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Sample records for acid hybridization probes

  1. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  2. Chemically modified nucleic acids as immunodetectable probes in hybridization experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tchen, P; Fuchs, R P; Sage, E; Leng, M

    1984-01-01

    Guanine residues in nucleic acids can be modified by treatment with N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene and its 7-iodo derivative in an in vitro nonenzymatic reaction. The modified nucleic acids (ribo or deoxyribo, single or double stranded) are recognized by specific antibodies. They can be immunoprecipitated or used as probes in hybridization experiments and detected by immunochemical techniques. Images PMID:6374657

  3. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  4. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  5. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  6. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  7. Studies towards the development of chemically synthesized non-radioactive biotinylated nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, A H; Hull, R

    1986-01-01

    Non-radioactive nucleic acid hybridization probes have been constructed in which the reporter group is long chain biotin chemically linked to a basic macromolecule (histone H1, cytochrome C or polyethyleneimine). The modified basic macromolecule which carries many biotin residues can, in turn, be covalently linked to nucleic acids (DNA) via the bifunctional cross-linking reagents, glutaraldehyde, 1,2,7,8-diepoxyoctane, bis (succinimidyl) suberate or bis (sulfonosuccinimidyl) suberate. This provides a very sensitive probe by which as little as between 10-50fg of target DNA can be visualized using dot-blot hybridization procedures in conjunction with avidin or streptavidin enzyme conjugates. PMID:3027670

  8. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms. PMID:26969040

  9. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  10. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  11. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  12. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  13. Exploring the Hybridization Thermodynamics of Spherical Nucleic Acids to Tailor Probes for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Pratik Shailesh

    Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), three-dimensional nanoparticle conjugates composed of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotides around organic or inorganic nanoparticles, are an emergent class of nanostructures that show promise as single-entity agents for intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) detection and gene regulation. SNAs exhibit superior biocompatibility and biological properties compared to linear oligonucleotides, enabling them to overcome many of the limitations of linear oligonucleotides for use in biomedical applications. However, the origins of these biologically attractive properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, the chemistry underlying one such property is studied in detail, and the findings are applied towards the rational design of more effective SNAs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chapter 1 introduces the synthesis of SNAs, the unique properties that make them superior to linear nucleic acids for biomedicine, and previously studied applications of these structures. Chapter 2 focuses on quantitatively studying the impact of the chemical structure of the SNA on its ability to hybridize multiple complementary nucleic acids. This chapter lays the groundwork for understanding the factors that govern SNA hybridization thermodynamics and how to tailor SNAs to increase their binding affinity to target mRNA strands. Chapters 3 and 4 capitalize on this knowledge to engineer probes for intracellular mRNA detection and gene regulation applications. Chapter 3 reports the development of an SNA-based probe that can simultaneously report the expression level of two different mRNA transcripts in live cells and differentiate diseased cells from non-diseased cells. Chapter 4 investigates the use of topically-applied SNAs to down-regulate a critical mediator of impaired wound healing in diabetic mice to accelerate wound closure. This study represents the first topical therapeutic application of SNA nanotechnology to treat open

  14. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  15. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  16. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH. PMID:23391931

  17. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  18. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  19. Molecular beacons: Probes that fluoresce upon hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, S.; Kramer, F.R.

    1996-03-01

    We have developed novel nucleic acid probes that recognize and report the presence of specific nucleic acids in homogeneous solutions. These probes undergo a spontaneous fluorogenic conformational change when they hybridize to their targets. Only perfectly complementary targets elicit this response, as hybridization does not occur when the target contains a mismatched nucleotide or a deletion. The probes are particularly suited for monitoring the synthesis of specific nucleic acids in real time. When used in nucleic acid amplification assays, gene detection is homogeneous and sensitive, and can be carried out in a sealed tube. When introduced into living cells, these probes should enable the origin, movement, and fate of specific mRNAs to be traced. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization method using Peptide Nucleic Acid probes for rapid detection of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella spp.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal infection occurring in women of reproductive age. It is widely accepted that the microbial switch from normal microflora to BV is characterized by a decrease in vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus species together with an increase of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes. Our goal was to develop and optimize a novel Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence in situ Hybridization assay (PNA FISH) for the detection of Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis in mixed samples. Results Therefore, we evaluated and validated two specific PNA probes by using 36 representative Lactobacillus strains, 22 representative G. vaginalis strains and 27 other taxonomically related or pathogenic bacterial strains commonly found in vaginal samples. The probes were also tested at different concentrations of G. vaginalis and Lactobacillus species in vitro, in the presence of a HeLa cell line. Specificity and sensitivity of the PNA probes were found to be 98.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 87.8 to 99.9%) and 100% (95% CI, from 88.0 to 100.0%), for Lactobacillus spp.; and 100% (95% CI, from 92.8 to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, from 81.5 to 100.0%) for G. vaginalis. Moreover, the probes were evaluated in mixed samples mimicking women with BV or normal vaginal microflora, demonstrating efficiency and applicability of our PNA FISH. Conclusions This quick method accurately detects Lactobacillus spp. and G. vaginalis species in mixed samples, thus enabling efficient evaluation of the two bacterial groups, most frequently encountered in the vagina. PMID:23586331

  1. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  2. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lehtola, Markku J.; Torvinen, Eila; Miettinen, Ilkka T.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive and grow in drinking-water biofilms and possibly transmit via drinking water. The designed PNA probe (MAV148) specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other mycobacteria and mycolic acid-containing bacteria. From the range of bacterial strains tested, only M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were hybridized. The PNA FISH method was applied successfully to detect M. avium subsp. avium spiked in water samples and biofilm established within a Propella biofilm reactor fed with potable water from a distribution supply. PMID:16391126

  3. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  4. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23762388

  5. Optimization of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) for the detection of bacteria: The effect of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rui; Santos, Rita S; Madureira, Pedro; Almeida, Carina; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-05-20

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular technique widely used for the detection and characterization of microbial populations. FISH is affected by a wide variety of abiotic and biotic variables and the way they interact with each other. This is translated into a wide variability of FISH procedures found in the literature. The aim of this work is to systematically study the effects of pH, dextran sulfate and probe concentration in the FISH protocol, using a general peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe for the Eubacteria domain. For this, response surface methodology was used to optimize these 3 PNA-FISH parameters for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive species (Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus). The obtained results show that a probe concentration higher than 300nM is favorable for both groups. Interestingly, a clear distinction between the two groups regarding the optimal pH and dextran sulfate concentration was found: a high pH (approx. 10), combined with lower dextran sulfate concentration (approx. 2% [w/v]) for Gram-negative species and near-neutral pH (approx. 8), together with higher dextran sulfate concentrations (approx. 10% [w/v]) for Gram-positive species. This behavior seems to result from an interplay between pH and dextran sulfate and their ability to influence probe concentration and diffusion towards the rRNA target. This study shows that, for an optimum hybridization protocol, dextran sulfate and pH should be adjusted according to the target bacteria. PMID:27021959

  6. Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Prezetakiewiczr, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    2008-01-15

    This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  7. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Method Using a Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe for Identification of Salmonella spp. in a Broad Spectrum of Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, C.; Azevedo, N. F.; Fernandes, R. M.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Salmonella spp. using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe was developed. The probe theoretical specificity and sensitivity were both 100%. The PNA-FISH method was optimized, and laboratory testing on representative strains from the Salmonella genus subspecies and several related bacterial species confirmed the predicted theoretical values of specificity and sensitivity. The PNA-FISH method has been successfully adapted to detect cells in suspension and is hence able to be employed for the detection of this bacterium in blood, feces, water, and powdered infant formula (PIF). The blood and PIF samples were artificially contaminated with decreasing pathogen concentrations. After the use of an enrichment step, the PNA-FISH method was able to detect 1 CFU per 10 ml of blood (5 × 109 ± 5 × 108 CFU/ml after an overnight enrichment step) and also 1 CFU per 10 g of PIF (2 × 107 ± 5 × 106 CFU/ml after an 8-h enrichment step). The feces and water samples were also enriched according to the corresponding International Organization for Standardization methods, and results showed that the PNA-FISH method was able to detect Salmonella immediately after the first enrichment step was conducted. Moreover, the probe was able to discriminate the bacterium in a mixed microbial population in feces and water by counter-staining with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). This new method is applicable to a broad spectrum of samples and takes less than 20 h to obtain a diagnosis, except for PIF samples, where the analysis takes less than 12 h. This procedure may be used for food processing and municipal water control and also in clinical settings, representing an improved alternative to culture-based techniques and to the existing Salmonella PNA probe, Sal23S10, which presents a lower specificity. PMID:20453122

  8. Hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide-carbon dots hybridized surface: high sensitive fluorescence turn-on probe for monitoring of ascorbic acid in rat brain following brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Linbo; Wang, Chao; Liu, Kangyu; Wang, Yuhan; Liu, Kun; Lin, Yuqing

    2015-03-17

    In this study, we report a novel and efficient fluorescence probe synthesized by Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-derived carbon dots (CDs)-modified hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide(CoOOH) nanoflakes (Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH) for monitoring of cerebral ascorbic acid (AA) in brain microdialysate. The as-prepared Tris-derived CDs with the fluorescence quantum yield of 7.3% are prepared by a one-step pyrolysis strategy of the sole precursor and used as the signal output. After being hybridized with CoOOH nanoflakes to form Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH, the luminescence of the Tris-derived CDs can be efficiently quenched by CoOOH via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Due to the specific redox reaction between the enediol group of AA and hexagonal CoOOH nanoflakes, AA can reduce the hexagonal CoOOH nanoflakes in the Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH and lead to collapse of the hybrized structure, then the release of Tris-derived CDs, and thus finally the fluorescence recovery. Moreover, cobalt ions (II), generated by CoOOH nanoflakes oxidizing AA, almost have no obvious interference on the fluorescence probe, i.e., Tris-derived CDs, which could be ascribed to the surface of Tris-derived CDs containing a few strong chelation groups such as amino/carboxyl/thiol groups, instead of plenty of -OH groups with weak chelation with Co(2+). On the basis of this feature, the Tris-derived CDs-CoOOH fluorescent probe demonstrates a linear range from 100 nM to 20 μM with the detection limit of ∼50 nM, i.e., with an improved sensitivity toward AA detection. Compared with other turn-on fluorescent methods using convenient fluorophore-nitroxide fluorescent probes for detection of AA, the method demonstrated here possesses a facial synthesis route, lower limit of detection, and wider linear range, which validates sensing of AA in the cerebral systems during the calm/ischemia process. This study provides a fluorescence assay for the simple yet facial detection of AA in the cerebral systems and

  9. DNA Stains as Surrogate Nucleobases in Fluorogenic Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Seitz, Oliver

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance assigned to RNA dynamics in cells and tissues calls for probe molecules that enable fluorescence microscopy imaging in live cells. To achieve this goal, fluorescence dyes are conjugated with oligonucleotides so as to provide strong emission upon hybridization with the target molecule. The impressive 10(3)-fold fluorescence intensification observed when DNA stains such as thiazole orange (TO) interact with double-stranded DNA is intriguing and prompted the exploration of oligonucleotide conjugates. However, nonspecific interactions of DNA stains with polynucleotides tend to increase background, which would affect the contrast achievable in live-cell imaging. This Account describes the development of DNA-stain-labeled hybridization probes that provide high signal-to-background. We focus on our contributions in context with related advances from other laboratories. The emphasis will be on the requirements of RNA imaging in live cells. To reduce background, intercalator dyes such as TO were appended to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is less avidly recognized by DNA stains than DNA/RNA. Constraining the TO dye as a nucleobase surrogate in "forced intercalation (FIT) probes" improved the target specificity, presumably by helping to prevent unspecific interactions. The enforcement of TO intercalation between predetermined base pairs upon formation of the probe-target duplex provided for high brightness and enabled match/mismatch selectivity beyond stringency of hybridization. We show examples that highlight the use of PNA FIT probes in the imaging of mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA in living cells. The "FIT approach" was recently extended to DNA probes. Signal brightness can become limiting when low-abundance targets ought to be visualized over cellular autofluorescence. We discuss strategies that further the brightness of signaling by FIT probes. Multilabeling with identical dyes does not solve the brightness issue. To avoid self-quenching, we

  10. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  11. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  12. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  13. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  14. Probing Compositional Variation within Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhas, Benjamin D.; Habas, Susan E.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mokari, Taleb

    2010-06-22

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural and magnetic properties of solution-grown PtCo-CdS hybrid structures in comparison to similar free-standing PtCo alloy nanoparticles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is utilized as a sensitive probe for identifying subtle differences in the structure of the hybrid materials. We found that the growth of bimetallic tips on a CdS nanorod substrate leads to a more complex nanoparticle structure composed of a PtCo alloy core and thin CoO shell. The core-shell architecture is an unexpected consequence of the different nanoparticle growth mechanism on the nanorod tip, as compared to free growth in solution. Magnetic measurements indicate that the PtCo-CdS hybrid structures are superparamagnetic despite the presence of a CoO shell. The use of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to detect minute differences in atomic structure and bonding in complex nanosystems makes it possible to better understand and predict catalytic or magnetic properties for nanoscale bimetallic hybrid materials.

  15. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  16. Luminescent Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Kozlov, Maxim; Wirpsza, Laura; Mustaev, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    Novel amino-reactive derivatives of lanthanide-based luminescent labels of enhanced brightness and metal retention were synthesized and used for the detection of complementary DNA oligonucleotides by molecular beacons. Time-resolved acquisition of the luminescent signal that occurs upon hybridization of the probe to the target enabled the avoidance of short-lived background fluorescence, markedly enhancing the sensitivity of detection, which was less than 1 pM. This value is about 50 to 100 times more sensitive than the level achieved with conventional fluorescence-based molecular beacons, and is 10 to 60 times more sensitive than previously reported for other lanthanide-based hybridization probes. These novel luminescent labels should significantly enhance the sensitivity of all type of nucleic acid hybridization probes, and could dramatically improve the detection limit of other biopolymers and small compounds that are used in a variety of biological applications. PMID:20085336

  17. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  18. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  19. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  20. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  1. Probing of Strain Mediated Hybrid Multiferroic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohtung, Edwin; Kim, J.; Marsh, M.; Lei, Na; Chen, S.; Sinha, S.; Ravelosona, D.; Fullerton, Eric; Shpyrko, Oleg

    2012-02-01

    Smart materials for sensor technology, (non) volatile device memories for information technology, and ultrasound generators in medical imaging have one thing in common, their active elements consist of ferroelectrics (FE) driven by voltages or ferromagnetics (FM) driven by magnetization. In the quest to design high functionality devices to meet today's consumer technological demands, high focus has been given to multiferroic [1]. However, the coexistence of magnetic order and ferroelectric polarization combined in a single-phase material has proven to be rear as most of these materials tend to have low magnetic ordering temperatures and are often antiferromagnets, in which the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling effect is intrinsically small. We utilize an alternative approach to design multiferroic-hybrid devices based on FE-FM composites where the ME coupling emerges from strain-mediated interaction between individual phases [2]. We develop a nonlinear thermodynamic theory for strain-mediated direct ME effect and Bragg Ptychographic Coherent Diffraction Imaging (BCDI) serves as the unique tool of choice for sub-nanometer resolution nondestructive probing of the order parameters in the devices [1] N. Spaldin and M. Fiebig, Science 309, 391 (2005). [2] E. Fohtung et al., submitted (2012)

  2. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  3. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  4. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  5. Selective Nucleic Acid Capture with Shielded Covalent Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid probes are used for diverse applications in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. In any setting, their power is limited by imperfect selectivity (binding of undesired targets) and incomplete affinity (binding is reversible, and not all desired targets bound). These difficulties are fundamental, stemming from reliance on base pairing to provide both selectivity and affinity. Shielded covalent (SC) probes eliminate the longstanding trade-off between selectivity and durable target capture, achieving selectivity via programmable base pairing and molecular conformation change, and durable target capture via activatable covalent cross-linking. In pure and mixed samples, SC probes covalently capture complementary DNA or RNA oligo targets and reject two-nucleotide mismatched targets with near-quantitative yields at room temperature, achieving discrimination ratios of 2–3 orders of magnitude. Semiquantitative studies with full-length mRNA targets demonstrate selective covalent capture comparable to that for RNA oligo targets. Single-nucleotide DNA or RNA mismatches, including nearly isoenergetic RNA wobble pairs, can be efficiently rejected with discrimination ratios of 1–2 orders of magnitude. Covalent capture yields appear consistent with the thermodynamics of probe/target hybridization, facilitating rational probe design. If desired, cross-links can be reversed to release the target after capture. In contrast to existing probe chemistries, SC probes achieve the high sequence selectivity of a structured probe, yet durably retain their targets even under denaturing conditions. This previously incompatible combination of properties suggests diverse applications based on selective and stable binding of nucleic acid targets under conditions where base-pairing is disrupted (e.g., by stringent washes in vitro or in situ, or by enzymes in vivo). PMID:23745667

  6. Linear RNA amplification for the production of microarray hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Klebes, Ansgar; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2008-01-01

    To understand Drosophila development and other genetically controlled processes, it is often desirable to identify differences in gene expression levels. An experimental approach to investigate these processes is to catalog the transcriptome by hybridization of mRNA to DNA microbar-rays. In these experiments mRNA-derived hybridization probes are produced and hybridized to an array of DNA spots on a solid support. The labeled cDNAs of the complex hybridization probe will bind to their complementary sequences and provide quantification of the relative concentration of the corresponding transcript in the starting material. However, such approaches are often limited by the scarcity of the experimental sample because standard methods of probe preparation require microgram quantities of mRNA template. Linear RNA amplification can alleviate such limitations to support the generation of microarray hybridization probes from a few 100 pg of mRNA. These smaller quantities can be isolated from a few 100 cells. Here, we present a linear amplification protocol designed to preserve both the relative abundance of transcripts as well as their sequence complexity. PMID:18641956

  7. Design of ultrasensitive probes for human neutrophil elastase through hybrid combinatorial substrate library profiling.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Poreba, Marcin; Snipas, Scott J; Parker, Heather; Winterbourn, Christine C; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2014-02-18

    The exploration of protease substrate specificity is generally restricted to naturally occurring amino acids, limiting the degree of conformational space that can be surveyed. We substantially enhanced this by incorporating 102 unnatural amino acids to explore the S1-S4 pockets of human neutrophil elastase. This approach provides hybrid natural and unnatural amino acid sequences, and thus we termed it the Hybrid Combinatorial Substrate Library. Library results were validated by the synthesis of individual tetrapeptide substrates, with the optimal substrate demonstrating more than three orders of magnitude higher catalytic efficiency than commonly used substrates of elastase. This optimal substrate was converted to an activity-based probe that demonstrated high selectivity and revealed the specific presence of active elastase during the process of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. We propose that this approach can be successfully used for any type of endopeptidase to deliver high activity and selectivity in substrates and probes. PMID:24550277

  8. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  9. Modeling Formamide Denaturation of Probe-Target Hybrids for Improved Microarray Probe Design in Microbial Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, L. Safak; Loy, Alexander; Wright, Erik S.; Wagner, Michael; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of high-density microarrays to the diagnostic analysis of microbial communities is challenged by the optimization of oligonucleotide probe sensitivity and specificity, as it is generally unfeasible to experimentally test thousands of probes. This study investigated the adjustment of hybridization stringency using formamide with the idea that sensitivity and specificity can be optimized during probe design if the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotides with target and non-target molecules can be predicted as a function of formamide concentration. Sigmoidal denaturation profiles were obtained using fluorescently labeled and fragmented 16S rRNA gene amplicon of Escherichia coli as the target with increasing concentrations of formamide in the hybridization buffer. A linear free energy model (LFEM) was developed and microarray-specific nearest neighbor rules were derived. The model simulated formamide melting with a denaturant m-value that increased hybridization free energy (ΔG°) by 0.173 kcal/mol per percent of formamide added (v/v). Using the LFEM and specific probe sets, free energy rules were systematically established to predict the stability of single and double mismatches, including bulged and tandem mismatches. The absolute error in predicting the position of experimental denaturation profiles was less than 5% formamide for more than 90 percent of probes, enabling a practical level of accuracy in probe design. The potential of the modeling approach for probe design and optimization is demonstrated using a dataset including the 16S rRNA gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides as an additional target molecule. The LFEM and thermodynamic databases were incorporated into a computational tool (ProbeMelt) that is freely available at http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu. PMID:22952791

  10. Investigation of the hybrid molecular probe for intracellular studies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Karen; Medley, Colin D.; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo is essential to the advancement of biological studies, medical diagnostics, and drug discovery. Adding to major efforts in developing molecular probes for mRNA monitoring, we have recently developed an alternative tool, the hybrid molecular probe (HMP). To optimize the probe, a series of experiments were performed to study the properties of HMP hybridization kinetics and stability. The results demonstrated the potential of the HMP as a prospective tool for use in both hybridization studies and in vitro and in vivo analyses. The HMP has shown no tendency to produce false positive signals, which is a major concern for living cell studies. Moreover, HMP has shown the ability to detect the mRNA expression of different genes inside single cells from both basal and stimulated genes. As an effective alternative to conventional molecular probes, the proven sensitivity, simplicity, and stability of HMPs show promise for their use in monitoring mRNA expression in living cells. PMID:18421445

  11. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  12. Base-acid hybrid water electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-02-21

    A base-acid hybrid electrolytic system with a low onset voltage of 0.78 V for water electrolysis was developed by using a ceramic Li-ion exchange membrane to separate the oxygen-evolving reaction (OER) in a basic electrolyte solution containing the Li-ion and hydrogen-evolving reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte solution. PMID:26804323

  13. Hybridization-based biosensor containing hairpin probes and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Strohsahl, Christopher M.

