the

  7. Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2

    SciTech Connect

    Severinghaus, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases fiscal year 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1998-03-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1997 was another exciting and productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During FY 1997, CDIAC launched the Quality Systems Science Center for the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO). The purpose of NARSTO--a US-Canada-Mexico initiative of government agencies, industry, and the academic research community--is to improve the understanding of the formation and transport of tropospheric ozone.

  9. Reevaluation of the NOAA/CMDL carbon monoxide reference scale and comparisons with CO reference gases at NASA-Langley and the Fraunhofer Institut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novelli, P. C.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Myers, R. C.; Sachse, G. W.; Scheel, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon monoxide (CO) reference scale created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA/CMDL) is used to quantify measurements of CO in the atmosphere, calibrate standards of other laboratories and to otherwise provide reference gases to the community measuring atmospheric CO. This reference scale was created based upon a set of primary standards prepared by gravimetric methods at CMDL and has been propagated to a set of working standards. In this paper we compare CO mixing ratios assigned to the working standards by three approaches: (1) calibration against the original gravimetric standards, (2) calibration using only working standards as the reference gas, and (3) calibration against three new gravimetric standards prepared to CMDL. The agreement between these values was typically better than 1%. The calibration histories of CMDL working standards are reviewed with respect to expected rates of CO change in the atmosphere. Using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of drifting standards on calculated mixing ratios, we conclude that the error solely associated with the maintenance of standards will limit the ability to detect small CO changes in the atmosphere. We also report results of intercalibration experiments conducted between CMDL and the Diode Laser Sensor Group (DACOM) at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia), and CMDL and the Fraunhofer-Institut (Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany). Each laboratory calibrated several working standards for CO using their reference gases, and these results were compared to calibrations conducted by CMDL. The intercomparison of eight standards (CO concentrations between approximately 100 and approximately 165 ppb) by CMDL and NASA agreed to better than +/- 2%. The calibration of six standards (CO concentrations between approximately 50 and approximately 210 ppb) by CMDL and the Fraunhofer-Institut agreed to within +/- 2% for four

  10. Carbon and nitrogen compounds and emission of greenhouse gases in ancient and modern soils of the Arkaim Reserve in the Steppe Trans-Ural Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inubushi, K.; Prikhodko, V. E.; Nagano, Kh.; Manakhov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen compounds and the emission of CO2, CH4, and N2O were studied in the ancient buried and modern background soils developed from different parent materials in the Arkaim Reserve of Chelyabinsk oblast. The studies were performed after an 18-year-long period of absence of anthropogenic loads on the local ecosystems. Element contents in the humus horizons of the chernozems of the former plowland and pastures and of the forest soil reach 28-45.6 g/kg for Corg, 2.5-4.5 g/kg for Ntot, 140-423 mg/kg for labile carbon (Cl), 32-73 mg/kg for labile nitrogen (Nl), 350-952 mg/kg for carbon of microbial biomass (Cmic), and 38-85 mg/kg for nitrogen of microbial biomass (Nmic). The contents of different forms of C and N depend on the soil type and texture and on the type of land use, including that before reservation of the territory. The emission of greenhouse gases was examined in this area for the first time. The production of CO2 by the soil buried about 4000 years ago is an order of magnitude lower than that by the modern soil. The emission and sink of N2O are small in both modern and ancient soils. The behavior of methane is clearly different in the automorphic and hydromorphic soils: the former serve as methane sinks, whereas the latter act as methane sources. The rate of the CO2 emission from the soils is controlled by many factors, including the soil type, texture, degree of hydromorphism, composition of parent materials, and type of land use.

  11. The Formation and Stability of Carbonic Acid on Outer Solar System Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, Z.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Lewis, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The radiation chemistry, thermal stability, and vapor pressure of solid-phase carbonic acid (H2CO3) have been studied with mid-infrared spectroscopy. A new procedure for measuring this molecule's radiation stability has been used to obtain intrinsic IR band strengths and half-lives for radiolytic destruction. Results are compared to literature values. We report, for the first time, measurements of carbonic acid's vapor pressure and its heat of sublimation. We also report the first observation of a chemical reaction involving solid-phase carbonic acid. Possible applications of these findings are discussed, with an emphasis on the outer Solar System.

  12. Blood gases

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a measurement of how much oxygen and carbon dioxide are in your blood. They also determine the ... oxygen (PaO2): 75 - 100 mmHg Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2): 38 - 42 mmHg Arterial blood pH: 7. ...

  13. Electron microscopy of carbonaceous matter in Allende acid residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of characteristic diffuse ring diffraction patterns, much of the carbonaceous matter in a large suite of Allende acid residues has been identified as a variety of turbostratic carbon. Crystallites of this phase contain randomly stacked sp(2) hybridized carbon layers and diffraction patterns resemble those from carbon black and glassy carbon. Carbynes are probably absent, and are certainly restricted to less than 0.5% of these acid residues. The work of Ott et al. (1981) provides a basis for the possibility that turbostratic carbon is a carrier of noble gases, but an additional component - amorphous carbon - may be necessary to explain the high release temperatures of noble gases as well as the glassy character of many of the carbonaceous particles. Carbynes are considered to be questionable as important carriers of noble gases in the Allende acid residues.

  14. Oxidation and reduction rates for organic carbon in the Amazon mainstream tributary and floodplain, inferred from distributions of dissolved gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Jeffrey E.; Devol, Allan H.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Victoria, Reynaldo; Riberio, Maria N. G.

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of CO2, O2, CH4, and N2O in the Amazon River system reflect an oxidation-reduction sequence in combination with physical mixing between the floodplain and the mainstem. Concentrations of CO2 ranged from 150 microM in the Amazon mainstem to 200 to 300 microM in aerobic waters of the floodplain, and up to 1000 microM in oxygen-depleted environments. Apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) ranged from 80 to 250 microM. Methane was highly supersaturated, with concentrations ranging from 0.06 microM in the mainstem to 100 microM on the floodplain. Concentrations of N2O were slightly supersaturated in the mainstem, but were undersaturated on the floodplain. Fluxes calculated from these concentrations indicated decomposition of 1600 g C sq m y(-1) of organic carbon in Amazon floodplain waters. Analysis of relationships between CH4, O2, and CO2 concentrations indicated that approximately 50 percent of carbon mineralization on the floodplain is anaerobic, with 20 percent lost to the atmoshphere as CH4. The predominance of anaerobic metabolism leads to consumption of N2O on the flood plane. Elevated concentrations of CH4 in the mainstem probably reflect imput from the floodplain, while high levels of CO2 in the mainstem are derived from a combination of varzea drainage and in situ respiration.

  15. Sulfonated mesoporous silica-carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B.

    2012-11-01

    The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica-carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica-carbon composites contain ˜30 wt % of carbonaceous matter with a high density of acidic groups attached to the deposited carbon (i.e.sbnd SO3H, sbnd COOH and sbnd OH). The structural characteristics of the parent silica are retained in the composite materials, which exhibit a high surface area, a large pore volume and a well-ordered porosity made up uniform mesopores. The high density of the sulfonic groups in combination with the mesoporous structure of the composites ensures that a large number of active sites are easily accessible to reactants. These sulfonated silica-carbon composites behave as eco-friendly, active, selective, water tolerant and recyclable solid acids. In this study we demonstrate the usefulness of these composites as solid acid catalysts for the esterification of maleic anhydride, succinic acid and oleic acid with ethanol. These composites exhibit a superior intrinsic catalytic activity to other commercial solid acids such as Amberlyst-15.

  16. Humic acid adsorption on fly ash and its derived unburned carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-11-01

    Fly ash is solid waste from combustion process, containing oxide minerals and unburned carbon. In this investigation, fly ash has been separated into metal oxide mineral section and unburned carbon. The fly ash with different contents of unburned carbon was employed for humic acid adsorption to investigate the influence of unburned carbon on adsorption. It is found that metal oxides and unburned carbon in fly ash exhibit significant difference in humic acid adsorption. The unburned carbon plays the major role in adsorption. Higher content of unburned carbon in fly ash results in higher surface area and thus higher humic acid adsorption. Fly ash and unburned carbon exhibit adsorption capacity of humic acid of 11 and 72 mg/g, respectively, at 30 degrees C, pH 7. Humic acid adsorption is also affected by ion strength, pH, and temperature. The thermodynamic calculations indicate that the adsorption is endothermic nature with DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) as 5.79 kJ/mol and 16.0 J/K mol, respectively. PMID:17628583

  17. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  18. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  19. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-02-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.

  20. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  1. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  2. Determination of primary and secondary sources of organic acids and carbonaceous aerosols using stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Rebeka; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Dommen, Josef; Szidat, Sönke; Samburova, Vera; Baltensperger, Urs

    Stable carbon isotope ratio ( δ13C) data can provide important information regarding the sources and the processing of atmospheric organic carbon species. Formic, acetic and oxalic acid were collected from Zurich city in August-September 2002 and March 2003 in the gas and aerosol phase, and the corresponding δ13C analysis was performed using a wet oxidation method followed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In August, the δ13C values of gas phase formic acid showed a significant correlation with ozone (coefficient of determination ( r2) = 0.63) due to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE). This indicates the presence of secondary sources (i.e. production of organic acids in the atmosphere) in addition to direct emission. In March, both gaseous formic and acetic acid exhibited similar δ13C values and did not show any correlation with ozone, indicating a predominantly primary origin. Even though oxalic acid is mainly produced by secondary processes, the δ13C value of particulate oxalic acid was not depleted and did not show any correlation with ozone, which may be due to the enrichment of 13C during the gas - aerosol partitioning. The concentrations and δ13C values of the different aerosol fractions (water soluble organic carbon, water insoluble organic carbon, carbonate and black carbon) collected during the same period were also determined. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) contributed about 60% to the total carbon and was enriched in 13C compared to other fractions indicating a possible effect of gas - aerosol partitioning on δ13C of carbonaceous aerosols. The carbonate fraction in general was very low (3% of the total carbon).

  3. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  4. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  5. Use of molecular modeling to determine the interaction and competition of gases within coal for carbon dioxide sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2006-04-21

    Molecular modeling was employed to both visualize and probe our understanding of carbon dioxide sequestration within a bituminous coal. A large-scale (>20,000 atoms) 3D molecular representation of Pocahontas No. 3 coal was generated. This model was constructed based on a the review data of Stock and Muntean, oxidation and decarboxylation data for aromatic clustersize frequency of Stock and Obeng, and the combination of Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry data with HRTEM, enabled the inclusion of a molecular weight distribution. The model contains 21,931 atoms, with a molecular mass of 174,873 amu, and an average molecular weight of 714 amu, with 201 structural components. The structure was evaluated based on several characteristics to ensure a reasonable constitution (chemical and physical representation). The helium density of Pocahontas No. 3 coal is 1.34 g/cm{sup 3} (dmmf) and the model was 1.27 g/cm{sup 3}. The structure is microporous, with a pore volume comprising 34% of the volume as expected for a coal of this rank. The representation was used to visualize CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity, and the role of moisture in swelling and CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} capacity reduction. Inclusion of 0.68% moisture by mass (ash-free) enabled the model to swell by 1.2% (volume). Inclusion of CO{sub 2} enabled volumetric swelling of 4%.

  6. Carbon-doped high-mobility hole gases on (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerl, C.; Schmult, S.; Wurstbauer, U.; Tranitz, H.-P.; Mitzkus, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2006-05-01

    Since Stormer and Tsang have introduced the first two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterosystem, the choice of suitable dopants was limited to beryllium and silicon over the last 20 years. Both acceptor atoms have significant disadvantages, i.e. either high-diffusion rates or a limitation to specific growth directions. Utilizing a carbon filament-doping source, we prepared high-quality 2DHGs in the (0 0 1) and the nonpolar (1 1 0) crystal plane with carrier mobilies beyond 10 6 cm 2/Vs in quantum well and single interface structures. Low-temperature magnetoresistance measurements recover a large number of fractional QHE states and show a pronounced beating pattern from which the Rashba induced spin-splitting has been determined. In addition, 2DHGs have been grown on cleaved edges of (1 1 0) and (0 0 1) wafers with transport features in qualitative agreement to our findings on (1 1 0) substrates.

  7. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBONIISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (*13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SOM) cy...

  8. Reconciling Empirical Carbonate Clumped Isotope Calibrations: A Comparison of Calcite Precipitation and Acid Digestion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, J.; Huntington, K. W.; Schauer, A. J.; Saenger, C.; Lechler, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    An accurate empirical calibration is necessary to confidently apply the carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometer. Previous synthetic carbonate calibrations disagree in temperature sensitivity, with one group of calibrations displaying a shallow Δ47-temperature slope (e.g., Dennis & Schrag, GCA, 2010), and the other a steep slope (e.g., Zaarur et al., EPSL, 2013). These calibrations differ in both the method of mineral precipitation and the temperature of the phosphoric acid used to digest carbonates for analysis, making it difficult to isolate the cause of the discrepancy. Here, we precipitate synthetic carbonates at temperatures of 6-80ºC using 4 different precipitation methods, and analyze the samples using both 90 and 25°C acid digestion. Precipitation experiments varied the use of salts (NaHCO3 and CaCl2) vs. dissolved CaCO3 as a starting solution, the use of carbonic anhydrase to promote isotopic equilibrium among dissolved inorganic carbon species in solution, and the method by which CO2 degasses to force carbonate precipitation. Carbonates precipitated by using salts and allowing CO2 to passively degas produce a shallow calibration slope that we hypothesize to approach isotopic equilibrium. Precipitation methods that bubble CO2 into solution then degas that CO2 (either passively or actively by bubbling N2) produce carbonates with consistently lower Δ47 and higher δ18O values for a given growth temperature. We infer that these carbonates grew in disequilibrium during rapid CO2 degassing. Varying acid digestion temperature does not change the results; acid fractionation factor is not correlated with grain size, Δ47, or d47 values. No precipitation method produces a steep calibration slope. Our large sample set of >60 carbonates lend confidence to a shallow slope calibration, and inform interpretations of Δ47 and δ18O values of natural carbonates that grow under conditions of isotopic disequilibrium.

