Science.gov

Sample records for acid rain deposition

  1. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  2. Role of acid rain in atmospheric deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winchester, J.W.

    1990-12-31

    A study was conducted to assess the potential importance of atmospheric nitrate deposition for a north Florida estuary. A comparison, based on statistical analysis of fluxes of ten dissolved constituents of rain water and river water, has been carried out for the watershed of the Apalachicola River, utilizing weekly rain water chemical data from the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) for five sites within the watershed area, monitored from 1978-84 until late 1989, and less frequent river water chemical data from the U.S. Geological Survey for one site at Chattahoochee, Florida, monitored from 1965 until late 1989. Similar statistical analysis was performed on monitoring data for the Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Rivers of north Florida. Atmospheric deposition to the watershed appears to be sufficient to account for essentially all the dissolved nitrate and ammonium and total organic nitrogen flow in the three rivers. However, after deposition most of the nitrate may be transformed to other chemical forms during the flow of the rivers toward their estuaries. In an additional statistical analysis of rain water monitoring data from the eight state southeastern USA region, it was found that both meteorological conditions and transport from pollution sources appear to control deposition fluxes of nitrate and sulfate acid air pollutants.

  3. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION MODEL ASSESSMENT: ACID RAIN MOUNTAIN MESOSCALE MODEL (ARM3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Rain Mountain Mesoscale Model (ARM3) is a mesoscale acid deposition/air quality model that was developed for calculating incremental acid deposition (sulfur and nitrogen species) and pollutant concentration impacts in complex terrain. The model was set up for operation w...

  4. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  5. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  6. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  7. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  8. RAINS-ASIA: An assessment model for acid deposition in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.J.; Ramankutty, R.; Shah, J.J.

    1997-08-31

    Asia`s rapid economic growth has fueled a growing appetite for commercial energy, which is satisfied by fossil fuels that emit pollutants. These pollutants are oxidized and transported into the atmosphere, creating acidic depositions known as acid rain that can damage foliage, soils, and surface waters. At current energy consumption growth rates, by the year 2000 sulfur dioxide emissions from Asia will surpass the emissions of North America and Europe combined. RAINS-ASIA is an assessment tool developed by the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and donors to study the implications of alternative energy development strategies for air pollution and acid rain and to help identify cost-effective abatement methods. This report provides an overview of the model and some results of analyses that have been conducted as part of the RAINS-ASIA program.

  9. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy B.; Howell, Graham; Jenkins, Meaghan E.

    2008-09-01

    Sulfate in acid rain is known to suppress methane (CH4) emissions from natural freshwater wetlands. Here we examine the possibility that CH4 emissions from rice agriculture may be similarly affected by acid rain, a major and increasing pollution problem in Asia. Our findings suggest that acid rain rates of SO42- deposition may help to reduce CH4 emissions from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants treated with simulated acid rain at levels of SO42- consistent with the range of deposition in Asia were reduced by 24% during the grain filling and ripening stage of the rice season which accounts for 50% of the overall CH4 that is normally emitted in a rice season. A single application of SO42- at a comparable level reduced CH4 emission by 43%. We hypothesize that the reduction in CH4 emission may be due to a combination of effects. The first mechanism is that the low rates of SO42- may be sufficient to boost yields of rice and, in so doing, may cause a reduction in root exudates to the rhizosphere, a key substrate source for methanogenesis. Decreasing a major substrate source for methanogens is also likely to intensify competition with sulfate-reducing microorganisms for whom prior SO42- limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition.

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  11. Global impacts of sulfate deposition from acid rain on methane emissions from natural wetlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, V.