    2010-10-12

    A sensor chip that includes: a fluorescence quenching surface; a nucleic acid probe that contains first and second ends with the first end bound to the fluorescence quenching surface, and is characterized by being able to self-anneal into a hairpin conformation; and a first fluorophore bound to the second end of the first nucleic acid molecule. When the first nucleic acid molecule is in the hairpin conformation, the fluorescence quenching surface substantially quenches fluorescent emissions by the first fluorophore; and when the first nucleic acid molecule is in a non-hairpin conformation, fluorescent emissions by the fluorophore are substantially free of quenching by the fluorescence quenching surface. Various nucleic acid probes, methods of making the sensor chip, biological sensor devices that contain the sensor chip, and their methods of use are also disclosed.

  14. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  15. Selection of oligonucleotide probes and experimental conditions for multiplex hybridization experiments.

    PubMed

    Bains, W

    1994-01-01

    Different DNA probes hybridize under different conditions. I examine the constraints of the design of oligonucleotide probes that are meant to hybridize to different unique sites in human genomic DNA under a single set of hybridization conditions as a parallel array. In 522 kb of human genomic DNA, 75% of 12-base and 89% of 22-base are unique, as opposed to 90% and 100% as expected of unstructured DNA, and this is not due solely to repetitive elements in the DNA. Hybridization in TMAC to reduce A+T content effects on melting temperature allows only 90% of unique targets to be hybridized under one set of conditions if a 2 degrees C difference between matched and mismatched sequences is required. Standard hybridization conditions allow no more than 60% of unique probes to be used together. This suggests that probe, hybridization conditions, and instrument design for multiple-probe hybridization applications will be harder than previously suggested. PMID:7803130

  16. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  17. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Genus- and group-specific hybridization probes for determinative and environmental studies of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, R.; Kane, M.D.; Winfrey, J.; Stahl, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    A set of six oligonucleotides, complementary to conserved tracts of 16S rRNA from phylogenetically-defined groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria, was characterized for use as hybridization probes in determinative and environmental microbiology. Four probes were genus specific and identified Desulfobacterium spp., Desulfobacter spp., Desulfobulbus spp., or Desulfovibrio spp. The other two probes encompassed more diverse assemblages. One probe was specific for the phylogenetic lineage composed of Desulfococcus multivorans, Desulfosarcina variabilis, and Desulfobotulus sapovorans. The remaining probe was specific for Desulfobacterium spp., Desulfobacter spp., D. multivorans, D. variabilis, and D. sapovorans. Temperature of dissociation was determined for each probe and the designed specificities of each were evaluated by hybridizations against closely related nontargeted species. In addition, each probe was screened by using a 'phylogrid' membrane which consisted of nucleic acids from sixtyfour non-targeted organisms representing a diverse collection of eukarya, archaea, and bacteria. The value of these probes to studies in environmental microbiology was evaluated by hybridizations to 16S rRNAs of sulfate-reducing bacteria present in marine sediments.

  19. Comparative examination of probe labeling methods for microarray hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David I.; Woodward, Karen; Setterquist, Robert A.; Kawasaki, Ernest S.

    2001-06-01

    For detection of differential gene expression, confocal laser based scanners are now capable of analyzing microarrays using one to five wavelengths. This allows investigators to choose among several labeling methods. Here we compare direct incorporation and indirect methods (amino-allyl and dendrimers) for labeling cDNA probes. We assessed reproducible sensitivity of each probe preparation method in two ways. First, by comparing hybridization intensities for limit of signal detection and second by measuring the lowest detectable concentration of a known ratio of mixed DNA (spikes). Limit of detection assay was done using arrays of mixed targets consisting of a serially diluted human specific gene fragment (HU1) and an undiluted DNA of chloramphenicol acetyl tranferase (CAT) gene. Then, individual single target arrays of CAT and HU1 DNA were used to determine the lowest detectable spike ratio of each labeling method. The results of this study will be presented and their significance for the analysis of microarrays will be discussed.

  20. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  1. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Huizhe; Chen, Qiuchen; Zhao, Pengfei; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A) from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature. PMID:26347880

  2. Fast ion measurement using a hybrid directional probe in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Watanabe, Kiyomasa Y.; Osakabe, Masaki; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Minami, Takashi; Toi, Kazuo; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Nishiura, Masaki; Ito, Takafumi; Ogawa, Kunihiro

    2008-10-15

    A hybrid directional probe was newly installed in the large helical device for fast ion measurement. The collector of the probe mounts a thermocouple to estimate local power flux and can be also utilized as a collector of a conventional Langmuir probe; therefore, the hybrid directional probe can simultaneously measure both local power density flux and current flux at the same collector surface. The concept and design of the hybrid directional probe, the calibration of the power density measurement, and preliminary result of the fast ion measurement are presented.

  3. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency. PMID:19282155

  4. Highly specific detection of genetic modification events using an enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M Z; Zhang, X F; Chen, X M; Chen, X; Wu, S; Xu, L L

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip utilizes a method based on ligase-hybridizing probe chip technology, with the principle of using thio-primers for protection against enzyme digestion, and using lambda DNA exonuclease to cut multiple PCR products obtained from the sample being tested into single-strand chains for hybridization. The 5'-end amino-labeled probe was fixed onto the aldehyde chip, and hybridized with the single-stranded PCR product, followed by addition of a fluorescent-modified probe that was then enzymatically linked with the adjacent, substrate-bound probe in order to achieve highly specific, parallel, and high-throughput detection. Specificity and sensitivity testing demonstrated that enzyme-linked probe hybridization technology could be applied to the specific detection of eight genetic modification events at the same time, with a sensitivity reaching 0.1% and the achievement of accurate, efficient, and stable results. PMID:26345863

  5. Design and Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Specific Identification of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  6. Design and evaluation of peptide nucleic acid probes for specific identification of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Joong; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2015-02-01

    Candida albicans is an important cause of systemic fungal infections, and rapid diagnostics for identifying and differentiating C. albicans from other Candida species are critical for the timely application of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, improved patient outcomes, and pharmaceutical cost savings. In this work, two 28S rRNA-directed peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probes, P-Ca726 (targeting a novel region of the ribosome) and P-CalB2208 (targeting a previously reported region), were evaluated. Hybridization conditions were optimized by using both fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM), and probes were screened for specificity and discriminative ability against a panel of C. albicans and various nontarget Candida spp. The performance of these PNA probes was compared quantitatively against that of DNA probes or DNA probe/helper combinations directed against the same target regions. Ratiometric analyses of FCM results indicated that both the hybridization quality and yield of the PNA probes were higher than those of the DNA probes. In FCM-based comparisons of the PNA probes, P-Ca726 was found to be highly specific, showing 2.5- to 5.5-fold-higher discriminatory power for C. albicans than P-CalB2208. The use of formamide further improved the performance of the new probe. Our results reinforce the significant practical and diagnostic advantages of PNA probes over their DNA counterparts for FISH and indicate that P-Ca726 may be used advantageously for the rapid and specific identification of C. albicans in clinical and related applications, especially when combined with FCM. PMID:25428160

  7. Nucleic acid probes as a diagnostic method for tick-borne hemoparasites of veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J V; Buening, G M

    1995-03-01

    An increased number of articles on the use of nucleic acid-based hybridization techniques for diagnostic purposes have been recently published. This article reviews nucleic acid-based hybridization as an assay to detect hemoparasite infections of economic relevance in veterinary medicine. By using recombinant DNA techniques, selected clones containing inserts of Anaplasma, Babesia, Cowdria or Theileria genomic DNA sequences have been obtained, and they are now available to be utilized as specific, highly sensitive DNA or RNA probes to detect the presence of the hemoparasite DNA in an infected animal. Either in an isotopic or non-isotopic detection system, probes have allowed scientists to test for--originally in samples collected from experimentally infected animals and later in samples collected in the field--the presence of hemoparasites during the prepatent, patent, convalescent, and chronic periods of the infection in the host. Nucleic acid probes have given researchers the opportunity to carry out genomic analysis of parasite DNA to differentiate hemoparasite species and to identify genetically distinct populations among and within isolates, strains and clonal populations. Prevalence of parasite infection in the tick vector can now be accomplished more specifically with the nucleic acid probes. Lately, with the advent of the polymerase chain reaction technique, small numbers of hemoparasites can be positively identified in the vertebrate host and tick vector. These techniques can be used to assess the veterinary epidemiological situation in a particular geographical region for the planning of control measures. PMID:7597795

  8. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  9. Quantification of Gordona amarae strains in foaming activated sludge and anaerobic digester systems with oligonucleotide hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, M F; de los Reyes, F L; Hernandez, M; Raskin, L

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  10. [Use of photo-anchoring of DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Mal'kov, R B; Fedorova, L I; Godovikova, T S; Kolpashchikov, D M; Poletaev, A I

    1998-01-01

    A possibility was investigated to use photo-crosslinking DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA probes were modified by incorporating photonucleotides in these, containing a photoreactive group (tetrafluorobenzazid) and capable of making covalent bonds with the examined DNA, when irradiated in 300-330 nm region. The photonucleotide was incorporated into the probe either by nick-translation, or upon elongation of the hybridized probe by the Kljonow fragment. It has been shown that the DNA probe, cross-linking to a chromosome as a result of covalent bonds, is not removed from the place of hybridization under consequent denaturating washing, which makes it possible to carry out the following DNA hybridization with selective conservation of signals obtained due to previous hybridization. This peculiarity of photo-linking DNA probes makes it possible to use them for the two-step DNA hybridization. To demonstrate this, preparations of human chromosomes were investigated. On the first step, chromosomal DNA was hybridized by means of DNA probe having nucleotide sequences of centromeric regions of chromosomes 13 and 21, the probe being linked to chromosomal DNA by the photonucleotide. Following the denaturation treatment of the preparation, and after the second chromosomal DNA hybridization with cosmid DNA, containing chromosome 13 DNA nucleotide sequence, the signal in chromosome 13 centromeric region was retained to serve a marker of this chromosome, thus fascilitating its easier identification following the hybridization of its DNA with cosmic DNA. The denaturation stability of photo-crosslinking probes opens some new possibilities in technology of DNA in situ hybridization. PMID:9821246

  11. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  12. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  13. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs. PMID:27356098

  14. Time-Resolved Nucleic Acid Hybridization Beacons Utilizing Unimolecular and Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Designs.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L; Algar, W Russ

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization probes are sought after for numerous assay and imaging applications. These probes are often limited by the properties of fluorescent dyes, prompting the development of new probes where dyes are paired with novel or nontraditional luminescent materials. Luminescent terbium complexes are an example of such a material, and these complexes offer several unique spectroscopic advantages. Here, we demonstrate two nonstem-loop designs for light-up nucleic acid hybridization beacons that utilize time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb cryptate (Tb) donor and a fluorescent reporter dye, where time-resolved emission from the dye provides an analytical signal. Both designs are based on probe oligonucleotides that are labeled at their opposite termini with Tb and a fluorescent reporter dye. In one design, a probe is partially blocked with a quencher dye-labeled oligonucleotide, and target hybridization is signaled through toehold-mediated strand displacement and loss of a competitive FRET pathway. In the other design, the intrinsic folding properties of an unblocked probe are utilized in combination with a temporal mechanism for signaling target hybridization. This temporal mechanism is based on a recently elucidated "sweet spot" for TR-FRET measurements and exploits distance control over FRET efficiencies to shift the Tb lifetime within or outside the time-gated detection window for measurements. Both the blocked and unblocked beacons offer nanomolar (femtomole) detection limits, response times on the order of minutes, multiplexing through the use of different reporter dyes, and detection in complex matrices such as serum and blood. The blocked beacons offer better mismatch selectivity, whereas the unblocked beacons are simpler in design. The temporal mechanism of signaling utilized with the unblocked beacons also plays a significant role with the blocked beacons and represents a new and effective

  15. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  16. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  17. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-03-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  18. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  19. HYBRIDIZATION OF DNA PROBES WITH WHOLE-COMMUNITY GENOMES FOR DETECTION OF GENES THAT ENCODE MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO POLLUTANTS: MER GENES AND HG2+ RESISTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleic acids extracted from microbial biomass were hybridized with probes representing four mer operons, to detect genes encoding adaptation to Hg2+. An enrichment in sequences similar to the mer genes of transposon 501 occurred during adaptation in a freshwater community. In an...

  20. Sequence-specific purification of nucleic acids by PNA-controlled hybrid selection.

    PubMed

    Orum, H; Nielsen, P E; Jørgensen, M; Larsson, C; Stanley, C; Koch, T

    1995-09-01

    Using an oligohistidine peptide nucleic acids (oligohistidine-PNA) chimera, we have developed a rapid hybrid selection method that allows efficient, sequence-specific purification of a target nucleic acid. The method exploits two fundamental features of PNA. First, that PNA binds with high affinity and specificity to its complementary nucleic acid. Second, that amino acids are easily attached to the PNA oligomer during synthesis. We show that a (His)6-PNA chimera exhibits strong binding to chelated Ni2+ ions without compromising its native PNA hybridization properties. We further show that these characteristics allow the (His)6-PNA/DNA complex to be purified by the well-established method of metal ion affinity chromatography using a Ni(2+)-NTA (nitrilotriactic acid) resin. Specificity and efficiency are the touchstones of any nucleic acid purification scheme. We show that the specificity of the (His)6-PNA selection approach is such that oligonucleotides differing by only a single nucleotide can be selectively purified. We also show that large RNAs (2224 nucleotides) can be captured with high efficiency by using multiple (His)6-PNA probes. PNA can hybridize to nucleic acids in low-salt concentrations that destabilize native nucleic acid structures. We demonstrate that this property of PNA can be utilized to purify an oligonucleotide in which the target sequence forms part of an intramolecular stem/loop structure. PMID:7495562

  1. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  2. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  3. Nucleic acid hybridization for detection of cell culture-amplified adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C; Deibel, R

    1988-01-01

    A number of recombinant plasmids containing genomic segments of adenovirus were constructed. Seven cloned probes, as well as total adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) and Ad16 genomic DNA, were tested by a nucleic acid hybridization technique for sensitivity and specificity in detecting adenoviruses in infected cells. Adenovirus DNA was spotted onto a nitrocellulose filter and hybridized with 32P-labeled DNA probes. The probes, total Ad2 genomic DNA, and plasmid pAd2-H (containing the hexon gene from Ad2 DNA) all detected 10 reference serotypes of five genomic subgroups (A through E) with similar sensitivities. However, plasmid pAd2-H required less preparation time than did total Ad2 DNA. Probes pAd2-F (containing the fiber gene from Ad2) and pAd16-BD (containing the BamHI D fragment from Ad16) hybridized only with reference serotypes from the homologous subgroups (C and B, respectively). Of 101 patient isolates amplified in cells, pAd2-H detected 100% of all isolates from both the homologous and the heterologous subgroups. The detection rates for pAd2-F were 100% (subgroup C) and 3.6% (subgroups A, B, and D), and those for pAd16-BD were 100% (subgroup B) and 9.4% (subgroups A, C, and D). A commercial biotinylated product (Pathogene II) was also included in this study for comparison. Images PMID:3230138

  4. Probing hybrid modified gravity by stellar motion around Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Capozziello, S.; Jovanović, P.; Borka Jovanović, V.

    2016-06-01

    We consider possible signatures for the so called hybrid gravity within the Galactic Central Parsec. This modified theory of gravity consists of a superposition of the metric Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian with an f(R) term constructed à la Palatiniand can be easily reduced to an equivalent scalar-tensor theory. Such an approach is introduced in order to cure the shortcomings related to f(R) gravity, in general formulated either in metric or in metric-affine frameworks. Hybrid gravity allows to disentangle the further gravitational degrees of freedom with respect to those of standard General Relativity. The present analysis is based on the S2 star orbital precession around the massive compact dark object at the Galactic Center where the simulated orbits in hybrid modified gravity are compared with astronomical observations. These simulations result with constraints on the range of hybrid gravity interaction parameter ϕ0, showing that in the case of S2 star it is between -0.0009 and -0.0002. At the same time, we are also able to obtain the constraints on the effective mass parameter mϕ, and found that it is between -0.0034 and -0.0025 AU-1 for S2 star. Furthermore, the hybrid gravity potential induces precession of S2 star orbit in the same direction as General Relativity. In previous papers, we considered other types of extended gravities, like metric power law f(R)∝Rn gravity, inducing Yukawa and Sanders-like gravitational potentials, but it seems that hybrid gravity is the best among these models to explain different gravitational phenomena at different astronomical scales.