  9. Enhancing the performance of lead-acid batteries with carbon - In pursuit of an understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Patrick T.; Rand, David A. J.; Peters, Ken

    2015-11-01

    The inherently poor dynamic charge-acceptance of the lead-acid battery can be greatly improved by the incorporation of additional carbon to the negative plate. An analysis is undertaken of the various ways by which the carbon may be introduced, and of the proposed mechanisms whereby its presence proves to be beneficial. It is intended that such an investigation should provide a guide to the selection of the optimum carbon inventory.

  10. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst. PMID:24661813

  11. Carbon monoxide and related trace gases and aerosols over the Amazon Basin during the wet and dry seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Beck, V.; Bela, M.; Freitas, S.; Gerbig, C.; Longo, K.; Munger, J. W.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of airborne measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol particle number concentration (CN) made during the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA) program. The primary goal of BARCA is to address the question of basin-scale sources and sinks of CO2 and other atmospheric carbon species, a central issue of the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) program. The experiment consisted of two aircraft campaigns during November-December 2008 (BARCA-A) and May 2009 (BARCA-B), which covered the altitude range from the surface up to about 4500 m, and spanned most of the Amazon Basin. Based on meteorological analysis and measurements of the tracer, SF6, we found that airmasses over the Amazon Basin during the late dry season (BARCA-A, November 2008) originated predominantly from the Southern Hemisphere, while during the late wet season (BARCA-B, May 2009) low-level airmasses were dominated by northern-hemispheric inflow, and mid-tropospheric airmasses were of mixed origin. In BARCA-A we found strong influence of biomass burning emissions on the composition of the atmosphere over much of the Amazon Basin, with CO enhancements up to 300 ppb and CN concentrations approaching 10 000 cm-3; the highest values were in the southern part of the Basin at altitudes of 1-3 km. The ΔCN/ΔCO ratios were diagnostic for biomass burning emissions, and were lower in aged than in fresh smoke. Fresh emissions indicated CO/CO2 and CN/CO emission ratios in good agreement with previous work, but our results also highlight the need to consider the residual smoldering combustion that takes place after the active flaming phase of deforestation fires. During the late wet season, in contrast, there was little evidence for a significant presence of biomass smoke. Low CN concentrations (300-500 cm-3) prevailed basinwide, and CO mixing ratios were enhanced by only ~10 ppb above the mixing line between Northern and Southern Hemisphere air. There was no

  12. Carbon monoxide and related trace gases and aerosols over the Amazon Basin during the wet and dry seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Beck, V.; Bela, M.; Freitas, S.; Gerbig, C.; Longo, K.; Munger, J. W.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of airborne measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol particle number concentration (CN) made during the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA) program. The primary goal of BARCA is to address the question of basin-scale sources and sinks of CO2 and other atmospheric carbon species, a central issue of the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) program. The experiment consisted of two aircraft campaigns during November-December 2008 (BARCA-A) and May-June 2009 (BARCA-B), which covered the altitude range from the surface up to about 4500 m, and spanned most of the Amazon Basin. Based on meteorological analysis and measurements of the tracer, SF6, we found that airmasses over the Amazon Basin during the late dry season (BARCA-A, November 2008) originated predominantly from the Southern Hemisphere, while during the late wet season (BARCA-B, May 2009) low-level airmasses were dominated by northern-hemispheric inflow and mid-tropospheric airmasses were of mixed origin. In BARCA-A we found strong influence of biomass burning emissions on the composition of the atmosphere over much of the Amazon Basin, with CO enhancements up to 300 ppb and CN concentrations approaching 10 000 cm-3; the highest values were in the southern part of the Basin at altitudes of 1-3 km. The ΔCN/ΔCO ratios were diagnostic for biomass burning emissions, and were lower in aged than in fresh smoke. Fresh emissions indicated CO/CO2 and CN/CO emission ratios in good agreement with previous work, but our results also highlight the need to consider the residual smoldering combustion that takes place after the active flaming phase of deforestation fires. During the late wet season, in contrast, there was little evidence for a significant presence of biomass smoke. Low CN concentrations (300-500 cm-3) prevailed basinwide, and CO mixing ratios were enhanced by only ~10 ppb above the mixing line between Northern and Southern Hemisphere air. There was no

  13. USE OF MOLECULAR MODELING TO DETERMINE THE INTERACTION AND COMPETITION OF GASES WITHIN COAL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2005-05-27

    We have made progress in carrying out large scale molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMM force field in order to refine our coal/guest interactions. There have been two issues facing us over the last year. First, we have had to create a completely new topology and parameter definition for coal. Since we are using a classical force field, we have adopted the strategy of treating coal composed of individual common fragments based upon a distribution of mass, composition, and bonding. Our procedure is similar to treating a protein as being composed of the discrete set of amino acids. Second, we have had to incorporate the quality CO{sub 2} parameters that we have developed over the last two years. There are the geometric and arithmetic procedures, which we have successfully implemented. We have utilized computational molecular modeling to generate a state-of-the-art large scale structural representation of a bituminous coal of low volatile bituminous rank. This structure(s) has been used to investigate the molecular forces between the bituminous coal structure (or idealized pores) and the molecular species CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. We are close to carrying out molecular dynamics simulations, which will allow us to explore and test the newly created model of coal.

  14. Predicting the Sorption of Aromatic Acids to Noncarbonized and Carbonized Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo; Kah, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Approaches based on the octanol-water partition coefficient are commonly used to describe sorption of neutral organic compounds in environmental systems, but they are not suitable for organic acids, which can dissociate to form anions. We here investigate the applicability of an alternative approach based on the pH-dependent distribution ratio (DOW) to describe sorption of aromatic acids to sorbents representing different degrees of carbonization. Sorption isotherms for four structurally similar acids ((2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D), 4-chloro-2-15 methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)butanoic16 acid (2,4-DB), and 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol (triclosan)) were measured for 15 sorbents: fresh and carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes, and activated carbon. Dissociation greatly affected the sorption of all acids. Sorption coefficients measured in the high pH range indicated that sorption of the anions ranged over several orders of magnitude and should not be neglected. Sorption trends for all sorbates and carbonized sorbents could be very well described by a single regression equation that included DOW of the sorbate and the specific surface area of the sorbent (R(2) > 0.89). PMID:26949216

  15. Carbonic Acid as a Reserve of Carbon Dioxide on Icy Moons: The Formation of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in a Polar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν3 band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO2 band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H2O)-carbon dioxide (CO2) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν3 band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  16. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  17. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Cao, F.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C of particle-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly higher than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors, associated with isotope fractionation during atmospheric oxidation. 13C is consistently more enriched for oxalic acid (C2), glyoxylic acid, pyruvic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal compared to other organic compounds identified, which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during aqueous-phase processing and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after clouds or wet aerosols evaporation δ13C of C2 is positively correlated with C2 and organic carbon ratio, indicating that a photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation process during long-range transport. The 13C results also suggest that aqueous-phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is major formation process of oxalic acid production via the major intermediates glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photo-chemically aged in this region.

  18. PERFORMANCE AND MODELING OF A HOT POTASSIUM CARBONATE ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM IN TREATING COAL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance and modeling of a hot potassium carbonate (K2CO3) acid gas removal system (AGRS) in treating coal gas. Aqueous solutions of K2CO3, with and without amine additive, were used as the acid gas removal solvent in the Coal Gasification/Gas Cleaning...

  19. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  20. Effect of varying the combustion parameters on the emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases from propane-fueled vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberge, B

    2000-05-01

    Propane-fueled forklifts are one source of carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of workplace air. The previous study carried out by the Quebec Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute dealt with worker exposure to CO during forklift use in buildings. It recommends that exhaust gas emissions be kept below a 1 percent concentration. However, this control has not produced a significant reduction in worker exposure to CO, when factors (ventilation, type of work tasks, and management of vehicle fleet) specific to companies are taken into account. Consequently, a reduction in CO emissions below the threshold of 0.3 percent should be considered. The experience acquired with propane-fueled ice resurfacers can be used to determine the effect of combustion parameters on exhaust gas emissions. It is known that a reduction in CO emissions from ice resurfacers resulted in the appearance of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and eventually in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) poisoning. Few publications present NOx results in relation to the CO measured in the exhaust gases of propane-fueled vehicles. The objective of this study is to define the level to which CO emissions can be reduced without increasing NOx concentrations. This real-situation study quantified the CO, NO, and NOx in the exhaust gases of a fleet of propane-fueled forklifts in relation to the mixture ratio. The results show the impact of the motor speed and mixture ratio on the CO, NO, and NO2 concentrations. They confirm an increase in NOx concentrations when CO concentrations are reduced. They also show that proper maintenance of forklifts combined with optimal adjustments can reduce CO and NOx emissions. The study proposes a compromise between CO and NOx emissions by taking into account worker health and safety as well as vehicle performance. Monitoring must be done to control air quality in work areas and worker exposure to CO and NO2. A forklift preventive maintenance program and general building ventilation are the favored

  1. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by acid modified waste activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2009-11-15

    Fresh activated carbon (AC) and waste activated carbon (WAC) were pretreated by heating with mineral acids (sulfuric acid and nitric acid) at high temperature to prepare several grades of adsorbents to evaluate their performance on Cr(VI) removal from aqueous phase. Effects of temperature, agitation speed and pH were tested, and optimum conditions were evaluated. Kinetic study was performed under optimum conditions with several grades of modified adsorbents to know the rates of adsorption. Batch adsorption equilibrium data followed both, Freuindlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of the selected adsorbents treated with sulfuric acid (MWAC 1) and nitric acid (MWAC 2), calculated from Langmuir isotherm are 7.485 and 10.929 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid treated adsorbent (MWAC 2) was used for column study to determine the constants of bed depth service time (BDST) model for adsorption column design. PMID:19553008

  2. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  3. [Some considerations about the use of carbon sources in jasmonic acid production.].

    PubMed

    Almeida González, G; Klibansky Delgado, M; Altuna Seijas, B; Eng Sánchez, F; Legrá Mora, S; Armenteros Galarraga, S

    1999-09-01

    The effect of different carbon sources as sucrose, fructose, glucose and molasses were studied in relation to jasmonic acid production. The best results were obtained with a simple medium made up by final molasses, potassium nitrate and acid potassium phosphate, without the addition of other salts like Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, etc. This alternative guaranteed a 100% increase in jasmonic acid production, compared to pattern medium, since a concentration of 2.08 g/l was obtained. PMID:18473562

  4. Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres and their acid catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Zhang, Yuxiao; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres bearing sulfonic acid groups (MPCS-SO3H) were prepared by incomplete carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by sulfonation and removal of the template. The composition and porous structure of the obtained carbon spheres were investigated by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. The catalytic properties of the MPCS-SO3H were evaluated by esterification of ethanol with acetic acid, indicating that MPCS-SO3H possess remarkable catalytic performance (high stability and acid catalytic ability) for the esterification.

  5. Photochemical functionalization of diamond films using a short carbon chain acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Huang, Nan; Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Diamond is recognized as a promising semiconductor material for biological applications, because of its high chemical stability and biocompatibility. Here, we report an acid with only three carbon chain, acrylic acid (AA), for the functionalization of H-terminated diamond film via photochemical method. The successfully modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle analyzer. Our functionalization approach was proven to be simple and facile, which shows a new potential opportunity for the photochemical modification of diamond surface with short carbon chain acid.

  6. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes. PMID:25485884

  7. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  8. Dissimilation of Carbon Monoxide to Acetic Acid by Glucose-Limited Cultures of Clostridium thermoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Douglas R.; Misra, Arun; Drake, Harold L.

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium thermoaceticum was cultivated in glucose-limited media, and the dissimilation of CO to acetic acid was evaluated. We found that cultures catalyzed the rapid dissimilation of CO to acetic acid and CO2, with the stoichiometry obtained for conversion approximating that predicted from the following reaction: 4CO + 2H2O → CH3CO2H + 2CO2. Growing cultures formed approximately 50 mmol (3 g) of CO-derived acetic acid per liter of culture, with the rate of maximal consumption approximating 9.1 mmol of CO consumed/h per liter of culture. In contrast, resting cells were found not to dissimilate CO to acetic acid. 14CO was incorporated, with equal distribution between the carboxyl and methyl carbons of acetic acid when the initial cultivation gas phase was 100% CO, whereas 14CO2 preferentially entered the carboxyl carbon when the initial gas phase was 100% CO2. Significantly, in the presence of saturating levels of CO, 14CO2 preferentially entered the methyl carbon, whereas saturating levels of CO2 yielded 14CO-derived labeling predominantly in the carboxyl carbon. These findings are discussed in relation to the path of carbon flow to acetic acid. PMID:16346807

  9. Thermal infrared nadir observations of 24 atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, Lieven; R'Honi, Yasmina; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2011-05-01

    Thermal infrared nadir sounders are ideal for observing total columns or vertical profiles of atmospheric gases such as water, carbon dioxide and ozone. High resolution sounders with a spectral resolution below 5 cm-1 can distinguish fine spectral features of trace gases. Forty years after the launch of the first hyperspectral sounder IRIS, we have now several state of the art instruments in orbit, with improved instrumental specifications. In this letter we give an overview of the trace gases which have been observed by infrared nadir sounders, focusing on new observations of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). We present typical observations of 14 rare reactive trace gas species. Several species are reported here for the first time in nadir view, including nitrous acid, furan, acetylene, propylene, acetic acid, formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, observations which were made in a pyrocumulus cloud from the Australian bush fires of February 2009. Being able to observe this large number of reactive trace gases will likely improve our knowledge of source emissions and their impact on the environment and climate.