    2003-04-01

    Natural wetlands form the largest methane (CH_4) source to the atmosphere. A collection of recent field and laboratory studies point to an anthropogenic control on CH_4 emissions from these systems: acid rain sulfate (SO_42-) deposition. These studies ranging from the UK, USA, Canada, Sweden and Czech Republic demonstrate that low rates of SO_42- deposition, within the range commonly experienced in acid rain impacted regions, can suppress CH_4 emissions by as much as 40% and that the response of CH_4 emissions to increasing rates of SO_42- deposition closely mirrors changes in sulfate reduction rates with SO_42- deposition. This indicates that the suppression in CH_4 flux is the result of acid rain stimulating a competitive exclusion of methanogenesis by sulfate reducing bacteria, resulting in reduced methane production. These findings were extrapolated to the global scale by combining modelled, spatially explicit data sets of CH_4 emission from wetlands across the globe with modelled S deposition. Results indicate that this interaction may be important at the global scale, suppressing CH_4 emissions from wetlands in 2030 by as much as 20--28Tg, and, in the process, offsetting predicted climate induced growth in the wetland CH_4 source.

  12. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a science demonstration on the dissolution of sulfuric oxide emphasizing the concept of acid rain which is an environmental problem. Demonstrates the acidification from acid rain on two lake environments, limestone and granite. Includes safety information. (YDS)

  13. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  14. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  15. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  16. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  19. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  20. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  1. Acid rain: a primer on what, where, and how much

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    Acid rain is introduced by defining its components: wet and dry deposition. Data bases on precipitation chemistry from several monitoring networks are used to show where acid rain occurs. Precipitation chemistry and air quality data are used to discuss what is in acid rain. Maps of the deposition of the major constituents of wet deposition are presented to contrast the amount of material deposited (deposition) in acid rain with its composition (concentration). The interactions of acid rain with the surfaces on which it falls are used to trace the paths by which acid rain reaches surface and soil waters. Implications of acid rain effects are introduced but not discussed in detail.

  2. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain and lake acidification is described. In this demonstration, SO2 gas is generated in a large graduated cylinder and then dissolved in water droplets from a simple spray bottle. The droplets carry the acid into simulated lakes, one of which includes solid CaCO3 to mimic limestone's natural buffering capacity.

  3. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    endangers the existing biota. Concerns about acid (or acidic) rain in its modern sense were publicized by the Swedish soil scientist Svante Odén (1968). He argued, initially in the Swedish press, that long-term increases in the atmospheric deposition of acid could lower the pH of surface waters, cause a decline in fish stocks, deplete soils of nutrients, and accelerate damage to materials. By the 1970s, acidification of surface waters was reported in many countries in Europe as well as in North America. The late twentieth-century rush to understand the impact of acid rain was driven by: (i) reports of damaged or threatened freshwater fisheries and (ii) damaged forests. Perhaps the earliest linkage between acidic surface water and damage to fish was made by Dahl (1921) in southern Norway. There, spring runoff was sufficiently acidic to kill trout. It was not until the 1970s that a strong link was established between depressed pH, mobilization of aluminum from soil, and fish status ( Schofield and Trojnar,1980). The relationship between acidification of soils and forest health started with hypotheses in the 1960s and has slowly developed. Acid rain enhances the availability of some nutrients (e.g., nitrogen), and may either enhance or diminish the availability of others (e.g., calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus). Damage to anthropogenic structures, human health, and visibility have also raised concerns. The history of these early developments was summarized by Cowling (1982). Since the 1970s, sulfur and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere have been reduced by 50-85% and 0-30%, respectively, both in North America and Europe. The emission reductions have occurred as a consequence of knowledge gained and economic factors. While recovery of water quality is underway in some areas, problems of acidification persist, and are now complicated by the effects of climate change ( Schindler, 1997).