  5. Fiber-based hybrid probe for non-invasive cerebral monitoring in neonatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberger, Matthias; Giovannella, Martina; Pagliazzi, Marco; Weigel, Udo; Durduran, Turgut; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Schmitt, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Improved cerebral monitoring systems are needed to prevent preterm infants from long-term cognitive and motor restrictions. Combining advanced near-infrared diffuse spectroscopy measurement technologies, time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) will introduce novel indicators of cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow for neonatology. For non-invasive sensing a fiber-optical probe is used to send and receive light from the infant head. In this study we introduce a new fiber-based hybrid probe that is designed for volume production. The probe supports TRS and DCS measurements in a cross geometry, thus both technologies gain information on the same region inside the tissue. The probe is highly miniaturized to perform cerebral measurements on heads of extreme preterm infants down to head diameters of 6cm. Considerations concerning probe production focus on a reproducible accuracy in shape and precise optical alignment. In this way deviations in measurement data within a series of probes should be minimized. In addition to that, requirements for clinical use like robustness and hygiene are considered. An additional soft-touching sleeve made of FDA compatible silicone allows for a flexible attachment with respect to the individual anatomy of each patient. We present the technical concept of the hybrid probe and corresponding manufacturing methods. A prototype of the probe is shown and tested on tissue phantoms as well as in vivo to verify its operational reliability.

  6. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  7. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  8. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  9. Fabrication of Uniform DNA-Conjugated Hydrogel Microparticles via Replica Molding for Facile Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Christina L.; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  10. Multi-stringency wash of partially hybridized 60-mer probes reveals that the stringency along the probe decreases with distance from the microarray surface

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Lena; Søe, Martin Jensen; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Dufva, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe a multi-parametric study of DNA hybridization to probes with 20–70% G + C content. Probes were designed towards 71 different sites/mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Seven probe lengths, three spacer lengths and six stringencies were systematically varied. The three spacer lengths were obtained by placing the gene-specific sequence in discrete steps along the 60-mer probes. The study was performed using Agilent 8 × 15 000 probes custom-made arrays and a home-built array washer providing different stringencies to each of the eight sub-arrays on the slides. Investigation of hybridization signals, specificity and dissociation curves indicated that probes close to the surface were influenced by an additional stringency provided by the microarray surface. Consistent with this, probes close to the surface required 4 × SSC, while probes placed away from the surface required 0.35 × SSC wash buffers in order to give accurate genotyping results. Multiple step dissociation was frequently observed for probes placed furthest away from surface, but not for probes placed proximal to the surface, which is consistent with the hypothesis that there is different stringency along the 60-mer. The results have impact on design of probes for genotyping, gene expression and comparative genome hybridization analysis. PMID:18805905

  11. Field-hardened optical waveguide hybrid integrated-circuit multisensor chemical probe and its chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollina, Richard J.; Himka, Roger L.; Saini, Devinder P.; McGibbon, Alan; Klainer, Stanley M.

    1997-05-01

    A single probe containing three hybrid integrated-circuit, optical waveguide, chemical-biochemical sensors (chip sensors) has been developed. Each chip sensor contains two hybrid waveguides -- one for sensing and one for reference. The sense waveguide is coated with a species-specific or group-specific chemistry or biochemistry. The reference waveguide is coated with a version of the sense chemistry or biochemistry, which is not sensitive to the analyte. The integrated structure is encapsulated and contains a single fixed light source, two detectors (reference and sense), and an optical train. The design is amenable to fluorescence, absorption, and refraction measurements. The three chip sensors are individually mounted in a probe that contains all of the electronics and computing capability necessary to collect and process the output information from each chip sensor. Only the surface of the individual chips are exposed to the target analytes. The probe is rugged, intrinsically safe, and can operate under 75 m (250 ft) of water.

  12. The theory of the deoxyribonucleic acid - ribonucleic acid hybridization reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Thomou, H; Katsanos, N A

    1976-01-01

    A general equation is derived describing data of DNA-RNA hybridization in the presence of a competing self-annealing reaction of RNA. The well known double-reciprocal relation and the Scatchard equation are shown to be limiting cases of this general equation. Some new hybridization data at various temperatures are presented and analysed by using the new equation. The results can only be explained if we assume that the behavior of DNA towards single RNA molecules is the same as that towards the annealed form, (RNA12. The variation of the equilibrium constant of the hybridization reaction with temperature is small, indicating a small heat of reaction. The maximum amount of hybridized RNA at equilibrium appears to be independent of temperature. PMID:1275887

  13. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu). PMID:24928876

  14. Development of a PNA Probe for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guofu; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Baoyu; Wang, Guangce; Lu, Douding; Xu, Zhong; Yan, Peishen

    2011-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is a common but dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) species, which is widely distributed along the China Sea coast. Development of methods for rapid and precise identification and quantification is prerequisite for early-stage warning and monitoring of blooms due to P. donghaiense. In this study, sequences representing the partial large subunit rDNA (D1–D2), small subunit rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS-2) of P. donghaiense were firstly obtained, and then seven candidate DNA probes were designed for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests on P. donghaiense. Based on the fluorescent intensity of P. donghaiense cells labeled by the DNA probes, the probe DP0443A displayed the best hybridization performance. Therefore, a PNA probe (PP0443A) analogous to DP0443A was used in the further study. The cells labeled with the PNA probe displayed more intensive green fluorescence than that labeled with its DNA analog. The PNA probe was used to hybridize with thirteen microalgae belonging to five families, i.e., Dinophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Raphidophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Bacillariophyceae, and showed no visible cross-reaction. Finally, FISH with the probes PP0443A and DP0443A and light microscopy (LM) analysis aiming at enumerating P. donghaiense cells were performed on the field samples. Statistical comparisons of the cell densities (cells/L) of P. donghaiense in the natural samples determined by FISH and LM were performed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparisons of the means. The P. donghaiense cell densities determined by LM and the PNA probe are remarkably higher than (p<0.05) that determined by the DNA probe, while no significant difference is observed between LM and the PNA probe. All results suggest that the PNA probe is more sensitive that its DNA analog, and therefore is promising for the monitoring of harmful algal blooms of P. donghaiense in the future. PMID:22022408

  15. Hybrid semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as polarization-sensitive fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Maxwell B.; Sun, Wei; Rong, Yu; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Much work has been done on collapsed chains of conjugated semiconducting polymers and their applications as fluorescent probes or sensors. On surfaces spin-coated with semiconducting polymers, excitation energy transfer along the polymer backbone can be used to quickly and efficiently funnel energy to chromophores with localized energy minima. If each chromophore is immobilized within its matrix, this can result in large fluorescence anisotropy. Through nanoprecipitation of a matrix polymer blended at low mass ratios with short-chain, hydrophobic, fluorescent semiconducting polymers, we take advantage of this large fluorescence anisotropy to make polarization-sensitive nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are small at approximately 7 nm in diameter; exhibit a high quantum yield of 0.75; and are easily functionalized to bind to protein targets. By exciting the nanoparticles with polarized light on a wide-field fluorescence microscope, we are able to monitor not only protein location, but also changes in their orientation. PMID:23895535

  16. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  17. D-region blunt probe data analysis using hybrid computer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of performing data reduction techniques with a hybrid computer was studied. The data was obtained from the flight of a parachute born probe through the D-region of the ionosphere. A presentation of the theory of blunt probe operation is included with emphasis on the equations necessary to perform the analysis. This is followed by a discussion of computer program development. Included in this discussion is a comparison of computer and hand reduction results for the blunt probe launched on 31 January 1972. The comparison showed that it was both feasible and desirable to use the computer for data reduction. The results of computer data reduction performed on flight data acquired from five blunt probes are also presented.

  18. Microfluidic platform for isolating nucleic acid targets using sequence specific hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Morabito, Kenneth; Tang, Jay X.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-01-01

    The separation of target nucleic acid sequences from biological samples has emerged as a significant process in today's diagnostics and detection strategies. In addition to the possible clinical applications, the fundamental understanding of target and sequence specific hybridization on surface modified magnetic beads is of high value. In this paper, we describe a novel microfluidic platform that utilizes a mobile magnetic field in static microfluidic channels, where single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules are isolated via nucleic acid hybridization. We first established efficient isolation of biotinylated capture probe (BP) using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. Subsequently, we investigated the hybridization of target ssDNA with BP bound to beads and explained these hybridization kinetics using a dual-species kinetic model. The number of hybridized target ssDNA molecules was determined to be about 6.5 times less than that of BP on the bead surface, due to steric hindrance effects. The hybridization of target ssDNA with non-complementary BP bound to bead was also examined, and non-specific hybridization was found to be insignificant. Finally, we demonstrated highly efficient capture and isolation of target ssDNA in the presence of non-target ssDNA, where as low as 1% target ssDNA can be detected from mixture. The microfluidic method described in this paper is significantly relevant and is broadly applicable, especially towards point-of-care biological diagnostic platforms that require binding and separation of known target biomolecules, such as RNA, ssDNA, or protein. PMID:24404041

  19. Photoinitiator Nucleotide for Quantifying Nucleic Acid Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leah M.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    This first report of a photoinitiator-nucleotide conjugate demonstrates a novel approach for sensitive, rapid and visual detection of DNA hybridization events. This approach holds potential for various DNA labeling schemes and for applications benefiting from selective DNA-based polymerization initiators. Here, we demonstrate covalent, enzymatic incorporation of an eosin-photoinitiator 2′-deoxyuridine-5′-triphosphate (EITC-dUTP) conjugate into surface-immobilized DNA hybrids. Subsequent radical chain photoinitiation from these sites using an acrylamide/bis-acrylamide formulation yields a dynamic detection range between 500pM and 50nM of DNA target. Increasing EITC-nucleotide surface densities leads to an increase in surface-based polymer film heights until achieving a film height plateau of 280nm ±20nm at 610 ±70 EITC-nucleotides/μm2. Film heights of 10–20 nm were obtained from eosin surface densities of approximately 20 EITC-nucleotides/μm2 while below the detection limit of ~10 EITC-nucleotides/μm2, no detectable films were formed. This unique threshold behavior is utilized for instrument-free, visual quantification of target DNA concentration ranges. PMID:20337438

  20. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  1. A highly sensitive aptasensor for OTA detection based on hybridization chain reaction and fluorescent perylene probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuanya; Chen, Yanfen; Weng, Bo; Xu, Liqun; Li, Changming

    2016-07-15

    An optical aptasensor was developed for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification strategy and fluorescent perylene probe (PAPDI)/DNA composites. Dendritic DNA concatamers were synthesized by HCR strategy and modified on magnetic nanoparticles through aptamer as medium. A large amount of PAPDI probe aggregated under the induction of DNA concatamers and caused fluorescence quenching. In the presence of OTA, the PAPDI/DNA composites were released from magnetic nanoparticles due to the strong affinity between aptamer and OTA. In ethanol, PAPDI monomers disaggregated and produced strong fluorescence. The present method displays excellent sensitivity and selectivity towards OTA. PMID:26938491

  2. Quantification of methanogenic groups in anaerobic biological reactors by oligonucleotide probe hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, L; Poulsen, L K; Noguera, D R; Rittmann, B E; Stahl, D A

    1994-01-01

    The microbial community structure of anaerobic biological reactors was evaluated by using oligonucleotide probes complementary to conserved tracts of the 16S rRNAs of phylogenetically defined groups of methanogens. Phylogenetically defined groups of methanogens were quantified and visualized, respectively, by hybridization of 32P- and fluorescent-dye-labeled probes to the 16S rRNAs from samples taken from laboratory acetate-fed chemostats, laboratory municipal solid waste digestors, and full-scale sewage sludge digestors. Methanosarcina species, members of the order Methanobacteriales, and Methanosaeta species were the most abundant methanogens present in the chemostats, the solid-waste digestors, and the sewage sludge digestors, respectively. PMID:7517129

  3. Design, Preparation, and Characterization of PNA-Based Hybridization Probes for Affibody-Molecule-Mediated Pretargeting.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie

    2015-08-19

    In radioimmunotherapy, the contrast between tumor and normal tissue can be improved by using a pretargeting strategy with a primary targeting agent, which is conjugated to a recognition tag, and a secondary radiolabeled molecule binding specifically to the recognition tag. The secondary molecule is injected after the targeting agent has accumulated in the tumor and is designed to have a favorable biodistribution profile, with fast clearance from blood and low uptake in normal tissues. In this study, we have designed and evaluated two complementary peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based probes for specific and high-affinity association in vivo. An anti-HER2 Affibody-PNA chimera, Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1, was produced by a semisynthetic approach using sortase A catalyzed ligation of a recombinantly produced Affibody molecule to a PNA-based HP1-probe assembled using solid-phase chemistry. A complementary HP2 probe carrying a DOTA chelator and a tyrosine for dual radiolabeling was prepared by solid-phase synthesis. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and UV thermal melts showed that the probes can hybridize to form a structured duplex with a very high melting temperature (T(m)), both in HP1:HP2 and in Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 (T(m) = 86-88 °C), and the high binding affinity between Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1 and HP2 was confirmed in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based binding study. Following a moderately fast association (1.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), the dissociation of the probes was extremely slow and <5% dissociation was observed after 17 h. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) for Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 binding to HER2 was estimated by SPR to be 212 pM, suggesting that the conjugation to PNA does not impair Affibody binding to HER2. The biodistribution profiles of (111)In- and (125)I-labeled HP2 were measured in NMRI mice, showing very fast blood clearance rates and low accumulation of radioactivity in kidneys and other organs. The measured radioactivity in blood was 0.63

  4. Probing interactions between plant virus movement proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    Most plant viruses move between plant cells with the help of their movement proteins (MPs). MPs are multifunctional proteins, and one of their functions is almost invariably binding to nucleic acids. Presumably, the MP-nucleic acid interaction is directly involved in formation of nucleoprotein complexes that function as intermediates in the cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses. Thus, when studying a viral MP, it is important to determine whether or not it binds nucleic acids, and to characterize the hallmark parameters of such binding, i.e., preference for single- or double-stranded nucleic acids and binding cooperativity and sequence specificity. Here, we present two major experimental approaches, native gel mobility shift assay and ultra violet (UV) light cross-linking, for detection and characterization of MP binding to DNA and RNA molecules. We also describe protocols for purification of recombinant viral MPs over-expressed in bacteria and production of different DNA and RNA probes for these binding assays. PMID:18370264

  5. Detection of viral genomes in the liver by in situ hybridization using 35S-, bromodeoxyuridine-, and biotin-labeled probes

    SciTech Connect

    Niedobitek, G.; Finn, T.; Herbst, H.; Stein, H.

    1989-03-01

    Methods employing /sup 35/S-, biotin-, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd)-labeled DNA probes were compared for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the liver. The results demonstrate that: 1) HBV can be detected reliably only by the use of radiolabeled probes, whereas methods employing nonradioactive probes obviously are not sensitive enough for this virus. The use of /sup 35/S-labeled probes shortens the exposure times considerably in comparison to tritiated probes. 2) Biotin-labeled probes are of limited value for in situ hybridization on liver tissues because the presence of endogenous avidin-binding activity often leads to false positive results. 3) Brd-Urd-labeled probes are a useful alternative to biotinylated probes for the detection of CMV. In comparison with biotinylated probes, BrdUrd-labeled probes produce a specific signal of similar staining intensity in the absence of background staining in the liver.

  6. Identification of cDNAs by direct hybridization using cosmid probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Lieuallen, K.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this effort is to quickly obtain as many chromosome-specific cDNAs with as much map and sequence detail as possible. Many techniques have been proposed to isolate and identify genes within defined genomic regions; the technique discussed here is direct hybridization of a relatively complex genomic probe, an entire cosmid clone, to cDNA libraries. This method continues to be a straightforward technique with a fair number of successes.

  7. Electric field directed nucleic acid hybridization on microchips.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, C F; Raymond, D E; Wu, D J; Tu, E; Sosnowski, R G; Butler, W F; Nerenberg, M; Heller, M J

    1997-01-01

    Selection and adjustment of proper physical parameters enables rapid DNA transport, site selective concentration, and accelerated hybridization reactions to be carried out on active microelectronic arrays. These physical parameters include DC current, voltage, solution conductivity and buffer species. Generally, at any given current and voltage level, the transport or mobility of DNA is inversely proportional to electrolyte or buffer conductivity. However, only a subset of buffer species produce both rapid transport, site specific concentration and accelerated hybridization. These buffers include zwitterionic and low conductivity species such as: d- and l-histidine; 1- and 3-methylhistidines; carnosine; imidazole; pyridine; and collidine. In contrast, buffers such as glycine, beta-alanine and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) produce rapid transport and site selective concentration but do not facilitate hybridization. Our results suggest that the ability of these buffers (histidine, etc.) to facilitate hybridization appears linked to their ability to provide electric field concentration of DNA; to buffer acidic conditions present at the anode; and in this process acquire a net positive charge which then shields or diminishes repulsion between the DNA strands, thus promoting hybridization. PMID:9396795

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid Hyaluronic Acid-Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Cuttica, Davide; Annabi, Nasim; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic hybrid hydrogels have generated broad interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin (hydrolyzed collagen) are naturally derived polymers and biodegradable under physiological conditions. Moreover, collagen and HA are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in most of the tissues (e.g. cardiovascular, cartilage, neural). When used as a hybrid material, HA-gelatin hydrogels may enable mimicking the ECM of native tissues. Although HA-gelatin hybrid hydrogels are promising biomimetic substrates, their material properties have not been thoroughly characterized in the literature. Herein, we generated hybrid hydrogels with tunable physical and biological properties by using different concentrations of HA and gelatin. The physical properties of the fabricated hydrogels including swelling ratio, degradation, and mechanical properties were investigated. In addition, in vitro cellular responses in both two and three dimensional (2D and 3D) culture conditions were assessed. It was found that the addition of gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) into HA methacrylate (HAMA) promoted cell spreading in the hybrid hydogels. Moreover, the hybrid hydrogels showed significantly improved mechanical properties compared to their single component analogs. The HAMA-GelMA hydrogels exhibited remarkable tunability behavior and may be useful for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. PMID:23419055

  9. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Cuttica, Davide; Annabi, Nasim; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Biomimetic hybrid hydrogels have generated broad interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin (hydrolyzed collagen) are naturally derived polymers and biodegradable under physiological conditions. Moreover, collagen and HA are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in most of the tissues (e.g., cardiovascular, cartilage, neural). When used as a hybrid material, HA-gelatin hydrogels may enable mimicking the ECM of native tissues. Although HA-gelatin hybrid hydrogels are promising biomimetic substrates, their material properties have not been thoroughly characterized in the literature. Herein, we generated hybrid hydrogels with tunable physical and biological properties by using different concentrations of HA and gelatin. The physical properties of the fabricated hydrogels including swelling ratio, degradation, and mechanical properties were investigated. In addition, in vitro cellular responses in both two and three-dimensional culture conditions were assessed. It was found that the addition of gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) into HA methacrylate (HAMA) promoted cell spreading in the hybrid hydogels. Moreover, the hybrid hydrogels showed significantly improved mechanical properties compared to their single component analogs. The HAMA-GelMA hydrogels exhibited remarkable tunability behavior and may be useful for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. PMID:23419055

  10. Platinum porous nanoparticles hybrid with metal ions as probes for simultaneous detection of multiplex cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-03-15

    In this work, platinum porous nanoparticles (PtPNPs) absorbed metal ions as electrochemical signals were fabricated. Clean-surface PtPNPs were prepared by a surfactant-free method and decorated with amino groups via 2-aminoethanethiol. Amino capped PtPNPs complexation with Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) to form PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) hybrids, respectively. Anti-CEA and Anti-AFP separately labeled with PtPNPs-Cd(2+) and PtPNPs-Cu(2+) were used as distinguishable signal tags for capturing antigens. The metal ions were detected in a single run through differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) without acid dissolution, electric potentials and peak heights of which reflected the identity and concentrations of the corresponding antigen. Ionic liquid reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as a substrate, which was rich in amino groups to immobilize antibodies by glutaraldehyde through cross-link between aldehyde groups and amino groups. Using the proposed probes and platform, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for simultaneous detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was successfully developed. This immunoassay possessed good linearity from 0.05 ng mL(-1) to 200 ng mL(-1) for both CEA and AFP. The detection limit of CEA was 0.002 ng mL(-1) and that of AFP was 0.05 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). Furthermore, analysis of clinical serum samples using this immunosensor was well consistent with the data determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It suggested that the proposed electrochemical immunoassay provided a potential application of clinical screening for early-stage cancers. PMID:24176967

  11. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  12. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Microwave probe diagnostic for the lower hybrid multijunction antenna on TdeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Demers, Y.; Chaudron, G.A.; Glaude, V.; Cote, A.; Dube, A.; Mireault, R.; Robert, A.; Vachon, L.