  10. Solubility of single gases carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of N-methyldiethanolamine in the temperature range 313--413 K at pressures up to 5 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranov, G.; Smirnova, N.A.; Rumpf, B.; Maurer, G.

    1996-06-01

    Experimental results for the solubility of the single gases carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of 2,2{prime}-methyliminodiethanol (N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA)) at temperatures between 313 and 413 K and total pressures up to 5 MPa are reported. A model taking into account chemical reactions as well as physical interactions is used to correlate the new data. The correlation is also used to compare the new experimental data with literature data.

  11. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions. PMID:25827692

  12. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (<15% carbon) was directly condensed with acetyl-CoA for 3-hydroxyvalerate. The ratio of glyoxylate shunt to TCA cycle varies from 0 to 0.25, depending on the intracellular acetyl-CoA level and acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  13. Inhibition Effect of Dodecylamine on Carbon Steel Corrosion in Hydrochloric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenyu; Huang, Ling; Qiu, Yubing; Guo, Xingpeng

    2012-12-01

    Dodecylamine spontaneously adsorbs on carbon steel via its polar group (-NH2) in hydrochloric acid solution. Furthermore, it forms a monolayer film on carbon steel surface. The inhibition mechanism of dodecylamine for carbon steel is geometric blocking effect. The adsorption of dodecylamine on carbon steel surface follows Arrhenius equation. The adsorption slightly increases activated energy, but greatly reduces pre-exponential factor value. Atomic force microscopy force curves indicate that at the area without adsorbed dodecylamine, no obvious adhere force occurs. At the area with adsorbed dodecylamine, however, an average 1.3 nN adhere force is observed.

  14. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  15. Effects of simulated acid precipitation on decomposition and leaching of organic carbon in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Alexander, M.

    1984-09-01

    Soil samples from three watersheds of New York State were treated with simulated rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, and 5.6 daily for 14 d, at 12 3-d intervals in three separate tests, or at 22 7-d intervals. Except for one system of treating the three forest soils, simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic matter leached from samples of soil from which more than 0.05% of the organic carbon was leached during the exposure period. In the soil samples representing the exceptions, acid rain enhanced the leaching of organic matter. Samples from the organic layer of the treated samples of acid soil were taken at two equal depths, and the rates of organic matter decomposition in the two layers were studied. As compared with simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated acid rain reduced the decomposition of organic matter in the three soils at both depths in three of the five tests and at both depths of two of the soils in the fourth test. In some instances, organic matter decomposition was enhanced by the simulated acid rain. Except for the sample of soil at the highest initial pH, carbon mineralization was inhibited in soils and treatments in which simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic carbon leached, and it was stimulated in soils and treatments in which the quantity of organic carbon leached was increased by the simulated acid rain. 12 references, 3 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Assessing the potential of amino acid 13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing the biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on naturally occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions, and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results emphasize that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e., isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterially derived amino acids ranged from 10 to 15 % in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years, and up to 35 % during the last glacial period. The greater bacterial contributions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a

  17. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  18. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  19. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  20. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  1. Preliminary simulations of planned experiments to study the impact of trace gases on the capacity of the Weyburn-Midale field to store carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y

    2009-11-13

    The CO{sub 2} stream injecting into the Weyburn-Midale field can be generally classified as a reducing stream with residual H{sub 2}S and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons. The composition of the CO{sub 2} gas stream from the Dakota Gasification Company is reported to be 95% CO{sub 2}, 4% hydrocarbons, and 1% H{sub 2}S by volume (Huxley 2006). In addition to the H{sub 2}S introduced at the injection wells, significant concentrations of H{sub 2}S are thought to have been produced in-situ by sulfate reducing bacteria from previous water floods for enhanced oil production. Produced gas compositions range in H{sub 2}S concentrations from 1 to 6 volume percent. The produced gas, including the trace impurities, is re-injected into the field. Although there is no evidence for inorganic reduction of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} to H{sub 2}S at the Weyburn-Midale field, Sitchler and Kazuba (2009) suggest that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can be inorganically reduced to elemental sulfur in highly reducing environments based on a natural analog study of the Madison Formation in Wyoming. They propose that elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} dissolve anhydrite to produce the sulfate that is then reduced. Oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams with residual O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} typical of streams captured from oxyfuel and post combustion processes are not presently an issue at the Weyburn-Midale field. However it is possible that the oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams may be injected in the future in carbonate reservoirs similar to the Weyburn-Midale field. To date there are few modeling and experimental studies that have explored the impact of impurity gases in CO{sub 2} streams targeted for geologic storage (Gale 2009). Jacquemet et al (2009) reviewed select geochemical modeling studies that explored the impact of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S impurities in the waste streams (Gunter et al., 2000, Knauss et al., 2005, Xu et al., 2007). These studies collectively show that SO{sub 2} significantly reduces the pH when

  2. Carbon isotope and abundance systematics of Icelandic geothermal gases, fluids and subglacial basalts with implications for mantle plume-related CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Hilton, D. R.; Füri, E.; Halldórsson, S. A.; Grönvold, K.

    2014-06-01

    We report new carbon dioxide (CO2) abundance and isotope data for 71 geothermal gases and fluids from both high-temperature (HT > 150 °C at 1 km depth) and low-temperature (LT < 150 °C at 1 km depth) geothermal systems located within neovolcanic zones and older segments of the Icelandic crust, respectively. These data are supplemented by CO2 data obtained by stepped heating of 47 subglacial basaltic glasses collected from the neovolcanic zones. The sample suite has been characterized previously for He-Ne (geothermal) and He-Ne-Ar (basalt) systematics (Füri et al., 2010), allowing elemental ratios to be calculated for individual samples. Geothermal fluids are characterized by a wide range in carbon isotope ratios (δ13C), from -18.8‰ to +4.6‰ (vs. VPDB), and CO2/3He values that span eight orders of magnitude, from 1 × 104 to 2 × 1012. Extreme geothermal values suggest that original source compositions have been extensively modified by hydrothermal processes such as degassing and/or calcite precipitation. Basaltic glasses are also characterized by a wide range in δ13C values, from -27.2‰ to -3.6‰, whereas CO2/3He values span a narrower range, from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1012. The combination of both low δ13C values and low CO2 contents in basalts indicates that magmas are extensively and variably degassed. Using an equilibrium degassing model, we estimate that pre-eruptive basaltic melts beneath Iceland contain ∼531 ± 64 ppm CO2 with δ13C values of -2.5 ± 1.1‰, in good agreement with estimates from olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Metrich et al., 1991) and depleted MORB mantle (DMM) CO2 source estimates (Marty, 2012). In addition, pre-eruptive CO2 compositions are estimated for individual segments of the Icelandic axial rift zones, and show a marked decrease from north to south (Northern Rift Zone = 550 ± 66 ppm; Eastern Rift Zone = 371 ± 45 ppm; Western Rift Zone = 206 ± 24 ppm). Notably, these results are model dependent, and selection of a lower

  3. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model-observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average +/- standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 +/- 2353 ng m(-3)) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61 %) and industrial (23 %) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  4. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. The model reproduced the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and SD (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755 ± 734 and 732 ± 913 ng m-3 respectively. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70 and 28 % of the average ± SD BC mass concentration (1480 ± 5920 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49 %) and industrial (37 %) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominated. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over the Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30 % of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  5. Sources of Black Carbon Aerosols in South Asia and Surrounding Regions During the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishnamoorthy, K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)) by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. The model reproduced well the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC concentrations observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and standard deviation (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755±734 ng m-3 and 732±913 ng m-3 respectively, where the standard deviation represents the spatial and temporal variability in the region. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70% and 28% of the BC mass concentration in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49%) and industrial (37%) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that long-range transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30% of BC concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  6. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  7. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore » sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  8. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in W. Texas, S.E. New Mexico, and Oklahoma. The evaluation determined how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in the following formations: Ellenburger, Blinebry, San Andres, Clearfork, Canyon Lime, Strawn Lime, Grayburg, Devonian, Drinkard Dolomite, Viola and Chester. Treatment depths vary from 4000 to 22,000 ft. Treatment temperatures vary from 70 to 310 F. Treatments were performed on both oil and gas wells. The age of the wells stimulated varies from new to 30 yr old. The concentration of gelled acid remained constant at 15% HCl. The concentration of gelling agent remained constant at 60 lb/1000 gal. The size of the treatments varied from 5000 to 80,000 gal of gelled acid. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the well treated are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information.

  9. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-06-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%.

  10. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  11. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  12. In vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes, nano-graphite and carbon black, similar impacts of acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Akono, Céline; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-12-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite (NG) are graphene-based nanomaterials which share exceptional physicochemical properties, but whose health impacts are unfortunately still not well understood. On the other hand, carbon black (CB) is a conventional and widely studied material. The comparison of these three carbon-based nanomaterials is thus of great interest to improve our understanding of their toxicity. An acid functionalization was carried out on CNT, NG and CB so that, after a thorough characterization, their impacts on RAW 264.7 macrophages could be compared for a similar surface chemistry (15 to 120 μg·mL(-1) nanomaterials, 90-min to 24-h contact). Functionalized nanomaterials triggered a weak cytotoxicity similar to the pristine nanomaterials. Acid functionalization increased the pro-inflammatory response except for CB which did not trigger any TNF-α production before or after functionalization, and seemed to strongly decrease the oxidative stress. The toxicological impact of acid functionalization appeared thus to follow a similar trend whatever the carbon-based nanomaterial. At equivalent dose expressed in surface and equivalent surface chemistry, the toxicological responses from murine macrophages to NG were higher than for CNT and CB. It seemed to correspond to the hypothesis of a platelet and fiber paradigm. PMID:26381085

  13. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  14. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF-carbon

  15. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  16. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VIII. The Role of Malic Acid

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bassham, James A.; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, Melvin

    1950-01-25

    Malonate has been found to inhibit the formation of malic acid during short periods of photosynthesis with radioactive carbon dioxide. This result, together with studies which show the photosynthetic cycle to be operating normally at the same time, indicates that malic acid is not an intermediate in photosynthesis but is probably closely related to some intermediate of the cycle. Absence of labeled succinic and fumaric acids in these experiments, in addition to the failure of malonate to inhibit photosynthesis, precludes the participation of these acids as intermediates in photosynthesis.

  17. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  18. Assessing the potential of amino acid δ13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles, and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on natural occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions; and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results underscore that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e. isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterial derived amino acids ranged from 10-15% in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years to 35% during the last glacial period. The larger bacterial fractions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a function of sediment age, to

  19. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes. PMID:26588826

  20. SORPTION OF MERCURY SPECIES BY ACTIVATED CARBONS AND CALCIUM-BASES SORBENTS: EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, MERCURY CONCENTRATION AND ACID GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale studies of mercury/sorbent reactions were conducted to understand mechanistic limitations of field-scale attempts to reduce emissions of mercury from combustion processes. The effects of temperature (60 - 140 degrees C), sulfur dioxide (SO2, 1000 ppm ), hydrogen chlor...

  1. Heterogeneous reactions of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on pristine and acidic gas-processed calcium carbonate particles: Effects of relative humidity and surface coverage of coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Xiaoli; Huang, Dao

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric aging appears to alter physical and chemical properties of mineral dust aerosol and thus its role as reactive surface in the troposphere. Yet, previous studies in the atmosphere have mainly focused on the pristine surfaces of mineral dust aerosol, and the reactivity of aged mineral dust toward atmospheric trace gases is poorly recognized. This work presents the first laboratory investigation of heterogeneous reactions of gaseous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important atmospheric oxidant, on the surfaces of HNO3 and SO2-processed calcium carbonate particles as surrogates of atmospheric mineral dust aged by acidic trace gases. It is found that the processing of the calcium carbonate particles with HNO3 and SO2 has a strong impact on their reactivity toward H2O2. On HNO3-processed particles, the presence of nitrate acts to either decrease or increase H2O2 uptake, greatly depending on RH and surface coverage of nitrate. On SO2-processed particles, the presence of surface sulfite appears to enhance the intrinsic reactivity of the mineral particles due to its affinity for H2O2, and the uptake of H2O2 increases significantly relative to the pristine particles, in particular at high RH. The mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions of H2O2 with these processed particles are discussed, as well as their potential implications on tropospheric chemistry. The results of our study suggest that the reactivity of mineral dust aerosol toward H2O2 and maybe other trace gases is markedly dependent on the chemical composition and coverage of the coatings as well as ambient RH, and thus will vary considerably in different polluted air masses.

  2. Formation of Carbonic Acid in Impact of CO2 on Ice and Water.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-08-01

    A new mode of formation is proposed for carbonic acid in the atmosphere. It involves impact of vibrationally excited gas-phase CO2 molecules on water or ice particles. This is a first mechanism that supports formation on ice as well as on liquid water surfaces. Results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are presented on collisions of CO2 with (H2O)n clusters (n = 1, 4, 8, 12). Efficient formation of carbonic acid is seen with product lifetimes exceeding 100 ps. The reaction is feasible even for collision of CO2 with a single water molecule but in a different mechanism than for larger clusters. For clusters, the transition state shows charge separation into H3O(+)···HCO3(-), which transforms into neutral carbonic acid as the product, hydrated by the remaining waters. Possible atmospheric implications of the results are discussed. PMID:27420400

  3. Carbon isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G.; Blair, N.; Des Marais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions have been measured for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from the Murchison meteorite, a C2 carbonaceous chondrite which fell in Australia in 1969. With few exceptions, notably benzene, the volatile products are substantially isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts, signifying their extraterrestrial origin. For both classes of compounds, the ratio of C-13 to C-12 decreases with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic ratio than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with the kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues from lower ones. The results suggest the possibility that the production mechanisms for hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids may be similar, and impose constraints on the identity of the reactant species.