  4. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  5. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  6. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  7. Controls on suppression of methane flux from a peat bog subjected to simulated acid rain sulfate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy; Fowler, David

    2002-01-01

    The effect of acid rain SO42- deposition on peatland CH4 emissions was examined by manipulating SO42- inputs to a pristine raised peat bog in northern Scotland. Weekly pulses of dissolved Na2SO4 were applied to the bog over two years in doses of 25, 50, and 100 kg S ha-1 yr-1, reflecting the range of pollutant S deposition loads experienced in acid rain-impacted regions of the world. CH4 fluxes were measured at regular intervals using a static chamber/gas chromatographic flame ionization detector method. Total emissions of CH4 were reduced by between 21 and 42% relative to controls, although no significant differences were observed between treatments. Estimated total annual fluxes during the second year of the experiment were 16.6 g m-2 from the controls and (in order of increasing SO42- dose size) 10.7, 13.2, and 9.8 g m-2 from the three SO42- treatments, respectively. The relative extent of CH4 flux suppression varied with changes in both peat temperature and peat water table with the largest suppression during cool periods and episodes of falling water table. Our findings suggest that low doses of SO42- at deposition rates commonly experienced in areas impacted by acid rain, may significantly affect CH4 emissions from wetlands in affected areas. We propose that SO42- from acid rain can stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria into a population capable of outcompeting methanogens for substrates. We further propose that this microbially mediated interaction may have a significant current and future effect on the contribution of northern peatlands to the global methane budget.

  8. Acid rain: Controllable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Acid rain is one of a growing number of environmental issues in which impacts are far removed from the source o f the irritants. Those who suffer may differ in geographical area from those who benefit from the activity which releases pollution to the atmosphere. Like the issue concerning the depletion of ozone by manufactured chemicals, the acid rain issue further emphasizes the need for continuing atmospheric chemistry research, a science whose history dates back but a few decades. Examination of the acid rain issue also calls for intimate collaboration of atmospheric scientists with ecologists, biologists, and other scientists, who must advise the geophysicists regarding what chemicals in the environment produce damage, their mode of entry into an ecosystem, and the need to understand acute or chronic impacts.

  9. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value <5.6. The volume-weighted mean (vwm) pH was 4.62 and higher in the dry (Oct.-Mar.) than in the wet (Apr.-Sep.) seasons. The major acidic anion was sulfate with vwm concentration of 140 μeq l-1 and annual deposition flux of 110.3 kg ha-1 yr-1. The major neutralizing cations were calcium (94.8 μeq l-1 and 28 kg ha-1 yr-1) and ammonium (41.2 μeq l-1 and 11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1). Over 95% of these major acidic anions and neutralizing cations were derived from anthropogenic and terrestrial sources as a result of industrial, agricultural and forestry activities. Plantation canopy had marked impacts on rainwater chemistry, with the measured anion and cation concentrations being significantly enriched in throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) rainwater by 1.4 (for NO) to 20-fold (for K+) compared to those in bulk precipitation (BP). Dry deposition generally contributed about 13-22% of the total deposition while canopy leaching mainly occurred for K+ (>88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  10. Different responses of two Mosla species to potassium limitation in relation to acid rain deposition*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Gu, Bao-jing; Ge, Ying; Liu, Zhen; Jiang, De-an; Chang, Scott X.; Chang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The increasingly serious problem of acid rain is leading to increased potassium (K) loss from soils, and in our field investigation, we found that even congenerically relative Mosla species show different tolerance to K-deficiency. A hydroponic study was conducted on the growth of two Mosla species and their morphological, physiological and stoichiometric traits in response to limited (0.35 mmol K/L), normal (3.25 mmol K/L) and excessive (6.50 mmol K/L) K concentrations. Mosla hangchowensis is an endangered plant, whereas Mosla dianthera a widespread weed. In the case of M. hangchowensis, in comparison with normal K concentration, K-limitation induced a significant reduction in net photosynthetic rate (P n), soluble protein content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. However, leaf mass ratio (LMR) and root mass ratio (RMR) were changed little by K-limitation. In contrast, for M. dianthera, K-limitation had little effect on P n, soluble protein content, SOD activity, and MDA concentration, but increased LMR and RMR. Critical values of N (nitrogen):K and K:P (phosphorus) ratios in the shoots indicated that limitation in acquiring K occurred under K-limited conditions for M. hangchowensis but not for M. dianthera. We found that low K content in natural habitats was a restrictive factor in the growth and distribution of M. hangchowensis, and soil K-deficiency caused by acid rain worsened the situation of M. hangchowensis, while M. dianthera could well acclimate to the increasing K-deficiency. We suggest that controlling the acid rain and applying K fertilizers may be an effective way to rescue the endangered M. hangchowensis. PMID:19650194