    1997-02-01

    On the TdeV tokamak a microwave probe diagnostic enables direct measurement of the electromagnetic fields in ten reduced waveguides of the lower hybrid current drive multijunction antenna. In each instrumented reduced waveguide, the local field is measured at two different locations by probes through coupling holes located in the narrow wall of the waveguides. The amplitude and phase of the signals are measured with a multichannel heterodyne circuit and are used to calculate the incident and reflected fields at the antenna mouth. The probes are under vacuum and they are bakeable up to the maximum operating temperature of the antenna ({ital T}=350{degree}C). They are calibrated at room temperature but the evolution of their characteristic with temperature is taken into account in the data analysis. Typical accuracies of the field measurements at the grill mouth are: {plus_minus}9{percent} for the amplitude and {plus_minus}6{degree} for the phase. The probe diagnostic has been operating reliably for the last two years and the probes do not appear to perturb the operation of the antenna nor to reduce its power handling capability. Comparisons of the probe measurements with calculations from the multijunction antenna modeling code SWAN show that the code is accurate for low rf power densities at the antenna mouth. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  15. Nucleic Acid Sandwich Hybridization Assay with Quantum Dot-Induced Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Cheng-Chung; Huang, Yi-Han

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization assay with a quantum dot (QD)-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter system. Two label-free hemagglutinin H5 sequences (60-mer DNA and 630-nt cDNA fragment) of avian influenza viruses were used as the targets in this work. Two oligonucleotides (16 mers and 18 mers) that specifically recognize two separate but neighboring regions of the H5 sequences were served as the capturing and reporter probes, respectively. The capturing probe was conjugated to QD655 (donor) in a molar ratio of 10:1 (probe-to-QD), and the reporter probe was labeled with Alexa Fluor 660 dye (acceptor) during synthesis. The sandwich hybridization assay was done in a 20 μL transparent, adhesive frame-confined microchamber on a disposable, temperature-adjustable indium tin oxide (ITO) glass slide. The FRET signal in response to the sandwich hybridization was monitored by a homemade optical sensor comprising a single 400 nm UV light-emitting diode (LED), optical fibers, and a miniature 16-bit spectrophotometer. The target with a concentration ranging from 0.5 nM to 1 μM was successfully correlated with both QD emission decrease at 653 nm and dye emission increase at 690 nm. To sum up, this work is beneficial for developing a portable QD-based nucleic acid sensor for on-site pathogen detection. PMID:23211753

  16. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships. PMID:25429559

  17. Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elisa; Ponzano, Stefano; Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-09-18

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α-amino-β-lactone (3-aminooxetan-2-one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl-N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  18. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  19. Detection of Chromosomal Inversions Using Non-Repetitive Nucleic Acid Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and a kit for the identification of chromosomal inversions are described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  20. Detection of chromosomal inversions using non-repetitive nucleic acid probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for the identification of chromosomal inversions is described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  1. GENUS- AND GROUP-SPECIFIC HYBRIDIZATION PROBES FOR DETERMINATIVE AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of six oligonucleotides, complementary to conserved tracts of 16S rRNA from phylogenetically-defined groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria, was characterized for use as hybridization probes in determinative and environmental microbiology. our probes were genus specific and id...

  2. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Dobson, C.; Jones, J. E.; Chavers, D. G.

    2007-11-15

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas.

  3. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method.

    PubMed

    Deline, C; Gilchrist, B E; Dobson, C; Jones, J E; Chavers, D G

    2007-11-01

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas. PMID:18052471

  4. Redox polymer and probe DNA tethered to gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified amperometric detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2006-04-15

    The detection of nucleic acids based upon recognition surfaces formed by co-immobilization of a redox polymer mediator and DNA probe sequences on gold electrodes is described. The recognition surface consists of a redox polymer, [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+/2+), and a model single DNA strand cross-linked and tethered to a gold electrode via an anchoring self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cysteamine. Hybridization between the immobilized probe DNA of the recognition surface and a biotin-conjugated target DNA sequence (designed from the ssrA gene of Listeria monocytogenes), followed by addition of an enzyme (glucose oxidase)-avidin conjugate, results in electrical contact between the enzyme and the mediating redox polymer. In the presence of glucose, the current generated due to the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone is measured, and a response is obtained that is binding-dependent. The tethering of the probe DNA and redox polymer to the SAM improves the stability of the surface to assay conditions of rigorous washing and high salt concentration (1 M). These conditions eliminate nonspecific interaction of both the target DNA and the enzyme-avidin conjugate with the recognition surfaces. The sensor response increases linearly with increasing concentration of target DNA in the range of 1 x 10(-9) to 2 x 10(-6) M. The detection limit is approximately 1.4 fmol, (corresponding to 0.2 nM of target DNA). Regeneration of the recognition surface is possible by treatment with 0.25 M NaOH solution. After rehybridization of the regenerated surface with the target DNA sequence, >95% of the current is recovered, indicating that the redox polymer and probe DNA are strongly bound to the surface. These results demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach. PMID:16615783

  5. Rapid and correct identification of intestinal Bacteroides spp. with chromosomal DNA probes by whole-cell dot blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi, M.; Ohno, T.; Mutai, M.

    1988-05-01

    A dot blot hybridization procedure with /sup 32/P-labeled whole chromosomal DNA of the type strains as probes was developed as a rapid and simple method for identification of intestinal Bacteroides species. Bacterial cells were fixed onto membrane filters by slight suction, treated with 0.5 N NaOH, and hybridized with these probes. Of 65 Bacteroides strains isolated from 19 human fecal specimens, which were identified as B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. caccae, B. uniformis, B. stercoris, B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. merdae by conventional phenotypic characterization, 62 (95%) were correctly identified with this hybridization procedure.

  6. Quantum Dot-Bead-DNA Probe-Based Hybridization Fluorescence Assays on Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-10-01

    The development of chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-DNA conjugate probes for hybridization detection is a prime research focus in the field of microfluidics. QD-Bead-DNA probe-based hybridization detection methods are often called "bead-based assays," and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capabilities of microfluidic technology. Met was identified as a prognostic marker in different cancers including lung, renal, liver, head and neck, stomach, and breast. In this report, the cancer causing Met gene was detected with QDs attached to polystyrene microbeads. We constructed a microfluidic platform using a flexible PDMS polymer. The chip consists of two channels, with two inlets and two outlets. The two channels were integrated with QD-bead-DNA probes for simultaneous detection of wild type target DNA and mutant DNA, containing three nucleotide changes compared to the wild type sequence. The fluorescence quenching ability of QDs within the channels of microfluidic chips were compared for both DNAs. PMID:26726440

  7. Visualization of NRAS RNA G-Quadruplex Structures in Cells with an Engineered Fluorogenic Hybridization Probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo-Bin; Hu, Ming-Hao; Liu, Guo-Cai; Wang, Jin; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2016-08-24

    The RNA G-quadruplex is an important secondary structure formed by guanine-rich RNA sequences. However, its folding studies have mainly been studied in vitro. Accurate identification of RNA G-quadruplex formation within a sequence of interest remains difficult in cells. Herein, and based on the guanine-rich sequence in the 5'-UTR of NRAS mRNA, we designed and synthesized the first G-quadruplex-triggered fluorogenic hybridization (GTFH) probe, ISCH-nras1, for the unique visualization of the G-quadruplexes that form in this region. ISCH-nras1 is made up of two parts: The first is a fluorescent light-up moiety specific to G-quadruplex structures, and the second is a DNA molecule that can hybridize with a sequence that is adjacent to the guanine-rich sequence in the NRAS mRNA 5'-UTR. Further evaluation studies indicated that ISCH-nras1 could directly and precisely detect the targeted NRAS RNA G-quadruplex structures, both in vitro and in cells. Thus, this GTFH probe was a useful tool for directly investigating the folding of G-quadruplex structures within an RNA of interest and represents a new direction for the design of smart RNA G-quadruplex probes. PMID:27508892

  8. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

    1998-08-18

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

  9. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Przetakiewicz, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  10. Monitoring of microbial communities by flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted hybridization probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Guenter; Amann, Rudolf

    1995-10-01

    Flow cytometry in combination with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) based fluorescence in situ hybridization is a new technique for the analysis of microbial communities. Oligonucleotide probes directed against ribosomal RNA allow the identification of species or groups of micro- organisms. Combined with flow cytometry, up to several thousand cells per second can be classified. In addition to the identification and specific enumeration of micro-organisms, further information on the distribution of cell size, DNA and ribosome content -- and therefore an assessment of activity -- within the entire community or subpopulations can be obtained. This technique is much more accurate, informative, and rapid than classical culture-dependent methods. Data of activated sludge samples hybridized with fluorescein labeled oligonucleotides and counterstained with the DNA-specific dye Hoechst 33342 are presented as examples for its applicability to complex microbial communities.

  11. Guided assembly of metal and hybrid conductive probes using floating potential dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Stadler, Johannes; Schaffhauser, Daniel; del Pino, Angel Pérez; Burg, Brian R; Dittrich, Petra S

    2011-03-01

    We present the site-selective, parallel and reproducible formation of conductive gold and tetrathiafulvalene-gold (TTF-Au) hybrid micro- and nanowires from their respective ion salt and cation-radical solutions. While the formation of micro- and nanowires by means of dielectrophoresis with directly coupled electrodes has been thoroughly investigated in recent studies, we present here the first relevant example of metal and hybrid wire assembly obtained by floating potential dielectrophoresis. In this configuration, the assembly of micro- and nanowires is achieved by capacitively coupling a large electrode (bias electrode) to a conductive substrate (p-doped Si) separated by an insulating oxide layer. In contrast to former studies, this allows parallel production of micro- and nanowires with only one pair of electrodes connected to a sine wave generator. We further demonstrate that these structures are suitable probes for localized surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). PMID:21225055

  12. Probing hybridization of a single energy level coupled to superconducting leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zanten, D. M. T.; Balestro, F.; Courtois, H.; Winkelmann, C. B.

    2015-11-01

    Electron transport through a quantum dot coupled to superconducting leads shows a sharp conductance onset when a quantum dot orbital level crosses the superconducting coherence peak of one lead. We study superconducting single electron transistors in the weak coupling limit by connecting individual gold nanoparticles with aluminum leads formed by electromigration. We show that the transport features close to the conductance onset threshold can be accurately described by the quantum dot levels' hybridization with the leads, which is strongly enhanced by the divergent density of states at the superconducting gap edge. This highlights the importance of electron cotunneling effects in spectroscopies with superconducting probes.

  13. Guided assembly of metal and hybrid conductive probes using floating potential dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Stadler, Johannes; Schaffhauser, Daniel; Del Pino, Ángel Pérez; Burg, Brian R.; Dittrich, Petra S.

    2011-03-01

    We present the site-selective, parallel and reproducible formation of conductive gold and tetrathiafulvalene-gold (TTF-Au) hybrid micro- and nanowires from their respective ion salt and cation-radical solutions. While the formation of micro- and nanowires by means of dielectrophoresis with directly coupled electrodes has been thoroughly investigated in recent studies, we present here the first relevant example of metal and hybrid wire assembly obtained by floating potential dielectrophoresis. In this configuration, the assembly of micro- and nanowires is achieved by capacitively coupling a large electrode (bias electrode) to a conductive substrate (p-doped Si) separated by an insulating oxide layer. In contrast to former studies, this allows parallel production of micro- and nanowires with only one pair of electrodes connected to a sine wave generator. We further demonstrate that these structures are suitable probes for localized surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).We present the site-selective, parallel and reproducible formation of conductive gold and tetrathiafulvalene-gold (TTF-Au) hybrid micro- and nanowires from their respective ion salt and cation-radical solutions. While the formation of micro- and nanowires by means of dielectrophoresis with directly coupled electrodes has been thoroughly investigated in recent studies, we present here the first relevant example of metal and hybrid wire assembly obtained by floating potential dielectrophoresis. In this configuration, the assembly of micro- and nanowires is achieved by capacitively coupling a large electrode (bias electrode) to a conductive substrate (p-doped Si) separated by an insulating oxide layer. In contrast to former studies, this allows parallel production of micro- and nanowires with only one pair of electrodes connected to a sine wave generator. We further demonstrate that these structures are suitable probes for localized surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Electronic supplementary

  14. Observation and Quantification of Telomere and Repetitive Sequences Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) with PNA Probes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beomseok; Lee, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Telomere is a ribonucleoprotein structure that protects chromosomal ends from aberrant fusion and degradation. Telomere length is maintained by telomerase or an alternative pathway, known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)(1). Recently, C. elegans has emerged as a multicellular model organism for the study of telomere and ALT(2). Visualization of repetitive sequences in the genome is critical in understanding the biology of telomeres. While telomere length can be measured by telomere restriction fragment assay or quantitative PCR, these methods only provide the averaged telomere length. On the contrary, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide the information of the individual telomeres in cells. Here, we provide protocols and representative results of the method to determine telomere length of C. elegans by fluorescent in situ hybridization. This method provides a simple, but powerful, in situ procedure that does not cause noticeable damage to morphology. By using fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and digoxigenin-dUTP-labeled probe, we were able to visualize two different repetitive sequences: telomere repeats and template of ALT (TALT) in C. elegans embryos and gonads. PMID:27583462

  15. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  16. Bipolar lead-acid battery for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakes, M.; Woortmeijer, R.; Schmal, D.

    Within the framework of the European project bipolar lead-acid power source (BILAPS), a new production route is being developed for the bipolar lead-acid battery. The performance targets are 500 W kg -1, 30 Wh kg -1 and 100 000 power-assist life cycles (PALCs). The operation voltage of the battery can be, according to the requirements, 12, 36 V or any other voltage. Tests with recently developed 4 and 12 V prototypes, each of 30 Ah capacity have demonstrated that the PALC can be operated using 10 C discharge and 9 C charge peaks. The tests show no overvoltage or undervoltage problems during three successive test periods of 16 h with 8 h rest in between. The temperature stabilizes during these tests at 40-45 °C using a thermal-management system. The bipolar lead acid battery is operated at an initial 50% state-of-charge. During the tests, the individual cell voltages display only very small differences. Tests are now in progress to improve further the battery-management system, which has been developed at the cell level, during the period no PALCs are run in order to improve the hybrid behaviour of the battery. The successful tests show the feasibility of operating the bipolar lead-acid battery in a hybrid mode. The costs of the system are estimated to be much lower than those for nickel-metal-hydride or Li-ion based high-power systems. An additional advantage of the lead-acid system is that recycling of lead-acid batteries is well established.

  17. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  18. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  19. Use of peptide nucleic acid probes for rapid detection and enumeration of viable bacteria in recreational waters and beach sand.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto

    2006-01-01

    Environmental monitoring and public health risk assessments require methods that are rapid and quantitative with defined sensitivity and specificity thresholds. Although several molecular techniques have been developed to rapidly detect bacteria in complex matrices, the challenge to simultaneously detect and enumerate only viable cells remains a limiting factor to their routine application. This chapter describes the use of peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to simultaneously detect and count live Staphylococcus aureus, a human pathogen in sea water and beach sand. Mixed bacteria from the environmental sample were immobilized on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane filters and allowed to form microcolonies during a 5-h incubation on Tryptic soy agar plates. PNA probes targeting species-specific regions of the 16S rRNA sequences of S. aureus were then used to hybridize the target bacteria in situ. Probes were detected by capturing chemiluminiscence on instant (e.g., Polaroid) films. Each viable cell (i.e., rRNA producing) is detected as a light spot from its microcolony on the film after scanning the image into a computer. This rapid in situ hybridization technique is simple and highly sensitive and could be developed into portable kits for monitoring pathogens and indicators in the environment. PMID:16957353

  20. Development of species-specific hybridization probes for marine luminous bacteria by using in vitro DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wimpee, C.F.; Nadeau, T.L.; Nealson, K.H. )

    1991-05-01

    By using two highly conserved regions of the luxA gene as primers, polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to prepare species-specific probes against the luciferase gene from four major groups of marine luminous bacteria. Laboratory studies with test strains indicated that three of the four probes cross-reacted with themselves and with one or more of the other species at low stringencies but were specific for members of their own species at high stringencies. The fourth probe, generated from Vibrio harveyi DNA, a cross-reacted with DNAs from two closely related species, V. orientalis and V. vulnificus. When nonluminous cultures were tested with the species-specific probes, no false-positive results were observed, even at low stringencies. Two field isolates were correctly identified as Photobacterium phosphoreum by using the species-specific hybridization probes at high stringency. A mixed probe (four different hybridization probes) used at low stringency gave positive results with all of the luminous bacteria tested, including the terrestrial species Xenorhabdus luminescens, and the taxonomically distinct marine bacterial species Shewanella hanedai; minimal cross-hybridization with these species was seen at higher stringencies.

  1. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  2. Enzymatic Amplification of DNA/RNA Hybrid Molecular Beacon Signaling in Nucleic Acid Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C.; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2012-01-01

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or non-isothermal conditions is described wherein the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by utilizing thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB comprised of a DNA stem and RNA loop (R/D-MB). Upon hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7x above background) due to an opening of the probe and concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. Addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9x above background), resulting in a ~2–2.8 fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time PCR reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence upon R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  3. Enzymatic amplification of DNA/RNA hybrid molecular beacon signaling in nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-15

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or nonisothermal conditions is described, where the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by using thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB composed of a DNA stem and an RNA loop (R/D-MB). On hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7× above background) due to an opening of the probe and a concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. The addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop, which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9× above background), resulting in an approximately 2- to 2.8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time polymerase chain reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence on R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods. PMID:23000602

  4. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Junager, Nina P L; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  5. The application of peptide nucleic acid probes for rapid detection and enumeration of eubacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in recreational beaches of S. Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Mohammed, Renuka; Echeverry, Andrea; Green, Melissa; Bonilla, Tonya; Hartz, Aaron; McCorquodale, Don; Rogerson, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    A novel chemiluminescent in situ hybridization technique using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) was adapted for the detection of bacteria in beach sand and recreational waters in South Florida. The simultaneous detection and enumeration of eubacteria and the novel indicators, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was achieved within 6-8 h of processing. Following 5 h of incubation on TSA, soybean peroxidase-labeled peptide nucleic acid probes (Boston Probes, Boston, MA) targeting species-specific 16S rRNA sequences of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were used to hybridize microcolonies of the target species in-situ. In addition, a universal probe for 16S rRNA sequences was used to target the eubacteria. Probes were detected after a light generating reaction with a chemiluminescent substrate and their presence recorded on Polaroid film. The probes showed limited cross-reactivity with mixed indigenous bacteria extracted from seawater and sand by shaking with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Specificity and cross-reactivity was tested on the reference bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Vibrio, Shigella, Salmonella, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia and Citrobacter. These tests confirmed that the probes were specific for the microorganisms of interest and were unaffected by high salt levels. The results of the PNA chemiluminescent in situ hybridization were compared with traditional plate count methods (PCM) for total 'freshwater' eubacteria, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Counts of eubacteria and S. aureus were comparable with numbers obtained from traditional plate counts but levels of P. aeruginosa were higher with PNA than with PCM. It is possible that PNA is more sensitive than PCM because it can detect microcolonies on the agar surface that never fully develop with the plate count method. We conclude that the in situ hybridization technique used here represents an important potential tool for the rapid monitoring of novel indicator organisms in

  6. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  7. In situ hybridization of phytoplankton using fluorescently labeled rRNA probes.