  4. Study of the influence of carbon on the negative lead-acid battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bača, Petr; Micka, Karel; Křivík, Petr; Tonar, Karel; Tošer, Pavel

    Experiments were made with negative lead-acid battery electrodes doped with different concentrations of powdered carbon. It turned out that the rate of formation decreased with the rising concentration of carbon added into the active material. During accelerated cycling in the PSoC regime, the cycle life showed a maximum at a concentration of carbon near 1%, whereas at lower or higher concentrations the cycle life was profoundly lower. A marked increase of the active mass resistance with the cycle number was recorded at carbon concentrations above 2%. Orientation experiments showed that compression of the lead-acid laboratory cells caused an increase of the cycle life of the negative electrode in the studied regime.

  5. One-Pot synthesis of phosphorylated mesoporous carbon heterogeneous catalysts with tailored surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Bauer, Christopher; Wang, Xiqing; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Soft-templated phosphorylated mesoporous carbons with homogeneous distributions of phosphate groups were prepared by a 'one-pot' synthesis method using mixtures of phosphoric acid with hydrochloric, or nitric acids in the presence of Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. Adjusting the various ratios of phosphoric acid used in these mixtures resulted in carbons with distinct adsorption, structural and surface acidity properties. The pore size distributions (PSDs) from nitrogen adsorption at -196 C showed that mesoporous carbons exhibit specific surface areas as high as 551 m{sup 2}/g and mesopores as large as 13 nm. Both structural ordering of the mesopores and the final phosphate contents were strongly dependent on the ratios of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the synthesis gels, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The number of surface acid sites determined from temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) were in the range of 0.3-1.5 mmol/g while the active surface areas are estimated to comprise 5-54% of the total surface areas. Finally, the conversion temperatures for the isopropanol dehydration were lowered by as much as 100 C by transitioning from the least acidic to the most acidic catalysts surface.

  6. Conversion of carbon dioxide to resorcylic acid under ultrasonication by Kolbe-Schmitt reaction.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, B; Palanivelu, K

    2015-11-01

    The present work focuses on a new approach for the synthesis of β-resorcylic acid based on Kolbe-Schmitt reaction using carbon dioxide under ultrasonic and mild condition. The Kolbe-Schmitt reaction is a process for the synthesis of β-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) from resorcinol in aqueous potassium hydroxide solution with gaseous CO2. The influences of carbonation time, flow rate of CO2 and the molar ratio of resorcinol/potassium hydroxide on the yield percentage of resorcylic acid were investigated. The study was assessed with the conventional thermal method (non ultrasonic method) for Kolbe-Schmitt reaction and it was observed that applying ultrasound to save more than 95% and 38.6% energy as shown by energy consumption calculations in bath type and horn type sonicator respectively. β-Resorcylic acid formed was characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The amount of CO2 utilized in the reaction was evaluated from the yield percentage of β-resorcylic acid yield. The maximum yield of resorcylic acid of 30% and 65% was obtained at the resorcinol/potassium hydroxide ratio of 1:3, carbonation time of 150 min and the CO2 flow rate of 2L/min in bath type and horn type ultrasonicator, respectively. The applicability of the research work was examined in two different positional isomers of resorcinol under optimum conditions. PMID:26186845

  7. An Examination of the Carbon Isotope Effects Associated with Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, James H.; O'Brien, Diane M.; Emerson, David; Sun, Henry; McDonald, Gene D.; Salgado, Antonio; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2006-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) were determined for alanine, proline, phenylalanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate (aspartic acid and asparagine), glutamate (glutamic acid and glutamine), lysine, serine, glycine, and threonine from metabolically diverse microorganisms. The microorganisms examined included fermenting bacteria, organotrophic, chemolithotrophic, phototrophic, methylotrophic, methanogenic, acetogenic, acetotrophic, and naturally occurring cryptoendolithic communities from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Here we demonstrated that reactions involved in amino acid biosynthesis can be used to distinguish amino acids formed by life from those formed by nonbiological processes. The unique patterns of δ13C imprinted by life on amino acids produced a biological bias. We also showed that, by applying discriminant function analysis to the δ13C value of a pool of amino acids formed by biological activity, it was possible to identify key aspects of intermediary carbon metabolism in the microbial world. In fact, microorganisms examined in this study could be placed within one of three metabolic groups: (1) heterotrophs that grow by oxidizing compounds containing three or more carbon-to-carbon bonds (fermenters and organotrophs), (2) autotrophs that grow by taking up carbon dioxide (chemolitotrophs and phototrophs), and (3) acetoclastic microbes that grow by assimilation of formaldehyde or acetate (methylotrophs, methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs). Furthermore, we demonstrated that cryptoendolithic communities from Antarctica grouped most closely with the autotrophs, which indicates that the dominant metabolic pathways in these communities are likely those utilized for CO2 fixation. We propose that this technique can be used to determine the dominant metabolic types in a community and reveal the overall flow of carbon in a complex ecosystem.

  8. Dissolution rates of carbonated hydroxyapatite in hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Hankermeyer, Christine R; Ohashi, Kevin L; Delaney, David C; Ross, John; Constantz, Brent R

    2002-02-01

    Osteoclasts have been shown to dissolve efficiently and effectively the mineral phase of bone by locally controlling the environment surrounding the cell. Although this mineral phase has been identified and well characterized as carbonated hydroxyapatite, there is little understanding of the factors that affect the dissolution properties of this mineral phase. Mimicking the mechanism by which osteoclasts dissolve the mineral phase of bone may provide insight into methods for the decalcification of atherosclerotic mineral deposits in the vascular system. Accordingly, a detailed characterization of the effects of various chemical and mechanical parameters on the dissolution of carbonated hydroxyapatite mineral was investigated in this study. Increases in the mineral dissolution rate (2-10 times) were associated with increases in dissolving solution [H+], osmolality, temperature, and flow rate. Mineral dissolution rate increases (5-8 times) were associated with greater surface area of the mineral and mechanical agitation of the dissolving solution. PMID:11771694

  9. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  10. Characterization of the origin of coalbed gases in southeastern Illinois Basin by compound-specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Eble, C.; Schimmelmann, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coalbed gases and waters from exploratory and production gas wells in the southeastern Illinois Basin were sampled to assess geochemically the origin of coalbed gases, with an emphasis on the Springfield and Seelyville Coal Members that are commercially targeted for coalbed methane production in Indiana. On-line analyses of hydrocarbon gases methane to butanes (C1, C2, C3, n-C4, i-C4) and CO2 yielded gas concentrations, plus ??D and ??13C values. The low thermal maturity of Indiana coals with vitrinite reflectance R0 ??? 0.6% is in agreement with an overwhelmingly biogenic isotopic signature of coalbed gases containing ???96% methane generated via bacterial CO2-reduction. In contrast, thermogenic gas was generated in the stratigraphically equivalent coal beds in western Kentucky's Rough Creek Graben zone where higher maturities of up to R0 ??? 0.8% were reached owing to tectonic and hydrothermal activity. No secondary biogenic methane was observed in more mature western Kentucky coal beds where greater burial depth limits the recharge of meteoric water. Biogenic and thermogenic coalbed gases represent two end-members that are compositionally and isotopically distinct. Microbial biodegradation of thermogenic C2+ hydrocarbon gases in Indiana coal beds preferentially targets C3 and introduces isotope fractionation whereby remaining C3 is enriched in deuterium and 13C.

  11. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  12. Recovery of calcium carbonate from steelmaking slag and utilization for acid mine drainage pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Mashego, M; Zvimba, J N

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of steelmaking slag (a waste product of the steelmaking process) to calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) was tested using hydrochloric acid, ammonium hydroxide and carbon dioxide via a pH-swing process. Batch reactors were used to assess the technical feasibility of calcium carbonate recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effects of key process parameters, such as the amount of acid (HCl/calcium molar ratio), the pH and the CO(2) flow rate were considered. It was observed that calcium extraction from steelmaking slag significantly increased with an increase in the amount of hydrochloric acid. The CO(2) flow rate also had a positive effect on the carbonation reaction rate but did not affect the morphology of the calcium carbonate produced for values less than 2 L/min. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with the commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3). PMID:22643421

  13. Carbon isotopic fractionation in the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids. Ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids as a means of determining the intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, K. David; Hayes, J. M.

    1982-02-01

    Methods for the determination of 13C abundances at individual olefinic carbon positions have been developed, tested, and shown to perform accurately. (1) The double bond is oxidized with ozone; (2) silver oxide is used to cleave the resulting ozonide quantitatively to carboxylic-acid fragments; (3) a modified Schmidt decarboxylation is used to produce CO 2 quantitatively from the carboxyl groups of the separated cleavage products; (4) the CO 2 is utilized for mass spectrometric analysis. The results of intramolecular isotopic analyses are combined with molecular-average isotopic compositions determined by total combustion in order to show that fatty acids biosynthesized by Escherichia coli grown aerobically with glucose as the sole carbon source and harvested at late log phase are depleted by approximately 3%. in 13C relative to the glucose. This fractionation arises in the formation of acetylcoenzyme A by pyruvate dehydrogenase and is localized at the carboxyl position in the acetyl-CoA product. The isotopic order in that two-carbon subunit is carried through the biosynthesis of fatty acids so that alternate positions in the fatty-acid chains are depleted in 13C by an amount equal to twice the molecular-average depletion. The kinetic isotope effect at C-2 for pyruvate dehydrogenase in vivo is shown to be approximately 2.3%. While it appears that no other fractionation mechanism has controlled the overall depletion of 13C in these fatty acids, a separate process responsible for control of isotopic abundances in the carboxyl groups has been identified and described elsewhere [Monson K.D. and Hayes J.M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11435-11441]. It is concluded that kinetic, rather than thermodynamic, factors have controlled isotopic distributions in these cells and that kinetic factors will be dominant in most biological reactions.

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Miao, Yun; Ye, Pingping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA-MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species.

  15. Removal of free fatty acid in Palm Fatty Acid Distillate using sulfonated carbon catalyst derived from biomass wastefor biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi; Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the esterification of PFAD using the sulfonatedcoconut shell biochar catalyst was studied. Carbon solid catalysts were prepared by a sulfonation of carbonized coconut shells. The performances of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of the reaction temperatures, the molar ratios of methanol to PFAD, the catalyst loading and the reaction times. The reusability of the solid acid carbon catalysts was also studied in this work. The results indicated that the FFA conversion was significantly increased with increasing catalyst loading and reaction times. It can be concluded that the optimal conditions were an PFAD to methanol molar ratio of 1:12, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60oC.At this optimum condition, the conversion to biodieselreached 88%.

  16. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  17. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  18. Effect of acid rain on calcium carbonate saturation in the Albemarle sound of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, K.A.; Burgess, S.K.; Willey, J.D.; Kieber, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of acidic rainwater additions on calcium carbonate solubility and alkalinity in the poorly buffered, biologically active and commercially important waters of the Albemarle Sound, NC are reported. Samples collected monthly at four sites were analyzed for salinity, pK total alkalinity, and calcium concentrations. Five percent and 10% dilutions of sulfuric acid at pH 4, mimicking acid rain additions, were added and total alkalinity and calcium concentrations again determined. The addition of acid decreased the alkalinity in the Albemarle samples by as much as 15%, although the magnitude of the impact depended both on site and season. The effects of acid additions on dissolved calcium concentrations were more variable,. and also displayed a site and season dependency. Calcium concentrations, alkalinity, and pH values were also determined during controlled laboratory experiments, where 25 mg/L Callinectes sapidus shells were added to Albemarle Sound water. All three analytes increased significantly upon acid additions relative to controls.

  19. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  20. Abating environmentally harmful waste gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, S.; Sichen, Du; Pal, U. B.; Seetharaman, S.

    2002-05-01

    A gas-purification method, based on the condensation of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon-containing environmentally hazardous gases produced from industrial processes, is proposed in this article. The method, which utilizes the cooling capacity of waste nitrogen in the oxygen plant to condense the hazardous gases, is capable of removing hazardous impurities up to 99.98%. Theoretical calculations underlying the condensation process are presented employing gases produced in a blast furnace and coke oven in an integrated steel plant. The cooling power required for the condensation process is calculated using the waste nitrogen generated from an oxygen plant that generates captive oxygen for the steel plant. Design modifications that need to be made to the oxygen plant in order to utilize the cooling power of the waste nitrogen gas are also presented. As a case study, the advantages of the method are illustrated with purification of coke-oven gas. The economic impact and the investment aspects are also discussed.

  1. Hierarchical carbon nanotube assemblies created by sugar-boric or boronic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Tamesue, Shingo; Numata, Munenori; Kaneko, Kenji; James, Tony D; Shinkai, Seiji

    2008-10-01

    We previously found that polysaccharide "schizophyllan (SPG)" can entrap as-grown and cut single-walled carbon nanotubes (as-SWNTs and c-SWNTs, respectively): we here reported that the c-SWNT-s-SPG (single stranded SPG) composites thus obtained can be aligned regularly using the covalent bond formation between boric acid or boronic acid derivatives and the 4,6-dihydroxyl group of the glucose side-chain unit. PMID:18802596

  2. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation. PMID:23121485

  3. Black carbon and its correlation with trace gases at a rural site in Beijing: Top-down constraints from ambient measurements on bottom-up emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, Xuan; Kondo, Yutaka; Kajino, Mizuo; Munger, J. William; Hao, Jiming

    2011-12-01

    The mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) were measured continuously at Miyun, a rural site near Beijing, concurrently with some trace gases (CO, CO2, NOy, SO2) during the nonheating seasons of 2010 (April to October). The average concentration of BC was 2.26 ± 2.33 μg m-3. About 70%-100% of the air masses arriving at the site from June to September were from the source region of Beijing and the North China Plain (NCP), while in the spring, 40% were of continental background origin. BC had moderate to strong positive correlations with CO (R2 = 0.51), NOy (R2 = 0.58), and CO2 (nonsummer, R2 = 0.54), but not with SO2 (R2 < 0.1). The observed ΔBC/ΔCO ratio was 0.0050 ± 0.0001 μg m-3/ppbv for the regional air masses (excluding the influence of biomass burning). This ratio increased by 68% to 0.0084 ± 0.0004 μg m-3/ppbv after excluding the influence of wet deposition. Accounting further for the impact of atmospheric processes on the observation, we derived an average top-down BC/CO emission ratio of 0.0095 ± 0.002 μg m-3/ppbv for the source region of Beijing and NCP that is 18%-21% lower than the average emission ratio from the bottom-up inventory of Zhang et al. (2009), whereas the difference is substantially lower than the uncertainty of emissions for either species. The difference between the mean bottom-up and top-down emission ratios is most likely to be attributed to the residential sector, which needs to have a lower share in the total emissions of BC or a much lower BC/CO emission ratio. The industry and transportation sectors are found to be dominant sources of BC from Beijing and the NCP rather than from the residential sector as suggested by the bottom-up inventory.