  11. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  12. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  13. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  14. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  15. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  16. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  17. HCl in rocket exhaust clouds - Atmospheric dispersion, acid aerosol characteristics, and acid rain deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Both measurements and model calculations of the temporal dispersion of peak HCl (g + aq) concentration in Titan III exhaust clouds are found to be well characterized by one-term power-law decay expressions. The respective coefficients and decay exponents, however, are found to vary widely with meteorology. The HCl (g), HCl (g + aq), dewpoint, and temperature-pressure-altitude data for Titan III exhaust clouds are consistent with accurately calculated HCl/H2O vapor-liquid compositions for a model quasi-equilibrated flat surface aqueous aerosol. Some cloud evolution characteristics are also defined. Rapid and extensive condensation of aqueous acid clearly occurs during the first three min of cloud rise. Condensation is found to be intensified by the initial entrainment of relatively moist ambient air from lower levels, that is, from levels below eventual cloud stabilization. It is pointed out that if subsequent dilution air at stabilization altitude is significantly drier, a state of maximum condensation soon occurs, followed by an aerosol evaporation phase.

  18. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  19. Enhanced acid rain and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, sulfur and heavy metals in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is known to be important mechanism reducing air pollution. In response to the growing concern on the potential effects of the deposited material entering terrestrial and aquatic environments as well as their subsequent health effects, since 2007 we have established a 10-site monitoring network in Northern China, where particularly susceptible to severe air pollution. Wet and dry deposition was collected using an automatic wet-dry sampler. The presentation will focus on the new results of atmospheric deposition flux for a number of chemical species, such as nutrients (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus), acidic matters (e.g. sulfur and proton), heavy metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, etc. This is to our knowledge the first detailed element budget study in the atmosphere across Northern China. We find that: (1) Over the 3 year period, 26% of precipitation events in the target area were more acid than pH 5.60 and these acidic events occurred in summer and autumn. The annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH value of precipitation was lower than 5.60 at most sites, which indicated the acidification of precipitation was not optimistic. The primary ions in precipitation were NH4+, Ca2+, SO42- and NO3-, with 10-sites-average concentrations of 221, 216, 216 and 80 μeq L-1, respectively. The ratio of SO42- to NO3- was 2.7; suggesting SO42- was the dominant acid component. (2) The deposited particles were neutral in general and the pH value increased from rural area to industrial and coastal sites. It is not surprising to note that the annual VWM pH value of precipitation was higher than 5.60 at three urban sites (Beijing and Tianjin mega cities) and one coastal site near the Bohai Bay, considering the fact that high buffer capacity of alkaline component, gas NH3 and mineral aerosols, at these sites compared to other places. (3) The 10-sites annual total deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were 60 and 65 kg N/S ha-1 yr-1

  20. DISCOVERING THE CAUSES, CONSEQUENCES, AND IMPLICATIONS OF ACID RAIN AND ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much has been learned in recent years about air pollution, acid precipitation and atmospheric deposition and their effects on public welfare. There are still unanswered questions about certain aspects of these problems and possible strategies for their solution. Public concern ab...

  1. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  2. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers. PMID:19321190

  3. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  4. Controlling acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines recent transfer of electric power among 48 states and present evidence of significant transfers of electric power from so-called ''perpetrator'' to ''victim'' states. The book compares the efforts of several midwestern and northeastern states during the 1970's to control the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions causing acid rain. The report includes utility and government data on electricity production and sales, on purchase of out-of-state electricity, and on coal use and sulfur dioxide emissions, state by state, for 48 states.