    PubMed

    Groben, René; Medlin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Phytoplankton are one of the major components of ecosystem processes and play an important role in many biogeochemical cycles in the marine and freshwater environment. Despite their importance, many microalgae are poorly described and little is known of broad spatial and temporal scale trends in their abundance and distribution. Reasons for this are that microalgae are often small, lack distinct morphological features, and are unculturable, which make analyses difficult. It is now possible by using molecular biological techniques to advance our knowledge of aquatic biodiversity and to understand how biodiversity supports ecosystem structure, dynamics, and resilience. We present in this chapter a brief review of the progress that has been made in analyzing microalgae from populations to the species level. The described methods range from DNA fingerprinting techniques, such as random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and simple sequence repeats (SSRs), to microsatellites, which are used in population studies, to sequence analysis, which help to reconstruct the evolutionary history of organisms and to examine relationships at various taxonomic levels. Special emphasis is given to the application of molecular probes for the identification and characterization of microalgal taxa. The fast and secure identification of phytoplankton, especially of toxic species, is important from an ecological and economical point of view and whole-cell hybridization with specific fluorochrome-labeled probes followed by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry offers a fast method for this purpose. In this context, we present a detailed protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) probes that can be applied to many algal cell types and discuss practical considerations of its use. PMID:15865974

  8. Fluorescence probe for the convenient and sensitive detection of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidant that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive substances. The detection of ascorbic acid has traditionally been achieved using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry assays. However, the development of fluorescence probes for this purpose is highly desired because they provide a much more convenient and highly sensitive technique for the detection of this material. OFF-ON-type fluorescent probes have been developed for the detection of non-fluorescent compounds. Photo-induced electron transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer are the two main fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the detection of ascorbic acid, and several fluorescence probes have been reported based on redox-responsive metals and quantum dots. Profluorescent nitroxide compounds have also been developed as non-metal organic fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid. These nitroxide systems have a stable unpaired electron and can therefore react with ascorbic acid and a strong fluorescence quencher. Furthermore, recent synthetic advances have allowed for the synthesis of α-substituted nitroxides with varying levels of reactivity towards ascorbic acid. In this review, we have discussed the design strategies used for the preparation of fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid, with particular emphasis on profluorescent nitroxides, which are unique radical-based redox-active fluorescent probes. PMID:26798193

  9. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  10. An unnatural amino acid based fluorescent probe for phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenlin; Zhu, Weiping; Xu, Yufang; Qian, Xuhong

    2014-08-21

    A fluorescent probe (2a-LP) based on an unnatural amino acid (UAA) is developed for the detection of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). In the presence of PAL, 2a-LP is catalytically deaminated to ortho-amino-transcinnamic acid (o-a-CA), which shows a remarkable “off–on” fluorescence signal. Thus, the probe 2a-LP enables direct visualization of the PAL activity in tomato under UV illumination and has potential in vitro assays. PMID:24971756

  11. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  12. "Inosaminoacids": novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures accessed by microbial arene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Sarah; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Lloyd, Matthew D; Lewis, Simon E

    2011-04-28

    Microbial 1,2-dihydroxylation of sodium benzoate permits the rapid construction of novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures. Both β- and γ-amino acids are accessible by means of an acylnitroso Diels-Alder cycloaddition. PMID:21409268

  13. In situ detection of freshwater fungi in an alpine stream by new taxon-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Baschien, Christiane; Manz, Werner; Neu, Thomas R; Marvanová, Ludmila; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    New rRNA-targeting oligonucleotide probes permitted the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identification of freshwater fungi in an Austrian second-order alpine stream. Based on computer-assisted comparative sequence analysis, nine taxon-specific probes were designed and evaluated by whole-fungus hybridizations. Oligonucleotide probe MY1574, specific for a wide range of Eumycota, and the genus (Tetracladium)-specific probe TCLAD1395, as well as the species-specific probes ALacumi1698 (Alatospora acuminata), TRIang322 (Tricladium angulatum), and Alongi340 (Anguillospora longissima), are targeted against 18S rRNA, whereas probes TmarchB10, TmarchC1_1, TmarchC1_2, and AlongiB16 are targeted against the 28S rRNA of Tetracladium marchalianum and Anguillospora longissima, respectively. After 2 weeks and 3 months of exposure of polyethylene slides in the stream, attached germinating conidia and growing hyphae of freshwater fungi were accessible for FISH. Growing hyphae and germinating conidia on leaves and in membrane cages were also visualized by the new FISH probes. PMID:18776035

  14. Creatinyl amino acids: new hybrid compounds with neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dorosh, Marina; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Veselkina, Olga

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged oral creatine administration resulted in remarkable neuroprotection in experimental models of brain stroke. However, because of its polar nature creatine has poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) without specific creatine transporter (CRT). Thus, synthesis of hydrophobic derivatives capable of crossing the BBB by alternative pathway is of great importance for the treatment of acute and chronic neurological diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury and hereditary CRT deficiency. Here we describe synthesis of new hybrid compounds-creatinyl amino acids, their neuroprotective activity in vivo and stability to degradation in different media. The title compounds were synthesized by guanidinylation of corresponding sarcosyl peptides or direct creatine attachment using isobutyl chloroformate method. Addition of lipophilic counterion (p-toluenesulfonate) ensures efficient creatine dissolution in DMF with simultaneous protection of guanidino group towards intramolecular cyclization. It excludes the application of expensive guanidinylating reagents, permits to simplify synthetic procedure and adapt it to large-scale production. The biological activity of creatinyl amino acids was tested in vivo on ischemic stroke and NaNO(2) -induced hypoxia models. One of the most effective compounds-creatinyl-glycine ethyl ester increases life span of experimental animals more than two times in hypoxia model and has neuroprotective action in brain stroke model when applied both before and after ischemia. These data evidenced that creatinyl amino acids can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in stroke treatment. PMID:21644247

  15. Phthalic acid chemical probes synthesized for protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Wei-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Wu, Chin-Jen; Wang, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid) is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES) was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2) particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES-SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells) to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis. PMID:23797655

  16. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in raw milk by PCR and oligonucleotide probe hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, I; Ibrahim, A; Barta, J R; Griffiths, M W

    1996-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are potential contaminants of food. Suspected cases of food-borne cryptosporidiosis are rarely confirmed because of the limited numbers of oocysts in the samples and the lack of sensitive detection methods adaptable to food. PCR was investigated as a means of overcoming this problem. A PCR assay was designed for the specific amplification of a previously sequenced portion of an oocyst protein gene fragment of Cryptosporidium parvum (N. C. Lally, G. D. Baird, S. J. McQuay, F. Wright, and J. J. Oliver, Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 56:69-78, 1992) and compared with the primer set of Laxer et al. (M. A. Laxer, B. K. Timblin, and R. J. Patel, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 45:688-694, 1991). The PCR products were hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled internal probes and detected by chemiluminescence to enhance sensitivity. The two sets of primers were compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity by using a variety of human and animal isolates of C. parvum and related parasites. Both assays enabled the detection of 1 to 10 oocysts in 20 ml of artificially contaminated raw milk. The assay based on the PCR set and probe of Laxer et al. detected DNAs from Eimeria acervulina and Giardia intestinalis. The new assay has good specificity for C. parvum bovine isolates and hence has a better potential for monitoring the prevalence of C. parvum in raw milk and other environmental samples. PMID:8795214

  17. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated in Nepal by southern hybridization with a cholera toxin gene probe.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Shrestha, J; Iida, T; Yoh, M; Honda, T

    1995-06-01

    A cholera epidemic broke out in 1992 due to Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in the eastern and southern belt of Nepal mainly among the Bhutanese refugees. Restriction fragment profiles (RFP) of DNA fragments of V. cholerae O1 isolates hybridized with an enzyme-labelled oligonucleotide probe for cholera toxin gene (ctx) by Southern Hybridization were compared. The probe hybridized with the 13- and 8-kb fragments of PstI-digested total DNA in all isolates observed in the epidemic. This RFP in the Nepalese strain was not observed in the strains isolated during other epidemics but was observed in the strains isolated from the exported marine products from Taiwan and Thailand. PMID:7594311

  19. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  20. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: A procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution.

  1. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: a procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors.

    PubMed

    Bhat, S P

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution. PMID:2321760

  2. A comparison of two methods for colorimetric in situ hybridization using paraffin-embedded tissue sections and digoxigenin-labeled hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marcino, Joe

    2013-06-01

    Two methods for colorimetric in situ DNA probe hybridization (CISH) assays on paraffin-embedded tissue sections were compared. The heated method used heat (90-100°C) to denature DNA in the sample prior to probe hybridization, while the unheated method used a standard hybridization temperature of 42°C. Both procedures were tested on tissue samples that harbored the mollusk protozoan pathogens Perkinsus marinus, P. chesapeaki, or Haplosporidium nelsoni, the protozoan and bacterial fish pathogens Myxobolus cerebralis (myxosporidean) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (bacterial), or the crab viral pathogen Callinectes sapidus reovirus. Samples were fixed in either formalin or Davidson's fixative and embedded in paraffin for histological examination. The heated method is labor intensive and highly prone to human error, while the unheated method is less labor intensive and can be completed in a shorter period of time. Both methods yielded similar hybridization results. The use of complex and expensive prehybridization buffers did not improve the performances of the tested CISH assays. Prehybridization heat denaturation of DNA in assayed samples increased both assay duration and loss of samples but did not improve hybridization signals. PMID:23697605

  3. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  4. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method.

    PubMed

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6-99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  5. Detecting Microbial Nucleic Acids within Nematode Bodies: A Photo Essay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a taxa-specific, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to localize microbial nucleic acids within nematode bodies. This technique involves hybridization of a nucleic acid probe to target microbial sequences. Hybridization is detected microscopically, as the probes have f...

  6. A nested array of rRNA targeted probes for the detection and identification of enterococci by reverse hybridization.

    PubMed

    Behr, T; Koob, C; Schedl, M; Mehlen, A; Meier, H; Knopp, D; Frahm, E; Obst, U; Schleifer, K; Niessner, R; Ludwig, W

    2000-12-01

    Complete 23S and almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for the type strains of the validly described Enterococcus species, Melissococcus pluton and Tetragenococcus halophilus. A comprehensive set of rRNA targeted specific oligonucleotide hybridization probes was designed according to the multiple probe concept. In silico probe design and evaluation was performed using the respective tools of the ARB program package in combination with the ARB databases comprising the currently available 16S as well as 23S rRNA primary structures. The probes were optimized with respect to their application for reverse hybridization in microplate format. The target comprising 16S and 23S rDNA was amplified and labeled by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using general primers targeting a wide spectrum of bacteria. Alternatively, amplification of two adjacent rDNA fragments of enterococci was performed by using specific primers. In vitro evaluation of the probe set was done including all Enterococcus type strains, and a selection of other representatives of the gram-positive bacteria with a low genomic DNA G+C content. The optimized probe set was used to analyze enriched drinking water samples as well as original samples from waste water treatment plants. PMID:11249027

  7. Identification of species in tribe Brassiceae by dot-blot hybridization using species-specific ITS1 probes.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K; Nishio, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Simple, reliable methods for identification of species are required for management of many species and lines in a plant gene bank. Species-specific probes were designed from published sequences of the ITS1 region in rDNA of 16 species in Brassica and its related genera, and used as probes for dot-blot hybridization with plant genomic DNA. All the probes detected species-specific signals at dot-blots of genomic DNAs of the 16 species in Brassica, Diplotaxis, Eruca, and Raphanus. Signals of the Brassica digenomic species in the U's triangle, i.e., B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata, were detected by the probes of their parental monogenomic species, i.e., B. rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea. The probe for B. oleracea showed signals of B. balearica, B. cretica, B. incana, B. insularis, and B. macrocarpa, which have the C genome as B. oleracea. Eruca vesicaria DNA was detected by the probe for E. sativa, which has been classified as a subspecies of E. vescaria. DNA of leaf tissue extracted by an alkaline solution and seed DNA prepared by the NaI method can be used directly for dot-blotting. Misidentification of species was revealed in 20 accessions in the Tohoku University Brassica Seed Bank. These results indicate dot-blot hybridization to be a simple and efficient technique for identification of plant species in a gene bank. PMID:20683723

  8. Adenovirus Type 2-Simian Virus 40 Hybrid Population: Evidence for a Hybrid Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecule and the Absence of Adenovirus-Encapsidated Circular Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Crumpacker, Clyde S.; Levin, Myron J.; Wiese, William H.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1970-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-simian virus 40 (SV40) hybrid population plaque variant (Ad2++ HEY), known to yield SV40 virus with high efficiency, was studied by equilibrium density centrifugation followed by ribonucleic acid-DNA hybridization employing virus-specific complementary ribonucleic acids synthesized in vitro. These techniques establish linkage between the Ad2 and SV40 components in the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of this population. The linkage is alkali-resistant and presumably covalent; thus, the Ad2 DNA and SV40 DNA are present in a hybrid molecule. Velocity centrifugation studies in alkaline sucrose gradients eliminated the possibility that supercoiled circular SV40 DNA is present in the adenovirus capsids. The DNA obtained from the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of the Ad2++ HEY population appears to consist of nonhybrid Ad2 DNA and Ad2-SV40 hybrid DNA molecules. PMID:4322081

  9. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  10. High-affinity homologous peptide nucleic acid probes for targeting a quadruplex-forming sequence from a MYC promoter element.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadeep; Tanious, Farial A; Wilson, W David; Ly, Danith H; Armitage, Bruce A

    2007-09-18

    Guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences are known to fold into secondary structures known as G-quadruplexes. Recent biochemical evidence along with the discovery of an increasing number of sequences in functionally important regions of the genome capable of forming G-quadruplexes strongly indicates important biological roles for these structures. Thus, molecular probes that can selectively target quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) are envisioned as tools to delineate biological functions of quadruplexes as well as potential therapeutic agents. Guanine-rich peptide nucleic acids have been previously shown to hybridize to homologous DNA or RNA sequences forming PNA-DNA (or RNA) quadruplexes. For this paper we studied the hybridization of an eight-mer G-rich PNA to a quadruplex-forming sequence derived from the promoter region of the MYC proto-oncogene. UV melting analysis, fluorescence assays, and surface plasmon resonance experiments reveal that this PNA binds to the MYC QFS in a 2:1 stoichiometry and with an average binding constant Ka = (2.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(8) M(-1) or Kd = 5.0 nM. In addition, experiments carried out with short DNA targets revealed a dependence of the affinity on the sequence of bases in the loop region of the DNA. A structural model for the hybrid quadruplex is proposed, and implications for gene targeting by G-rich PNAs are discussed. PMID:17718513

  11. Facile Probe Design: Fluorescent Amphiphilic Nucleic Acid Probes without Quencher Providing Telomerase Activity Imaging Inside Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongmei; Gao, Pengcheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Miao, Mao; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-06-21

    Nowadays, the probe with fluorophore but no quencher is promising for its simple preparation, environmental friendliness, and wide application scope. This study designs a new amphiphilic nucleic acid probe (ANAP) based on aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect without any quencher. Upon binding with targets, the dispersion of hydrophobic part (conjugated fluorene, CF) in ANAP is enhanced as a signal-on model for proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules detection or the aggregation of CF is enhanced as a signal-off model for ion detection. Meanwhile, because of the high specificity of ANAP, a one-step method is developed powerfully for monitoring the telomerase activity not only from the cell extracts but also from 50 clinic urine samples (positive results from 45 patients with bladder cancer and negative results from 5 healthy people). ANAPs can also readily enter into cells and exhibit a good performance for distinguishing natural tumor cells from the tumor cells pretreated by telomerase-related drugs or normal cells. In contrast to our previous results ( Anal. Chem. 2015 , 87 , 3890 - 3894 ), the present CF is a monomer which is just the structure unit of the previous fluorescent polymer. Since the accurate molecular structure and high DNA/CF ratio of the present CF, these advanced experiments obtain an easier preparation of probes, an improved sensitivity and specificity, and broader detectable targets. PMID:27223599

  12. Factors affecting detection of PVY in dormant tubers by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid spot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Singh, R P

    1996-06-01

    A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed using two 20-mer primers located in nuclear inclusion genes NIa and NIb of potato virus Y (PVY). A 1017 bp PCR-product was detected in dormant potato tubers, infected with PVY(O), but not in tubers from healthy plants. The PCR product was specific to PVY, as determined by Southern blot detection by hybridization with a PVY(O)-specific probe. As little as 1 pg of purified PVY(O)-RNA can be detected after RT-PCR amplification. The presence of phenolics or polysaccharides in tuber nucleic acids inhibited PVY(O) amplification, which was eliminated by diluting nucleic acid preparations prior to cDNA synthesis, modifying the nucleic acid extraction procedure by isopropanol precipitation and using phosphate-buffered saline-Tween in the cDNA mix. Potato cultivars differed in PVY(O) concentration in tubers as much as 128-fold. Tuber parts used for nucleic acid extractions were important in potato cultivars with low virus titres and did not result in reduced detection of PVY(O) by both nucleic acid spot hybridization and RT-PCR, but RT-PCR band intensity was lower at longer storage periods. The primer pair developed in this study exhibited broad specificities with field isolates from Peru, Scotland and North America. PMID:8795005

  13. Identification of bovine Neospora parasites by PCR amplification and specific small-subunit rRNA sequence probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Marsh, A E; Anderson, M L; Rowe, J D; Tarantal, A F; Hendrickx, A G; Sverlow, K; Dubey, J P; Conrad, P A

    1996-05-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized genus of pathogenic coccidia, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, that can cause abortion or congenital disease in a variety of domestic animal hosts. On the basis of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences of Neospora spp. and other apicomplexa coccidia, oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 were used for PCR amplification of conserved sequences of approximately 300 bp in size. A Neospora-specific chemiluminescent probe hybridized to Southern blots of amplification products from Neospora DNA but not to Southern blots with amplified DNA from the other coccidian parasites tested. A Toxoplasma-specific probe whose sequence differed from that of the probe for Neospora spp. by a single base pair was used to distinguish these parasites by specific Southern blot hybridization. The PCR system detected as few as one Neospora tachyzoite in the culture medium or five tachyzoites in samples of whole blood or amniotic fluid spiked with Neospora parasites. In addition, Neospora PCR products were successfully amplified from whole blood and amniotic fluid samples of experimentally infected bovine and rhesus macaque fetuses. These results indicate that this PCR and probe hybridization system could be a valuable adjunct to serology and immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of Neospora infections in bovine or primate fetuses. PMID:8727903