  4. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  5. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  6. Predicting sorption of organic acids to a wide range of carbonized sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Many contaminants and infochemicals are organic acids that undergo dissociation under environmental conditions. The sorption of dissociated anions to biochar and other carbonized sorbents is typically lower than that of neutral species. It is driven by complex processes that are not yet fully understood. It is known that predictive approaches developed for neutral compounds are unlikely to be suitable for organic acids, due to the effects of dissociation on sorption. Previous studies on the sorption of organic acids to soils have demonstrated that log Dow, which describes the decrease in hydrophobicity of acids upon dissociation, is a useful alternative to log Kow. The aim of the present study was to adapt a log Dow based approach to describe the sorption of organic acids to carbonized sorbents. Batch experiments were performed with a series of 9 sorbents (i.e., carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, and sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon), and four acids commonly used for pesticidal and biocidal purposes (i.e., 2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB, and triclosan). Sorbents were comprehensively characterized, including by N2 and CO2 physisorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The wide range of sorbents considered allows (i) discussing the mechanisms driving the sorption of neutral and anionic species to biochar, and (ii) their dependency on sorbate and sorbent properties. Results showed that the sorption of the four acids was influenced by factors that are usually not considered for neutral compounds (i.e., pH, ionic strength). Dissociation affected the sorption of the four compounds, and sorption of the anions ranged over five orders of magnitude, thus substantially contributing to sorption in some cases. For prediction purposes, most of the variation in sorption to carbonized sorbents (89%) could be well described with a two-parameter regression equation including log Dow and sorbent specific surface area. The proposed model

  7. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic evidence for the origin of combustible gases in water-supply wells in north-central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, K. M.; Breen, K.J.; Baldassare, A.J.; Burruss, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the combustible gases in groundwater from glacial-outwash and fractured-bedrock aquifers was investigated in northern Tioga County, Pennsylvania. Thermogenic methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) and microbial CH4 were found. Microbial CH4 is from natural in situ processes in the shale bedrock and occurs chiefly in the bedrock aquifer. The δ13C values of CH4 and C2H6 for the majority of thermogenic gases from water wells either matched or were between values for the samples of non-native storage-field gas from injection wells and the samples of gas from storage-field observation wells. Traces of C2H6 with microbial CH4 and a range of C and H isotopic compositions of CH4 indicate gases of different origins are mixing in sub-surface pathways; gas mixtures are present in groundwater. Pathways for gas migration and a specific source of the gases were not identified. Processes responsible for the presence of microbial gases in groundwater could be elucidated with further geochemical study.

  8. Generation of aliphatic acid anions and carbon dioxide by hydrous pyrolysis of crude oils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Lundegard, P.D.; Ambats, G.; Evans, William C.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Two crude oils with relatively high (0.60 wt%) and low (0.18 wt%) oxygen contents were heated in the presence of water in gold-plated reactors at 300??C for 2348 h. The high-oxygen oil was also heated at 200??C for 5711 h. The compositions of aqueous organic acid anions of the oils and of the headspace gases were monitored inn order to investigate the distribution of organic acids that can be generated from liquid petroleum. The oil with higher oxygen content generated about five times as much organic anions as the other oil. The dominant organic anions produced were acetate, propionate and butyrate. Small amounts of formate, succinate, methyl succinate and oxalate were also produced. The dominant oxygen-containing product was CO2, as has been observed in similar studies on the hydrous pyrolysis of kerogen. These results indicate that a significant portion (10-30%) of organic acid anions reported i be generated by thermal alteration of oils in reservoir rocks. The bulk of organic acid anions present in formation waters, however, is most likely generated by thermal alteration of kerogen in source rocks. Kerogen is more abundant than oil in sedimentary basins and the relative yields of organic acid anions reported from the hydrous pyrolysis of kerogen are much higher than the yields obtained for the two oils. ?? 1993.

  9. Carbon dioxide and organic acids: origin and role in burial diagenesis (Texas Gulf Coast Tertiary)

    SciTech Connect

    Lundegard, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon dioxide produced by decarboxylation of organic matter is not a dominant factor in secondary porosity development. Material balance calculations indicate the amount of feldspar and carbonate dissolution that has taken place in Tertiary sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast far exceeds that which is explainable by decarboxylation. Other potential sources of acid for dissolution reactions include reverse weathering reactions in shales, an hydrous pyrolysis reactions between organic carbon and oxygen in H/sub 2/O to yield CO/sub 2/ or organic acids. Considerations of CO/sub 2/ solubility and the temperature distribution of organic acids imply that these species must be generated locally to cause significant dissolution. The CO/sub 2/ content of gas from Gulf Coast Tertiary sandstones is proportional to reservoir age, and increases with depth and temperature at a rate that is approximately exponential. In the Wilcox Formation the increase in CO/sub 2/ content continues beyond depths where dissolved organic acids are abundant and where kerogen has lost its oxygen from functional groups that are readily liberated as CO/sub 2/. In this formation the /sup 13/C of CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ are proportional to temperature and to each other. Either mixing with fluids derived from the Mesozoic carbonate section of deep CO/sub 2/ generation by kinetically controlled organic reactions may explain these data. Organic acid concentration with depth and temperature indicates a non-biological origin by thermal cracking of kerogen during burial. Continued burial leads to their thermal decomposition. Cessation of burial may lead to meteoric water invasion and organic acid destruction by biological processes. The effect of time on organic acid production is minor compared to temperature.

  10. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  11. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  12. Modeling and optimizing the design of matrix treatments in carbonate reservoirs with self-diverting acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakova, G. T.; Kharisov, R. Ya; Sharifullin, A. R.; Pestrikov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Application of a self-diverting-acid based on viscoelastic surfactant (SDVA) is a promising technology for improving the efficacy of acid treatment in oil and gas-bearing carbonate reservoirs. In this study, we present a mathematical model for assessing SDVA flow and reaction with carbonate rock using the SDVA rheological characteristics. The model calculates the technological parameters for acidizing operations and the prediction of well productivity after acid treatment, in addition to technical and economic optimization of the acidizing process by modeling different acid treatment options with varying volumes, injection rates, process fluids stages and initial economic scenarios.

  13. Synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon fiber for improved electro-activated polymeric shape-memory nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Min Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery.

  14. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Terrestrial Carbonate Species using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure Impacting Mars Carbonate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five OC meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were selected for analysis based upon their size and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This study has two main tasks: 1) characterize the isotopic composition of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals formed on meteorites in Antarctica, and 2) study the mechanisms of carbonate formation in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each ~0.5g, was crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) Rx0 for 1 hour at 30°C, b) Rx1 for 18 hours at 30°C, and c) Rx2 for 3 hours at 150°C. CO2 was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6' 2mm stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected uncertainties. Two distinct species of carbonates are found based on the stepped extraction technique: 1) Ca-rich carbonate released at low temperatures, and 2) Mg, or Fe-rich carbonate released at high temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that most of the carbonates present in the ordinary chondrites analyzed have δ13C=+5‰, which is consistent with formation from atmospheric CO2 δ13C=-7‰ at -20°C. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates vary between +4‰ and +34‰ with the Mg-rich and/or Fe-rich carbonates possessing the lowest δ18O values. This suggests that the carbonates formed under a wide range of temperatures. However, the carbonate oxygen

  15. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  16. EFFECT OF ACID TREATMENT ON DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON RETENTION BY A SPODIC HORIZON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Processes involving the movement of organic substances in forest soils are not well understood. This study was conducted to examine the role of acidic inputs on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mobility, processes affecting the retention of DOV by a B horizon, and SO2-4 adsorption....

  17. Polymerization of euphorbia oil with Lewis acid in carbon dioxide media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3-OEt2) Lewis acid catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of euphorbia oil (EO), a natural epoxy oil, in liquid carbon dioxide was conducted in an effort to develop useful vegetable oil based polymers. The resulting polymers (RPEO) were characterized by FTIR, 1H-...

  18. FATTY ACID STABLE ISOTOPE INDICATORS OF MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in tropical ecosystem functioning because of its importance in the soil organic matter (SOM) cycle. We have measured the stable carbon isotopic ratio (delta13C) of individual phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in a variety of tr...

  19. Numbers of bacteria recovered from broiler carcasses and chiller water treated with hypochlorous and carbonic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of treating poultry chiller water with a mixture of hypochlorous and carbonic acids. Broiler carcasses and chiller water were obtained from a commercial processing facility which had recently installed a TOMCO Pathogen Management SystemJ to recycle wat...

  20. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2005-12-01

    Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. Through laboratory and modeling efforts, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. Our modeling efforts in the first year show that the idea is feasible, but requires more sophisticated analysis of fluid flow at high pressure in deep sea sediments. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. Our experimental results from the first year of work have shown that the kinetics are likely to be fast enough to create dissolution which will affect permeability. However, additional experiments are needed at high pressures, which will be a focus for years 2 and 3. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. Finally, we are in the beginning stages of an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the

  1. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  2. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Estevez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0 MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.

  3. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Estevez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0more » MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.« less

  4. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  5. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  6. Dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alkanol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for dispersing the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various alcohols was described. The obtained suspensions were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The solubility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohols was found to depend on the concentration of cholic acid. The ethanol-surfactant mixture was shown to be the best solvent for all alkanol-cholic acid mixtures (0.018 mol/kg) under study used for preparing time-stable suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The dissolving ability of aliphatic alcohols was found to decrease in the series: ethanol-isopropanol- tert-butanol-butanol-propanol.

  7. Preparation of activated carbon using low temperature carbonisation and physical activation of high ash raw bagasse for acid dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Cheung, W H; McKay, G

    2004-08-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from bagasse through a low temperature (160 degrees C) chemical carbonisation treatment and gasification with carbon dioxide at 900 degrees C. The merit of low temperature chemical carbonisation in preparing chars for activation was assessed by comparing the physical and chemical properties of activated carbons developed by this technique to conventional methods involving the use of thermal and vacuum pyrolysis of bagasse. In addition, the adsorption properties (acid blue dye) of these bagasse activated carbons were also compared with a commercial activated carbon. The results suggest that despite the high ash content of the precursor, high surface areas (614-1433 m2 g(-1)) and microporous (median pore size from 0.45 to 1.2 nm) activated carbons can be generated through chemical carbonisation and gasification. The micropore area of the activated carbon developed from chars prepared by the low temperature chemical carbonisation provides favourable adsorption sites to acid blue dye (391 mg g(-1) of carbon). The alkalinity of the carbon surface and total surface area were shown to have complementary effects in promoting the adsorption of acid blue dye. Adsorption of the anionic coloured component of the acid dye was shown to be promoted in carbon exhibiting alkaline or positively charged surfaces. This study demonstrates that activated carbons with high acid dye adsorption capacities can be prepared from high ash bagasse based on low temperature chemical carbonisation and gasification. PMID:15212915

  8. Enhancing adsorption efficiency of dichloroacetic acid onto mesoporous carbons: Procedure optimization, mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Ji, Dongliang; Cao, Yang; Ling, Xiaojia; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-15

    Highly ordered mesoporous carbon may be directly synthesized via supramolecular self-assembly with in situ evaporation-induced crystallization process by controlling thermal reaction temperatures and carbon mass loading. In the present study, the effects of thermal reaction temperatures on the structural characterization and adsorption capacity of mesoporous carbon have been investigated and analyzed with orthogonal test experiments. The results show the carbonization temperature (R=32.1) plays a more important role than the self-assembly temperature (R=8.5) and thermal polymerization temperature (R=10.1) in manipulating the pore texture structures. The optimization grouping temperature was 40-110-500 °C. The optimum mesoporous carbon sample had the highest BET specific surface area (474 m(2)/g), the largest pore volume (0.46 cm(3)/g), and with reasonable uniform pore size distribution. The adsorption evaluation also shows the adsorption capacity is strongly correlated with the pore structure of mesoporous carbon, the optimized mesoporous carbon sample displayed the largest adsorption capacity (350 mg/g) at an initial concentration of 20.0 mg/L of dichloroacetic acid. The study results indicate optimization of thermal reaction parameters is an effective approach for synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbons. PMID:25935284

  9. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids. PMID:26851898

  10. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  11. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Binbin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-01

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl2 using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl2 at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of -SO3H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of -SO3H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of -SO3H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and -SO3H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles.