  14. Salicylic acid biosynthesis is enhanced and contributes to increased biotrophic pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Li, Bosheng; Zheng, Xiao-yu; Li, Jigang; Yang, Mei; Dong, Xinnian; He, Guangming; An, Chengcai; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis, the phenotypic superiority of a hybrid over its parents, has been demonstrated for many traits in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its effect on defence remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that hybrids between some A. thaliana accessions show increased resistance to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Comparisons of transcriptomes between these hybrids and their parents after inoculation reveal that several key salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis genes are significantly upregulated in hybrids. Moreover, SA levels are higher in hybrids than in either parent. Increased resistance to Pst DC3000 is significantly compromised in hybrids of pad4 mutants in which the SA biosynthesis pathway is blocked. Finally, increased histone H3 acetylation of key SA biosynthesis genes correlates with their upregulation in infected hybrids. Our data demonstrate that enhanced activation of SA biosynthesis in A. thaliana hybrids may contribute to their increased resistance to a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. PMID:26065719

  15. Salicylic acid biosynthesis is enhanced and contributes to increased biotrophic pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Li, Bosheng; Zheng, Xiao-yu; Li, Jigang; Yang, Mei; Dong, Xinnian; He, Guangming; An, Chengcai; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis, the phenotypic superiority of a hybrid over its parents, has been demonstrated for many traits in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its effect on defence remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that hybrids between some A. thaliana accessions show increased resistance to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Comparisons of transcriptomes between these hybrids and their parents after inoculation reveal that several key salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis genes are significantly upregulated in hybrids. Moreover, SA levels are higher in hybrids than in either parent. Increased resistance to Pst DC3000 is significantly compromised in hybrids of pad4 mutants in which the SA biosynthesis pathway is blocked. Finally, increased histone H3 acetylation of key SA biosynthesis genes correlates with their upregulation in infected hybrids. Our data demonstrate that enhanced activation of SA biosynthesis in A. thaliana hybrids may contribute to their increased resistance to a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. PMID:26065719

  16. Comparison of biotinylated DNA and RNA probes for rapid detection of varicella-zoster virus genome by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, B; Yu, G J; Hurst, J W

    1991-01-01

    We describe a general method for the production of nonisotopic DNA and RNA probes for the detection of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome by in situ hybridization. VZV DNA was extracted from purified viral nucleocapsids, cleaved with restriction enzyme (RE) BamHI, and cloned into plasmid pBR322 by the standard vector insert procedure. We cloned over 85% of the VZV genome and obtained 18 recombinants. Plasmids containing the B, F, G, H, and J fragments of VZV DNA were labeled by the nick translation method with biotin-11-dUTP as the dTTP analog. Additionally, the B fragment was cleaved with RE AvaI, subcloned into the plasmid pGEM-4 transcription vector, and subsequently linearized with REs PstI and EcoRI. RNA was transcribed with T7 or SP6 polymerase, with a substitution of allylamine-UTP as the UTP analog, and labeled with epsilon-caproylamidobiotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. The DNA and RNA probes were used under full-stringency conditions for in situ hybridization with alkaline phosphatase as the detector and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate-Nitro Blue Tetrazolium as the substrate. When tested under comparable conditions, the RNA probe was slightly more sensitive than was the DNA probe: both probes showed homology only with VZV-infected cells and clinical tissues and not with the other herpesviruses. Probes prepared from variable regions of the genome (fragments F and J) performed as well as did those from conserved regions (fragments B. G. and H). Biotinylated probes have distinct advantages over isotopic probes and retain their full potency for more than 2 years when stored properly. Images PMID:1645371

  17. Structure and DNA Hybridization Properties of Mixed Nucleic Acid/Maleimide-Ethylene Glycol Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Nguyen, P.; Grainger, D.; Gamble, L.; Castner, D.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structure and DNA hybridization performance of thiolated single-strand DNA (HS-ssDNA) covalently attached to a maleimide-ethylene glycol disulfide (MEG) monolayer on gold have been investigated. Monolayer immobilization chemistry and surface coverage of reactive ssDNA probes were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Orientation of the ssDNA probes was determined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Target DNA hybridization on the DNA-MEG probe surfaces was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to demonstrate the utility of these probe surfaces for detection of DNA targets from both purified target DNA samples and complex biological mixtures such as blood serum. Data from complementary techniques showed that immobilized ssDNA density is strongly dependent on the spotted bulk DNA concentration and buffer ionic strength. Variation of the immobilized ssDNA density had a profound influence on the DNA probe orientation at the surface and subsequent target hybridization efficiency. With increasing surface probe density, NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s {yields} {pi}* transition) indicate that the immobilized ssDNA molecules reorient toward a more upright position on the MEG monolayer. SPR assays of DNA targets from buffer and serum showed that DNA hybridization efficiency increased with decreasing surface probe density. However, target detection in serum was better on the 'high-density' probe surface than on the 'high-efficiency' probe surface. The amounts of target detected for both ssDNA surfaces were several orders of magnitude poorer in serum than in purified DNA samples due to nonspecific serum protein adsorption onto the sensing surface.

  18. Identification of triclosan-degrading bacteria using stable isotope probing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Ihab Bishara; Chen, Xijuan; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2012-11-01

    Triclosan is considered a ubiquitous pollutant and can be detected in a wide range of environmental samples. Triclosan removal by wastewater treatment plants has been largely attributed to biodegradation processes; however, very little is known about the micro-organisms involved. In this study, DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) combined with microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) was applied to identify active triclosan degraders in an enrichment culture inoculated with activated sludge. Clone library sequences of 16S rRNA genes derived from the heavy DNA fractions of enrichment culture incubated with (13)C-labelled triclosan showed a predominant enrichment of a single bacterial clade most closely related to the betaproteobacterial genus Methylobacillus. To verify that members of the genus Methylobacillus were actively utilizing triclosan, a specific probe targeting the Methylobacillus group was designed and applied to the enrichment culture incubated with (14)C-labelled triclosan for MAR-FISH. The MAR-FISH results confirmed a positive uptake of carbon from (14)C-labelled triclosan by the Methylobacillus. The high representation of Methylobacillus in the (13)C-labelled DNA clone library and its observed utilization of (14)C-labelled triclosan by MAR-FISH reveal that these micro-organisms are the primary consumers of triclosan in the enrichment culture. The results from this study show that the combination of SIP and MAR-FISH can shed light on the networks of uncultured micro-organisms involved in degradation of organic micro-pollutants. PMID:22956759

  19. Design and synthesis of an activity-based protein profiling probe derived from cinnamic hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ai, Teng; Qiu, Li; Xie, Jiashu; Geraghty, Robert J; Chen, Liqiang

    2016-02-15

    In our continued effort to discover new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents, we validated the anti-replicon activity of compound 1, a potent and selective anti-HCV hydroxamic acid recently reported by us. Generally favorable physicochemical and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties exhibited by 1 made it an ideal parent compound from which activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe 3 was designed and synthesized. Evaluation of probe 3 revealed that it possessed necessary anti-HCV activity and selectivity. Therefore, we have successfully obtained compound 3 as a suitable ABPP probe to identify potential molecular targets of compound 1. Probe 3 and its improved analogs are expected to join a growing list of ABPP probes that have made important contributions to not only the studies of biochemical and cellular functions but also discovery of selective inhibitors of protein targets. PMID:26753813

  20. Poly(o-phenylenediamine) colloid-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotide as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Luo, Yonglan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingwei; Sun, Xuping

    2011-02-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that chemical oxidation polymerization of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) by potassium bichromate at room temperature results in the formation of submicrometer-scale poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD) colloids. Such colloids can absorb and quench dye-labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) very effectively. In the presence of a target, a hybridization event occurs, which produces a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that detaches from the POPD surface, leading to recovery of dye fluorescence. With the use of an oligonucleotide (OND) sequence associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system, we demonstrate the proof of concept that POPD colloid-quenched fluorescent OND can be used as a probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection with selectivity down to single-base mismatch. PMID:21186809

  1. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-22

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  2. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent. PMID:11724137

  3. Evaluating a hybrid three-dimensional metrology system: merging data from optical and touch probe devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerde, Janice R.; Christens-Barry, William A.

    2011-08-01

    In a project to meet requirements for CBP Laboratory analysis of footwear under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), a hybrid metrology system comprising both optical and touch probe devices has been assembled. A unique requirement must be met: To identify the interface-typically obscured in samples of concern-of the "external surface area upper" (ESAU) and the sole without physically destroying the sample. The sample outer surface is determined by discrete point cloud coordinates obtained using laser scanner optical measurements. Measurements from the optically inaccessible insole region are obtained using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). That surface similarly is defined by point cloud data. Mathematically, the individual CMM and scanner data sets are transformed into a single, common reference frame. Custom software then fits a polynomial surface to the insole data and extends it to intersect the mesh fitted to the outer surface point cloud. This line of intersection defines the required ESAU boundary, thus permitting further fractional area calculations to determine the percentage of materials present. With a draft method in place, and first-level method validation underway, we examine the transformation of the two dissimilar data sets into the single, common reference frame. We also will consider the six previously-identified potential error factors versus the method process. This paper reports our on-going work and discusses our findings to date.

  4. Gibberellic Acid-induced Phase Change in Hedera helix as Studied by Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Ribonucleic Acid Hybridization 1

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, Charles E.; Dahmus, Michael E.

    1974-01-01

    Applications of gibberellic acid to the mature form of Hedera helix induce morphological reversions to the juvenile form of growth. The juvenile forms produced are stable with time and differ dramatically from the mature in phenotype. DNA-RNA hybridization techniques have been used to study the RNA populations of juvenile, mature and gibberellic acid-treated mature apices. Hybridization competition experiments using RNA extracted by a hot phenol technique and uniformly labeled in vitro with 3H dimethylsulfate show no qualitative differences between the species of RNA present in juvenile and mature apices. However, differences are observed in the frequency distribution of RNA species using both uniformly labeled or pulse-labeled RNA as a reference. RNA extracted from gibberellic acid-treated mature buds was a less effective competitor than control mature RNA and the difference observed was comparable to that observed between mature and juvenile RNA. These results indicate that at least part of the molecular basis of phase change and gibberellic acid action may involve an alteration in the rate of transcription of certain genes in the apices of the mature form. RNA extracted using the hot phenol procedure contained a fraction of rapidly labeled RNA which was not extractable with cold phenol. When RNA extracted only with cold phenol was used in competition experiments sequences unique to the juvenile were detected and sequences unique to the mature were not detected. Implications of these results in relation to possible post-transcriptional control mechanisms are discussed. PMID:16658844

  5. Babesia gibsoni: detection in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using deoxyribonucleic acid in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Rajapakshage, Bandula Kumara Wickramasekara; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to detect Babesia gibsoni in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from B. gibsoni-infected dogs using in situ hybridization. Using a digoxigenin-conjugated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe, both intraerythrocytic and exoerythrocytic parasites in the culture could be specifically stained in blood smears fixed with 4% phosphate-buffered paraformaldehyde. This indicated that genomic DNA extracted from the parasites could be detected using in situ hybridization. Moreover, the parasite could be specifically stained in paraffin-embedded spleen, lymph node, and kidney sections using in situ hybridization. Infected erythrocytes in blood vessels in the spleen and kidney, hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the spleen, and phagocytized erythrocytes, which seemed to be infected with the parasites, in lymph nodes were also specifically stained. This suggests that in situ hybridization can be utilized to investigate both the life cycle of B. gibsoni and the pathological condition of canine babesiosis. PMID:20637756

  6. Mfold web server for nucleic acid folding and hybridization prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zuker, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The abbreviated name, ‘mfold web server’, describes a number of closely related software applications available on the World Wide Web (WWW) for the prediction of the secondary structure of single stranded nucleic acids. The objective of this web server is to provide easy access to RNA and DNA folding and hybridization software to the scientific community at large. By making use of universally available web GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces), the server circumvents the problem of portability of this software. Detailed output, in the form of structure plots with or without reliability information, single strand frequency plots and ‘energy dot plots’, are available for the folding of single sequences. A variety of ‘bulk’ servers give less information, but in a shorter time and for up to hundreds of sequences at once. The portal for the mfold web server is http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/mfold. This URL will be referred to as ‘MFOLDROOT’. PMID:12824337

  7. Identification of pathogenic Leptospira genospecies by continuous monitoring of fluorogenic hybridization probes during rapid-cycle PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, T H; Patel, B K; Smythe, L D; Symonds, M L; Norris, M A; Dohnt, M F

    1997-01-01

    Partial sequences of 23S rRNA gene PCR products from 23 strains of 6 pathogenic Leptospira genospecies and from 8 strains of the saprophytic Leptospira biflexa were determined. Sequence analyses enabled Leptospira genus-specific amplification primers and pathogen-specific fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to be designed and synthesized. A PCR protocol was developed in which changes in fluorescence emission resulting from specific annealing of fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to the target DNA were continuously monitored. Nine strains of the pathogenic Leptospira genospecies could be differentiated from Leptonema illini, Escherichia coli, and eight strains of Leptospira biflexa. The PCR method was rapid, requiring 18 min for the completion of 45 cycles. It was also simple and flexible, as DNA templates prepared by four different methods, including the simple boiling method, could be used without adverse effects. Two hundred copies of target, equivalent to 100 cells, could be detected. PMID:9399509

  8. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  9. Synthesis and Monolayer Behaviors of Novel Hybrid Corynomycolic Acids Containing Semifluoroalkyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Tamaki, Kazuki; Oida, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel hybrid-type corynomycolic acids [hybrid-OH and hybrid-COOH, with semifluoroalkyl groups (Rf-(CH2)n-: Rf = C4F9, n = 6 and Rf = C6F13, n = 3) located on the carbon atoms attached to the hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups (C-OH and C-COOH), respectively] were successfully synthesized. The behaviors and formation of hybrid corynomycolic acid monolayers at the air-water interface were investigated by surface tension and surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements to clarify the effects of the Rf chain length, position of the semifluoroalkyl group, and surfactant molecule stereochemistry. Compared to dialkyl corynomycolic acid, both the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension at the CMC (γCMC) of hybrid corynomycolic acids were reduced by the presence of the Rf group. With respect to the surface tension versus log concentration (γ vs. log C) isotherms, all syn-isomers of the hybrid-OH and hybrid-COOH acids showed two break points, while the anti-isomers showed only one break point. These different isotherms can be explained in terms of the steric repulsion between the two hydrophilic groups (OH and COO(-)), which depend on the stereochemistry of the surfactant. No effect of the location of the semifluoroalkyl group was observed. With respect to the formation of a monolayer film, four parameters-the lift-off area (AL), zero-pressure molecular area (A0), maximum of the Gibbs elastic modulus [EG (max)], and monolayer collapse pressure (πc)-were measured. Both AL and A0 of all hybrid corynomycolic acids were larger than the corresponding dialkyl acids due to the bulky and rigid Rf groups. Interestingly, syn- and anti-hybrids had almost identical isotherms on compression, although the values of πc of anti-hybrids were higher than those of syn-isomers. In addition, the values of EG (max) of hybrid-COOHs were slightly larger than those of the corresponding hybrid-OHs. Using the nascent soap method (agent-in-oil method), we found that

  10. Rapid In Situ Hybridization using Oligonucleotide Probes on Paraformaldehyde-prefixed Brain of Rats with Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Ibrahim M; Callanan, John J; Sousa, John; Tao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) toxicity may cause region-specific changes in serotonergic mRNA expression due to acute serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) syndrome. This hypothesis can be tested using in situ hybridization to detect the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene htr2a. In the past, such procedures, utilizing radioactive riboprobe, were difficult because of the complicated workflow that needs several days to perform and the added difficulty that the technique required the use of fresh frozen tissues maintained in an RNase-free environment. Recently, the development of short oligonucleotide probes has simplified in situ hybridization procedures and allowed the use of paraformaldehyde-prefixed brain sections, which are more widely available in laboratories. Here, we describe a detailed protocol using non-radioactive oligonucleotide probes on the prefixed brain tissues. Hybridization probes used for this study include dapB (a bacterial gene coding for dihydrodipicolinate reductase), ppiB (a housekeeping gene coding for peptidylprolyl isomerase B), and htr2a (a serotonin gene coding for 5-HT2A receptors). This method is relatively simply, cheap, reproducible and requires less than two days to complete. PMID:26437182

  11. Photodegradation and inhibition of drug-resistant influenza virus neuraminidase using anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Shuho; Takahashi, Daisuke; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-02-11

    The anthraquinone-sialic acid hybrids designed effectively degraded not only non-drug-resistant neuraminidase but also drug-resistant neuraminidase, which is an important target of anti-influenza therapy. Degradation was achieved using long-wavelength UV radiation in the absence of any additives and under neutral conditions. Moreover, the hybrids efficiently inhibited neuraminidase activities upon photo-irradiation. PMID:23282898

  12. Catalytic performance of hybrid nanocatalyst for levulinic acid production from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2012-11-01

    Levulinic acid is one of the potential and versatile biomass-derived chemicals. Product analysis via HPLC revealed that the heterogeneous dehydration of glucose over hybrid nanocatalyst exhibited better performance compared to single catalyst. Hybrid nanocatalyst containing H-Y zeolite and CrCl3 could substitute homogenous acid catalyst for attaining high levulinic acid yield. Different CrC3 and H-Y zeolite weight ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 were prepared according to the wetness impregnation method. The hybrid catalyst with a 1:1 weight ratio performed better compared to others with the highest levulinic acid yield reported (93.5%) at 140 °C, 180 min reaction time, 0.1 g catalyst loading and 0.1 g glucose feed. Characterization results revealed that properties such as surface area, mesoporosity and acidic strength of the catalyst have significant effects on glucose dehydration for levulinic acid production.

  13. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  14. Chromosome painting in plants: in situ hybridization with a DNA probe from a specific microdissected chromosome arm of common wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, M; Abbo, S; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the successful painting of a specific plant chromosome within its own genome. Isochromosomes for the long arm of chromosome 5 of the wheat B genome (5BL) were microdissected from first meiotic metaphase spreads of a monoisosomic 5BL line of the common wheat Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. The dissected isochromosomes were amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR in a single tube reaction. The amplified DNA was used as a complex probe mixture for fluorescent in situ hybridization on first meiotic metaphase spreads of lines carrying 5BL as a distinctive marker. Hybridization signals were observed, specifically, along the entire 5BL. In some of the cells, labeling was also detected in two bivalents, presumably those of the 5B "homoeologues" (partial homologues) found in common wheat (5A and 5D). The probe also revealed discrete domains in tapetal nuclei at interphase, further supporting the probe's high specificity. These data suggest that chromosome and homoeologous group-specific sequences are more abundant in 5BL than genome-specific sequences. Chromosome-painting probes, such as the one described here for 5BL, can facilitate the study of chromosome evolution in polyploid wheat. Images PMID:7991581

  15. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Pols, Thijs W H; Nuti, Roberto; Ferrari, Cristina; Giacchè, Nicola; De Franco, Francesca; Pruzanski, Mark; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure-activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  16. Design and application of two oligonucleotide probes for the identification of Geodermatophilaceae strains using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Urzì, Clara; La Cono, Violetta; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2004-07-01

    Bacteria of the family of Geodermatophilaceae are actively involved in the decay processes [Urzì, C. and Realini, M. (1998) Int Biodeterior Biodegrad 42: 45-54; Urzì, C., Salamone, P., Schumann, P., and Stackebrandt, E. (2000) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 50: 529-536] of stone monuments. Characterization of isolates includes phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analysis often requiring long-term procedures. The use of specific probes for members of Geodermatophilaceae family could be useful for the easy detection of those strains colonizing rock surfaces and involved in the biodeterioration. Two 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the specific detection of members of the family Geodermatophilaceae using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); one probe specific for members of the two genera Geodermatophilus/Blastococcus and the second for members of the genus Modestobacter. PMID:15186346

  17. [Study on recovery and its influencing factors of ferulic acid and tetramethylpyrazine in cerebral microdialysis probe].