  12. [Studies on carbonization of saccharides by using aqueous solution of various acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; He, An-Qi; Kang, Ting-Guo; Xia, Jin-Ming; Weng, Shi-Fu; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2014-09-01

    The authors tried to establish an approach to use acids to convert biomass into a fuel with higher carbon content and lower oxygen content in a zero-energy-consumption fashion. Considering that biomass is composed of monosaccharide, we used aqueous solutions of variation acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and perchloric acid to treat 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose at ambient temperature and pressure. Black substances were produced after a period of time when 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose were mixed with aqueous solutions containing 8 mol · L(-1) acids. The black substance was collected and characterized by using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Elemental analysis results indicate that the contents of carbon increases significantly in the black substances in comparison with 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. Moreover, XPS results indicate that the content of oxygen in the black substance undergoes a significant decrease compared with pure 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. In the XPS spectra, the is peaks of 2-deoxy-ribose, strong sub peak at 286. 05 eV, which is assigned to carbon linked to oxygen directly, dominate in the C is peak envelop. After treatment by HClO4, the peak decreased dramatically. This result also supports the conclusion that the content of oxygen in mono-saccharide is significantly reduced after treatment by acids. In the FTIR spectra of the black substances, strong peaks can be observed around 1 600 cm(-1), indicating that C==C bond is formed in the product. The above results suggest that treatments with acids may be developed as a new zero-energy-consumption approach to convert biomass in a new fuel with improved energy output efficiency. PMID:25532323

  13. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  14. Carbonate precipitation under bulk acidic conditions as a potential biosignature for searching life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Preston, Louisa J.; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Huang, L.; Southam, Gordon; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta; Gómez-Ortíz, David; Prieto Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Darby Dyar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of carbonate minerals in ancient Martian rocks have been interpreted as evidence for the former presence of circumneutral solutions optimal for carbonate precipitation. Sampling from surface and subsurface regions of the low-pH system of Río Tinto has shown, unexpectedly, that carbonates can form under diverse macroscopic physicochemical conditions ranging from very low to neutral pH (1.5-7.0). A multi-technique approach demonstrates that carbonate minerals are closely associated with microbial activity. Carbonates occur in the form of micron-size carbonate precipitates under bacterial biofilms, mineralization of subsurface colonies, and possible biogenic microstructures including globules, platelets and dumbbell morphologies. We propose that carbonate precipitation in the low-pH environment of Río Tinto is a process enabled by microbially-mediated neutralization driven by the reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of biomolecules in microbially-maintained circumneutral oases, where the local pH (at the scale of cells or cell colonies) can be much different than in the macroscopic environment. Acidic conditions were likely predominant in vast regions of Mars over the last four billion years of planetary evolution. Ancient Martian microbial life inhabiting low-pH environments could have precipitated carbonates similar to those observed at Río Tinto. Preservation of carbonates at Río Tinto over geologically significant timescales suggests that similarly-formed carbonate minerals could also be preserved on Mars. Such carbonates could soon be observed by the Mars Science Laboratory, and by future missions to the red planet.

  15. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, Marat O; Chaschin, Ivan S; Khokhlova, Marina A; Grigorev, Timofey E; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Lyutova, Irina G; Kondratenko, Janna E; Badun, Gennadii A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H2O and CO2. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16-33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. PMID:24582232

  16. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  17. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  18. Maintenance carbon cycle in crassulacean Acid metabolism plant leaves : source and compartmentation of carbon for nocturnal malate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, W H; Severson, R F; Black, C C

    1985-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between diurnal changes in organic acid and storage carbohydrate was examined in the leaves of three Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. It was found that depletion of leaf hexoses at night was sufficient to account quantitatively for increase in malate in Ananas comosus but not in Sedum telephium or Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Fructose and to a lesser extent glucose underwent the largest changes. Glucose levels in S. telephium leaves oscillated diurnally but were not reciprocally related to malate fluctuations.Analysis of isolated protoplasts and vacuoles from leaves of A. comosus and S. telephium revealed that vacuoles contain a large percentage (>50%) of the protoplast glucose, fructose and malate, citrate, isocitrate, ascorbate and succinate. Sucrose, a major constituent of intact leaves, was not detectable or was at extremely low levels in protoplasts and vacuoles from both plants.In isolated vacuoles from both A. comosus and S. telephium, hexose levels decreased at night at the same time malate increased. Only in A. comosus, however, could hexose metabolism account for a significant amount of the nocturnal increase in malate. We conclude that, in A. comosus, soluble sugars are part of the daily maintenance carbon cycle and that the vacuole plays a dynamic role in the diurnal carbon assimilation cycle of this Crassulacean acid metabolism plant. PMID:16664005

  19. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  20. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology.

  1. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2−0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  2. Aqueous solutions of acidic ionic liquids for enhanced stability of polyoxometalate-carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chenchen; Zhao, Enbo; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyoxometalates (POMs) nanoconfined in microporous carbons have been synthesized and used as electrodes for supercapacitors. The addition of the pseudocapacitance from highly reversible redox reaction of POMs to the electric double-layer capacitance of carbon lead to an increase in specific capacitance of ∼90% at 1 mV s-1. However, high solubility of POM in traditional aqueous electrolytes leads to rapid capacity fading. Here we demonstrate that the use of aqueous solutions of protic ionic liquids (P-IL) as electrolyte instead of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions offers an opportunity to significantly improve POM cycling stability. Virtually no degradation in capacitance was observed in POM-based positive electrode after 10,000 cycles in an asymmetric capacitor with P-IL aqueous electrolyte. As such, POM-based carbon composites may now present a viable solution for enhancing energy density of electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC) based on pure carbon electrodes.

  3. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2006-07-14

    Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. The results of our modeling efforts were published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. We are expanding on that work through a variety of laboratory and modeling efforts. In the laboratories at Columbia and at Harvard, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. We are currently preparing the results of these findings for publication. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. This is done by injecting liquid CO{sub 2} into various types of porous media, and then monitoring the changes in permeability. Finally, we are performing an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States. We present some

  4. The effect of heating temperature and nitric acid treatments on the performance of Cu- and Zn-based broad spectrum respirator carbons.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W H; Romero, J V; Dahn, T R; Dunphy, K; Sullivan, B; Mallay, M; Croll, L M; Reynolds, J H; Andress, C; Dahn, J R

    2011-12-01

    Impregnated activated carbons (IACs) that are used in broad spectrum gas mask applications have historically contained copper and/or zinc impregnants. The addition of an oxidizing agent, such as nitric acid (HNO(3)) can be useful in distributing the metallic impregnants uniformly on the activated carbon substrate. In this work, we study IACs prepared from copper nitrate (Cu(NO(3))(2)) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO(3))(2)) precursors as a function of HNO(3) content present in the impregnating solution and as a function of heating temperature. The gas adsorption capacity of the IACs was determined by dynamic flow testing using sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), ammonia (NH(3)), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and cyclohexane (C(6)H(12)) challenge gases under dry and humid conditions. The thermal decomposition and distribution of the impregnant on the activated carbon substrate is studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis techniques. Relationships between gas adsorption capacity, impregnant distribution and the species of surface impregnants are discussed. PMID:21911221

  5. Analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition of formic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xinqing; Zhang, Like; Huang, Daikuan; An, Ning; Yang, Fang; Jiang, Wei; Fang, Bin

    2013-05-15

    Formic and acetic acids are ubiquitous in the environment and in many biological processes. Analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of formic and acetic acids is important to understanding their biogeochemical cycles. However, it has been faced with poor accuracy and high detection limits due to their low carbon number, high hydrophilicity, and semi-volatility. Here we developed an analytical technique by needle trap and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). The organic acids in aqueous solution were extracted using a NeedlEx needle through purge-and-trap and were analyzed by GC-IRMS for δ(13)C. The procedures incur no isotope fractionation. Defined as the point at which the mean δ(13)C is statistically the same as the given value and the analytical error starts rising, the method's detection limits are 200 and 100 mg/L for formic and acetic acids, respectively, with an uncertainty of approximately 0.5‰ in direct extraction and analysis. They were lowered to 1 mg/L with precision of 0.9‰ after samples were subjected to preconcentration. The method was successfully applied to natural samples as diverse as precipitation, vinegars, ant plasma, and vehicle exhaust, which vary considerably in concentration and matrix of the organic acids. It is applicable to the organic acids in not only aqueous solution but also gaseous phase. PMID:23395975

  6. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively. PMID:19459394

  7. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  8. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  9. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

  10. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces.more » The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.« less

  11. Large discharge capacity from carbon electrodes in sulfuric acid with oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, M.; Iwashita, N.

    The discharge performance of the graphite intercalation compounds in sulfuric acid containing nitric acid (H 2SO 4-GICs) was studied by focusing on the effects of oxidant and carbon nanotexture. A large discharge capacity from H 2SO 4-GICs synthesized by using an excess amount of HNO 3, more than 150 times of the theoretical value (93 mAh/g carbon), was obtained depending on the amount of oxidant added, the discharge current, and the nanotexture of carbon electrode. The experimental results are explained in terms of competition between the de-intercalation of sulfuric acid due to galvanostatic reduction and the re-intercalation due to chemical oxidation by HN03 during discharging. However, a subsidiary reaction decreases the effective amount of HNO 3 on the discharge by a small current and also on the cycle of chemical charging and electrochemical discharging. The oxidant KMnO 4 gave only a little larger capacity for discharge than the theoretical one, because it was reduced to the manganese oxide precipitates during the oxidation of the carbon electrode.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of polylactic acid and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofibers through centrifugal spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patlan, Richard

    Biocompatible polymer nanofibers hold great potential in the biomedical engineering field. Their biodegradable nature and enhanced properties could help solve a wide array of health related problems, particularly in the areas of tissue regeneration, drug delivery, and biosensor design. The novel Forcespinning™ method allows the production of submicron fibers without many of the drawbacks found in electrospinning, while also providing a substantial increase in fiber production. The aim of the study was to utilize this method to fabricate non-woven nanofibrous mats composed of polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite fibers. The morphology, thermal properties, and crystalline structure of the resulting nanofibers were then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).

  13. Evaluation of the Giggenbach bottle method using artificial fumarolic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruption is one of the most dangerous natural disasters. Mt. Baekdu, located on the border between North Korea and China, has been recently showing multiple signs of its eruption. The magmatic activity of a volcano strongly affects the composition of volcanic gases, which can provide a useful tool for predicting the eruption. Among various volcanic gas monitoring methods, the Giggenbach bottle method involves the on-site sampling of volcanic gases and the subsequent laboratory analysis, thus making it possible to detect a range of volcanic gases at low levels. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of the Giggenbach bottle method and develop the associated analytical tools using artificial fumarolic gases with known compositions. The artificial fumarolic gases are generated by mixing CO2, CO, H2S, SO2, Ar, and H2 gas streams with a N2 stream sparged through an acidic medium containing HCl and HF. The target compositions of the fumarolic gases are selected to cover those reported for various volcanoes under different tectonic environments as follows: CO2 (2-12 mol %), CO (0.3-1 mol %), H2S (0.7-2 mol %), SO2 (0.6-4 mol %), Ar (0.3-0.7 mol %), H2 (0.3-0.7 mol %), HCl (0.2-1 mol %), and HF (< 0.015 mol %). The artificial fumarolic gases are collected into an evacuated bottle partially filled with 4 M NaOH solution containing 0.5 mM Cd(CH3COO)2. While non-condensable components such as CO, Ar, H2, and N2 accumulate in the headspace of the bottle, acidic components including CO2, SO2, HCl, and HF dissolve into the alkaline solution. In case of H2S, it reacts with dissolved Cd2+ to precipitate as CdS(s). The gas accumulated in the headspace can be analyzed for CO, Ar, H2, and N2 on a gas chromatography. The alkaline solution is first separated from yellowish CdS precipitates by filtration, and then pretreated with hydrogen peroxide to oxidize dissolved SO2 (H2SO3) to SO42-. The resultant solution can be analyzed for SO2 as SO42-, HCl as Cl-, and HF

  14. Trehalose 6-phosphate coordinates organic and amino acid metabolism with carbon availability.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Carlos M; Feil, Regina; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kölling, Katharina; Krause, Ursula; Höhne, Melanie; Encke, Beatrice; Plaxton, William C; Zeeman, Samuel C; Li, Zhi; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hoefgen, Rainer; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) is an essential signal metabolite in plants, linking growth and development to carbon metabolism. The sucrose-Tre6P nexus model postulates that Tre6P acts as both a signal and negative feedback regulator of sucrose levels. To test this model, short-term metabolic responses to induced increases in Tre6P levels were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing the Escherichia coli Tre6P synthase gene (otsA) under the control of an ethanol-inducible promoter. Increased Tre6P levels led to a transient decrease in sucrose content, post-translational activation of nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and increased levels of organic and amino acids. Radio-isotope ((14)CO2) and stable isotope ((13)CO2) labelling experiments showed no change in the rates of photoassimilate export in plants with elevated Tre6P, but increased labelling of organic acids. We conclude that high Tre6P levels decrease sucrose levels by stimulating nitrate assimilation and anaplerotic synthesis of organic acids, thereby diverting photoassimilates away from sucrose to generate carbon skeletons and fixed nitrogen for amino acid synthesis. These results are consistent with the sucrose-Tre6P nexus model, and implicate Tre6P in coordinating carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. PMID:26714615

  15. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted. PMID:25847173

  16. Discrete carbon nanotubes increase lead acid battery charge acceptance and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swogger, Steven W.; Everill, Paul; Dubey, D. P.; Sugumaran, Nanjan

    2014-09-01

    Performance demands placed upon lead acid batteries have outgrown the technology's ability to deliver. These demands, typically leading to Negative Active Material (NAM) failure, include: short, high-current surges; prolonged, minimal, overvoltage charging; repeated, Ah deficit charging; and frequent deep discharges. Research shows these failure mechanisms are attenuated by inclusion of carbon allotropes into the NAM. Addition of significant quantities of carbon, however, produces detrimental changes in paste rheology, leading to lowered industrial throughput. Additionally, capacity, cold-cranking performance, and other battery metrics are negatively affected at high carbon loads. Presented here is Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative, a new battery additive comprising discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT) which uniformly disperse within battery pastes during mixing. NS40ZL batteries containing dCNT show enhanced charge acceptance, reserve capacity, and cold-cranking performance, decreased risk of polarization, and no detrimental changes to paste properties, when compared to dCNT-free controls. This work focuses on the dCNT as NAM additives only, but early-stage research is underway to test their functionality as a PAM additive. Batteries infused with Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative address the needs of modern lead acid battery applications, produce none of the detrimental side effects associated with carbon additives, and require no change to existing production lines.