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-guo; Wang, Li-sheng; Fan, Wen-tao; Li, Zhou; Yu, Jian-ye; Liao, Feng-yun; Wu, Yin-ai; Ba, Wen-qiang; Wang, Ding

    2015-11-01

    To establish a method for detecting microdialysis recovery of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) and ferulic acid (FA) and investigating the influencing factors, providing the basis for further in vivo microdialysis experiments. The concentration of FA and TMP in dialysates were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography ( HPLC) and probe recovery were calculated respectively. The influence of the flow rates, medium concentration, temperature and in vivo probe stability on the recovery of FA and TMP were investigated by using concentration difference method (incremental method and decrement method). The recovery obtained by incremental method were similar to by decrement method. The in vitro recovery rate of FA and TMP decreased with the increase of 1-2.5 μL min(-1), and increased obviously with the temperature of 25-42 degrees C under the same conditions. The concentration of FA and TMP had no obvious effect on the probe recovery under the same flow rate. In addition, the recovery of TMP and FA remained stable and showed similar trends under the condition of four concentration cycles, indicating that the intra day reproducibility of the concentration difference method was good. The recovery of brain microdialysis probes in vivo 8 h maintained a relatively stable, but certain differences existed between different brain microdialysis probes, demonstrating that each probe was required for recovery correction in vivo experiment. Microdialysis sampling can be used for the local brain pharmacokinetic study of FA and TMP, and retrodialysis method can be used in probe recovery of FA and TMP in vivo. PMID:27071270

  18. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  19. Phagocytosis of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing oxidized dextrans conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Arkhipov, S A; Troitsky, A V; Luzgina, N G; Zaikovskaja, M V; Ufimceva, E G; Iljine, D A; Akhramenko, E S; Gulyaeva, E P; Bistrova, T N

    2009-12-01

    We studied phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions consisting of 150-800-nm nanoliposomes containing oxidized dextrans with a molecular weight of 35 and 60 kDa obtained by chemical ("permanganate") and radiochemical oxidation of dextran conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide (dextrazides, intracellular prolonged antituberculous drugs). Phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides obtained by chemical oxidation of dextrans is higher than activity towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides prepared by radiochemical oxidation and depends on the size of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions and molecular weight of oxidized dextrans. PMID:21116494

  20. Label-free nucleic acids detection based on DNA templated silver nanoclusters fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Based on DNA templated Ag NCs (DNA/Ag NCs) fluorescent probe, a label-free fluorescent method was developed for the detection of clinical significant DNA fragments from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Firstly, a hairpin probe, containing target DNA recognition sequence and guanine-rich sequence, was designed to hybridize with the target DNA and form a blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex. Then, exonuclease III (Exo III) was employed to stepwise hydrolyze the mononucleotides from formed blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex, releasing the target DNA and guanine-rich sequence. Finally, DNA/Ag NCs fluorescent probe was introduced to hybridize with the guanine-rich sequence, leading to an enhanced fluorescence signal for detection. The proposed method could detect as low as 2.9×10(-10) mol L(-1) HIV-1 DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against mismatched target DNA. Furthermore, the method possessed perfect recoveries in cells lysate and human serum, showing potential to be used in biological samples. PMID:25863386

  1. Optimization of levulinic acid from lignocellulosic biomass using a new hybrid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Asmadi, Mohd

    2012-07-01

    Conversion of glucose, empty fruit bunch (efb) and kenaf to levulinic acid over a new hybrid catalyst has been investigated in this study. The characterization and catalytic performance results revealed that the physico-chemical properties of the new hybrid catalyst comprised of chromium chloride and HY zeolite increased the levulinic acid production from glucose compared to the parent catalysts. Optimization of the glucose conversion process using two level full factorial designs (2(3)) with two center points reported 55.2% of levulinic acid yield at 145.2 °C, 146.7 min and 12.0% of reaction temperature, reaction time and catalyst loading, respectively. Subsequently, the potential of efb and kenaf for producing levulinic acid at the optimum conditions was established after 53.2% and 66.1% of efficiencies were reported. The observation suggests that the hybrid catalyst has a potential to be used in biomass conversion to levulinic acid. PMID:22609656

  2. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Joern; Meissner, Eberhard; Shirazi, Sepehr

    More and more vehicles hit the European automotive market, which comprise some type of micro-hybrid functionality to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions. Most carmakers already offer at least one of their vehicles with an optional engine start/stop system, while some other models are sold with micro-hybrid functions implemented by default. But these car concepts show a wide variety in detail-the term "micro-hybrid" may mean a completely different functionality in one vehicle model compared to another. Accordingly, also the battery technologies are not the same. There is a wide variety of batteries from standard flooded and enhanced flooded to AGM which all are claimed to be "best choice" for micro-hybrid applications. A technical comparison of micro-hybrid cars available on the European market has been performed. Different classes of cars with different characteristics have been identified. Depending on the scope and characteristics of micro-hybrid functions, as well as on operational strategies implemented by the vehicle makers, the battery operating duties differ significantly between these classes of vehicles. Additional laboratory investigations have been carried out to develop an understanding of effects observed in batteries operated in micro-hybrid vehicles pursuing different strategies, to identify limitations for applications of different battery technologies.

  3. Rapid detection of sequence variation in Clostridium difficile genes using LATE-PCR with multiple mismatch-tolerant hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kenneth E; Khan, Huma; Mistry, Rohit; Goldenberg, Simon D; French, Gary L; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2012-11-01

    A novel molecular assay for Clostridium difficile was developed using Linear-After-The-Exponential polymerase chain reaction (LATE-PCR). Single-stranded DNA products generated by LATE-PCR were detected and distinguished by hybridization to fluorescent mismatch-tolerant probes, as the temperature was lowered after amplification in 5(°)C intervals between 65°C and 25°C. Single-tube multiplex reactions for tcdA, tcdB, tcdC, and cdtB (binary toxin) sequences were initially optimized using synthetic targets and were subsequently done using genomic DNA; each target was detected and characterized by hybridization to one or more probes of a different fluorescent color. In the case of tcdC, three probes, each labeled with a Quasar fluorophore, hybridize to different locations with known mutations, including the deletion at nucleotide 117 in ribotype 027 strains and the premature stop codon mutation at nucleotide 184 in ribotype 078 strains, each of which is associated with hypervirulent infections. These and other tcdC mutations were distinguished from the reference sequence, as well as from each other by changes in the fluorescent contour generated from the combined Quasar-labeled probes. Specific variations in tcdA and tcdB were also identified in the multiplex assay, including those that identified strains lacking toxin A production. This single closed-tube assay generates substantially more information about virulent C. difficile than currently available commercial assays and could be further expanded to provide strain typing. PMID:22982259

  4. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations. PMID:16295862

  5. Emission wavelength-dependent decay of the 9-anthroyloxy-fatty acid membrane probes.

    PubMed Central

    Matayoshi, E D; Kleinfeld, A M

    1981-01-01

    Using the phase-modulation technique, we have measured the fluorescence decay of 2- and 12-(9-anthroyloxy)-stearic acid (2- and 12-AS) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy)-palmitic acid (16-AP) bound to egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles or dissolved in nonpolar solvents. Heterogeneity analysis demonstrates that the decay is generally not monoexponential and exhibits large component variations across it emission spectrum. The mean decay time increases (and in parallel, the steady-state polarization decreases) monotonically with increasing wavelength from values at the blue end. The decay at the red side of the emission spectrum contains an exponential term with a negative amplitude, indicating that emission occurs from intermediates created in the excited-state. This behavior is interpreted as arising from intramolecular fluorophore relaxation occurring on the time scale of the fluorescence lifetime. We believe this to be the first study of wavelength-dependent fluorescent emission which is dominated by an intramolecular relaxation process. Although the three probes exhibit qualitatively similar effects, the emission band variations are greatest for 2-AS and smallest for 16-AP. The differences among the probes are not entirely due to environmental factors as demonstrated, for example, by the emission polarization differences observed in the isotropic solvent paraffin oil. In summary, while these findings point out some of the complexities in the 9-anthroyloxy-fatty acids as membrane probes, they also indicate how these complexities might be used as a sensitive measure of lipid-probe interaction. PMID:7260317

  6. Sets of RNA Repeated Tags and Hybridization-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes for Distinct Images of RNA in a Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2010-01-01

    Background Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. Methodology/Principal Findings Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO) probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3′-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag–probe pairs. Conclusions/Significance A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging. PMID:20885944

  7. Visualization and enumeration of marine planktonic archaea and bacteria by using polyribonucleotide probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    DeLong, E F; Taylor, L T; Marsh, T L; Preston, C M

    1999-12-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes has emerged as a popular technique for identifying individual microbial cells. In natural samples, however, the signal derived from fluor-labeled oligonucleotide probes often is undetectable above background fluorescence in many cells. To circumvent this difficulty, we applied fluorochrome-labeled polyribonucleotide probes to identify and enumerate marine planktonic archaea and bacteria. The approach greatly enhanced the sensitivity and applicability of FISH with seawater samples, allowing confident identification and enumeration of planktonic cells to ocean depths of 3,400 m. Quantitative whole-cell hybridization experiments using these probes accounted for 90 to 100% of the total 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells in most samples. As predicted in a previous study (R. Massana, A. E. Murray, C. M. Preston, and E. F. DeLong, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:50-56, 1997), group I and II marine archaea predominate in different zones in the water column, with maximal cell densities of 10(5)/ml. The high cell densities of archaea, extending from surface waters to abyssal depths, suggest that they represent a large and significant fraction of the total picoplankton biomass in coastal ocean waters. The data also show that the vast majority of planktonic prokaryotes contain significant numbers of ribosomes, rendering them easily detectable with polyribonucleotide probes. These results imply that the majority of planktonic cells visualized by DAPI do not represent lysed cells or "ghosts," as was suggested in a previous report. PMID:10584017

  8. Insights into 6‐Methylsalicylic Acid Bio‐assembly by Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, James S.; Havemann, Judith; Potter, Helen K.; Huang, Fanglu; Riva, Elena; Connolly, Jack; Wilkening, Ina; Song, Lijiang; Leadlay, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chemical probes capable of reacting with KS (ketosynthase)‐bound biosynthetic intermediates were utilized for the investigation of the model type I iterative polyketide synthase 6‐methylsalicylic acid synthase (6‐MSAS) in vivo and in vitro. From the fermentation of fungal and bacterial 6‐MSAS hosts in the presence of chain termination probes, a full range of biosynthetic intermediates was isolated and characterized for the first time. Meanwhile, in vitro studies of recombinant 6‐MSA synthases with both nonhydrolyzable and hydrolyzable substrate mimics have provided additional insights into substrate recognition, providing the basis for further exploration of the enzyme catalytic activities.

  9. Molecular imaging of biothiols and in vitro diagnostics based on an organic chromophore bearing a terbium hybrid probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Wang, Qianming; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-04-25

    In this research, a novel terbium-based luminescent hybrid inorganic/organic probe was designed and synthesized. Mesoporous silica nanospheres dispersed in water were used as the appropriate host for the covalently linked lanthanide-containing organic structures. The lanthanide structure was linked to a sulfonate ester unit, which, in the presence of biothiols, was cleaved to result in terbium emission. The hybrid probe exhibited the capabilities of quantitative determination and detection limits for biothiols were presented (36.8 nM for Cys, 32.5 nM for GSH, and 34.7 nM for Hcy). Evaluation of luminescence changes in cell culture demonstrated that this smart probe is cell membrane permeable and selectively lights up in the presence of cysteine and glutathione in human embryonic kidney cells and human lung adenocarcinoma cells. This variation in the presence of biothiols can be controlled by the treatment with N-methylmaleimide. The narrow line-like bands and long-lived excited states of this terbium luminescent sensor allows the discrimination of scattering signals and interfering fluorescence derived from biological tissues. PMID:27041001

  10. A method for preventing artifactual binding of cRNA probes to neurons caused by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Blödorn, B; Brück, W; Rieckmann, P; Felgenhauer, K; Mäder, M

    1998-01-01

    When in situ hybridization was used for the detection of mRNA for the beta-trace protein (beta-trace; prostaglandin-D-synthase) in sections of rat and porcine brains, unspecific binding reactions of sense and antisense probes to neurons were observed. The beta-trace fragment which served as a template for the synthesis of cRNA probes was blunt end-cloned in the vector pCR-Script SK (+). It was demonstrated that the unspecific signals were caused by artifactual binding of two portions of the cRNA which correspond to sequences of the multicloning site of this vector. These sequences are localized between the SrfI restriction site (or the insert) and the promoter for the T7 RNA polymerase. Thus, artifactual binding could be prevented using riboprobes synthesized by T3 RNA polymerase instead of T7 RNA polymerase. Because of the relatively weak transcription efficiency of T3 RNA polymerase, as compared with T7 RNA polymerase, a blocking procedure was established which allowed successful in situ hybridization with T7 RNA polymerase-synthesized probes. Blocking was performed using synthetic oligonucleotides deduced from the two sequences of the multicloning site which were found to be responsible for artifactual binding. PMID:9448846

  11. Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

  12. Resonant uv pump-probe spectroscopy of dipicolinic acid via impulsive excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, Robert K.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Sariyanni, Zoe-Elizabeth; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Backus, Sterling; Raymondson, Daisy; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-02-15

    We present experimental evidence of coherent wave packet motion in dipicolinic acid (C{sub 7}H{sub 5}NO{sub 4}) which is an important marker molecule for bacterial spores. Resonant impulsive excitation is achieved by applying a uv pump pulse (267 nm, 16 fs) which has a duration that is shorter than the vibrational period of the molecules. The resulting dynamics is then probed with a weaker pulse of the same width and frequency. Evidence of the important 'fingerprint' region for this molecule (between 1000 cm{sup -1} and 1500 cm{sup -1}) is found in the transient absorption of the probe. We present simulations of the pump-probe experiment, based on the Liouville equation for the density matrix, and predict the optimal pulse width and detuning.

  13. Application of rRNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is often associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). This species consists of many strains that differ in their ability to produce toxins but have similar morphology, making identification difficult. In this study, species-specific rRNA probes were designed for whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to distinguish A. minutum from two phylogenetic clades. We acquired the complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences (GenBank accession numbers JF906989-JF906999) of 11 Alexandrium strains and used these to design rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Three ribotype-specific probes, M-GC-1, M-PC-2, and M-PC-3, were designed. The former is specific for the GC clade ("Global clade") of A. minutum, the majority of which have been found non-toxic, and the latter two are specific for the PSP (paralytic shellfish poisoning)-producing PC clade ("Pacific clade"). The specificity of these three probes was confirmed by FISH. All cells in observed fields of view were fluorescently labeled when probes and target species were incubated under optimized FISH conditions. However, the accessibility of rRNA molecules in ribosomes varied among the probe binding positions. Thus, there was variation in the distribution of positive signals in labeled cells within nucleolus and cytosol (M-GC-1, M-PC-3), or just nucleolus (M-PC-2). Our results provide a methodological basis for studying the biogeography and population dynamics of A. minutum, and providing an early warning of toxic HABs.

  14. Nucleic acid hybridization with RNA immobilized on filter paper.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxinger, W. C.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Gillespie, D.

    1972-01-01

    RNA has been immobilized in a manner suitable for use in molecular hybridization experiments with dissolved RNA or DNA by a nonaqueous solid-phase reaction with carbonyldiimidazole and RNA 'dry coated' on cellulose or, preferably, on previously activated phosphocellulose filters. Immobilization of RNA does not appear to alter its chemical character or cause it to acquire affinity for unspecific RNA or DNA. The versatility and efficiency of this method make it potentially attractive for use in routine analytical or preparative hybridization experiments, among other applications.

  15. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Matocha, M F; Rapoport, S I

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons. PMID:3211154

  16. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid conjugated near infrared flourescence probe for in vivo early tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwen; Cao, Jie; Qin, Jingyi; Zhang, Xin; Achilefu, Samuel; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) is an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid with six cis double bonds and as a constituent of membranes used as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical path ways. In this manuscript,we describe the synthesis of near-infrared(NIR) flourescence ICG-Der-01 labeled DHA for in vitro and vivo tumor targeting.The structure of the probe was intensively characterized by UV and MS. The in vitro and vivo tumor targeting abilities of the DHA-based NIR probes were investigeted in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 xenograft mice model differently by confocal microscopy and CCD camera. The cell cytotoxicity were tested in tumor cells MCF-7 .The results shows that the DHA-based NIR probes have high affinity with the tumor both in vitro and vivo.In addition ,we also found that the DHA-based NIR probes have the apparent cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells .which demonstrated that DHA was conjugated with other antitumor drug could increase the abilities of antirumor efficacy .So DHA-ICG-Der-01 is a promising optical agent for diagnosis of tumors especially in their early stage.

  18. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  19. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by PCR amplification with pan-Mycobacterium primers and hybridization to an M. tuberculosis-specific probe.