  17. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Seiya; Kodama, Hiroki; Aramaki, Takafumi; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    This study reports carbon isotopic ratios (Δ(14)C and δ(13)C) of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system, northern Japan. These acids have a refractory feature and they represent the largest fraction of dissolved organic matter in aquatic environments. The acids were isolated using the XAD extraction method from river water samples collected at three sites (on the upper and lower Tokachi River, and from one of its tributaries) in June 2004 and 2005. δ(13)C values were -27.8 to -26.9 ‰ for humic and fulvic acids. On the other hand, the Δ(14)C values ranged from -247 to +26 ‰ and the average values were -170 ± 79 ‰ for humic acid and -44 ± 73 ‰ for fulvic acid. The difference was attributed to the residence time of fulvic acid in the watershed being shorter than that of humic acid. The large variation suggested that humic substances have a different pathway in each watershed environment. PMID:21515623

  18. Merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis: activation of carbon-carbon triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruiwen; Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Wangsheng; Xu, Dawen; Li, Yawei; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate that merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis provides a fundamentally new activation mode of C-C triple bonds, to achieve the bond-forming reaction of alkynes with weak nucleophiles. Using a synergistic merger of Eosin Y and Cu(OTf)2, a highly efficient cyclization reaction of arene-ynes was developed. PMID:27432542

  19. Colloidal methods for the fabrication of carbon nanotube-manganese dioxide and carbon nanotube-polypyrrole composites using bile acids.

    PubMed

    Ata, M S; Zhitomirsky, I

    2015-09-15

    Nature inspired strategies have been developed for the colloidal processing of advanced composites for supercapacitor applications. New approach was based on the use of commercially available bile acid salts, such as sodium cholate (ChNa) and taurocholic acid sodium salt (TChNa). It was demonstrated that cholic acid (ChH) films can be obtained by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) from ChNa solutions. The analysis of deposition yield, quartz crystal microbalance and cyclic voltammetry data provided an insight into the anodic deposition mechanism. The outstanding suspension stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), achieved using bile acids as anionic dispersants, allowed the fabrication of MWCNT films by EPD. The use of ChNa for EPD offered advantages of binding and film forming properties of this material. Composite MnO2-MWCNT films, prepared using ChNa as a dispersant and film forming agent for EPD, showed promising capacitive behavior. In another colloidal strategy, TChNa was used as a dispersant for MWCNT for the fabrication of polypyrrole (PPy) coated MWCNT. The use of PPy coated MWCNT allowed the fabrication of electrodes with high active mass loading, high capacitance and excellent capacitance retention at high charge-discharge rates. PMID:26001135

  20. Effect of magnesium carbonate on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid powder as an alkalising solubilizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Li, Dong Xun; Woo, Jong Soo; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the possibility of developing a novel oral pharmaceutical product using fenofibric acid instead of choline fenofibrate, the powder properties, solubility, dissolution and pharmacokinetics in rats of fenofibrate, choline fenofibrate and fenofibric acid were compared. Furthermore, the effect of magnesium carbonate, an alkalising agent on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid was assessed, a mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate being prepared by simple blending at a weight ratio of 2/1. The three fenofibrate derivatives showed different particle sizes and melting points with similar crystalline shape. Fenofibric acid had a significantly higher aqueous solubility and dissolution than fenofibrate, but significantly lower solubility and dissolution than choline fenofibrate. However, the fenofibric acid/magnesium carbonate mixture greatly improved the solubility and dissolution of fenofibric acid with an enhancement to levels similar with those for choline fenofibrate. Fenofibric acid gave lower plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values compared to choline fenofibrate in rats. However, the mixture resulted in plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values levels not significantly different from those for choline fenofibrate. Specifically, magnesium carbonate increased the aqueous solubility, dissolution and bioavailability of fenofibric acid by about 7.5-, 4- and 1.6-fold, respectively. Thus, the mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate at the weight ratio of 2/1 might be a candidate for an oral pharmaceutical product with improved oral bioavailability. PMID:26992922

  1. Selective Acidic Leaching of Spent Zinc-Carbon Batteries Followed by Zinc Electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchian, Hossein; Rafsanjani-Abbasi, Ali; Vahdati-Khaki, Jalil; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a selective acidic leaching procedure was employed for recycling zinc from spent zinc-carbon batteries. Leaching experiments were carried out in order to maximize zinc recovery and minimize manganese recovery in diluted sulfuric acid media. Response surface methodology and analysis of variance were employed for experimental design, data analysis, and leaching optimization. The experimental design has 28 experiments that include 24 main runs and four replicate in center point. The optimal conditions obtained from the selective acidic leaching experiments, were sulfuric acid concentration of 1 pct v/v, leaching temperature of 343 K (70 °C), pulp density of 8 pct w/v, and stirring speed of 300 rpm. The results show that the zinc and manganese recoveries after staged selective leaching are about 92 and 15 pct, respectively. Finally, metallic zinc with purity of 99.9 pct and electrolytic manganese dioxide were obtained by electrowinning.

  2. Covalently linked deoxyribonucleic acid with multi-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Yi, Changqing; Chi-Hung, Tzang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Yang, Mengsu

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, a multi-step protocol for covalently linking functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) oligonucleotides is provided. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to characterize the initially formed amine-terminated MWCNTs, to which DNA is covalently anchored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation of the DNA-MWCNT conjugates reveals that the chemical functionalization occurs at both the ends and sidewalls of the nanotubes. The described methodology represents an important step toward the realization of DNA-guided self-assembly for carbon nanotubes. PMID:20422378

  3. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of carbon nitride dots from folic acid for cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Weiwei; Gu, Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Chenyang; Su, Su; Xu, Pinxiang; Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A green, one-step microwave-assisted polyol synthesis was employed to prepare blue luminescent carbon nitride dots (CNDs) using folic acid molecules as both carbon and nitrogen sources. The as-prepared CNDs had an average size of around 4.51 nm and could be well dispersed in water. Under excitation at 360 nm, the CNDs exhibited a strong blue luminescence and the quantum yield was estimated to be 18.9%, which is greater than that of other reported CNDs. Moreover, the CNDs showed low cytotoxicity and could efficiently label C6 glioma cells, demonstrating their potential in cell imaging. PMID:25382977

  4. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of carbon nitride dots from folic acid for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weiwei; Gu, Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Chenyang; Su, Su; Xu, Pinxiang; Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A green, one-step microwave-assisted polyol synthesis was employed to prepare blue luminescent carbon nitride dots (CNDs) using folic acid molecules as both carbon and nitrogen sources. The as-prepared CNDs had an average size of around 4.51 nm and could be well dispersed in water. Under excitation at 360 nm, the CNDs exhibited a strong blue luminescence and the quantum yield was estimated to be 18.9%, which is greater than that of other reported CNDs. Moreover, the CNDs showed low cytotoxicity and could efficiently label C6 glioma cells, demonstrating their potential in cell imaging. PMID:25382977

  5. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  6. Carbon disulfide-formic acid: an efficient desorbant for industrial solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Raulinaitis, I.

    1987-11-01

    When vapors of one solvent are collected on a charcoal tube, the desorbants suggested by NIOSH are adequate. When several solvents are collected at the same time, however, then a desorbant suggested for one solvent may mask some of the analytes or some of the analytes may be desorbed very poorly. An actual sample containing 13 solvents was brought to the laboratory for analysis. All solvents could be resolved on a 6-m 10% FFAP column, but some could not be desorbed efficiently with carbon disulfide; masking problems were encountered with other desorbants. Several solvents were tried; the most promising one was carbon disulfide saturated with formic acid.

  7. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Baedecker, P.A. ); Reddy, M.M. )

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone erosion. It can serve as the basis for an undergraduate (or pre college) experiment in environmental chemistry. Recent field investigations are described that provide measurements of carbonate stone dissolution and mechanical erosion under weathering conditions that are prevalent in the eastern US. The purpose of the laboratory work is to answer questions concerning the effects of hydrogen ion deposition on stone erosion processes that were difficult to resolve on the basis of field experiments alone.

  8. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  9. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  10. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. PMID:25280680

  11. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels

  12. Methods for estimation of long-term non-carbonate neutralisation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stuart D; Stewart, Warwick S; Rusdinar, Yuni; Schumann, Russell E; Ciccarelli, Joseph M; Li, Jun; Smart, Roger St C

    2010-04-01

    In the long-term phase of an acid rock drainage (ARD) evolution profile, after any short-term neutralisation capacity provided by carbonate minerals is exhausted, the net acid release is a product of a declining acid generation rate (AGR) and a slower, long-term acid neutralisation rate mainly provided by gangue silicate minerals. At some point, the AGR and the non-carbonate acid neutralisation rate (ANRnc) will be similar. Matching of the AGR and ANRnc near 10mg H(2)SO(4)/kg/week is demonstrated in data from 10-year columns. This long-term neutralisation is not measured at present in any accepted assessment tests. Methods to estimate ANRnc, based on silicate mineralogy and solution assays from long-term column leach tests, are compared. Good agreement is demonstrated between rates measured from the solution assay data and those calculated from mineralogy using kinetic databases. More rigorous analysis of the leachate chemistry of selected long-term leach tests also suggests possible cover design criteria based on the maximum AGR that will maintain a pH>4 in leachate from ARD materials. The data show a distinct break at an AGR of 3mg H(2)SO(4)/kg/week, below which no leachate pH is less than 4. The results indicate that an AGR of 10t H(2)SO(4)/ha/year is conservative and a suitable cover design target for ARD control that would be matched by ANRnc. PMID:20097405

  13. Characterization of nano-lead-doped active carbon and its application in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Jiang, Liangxing; Xue, Haitao; Liu, Fangyang; Jia, Ming; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, nano-lead-doped active carbon (nano-Pb/AC) composite with low hydrogen evolution current for lead-acid battery was prepared by ultrasonic-absorption and chemical-precipitate method. The nano-Pb/AC composite was characterized by SEM, EDS and TEM. The electrochemical characterizations are performed by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a three-electrode system. Since intermediate adsorption is the rate-determining step, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is markedly inhibited as the intermediate adsorption impedance of nano-Pb/AC increased. Meanwhile, the working potential of nano-Pb/AC is widened to the whole potential region of Pb negative plate (from -1.36 V to -0.86 V vs. Hg/HgSO4) in lead-acid battery. In addition, nano-Pb can improve the interfacial compatibility between AC and Pb paste, accordingly relieve the symptoms of carbon floatation. Finally, 2.0 V single-cell flooded lead-acid batteries with 1.0 wt.% nano-Pb/AC or 1.0 wt.% AC addition in negative active materials are assembled. The cell performances test results show that the 3 h rate capacity, quick charging performance, high current discharging performance and cycling performance of nano-Pb/AC modified battery are all improved compared with regular lead-acid battery and AC modified lead-acid battery.

  14. Surface and catalytic properties of acid metal carbons prepared by the sol gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado-Serrano, J.; Rojas-Cervantes, M. L.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    The sol-gel method has been applied for the synthesis of a series of acid metal-carbon xerogels (with M = V, Cr, Mo and Ni) by polymerisation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in the presence of metallic precursors. A blank sample was also prepared without any metal addition. The xerogels were heated in nitrogen at 1000 °C to obtain the pyrolysed products. The samples were characterised by different techniques such as thermal-mass spectrometry analysis, gas physisorption, and mercury porosimetry. In addition, the acid character of the pyrolysed products was tested by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation between benzaldehyde and acetophenone for the formation of chalcones.

  15. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34

  16. Poly-glutamic acid modified carbon nanotube-doped carbon paste electrode for sensitive detection of L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Luo, Liqiang; Ding, Yaping; Ye, Daixin

    2011-08-01

    A novel poly-glutamic acid (PGA) film modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was first prepared for the determination of l-tryptophan (l-Trp). Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied for characterization of the surface morphology of the modified electrodes and cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties of the proposed electrode towards the oxidation of l-Trp. Optimization of the experimental parameters was performed with regard to pH, ratio of CNTs, concentration of glutamic acid, electro-polymerization cycles, accumulation time and concentration of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The linearity between the oxidation peak current and the l-Trp concentration was obtained in the range of 5.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-4)M with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-8)M (S/N=3) and the sensitivity was calculated to be 1143.79μA∙mM(-1)∙cm(-2). In addition, the PGA modified CPE incorporating CNTs displayed high selectivity, good stability and reproducibility, making it suitable for the routine analysis of l-Trp in clinical use. PMID:21640670

  17. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part I: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, Angel; Kircheva, Nina; Perrin, Marion

    2011-10-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid is proposed as innovative solution for high energy density lead acid battery. The proof of concept is demonstrated, developing grids suitable for the small capacity, scale of valve-regulated lead acid batteries with 2.5-3 Ah plates. The manufacturing of the grids, includes fast, known and simple processes which can be rescaled for mass production with a minimum, investment costs. The most critical process of green composite carbonisation by heating in inert, atmosphere from 200 to 1000 °C takes about 5 h, guaranteeing the low cost of the grids. An AGM-VRLA, cell with prototype positive plate based on the lead-2% tin electroplated carbon honeycomb grid and, conventional negative plates is cycled demonstrating 191 deep cycles. The impedance spectroscopy, measurements indicate the grid performance remains acceptable despite the evolution of the corrosion, processes during the cycling.

  18. Miniaturized ascorbic acid fuel cells with flexible electrodes made of graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisato; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2016-04-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is a biologically friendly compound and exists in many products such as sports drinks, fruit, and even in human blood. Thus, a miniaturized and flexible ascorbic acid fuel cell (AAFC) is expected be a power source for portable or implantable electric devices. In this study, we fabricated an AAFC with anode and cathode dimensions of 3 × 10 mm2 made of a graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth (GCFC) and found that GCFC electrodes significantly improve the power generated by the AAFC. This is because the GCFC has more than two times the effective surface area of a conventional carbon fiber cloth and it can contain more enzymes. The power density of the AAFC in a phosphate buffer solution containing 100 mM AA at room temperature was 34.1 µW/cm2 at 0.46 V. Technical issues in applying the AAFC to portable devices are also discussed.

  19. Isolation of anacardic acid from natural cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph Y N; Da Cruz Francisco, José; Dey, Estera S; Buchweishaija, Joseph; Mkayula, Lupituko L; Ye, Lei

    2008-10-22

    Solvent extracted cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), conventionally known as natural CNSL, is a mixture of several alkenyl phenols. One of these alkenyl phenols is anacardic acid, which is present at the highest concentration. In view of anticipated industrial applications of anacardic acid, the objective of this work was to isolate anacardic acid from natural CNSL by supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2). In this study, the solubility data for natural CNSL in scCO 2 under a range of operating conditions of pressure (100, 200, and 300 bar), temperature (40 and 50 degrees C), and CO 2 flow rate (5, 10, and 15 g min (-1)) were established. The best scCO 2 working conditions were found to be 50 degrees C and 300 bar at a flow rate of 5 g min (-1) CO 2. Using 3 g of sample (CNSL/solid adsorbent = 1/2) under these scCO 2 conditions, it was possible to quantitatively isolate high purity anacardic acid from crude natural CNSL (82% of total anacardic acid) within 150 min. The anacardic acid isolated by scCO 2 was analyzed by different spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis, FT-IR, and (1)H NMR) and HPLC analysis, indicating that the anacardic acid isolated by scCO 2 has better quality than that obtained through a conventional method involving several chemical conversion steps. PMID:18811166

  20. In vitro inhibition of salicylic acid derivatives on human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Esra; Senturk, Murat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-10-15

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, hCA I and II, with a series of salicylic acid derivatives was investigated by using the esterase method with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. IC(50) values for sulfasalazine, diflunisal, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-aminosalicylic acid, 4-sulfosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and 3-metylsalicylic acid were of 3.04 microM, 3.38 microM, 4.07 microM, 7.64 microM, 0.13 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.42 mM, 0.56 mM, 2.71 mM and 3.07 mM for hCA I and of 4.49 microM, 2.70 microM, 0.72 microM, 2.80 microM, 0.75 mM, 0.72 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.68 mM, 1.16 mM and 4.70 mM for hCA II, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used for the determination of the inhibition mechanism of these substituted phenols, most of which were noncompetitive inhibitors with this substrate. Some salicylic acid derivatives investigated here showed effective hCA I and II inhibitory activity, and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors eventually targeting other isoforms which have not been assayed yet for their interactions with such agents. PMID:18819808

  1. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  2. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  3. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the goals of research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone surfaces is to define the incremental impact of acidic deposition relative to natural weathering processes on the rate of carbonate stone erosion. If rain that impacts carbonate stone surfaces is resident on the surface long enough to approach chemical equilibrium, the incremental effect of hydrogen ion is expected to be small (i.e., 6% for a rain of pH 4.0). Under nonequilibrium (i.e., high flow rate) conditions, kinetic considerations suggest that the incremental effect of hydrogen ion deposition could be quite significant. Field run-off experiments involving the chemical analysis of rain collected from inclined stone slabs have been used to evaluate stone dissolution processes under ambient conditions of wet and dry deposition of acidic species. The stoichiometry of the reaction of stone with hydrogen ion is difficult to define from the field data due to scatter in the data attributed to hydrodynamic effects. Laboratory run-off experiments show that the stoichiometry is best defined by a reaction with H+ in which CO2 is released from the system. The baseline effect caused by water in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 is identical in the field and in laboratory simulation. The experiments show that the solutions are close enough to equilibrium for the incremental effect of hydrogen ion to be minor (i.e., 24% for marble for a rain of pH 4.0) relative to dissolution due to water and carbonic acid reactions. Stone erosion rates based on physical measurement are approximately double the recession rates that are due to dissolution (estimated from the observed calcium content of the run-off solutions). The difference may reflect the loss of granular material not included in recession estimates based on the run-off data. Neither the field nor the laboratory run-off experiments indicate a pH dependence for the grain-removal process.

  4. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  5. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1), biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  6. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10-0.12 h(-1)), biomass (0.7-0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14-0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  7. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  8. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  9. Removal of acid orange 7 by guava seed carbon: a four parameter optimization study.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-González, María P; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia

    2009-08-30

    The preparation of carbon from waste materials is a recent and economic alternative for the removal of dyes. In this study four samples of carbon were obtained by thermal treatment at 1000 degrees C using as precursor the guava seed with different particle sizes. The Taguchi method was applied as an experimental design to establish the optimum conditions for the removal of acid orange 7 in batch experiments. The chosen experimental factors and their ranges were: pH (2-12), temperature (15-35 degrees C), specific surface area (50-600 m(2)g(-1)) and adsorbent dosage (16-50 mg ml(-1)). The orthogonal array L(9) and the larger the better response category were selected to determine the optimum removal conditions: pH 2, temperature 15 degrees C, S(esp) 600 m(2)g(-1) and dosage 30 mg ml(-1). Under these conditions a total removal of acid orange 7 was achieved. Moreover, the most significant factors were the carbon specific surface area and the pH. The influence of the different factors on the adsorption of acid orange 7 from solution is explained in terms of electrostatic interactions by considering the dye species and the character of the surface. PMID:19285803

  10. N-doped carbon nanomaterials are durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Min; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, efficient, and durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a prerequisite for commercialization of the fuel cell technology. Along with intensive research efforts of more than half a century in developing nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to replace the expensive and scarce platinum-based catalysts, a new class of carbon-based, low-cost, metal-free ORR catalysts was demonstrated to show superior ORR performance to commercial platinum catalysts, particularly in alkaline electrolytes. However, their large-scale practical application in more popular acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells remained elusive because they are often found to be less effective in acidic electrolytes, and no attempt has been made for a single PEM cell test. We demonstrated that rationally designed, metal-free, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and their graphene composites exhibited significantly better long-term operational stabilities and comparable gravimetric power densities with respect to the best NPMC in acidic PEM cells. This work represents a major breakthrough in removing the bottlenecks to translate low-cost, metal-free, carbon-based ORR catalysts to commercial reality, and opens avenues for clean energy generation from affordable and durable fuel cells. PMID:26601132

  11. Tracing carbon sources through aquatic and terrestrial food webs using amino acid stable isotope fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O'Brien, Diane M; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ(13)C patterns among amino acids (δ(13)CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ(13)CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ(13)C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ(13)CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ(13)C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ(13)C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  12. Amino acid diagenesis, organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments from the inner Oslofjord, Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, J.E. ); Lichtentaler, R. )

    1991-06-01

    Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA), total organic carbon (TOC), and total nitrogen (TN) have been measured in an oxic and anoxic surface sediment from the inner Oslofjord. Downcore variations of these parameters are ascribed to both diagenesis and changes in organic matter supply, the latter being most important. These changes are most prominent in the anoxic sediment, which reflects the eutrophication history of the innermost part of the fjord. Downcore, THAA content decreased from 3.8 to 2.0 mg/g (salt-free dry weight) in the oxic sediment and from 22.3 to 3.8 mg/g in the anoxic sediment. Total amino acid nitrogen varied between 17 and 34% of total nitrogen in the oxic, and 25 and 54% in the anoxic, sediment. Organic carbon and organic nitrogen accumulation rates and depth integrated mineralization rates are about three times higher in the anoxic sediment than in the oxic sediment. Recycling of amino acids accounted for 4 to 12% of the total organic carbon and 13 to 40% of the total organic nitrogen regenerated in these sediments.

  13. Extreme carbon dioxide concentrations in acidic pit lakes provoked by water/rock interaction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-España, Javier; Boehrer, Bertram; Yusta, Iñaki

    2014-04-15

    We quantify the gas pressure and concentration of a gas-charged acidic pit lake in SW Spain. We measured total dissolved gas pressure, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, major ion concentration, isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)C(DIC)), and other physicochemical parameters. CO2 is the dominant dissolved gas in this lake and results mainly from carbonate dissolution during the interaction of acidic water with wall rocks, followed by diffusive and advective transport through the water column. The δ(13)C(DIC) values suggest that the biological contribution is comparatively small. Maximum CO2 concentrations higher than 0.1 M (∼5000 mg/L) have been measured, which are only comparable to those found in volcanic crater lakes. The corresponding gas pressures of CO2 alone (pCO2 ∼3.6 bar) imply 60% saturation relative to local pressure at 50 m depth. High CO2 concentrations have been observed in other pit lakes of the region. We recommend gas-specific monitoring in acidic pit lakes and, if necessary, the design of feasible degassing strategies. PMID:24628479

  14. Tracing Carbon Sources through Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs Using Amino Acid Stable Isotope Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O’Brien, Diane M.; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ13C patterns among amino acids (δ13CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ13CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ13C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ13CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ13C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ13C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  15. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  16. Potentially bioavailable natural organic carbon and hydrolyzable amino acids in aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Lashun K.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Novak, John T.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Benner, Ronald; Kaiser, Karl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between concentrations of operationally defined potentially bioavailable organic -carbon (PBOC) and hydrolyzable amino acids (HAAs) in sediments collected from a diverse range of chloroethene--contaminated sites. Concentrations of PBOC and HAA were measured using aquifer sediment samples collected at six selected study sites. Average concentrations of total HAA and PBOC ranged from 1.96 ± 1.53 to 20.1 ± 25.6 mg/kg and 4.72 ± 0.72 to 443 ± 65.4 mg/kg, respectively. Results demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship between concentrations of PBOC and total HAA present in the aquifer sediment (p < 0.05). Higher levels of HAA were consistently observed at sites with greater levels of PBOC and first-order decay rates. Because amino acids are known to be readily biodegradable carbon compounds, this relationship suggests that the sequential chemical extraction procedure used to measure PBOC is a useful indicator of bioavailable carbon in aquifer sediments. This, in turn, is consistent with the interpretation that PBOC measurements can be used for estimating the amount of natural organic carbon available for driving the reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes in groundwater systems.

  17. Flash pyrolysis of coal in non-reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    Coal pyrolysis experiments were carried out with a New Mexico subbituminous coal in the presence of nonreactive He, N/sub 2/, and Ar gases in an entrained downflow tubular reactor. The percent carbon conversions to CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, BTX, CO and CO/sub 2/ were determined as a function of temperature and residence time at 50 psi. In helium atmosphere, the yields of methane and CO/sub x/ reached asymptotic values in about 1 sec and ethylene was produced throughout the length of the BNL reactor corresponding to a coal particle residence time of 1.7 sec. The relative yields of individual products were influenced by the pyrolysis atmosphere but the total carbon conversion remained almost unaffected. A reduction in the cationic content of coal by acid treatment enhanced the production of CO and CO/sub 2/ but inhibited the formation of ethylene. 13 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus Lackner; Charles Harvey; Bruce Watson

    2008-01-14

    Carbon dioxide injection into deep sea sediments below 2700 m water depth and a few hundred meters to fifteen hundred meters deep in the sediment column may provide permanent geologic storage by gravitational trapping. At high pressures and low temperatures common in deep sea sediments a few hundred meters below sea floor, CO{sub 2} will be in its liquid phase and will be denser than the overlying pore fluid. The lower density of the pore fluid provides a cap to the denser CO{sub 2} and ensures gravitational trapping in the short term. The overall storage capacity for CO{sub 2} in such deep sea formations below the ocean floor is primarily determined by the permeability, and will vary with seafloor depth, geothermal gradient, porosity, and pore water salinity. Furthermore, the dissemination of the injected CO{sub 2} in the sediments and potential chemical reactions between CO{sub 2}, pore fluid and sediments will define its fate in the storage reservoir. The main objectives of our research was to evaluate the potential for sub-seabed CO{sub 2} storage in deep sea sediments using a range of approaches including experiments, permeability analysis, and modeling. Over the course of the three-year award, our results support an important role for sub-seabed storage in a diverse portfolio of carbons sequestration options. Our analysis has shown the feasibility of this type of storage, and also emphasizes that escape or leakage from such sites would be negligible. The most difficult challenge is to overcome the low permeability of typical deep-sea sediments, and a variety of approaches are suggested for future research.

  19. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological

  20. An amperometric uric acid biosensor based on chitosan-carbon nanotubes electrospun nanofiber on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Numnuam, Apon; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-06-01

    A novel amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing uricase on an electrospun nanocomposite of chitosan-carbon nanotubes nanofiber (Chi-CNTsNF) covering an electrodeposited layer of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on a gold electrode (uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au). The uric acid response was determined at an optimum applied potential of -0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl in a flow-injection system based on the change of the reduction current for dissolved oxygen during oxidation of uric acid by the immobilized uricase. The response was directly proportional to the uric acid concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the fabricated uric acid biosensor had a very wide linear range, 1.0-400 μmol L(-1), with a very low limit of detection of 1.0 μmol L(-1) (s/n = 3). The operational stability of the uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au biosensor (up to 205 injections) was excellent and the storage life was more than six weeks. A low Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.21 mmol L(-1) indicated that the immobilized uricase had high affinity for uric acid. The presence of potential common interfering substances, for example ascorbic acid, glucose, and lactic acid, had negligible effects on the performance of the biosensor. When used for analysis of uric acid in serum samples, the results agreed well with those obtained by use of the standard enzymatic colorimetric method (P > 0.05). PMID:24718436