    PubMed Central

    Tevere, V J; Hewitt, P L; Dare, A; Hocknell, P; Keen, A; Spadoro, J P; Young, K K

    1996-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification techniques such as the PCR are very useful in the rapid diagnosis of infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, recent studies have shown that the accuracy of results can vary widely when tests are performed with nonstandardized reagents. We have developed a PCR assay for the detection of M. tuberculosis that is both rapid and accurate. The assay reagents are standardized and quality controlled. False-positive results due to carryover contamination are prevented by the incorporation of dUTP coupled with uracil-N-glycosylase restriction. This assay also employs pan-Mycobacterium amplification primers, allowing for flexibility in the mycobacterial species that can be identified from a single amplification reaction. The amplification is very sensitive; amplification products generated from as few as three bacteria can be detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. DNAs isolated from 33 of 34 mycobacterial species tested were amplified efficiently. Only DNA from Mycobacterium simiae did not amplify. The amplification is also very specific. Amplification products were generated only from the DNAs of bacteria in closely related genera such as Corynebacterium. The nonmycobacterial amplicons do not pose a problem, as they do not hybridize to mycobacterium-specific probes. Hybridization of amplicons to an M. tuberculosis-specific probe allows for the unambiguous identification of M. tuberculosis complex organisms. The clinical performance of this PCR assay was evaluated against that of culture in 662 respiratory specimens. Sensitivities of 100 and 73.1% were obtained from smear-positive and -negative respiratory specimens, respectively. The corresponding specificities were 100 and 99.8%. The high sensitivity and specificity, coupled with the potential for detecting a wide range of mycobacteria, make this assay a useful tool in the clinical management of mycobacterial infections. PMID:8815108

  20. Reactivity, Selectivity, and Stability in Sulfenic Acid Detection: A Comparative Study of Nucleophilic and Electrophilic Probes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-18

    The comparative reaction efficiencies of currently used nucleophilic and electrophilic probes toward cysteine sulfenic acid have been thoroughly evaluated in two different settings-(i) a small molecule dipeptide based model and (ii) a recombinant protein model. We further evaluated the stability of corresponding thioether and sulfoxide adducts under reducing conditions which are commonly encountered during proteomic protocols and in cell analysis. Powered by the development of new cyclic and linear C-nucleophiles, the unsurpassed efficiency in the capture of sulfenic acid under competitive conditions is achieved and thus holds great promise as highly potent tools for activity-based sulfenome profiling. PMID:27123991

  1. Design and Synthesis of Novel Isoxazole Tethered Quinone-Amino Acid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kumar, P.; Sambaiah, M.; Kandula, Venu; Payili, Nagaraju; Jaya Shree, A.; Yennam, Satyanarayana

    2014-01-01

    A new series of isoxazole tethered quinone-amino acid hybrids has been designed and synthesized involving 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction followed by an oxidation reaction using cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN). Using this method, for the first time various isoxazole tethered quinone-phenyl alanine and quinone-alanine hybrids were synthesized from simple commercially available 4-bromobenzyl bromide, propargyl bromide, and 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in good yield. PMID:25709839

  2. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  3. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  4. Nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction hybrid system for separation of fumaric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Krystyna; Staszak, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Budych, Marta Joanna; Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena; Adamczak, Michalina; Wiśniewski, Maciej; Staniewski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach based on a hybrid system allowing nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction, was proposed to remove fumaric acid from fermentation broth left after bioconversion of glycerol. The fumaric salts can be concentrated in the nanofiltration process to a high yield (80-95% depending on pressure), fumaric acid can be selectively separated from other fermentation components, as well as sodium fumarate can be conversed into the acid form in bipolar electrodialysis process (stack consists of bipolar and anion-exchange membranes). Reactive extraction with quaternary ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or alkylphosphine oxides (Cyanex 923) solutions (yield between 60% and 98%) was applied as the final step for fumaric acid recovery from aqueous streams after the membrane techniques. The hybrid system permitting nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction was found effective for recovery of fumaric acid from the fermentation broth. PMID:24983693

  5. Evaluation of hybridization efficiencies of centromeric probes for chromosomes X, Y, 18 and 13/21 on uncultured amniocytes by a `rapid one-step` fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Prashad, N.; Cubbage, M.; Weber, W.

    1994-09-01

    Aprogenex has developed a rapid one-step FISH assay, KaryoSite{trademark}, for the detection of chromosomes X, Y, 13, 18 and 21. The chromosome probes used are synthetic oligonucleotides with covalently attached chromosomes. In combination with a unique hybridization cocktail, these chromosomes are detected in a one-step hybridization. This method allows the detection of aneuploidy for these five chromosomes in uncultured amniocytes as well as metaphase chromosome preparations. Hybridization efficiency of dual probe combinations, X-Rhodamine plus Y-FITC and 18-FITC plus 13/21-Rhodamine, was determined on 50 amniocyte samples. Probes were added to the cells on slides and target cellular DNA was denatured at 90{degrees}C for 5 minutes followed by hybridization at 42{degrees}C for 30 minutes. Hybridization efficiency for SY probes was greater than 95% and for 18-13/21 probes was greater than 90%. Aneuploidy data from amniocyte samples will be presented. Aprogenex`s FISH technology is a reliable and rapid one-step method for prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy for chromosome X, Y, 13, 18 and 21 in uncultured amniocytes.

  6. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  7. Formation of a hybrid plasmonic waveguide mode probed by dispersion measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Kurata, H.

    2015-04-07

    Hybrid waveguides, i.e., dielectric waveguides combined with plasmonic waveguides, have great potential for concomitantly exhibiting subwavelength confinement and long range propagation, enabling a highly integrated photonic circuit. We report the characterization of hybrid waveguide modes excited in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al films, by dispersion measurement using angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy. This experiment directly verifies the formation of the hybrid waveguide mode with a strongly localized electromagnetic field in a 6-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer. The results clearly describe the characteristic behavior of the hybrid waveguide mode, which depends on the effective index of the constituent dielectric waveguide and the surface plasmon-polariton modes.

  8. Site-specific incorporation of probes into RNA polymerase by unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Mazumder, Abhishek; Lin, Miaoxin; Hasemeyer, Adam; Xu, Qumiao; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A three-step procedure comprising (i) unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis with 4-azido-phenylalanine, (ii) Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation with a probe-phosphine derivative, and (iii) in vitro reconstitution of RNA polymerase (RNAP) enables the efficient site-specific incorporation of a fluorescent probe, a spin label, a crosslinking agent, a cleaving agent, an affinity tag, or any other biochemical or biophysical probe, at any site of interest in RNAP. Straightforward extensions of the procedure enable the efficient site-specific incorporation of two or more different probes in two or more different subunits of RNAP. We present protocols for synthesis of probe-phosphine derivatives, preparation of RNAP subunits and the transcription initiation factor σ, unnatural amino acid mutagenesis of RNAP subunits and σ, Staudinger ligation with unnatural-amino-acid-containing RNAP subunits and σ, quantitation of labelling efficiency and labelling specificity, and reconstitution of RNAP. PMID:25665560

  9. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    1997-07-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved coccidial nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequence, and amplification products were confirmed by hybridization with a Neospora-specific DNA probe. PCR products were amplified from DNAs of different fetal monkey tissues, including brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, and placenta. In addition, Neospora DNA was amplified from the brain, heart, and lung tissues of infected rhesus macaque dams. The PCR and probe hybridization system may provide an effective method for the detection of Neospora infection in fetuses and dams from nonhuman primates and may be useful in determining the zoonotic potential of Neospora. PMID:9196184

  10. Bimodal Imaging Probes for Combined PET and OI: Recent Developments and Future Directions for Hybrid Agent Development

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Uwe; Wängler, Björn; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging—and especially positron emission tomography (PET)—has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI), as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development. PMID:24822177

  11. Bimodal imaging probes for combined PET and OI: recent developments and future directions for hybrid agent development.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Uwe; Wängler, Björn; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging--and especially positron emission tomography (PET)--has gained increasing importance for diagnosis of various diseases and thus experiences an increasing dissemination. Therefore, there is also a growing demand for highly affine PET tracers specifically accumulating and visualizing target structures in the human body. Beyond the development of agents suitable for PET alone, recent tendencies aim at the synthesis of bimodal imaging probes applicable in PET as well as optical imaging (OI), as this combination of modalities can provide clinical advantages. PET, due to the high tissue penetration of the γ-radiation emitted by PET nuclides, allows a quantitative imaging able to identify and visualize tumors and metastases in the whole body. OI on the contrary visualizes photons exhibiting only a limited tissue penetration but enables the identification of tumor margins and infected lymph nodes during surgery without bearing a radiation burden for the surgeon. Thus, there is an emerging interest in bimodal agents for PET and OI in order to exploit the potential of both imaging techniques for the imaging and treatment of tumor diseases. This short review summarizes the available hybrid probes developed for dual PET and OI and discusses future directions for hybrid agent development. PMID:24822177

  12. Development of a new colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Wu; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Liu, Hui-Yun; Ye, Wen-Jie; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2014-07-01

    A tailor-made colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids was developed by incorporating a coumarin-hemicyanine fluorophore into an isaindigotone framework. The significant and distinct changes in both the color and fluorescence of this probe enable the label-free and visual detection of G-quadruplex structures. PMID:24841696

  13. Quantitative determination of uric acid using CdTe nanoparticles as fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dongri; Seo, Min-Ho; Huy, Bui The; Pham, Quoc-Thai; Conte, Maxwell L; Thangadurai, Daniel; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-15

    A convenient enzymatic optical method for uric acid detection was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles by H2O2 which was generated from the enzymatic reaction of uric acid. The interactions between the CdTe nanoparticles capped with different ligands (glutathione, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and thioglycerol) and H2O2 were investigated. The fluorescence quenching studies of GSH-capped CdTe nanoparticles demonstrated an excellent sensitivity to H2O2. The effects of uric acid, uricase and H2O2 on the fluorescence intensity of CdTe nanoparticles were also explored. The detection conditions, reaction time, pH value, incubation period and the concentration of uricase and uric acid were optimized. The detection limit of uric acid was found to be 0.10 µM and the linear range was 0.22-6 µM under the optimized experimental conditions. These results typify that CdTe nanoparticles could be used as a fluorescent probe for uric acid detection. PMID:26433069

  14. Indole-3-acetic acid biosensor based on G-rich DNA labeled AuNPs as chemiluminescence probe coupling the DNA signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Xu; Mei, Zhenghua; Wang, Zhouping; He, Yunhua

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for detection of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was developed by using G-rich DNA labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as CL probe coupling the DNA signal amplification technology. The IAA antibody was immobilized on carboxyl terminated magnetic beads (MBs). In the presence of IAA, antibody labeled AuNPs were captured by antibody functionalized MBs. The DNA on AuNPs is released by a ligand exchange process induced by the addition of DTT. The released DNA is then acted as the linker and hybridized with the capture DNA on MBs and probe DNA on AuNPs CL probe. The CL signal is obtained via the instantaneous derivatization reaction between a specific CL reagent, 3,4,5-trimethoxyl-phenylglyoxal (TMPG), and the G-rich DNA on AuNPs CL probe. IAA can be detected in the concentration range from 0.02 ng/mL to 30 ng/mL, and the limit of detection is 0.01 ng/mL.

  15. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  16. Zebrafish Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Followed by Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Doganli, Canan; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful technique used for locating specific nucleic acid targets within morphologically preserved tissues and cell preparations. A labeled RNA or DNA probe hybridizes to its complementary mRNA or DNA sequence within a sample. Here, we describe RNA in situ hybridization protocol for whole-mount zebrafish embryos. PMID:26695046

  17. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  18. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions. PMID:24310436

  19. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  20. Fluorescence imaging of siRNA delivery by peptide nucleic acid-based probe.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Iwai, Kenta; Kuge, Shusuke; Teramae, Norio; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    We report on the use of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based fluorescent probe for the analysis of siRNA delivery to living cells. The probe, Py-AA-TO, possesses thiazole orange (TO) and pyrene moieties in the C- and N-termini of PNA, and can function as a light-up probe capable of selective binding to 3'-overhanging nucleotides of target siRNAs. The affinity-labeling of the siRNAs with Py-AA-TO facilitates fluorescence imaging of cellular uptake of polymer-based carriers encapsulating the siRNAs (polyplexes) through endocytosis and subsequent sequestration into lysosome. In addition, flow cytometric measurements reveal that the monitoring of Py-AA-TO fluorescence inside the cells is successfully applicable to the analysis of the polyplex disassembly. These promising functions of Py-AA-TO are presented and discussed as a basis for the design of molecular probes for fluorescent imaging and quantitative analysis of the siRNA delivery process. PMID:25864675

  1. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  2. Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Genome with an Optical Biosensor Based on Hybridization of Urease Gene with a Gold Nanoparticles-Labeled Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrashoob, M.; Mohsenifar, A.; Tabatabaei, M.; Rahmani-Cherati, T.; Mobaraki, M.; Mota, A.; Shojaei, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    A novel optics-based nanobiosensor for sensitive determination of the Helicobacter pylori genome using a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-labeled probe is reported. Two specific thiol-modified capture and signal probes were designed based on a single-stranded complementary DNA (cDNA) region of the urease gene. The capture probe was immobilized on AuNPs, which were previously immobilized on an APTES-activated glass, and the signal probe was conjugated to different AuNPs as well. The presence of the cDNA in the reaction mixture led to the hybridization of the AuNPs-labeled capture probe and the signal probe with the cDNA, and consequently the optical density of the reaction mixture (AuNPs) was reduced proportionally to the cDNA concentration. The limit of detection was measured at 0.5 nM.

  3. Bioactivity in silica/poly(γ-glutamic acid) sol-gel hybrids through calcium chelation.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Esther M; Romer, Frederik; Wang, Daming; McPhail, David S; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Jones, Julian R

    2013-08-01

    Bioactive glasses and inorganic/organic hybrids have great potential as biomedical implant materials. Sol-gel hybrids with interpenetrating networks of silica and biodegradable polymers can combine the bioactive properties of a glass with the toughness of a polymer. However, traditional calcium sources such as calcium nitrate and calcium chloride are unsuitable for hybrids. In this study calcium was incorporated by chelation to the polymer component. The calcium salt form of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γCaPGA) was synthesized for use as both a calcium source and as the biodegradable toughening component of the hybrids. Hybrids of 40wt.% γCaPGA were successfully formed and had fine scale integration of Ca and Si ions, according to secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging, indicating a homogeneous distribution of organic and inorganic components. (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data demonstrated that the network connectivity was unaltered with changing polymer molecular weight, as there was no perturbation to the overall Si speciation and silica network formation. Upon immersion in simulated body fluid a hydroxycarbonate apatite surface layer formed on the hybrids within 1week. The polymer molecular weight (Mw 30-120kDa) affected the mechanical properties of the resulting hybrids, but all hybrids had large strains to failure, >26%, and compressive strengths, in excess of 300MPa. The large strain to failure values showed that γCaPGA hybrids exhibited non-brittle behaviour whilst also incorporating calcium. Thus calcium incorporation by chelation to the polymer component is justified as a novel approach in hybrids for biomedical materials. PMID:23632373

  4. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  5. Insights into 6‐Methylsalicylic Acid Bio‐assembly by Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, James S.; Havemann, Judith; Potter, Helen K.; Huang, Fanglu; Riva, Elena; Connolly, Jack; Wilkening, Ina; Song, Lijiang; Leadlay, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chemical probes capable of reacting with KS (ketosynthase)‐bound biosynthetic intermediates were utilized for the investigation of the model type I iterative polyketide synthase 6‐methylsalicylic acid synthase (6‐MSAS) in vivo and in vitro. From the fermentation of fungal and bacterial 6‐MSAS hosts in the presence of chain termination probes, a full range of biosynthetic intermediates was isolated and characterized for the first time. Meanwhile, in vitro studies of recombinant 6‐MSA synthases with both nonhydrolyzable and hydrolyzable substrate mimics have provided additional insights into substrate recognition, providing the basis for further exploration of the enzyme catalytic activities. PMID:26833898

  6. Ascorbic acid-functionalized Ag NPs as a probe for colorimetric sensing of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'souza, Stephanie L.; Pati, Ranjan; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we report the use of ascorbic acid-capped silver nanoparticles (AA-Ag NPs) as a probe for selective colorimetric detection of glutathione (GSH) in aqueous solution. This detection system was based on the GSH-induced aggregation of AA-Ag NPs, resulting in drastic changes in the absorption spectra and color of the AA-Ag NPs system. The GSH-induced AA-Ag NPs aggregation was confirmed by UV-visible spectrometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. Under optimal conditions, this method exhibited good linearity over the concentration ranges from 5.0 to 50 µM, with the limit of detection 2.4 × 10-7 M. This method was successfully applied to detect GSH in the presence of other biomolecules, which confirms that this probe can be used for the detection of GSH in real samples.

  7. Use of enrichments and nucleic acid probes in monitoring bioremediation of a deep trichloroethylene plume

    SciTech Connect

    Brockman, F.; Payne, W.; Workman, D.; Soong, A.; Manley, S.; Sun, W.; Ogram, A.

    1994-12-31

    The field site was manipulated with injection of air (control experiment), 1% methane (in air), pulsing of air only and 4% methane, and pulsing of 4% methane supplemented with gaseous forms of nitrogen and phosphorus. Gases were injected through a horizontal well into the aquifer and a vacuum was established in a second horizontal well in the vadose zone. Following each injection regime, sediment samples from the contaminated region were analyzed. Analyses included most-probable-number enrichments for physiological groups known or suspected to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) and per-chloroethylene (PCE), TCE and PCE removal from enrichments, and DNA extraction and hybridization with various gene probes corresponding to enzymes known to degrade TCE or TCE metabolites.

  8. Photoluminescence and quantum yields of organic/inorganic hybrids prepared through formic acid solvolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lianshe; Sá Ferreira, R. A.; Fernandes, M.; Nunes, S. C.; de Zea Bermudez, V.; Hungerford, Graham; Rocha, J.; Carlos, L. D.

    2008-03-01

    Three undoped di-urea cross-linked poly(oxyethylene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid matrices, classed as di-ureasils, incorporating POE segments with different lengths were prepared through the carboxylic acid solvolysis sol-gel method using formic acid. The resulting hybrids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy, 29Si and cross-polarization 13C magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The hybrids' structure is essentially independent of the polymer chain length and the materials are room temperature white-light emitters with emission quantum yields of ˜10 ± 1% and lifetime average values between 2 and 4 ns. For the di-ureasil host with short polymer chains the solvolysis method favours the increase of the PL quantum yields relatively to conventional sol-gel route.

  9. Fluorescence Probe Based on Hybrid Mesoporous Silica/Quantum Dot/Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for Detection of Tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Chen, Ligang

    2016-06-29

    A newly designed fluorescence probe made from a hybrid quantum dot/mesoporous silica/molecularly imprinted polymer (QD/MS/MIP) was successfully created, and the probe was used for the detection of tetracycline (TC) in serum sample. QD/MS/MIP was characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment and fluorescence spectroscopy. Tetracycline, which is a type of broad-spectrum antibiotic, was selected as the template. The monomer and the template were combined by covalent bonds. After the template was removed to form a binding site, a hydrogen bonding interaction formed between the hole and the target molecule. Moreover, when rebinding TC, a new complex was produced between the amino group of QD/MS/MIP and the hydroxyl group of TC. After that, the energy of the QDs could transfer to the complex, which explains the fluorescence quenching phenomenon. The fluorescent intensity of QD/MS/MIP decreased in 10 min, and an excellent linearity from 50 to 1000 ng mL(-1) was correspondingly obtained. This composite material has a high selectivity with an imprinting factor of 6.71. In addition, the confirmed probe strategy was successfully applied to serum sample analyses, and the recoveries were 90.2%-97.2% with relative standard deviations of 2.2%-5.7%. This current work offers a novel and suitable method to synthesize QD/MS/MIP with a highly selective recognition ability. This composite material will be valuable for use in fluorescence probe applications. PMID:27280785

  10. Nucleic Acid Hybridization Studies within the Genus Cucurbita

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Robert B.; Bemis, William P.; Siegel, Albert

    1972-01-01

    The DNAs of Cucurbita species were examined by several methods. All Cucurbita DNAs have a similar CsCl isopycnic banding pattern consisting of a major band at 1.695 g/cc and a well separated satellite band at 1.707 g/cc. Compared to other plant and animal genera, Cucurbita species have a large genomic proportion of rDNA; this value ranging from 1.4% to 3.1%. The genomic proportion of rDNA was found not to be useful as a characteristic indicating degree of relatedness of the various Cucurbita species. However, Cucurbita DNAs can be distinguished by the extent to which their repetitive sequences cross-hybridize to each other and an assessment of species relationships can be made on this basis. PMID:17248582