  5. Acid rain: Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain is now one of the most serious environmental problems in developed countries. Emissions and fallout were previously extremely localized, but since the introduction of tall stacks policies in both Britain and the US - pardoxically to disperse particulate pollutants and hence reduce local damage - emissions are now lifted into the upper air currents and carried long distances downwind. The acid rain debate now embraces many western countries - including Canada, the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland - and a growing number of eastern countries - including the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. The problem of acid rain arises, strictly speaking, not so much from the rainfall itself as from its effects on the environment. Runoff affects surface water and groundwater, as well as soils and vegetation. Consequently changes in rainfall acidity can trigger off a range of impacts on the chemistry and ecology of lakes and rivers, soil chemistry and processes, the health and productivity of plants, and building materials, and metallic structures. The most suitable solutions to the problems of acid rain require prevention rather than cure, and there is broad agreement in both the political scientific communities on the need to reduce emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere. Book divisions discuss: the problem of acid rain, the science of acid rain, the technology of acid rain, and the politics of acid rain, in an effort to evaluate this growing global problem of acid rain.

  6. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  7. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  8. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  9. Simulated acid rain on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Plocher, M.D.; Perrigan, S.C.; Hevel, R.J.; Cooper, R.M.; Moss, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    In 1981, simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/:HNO/sub 3/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given to effects of the acid rain on the appearance of the foliage, and the effects on yield were measured. Because the effect of pH 4.0 rain on corn yield was the only significant effect noted in the 1981 studies, in 1982, more-extensive studies of the effect of simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//HNO/sub 3/ rain on corn were conducted. No significant effects of acid rain were found on foliage appearance, or on yield of grain or stover in the 1982 studies.

  10. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  11. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  12. Acid rain & electric utilities II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This document presents reports which were presented at the Acid Rain and Electric Utilities Conference. Topics include environmental issues and electric utilities; acid rain program overview; global climate change and carbon dioxide; emissions data management; compliance; emissions control; allowance and trading; nitrogen oxides; and assessment. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  13. SIMULATED ACID RAIN ON CROPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1981, simulated H2SO4 acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H2SO4:HNO3 acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given...

  14. Acid rain threatens marine life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    In freshwater, acid rain harms aquatic organisms because one of its components, sulfur dioxide, lowers the water's pH. In seawater, the damage comes from other components of acid precipitation: nitrogen oxides. Acting as a nutrient, nitrogen promotes excessive algal growth, which blocks sunlight and depletes dissolved oxygen, thereby suffocating other plants and animals. Known as eutrophication, this phenomenon has been increasing in both frequency and intensity on the Atlantic coast during the past few years. The New York City-based Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), study focused on the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary and an important spawning ground for many species of economic importance. It has long been known that the bay is suffering from nitrogen pollution. Until now, it was assumed that most of the nitrogen was coming from sewage and agricultural runoff. However, based on data collected from both federal and state agencies, EDF scientists estimated that nitrates from acid rain are responsible for 25% of the nitrogen entering the bay. The report says that if present trends continue, airborne nitrates will contribute 42% of annual nitrogen deposits into the Chesapeake Bay by the year 2030.

  15. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  16. Be an acid rain detective

    SciTech Connect

    Atwill, L.

    1982-07-01

    Acid rain is discussed in a question and answer format. The article is aimed at educating sport fishermen on the subject, and also to encourage them to write their congressmen, senators, and the President about the acid rain problem. The article also announces the availability of an acid rain test kit available through the magazine, ''Sports Afield.'' The kit consists of pH-test paper that turns different shades of pink and blue according to the pH of the water tested. The color of the test paper is then compared to a color chart furnished in the kit and an approximate pH can be determined.

  17. Acid rain degradation of nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Kyllo, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Acid rain, precipitation with a pH less than 5.6, is known to damage lakes, vegetation and buildings. Degradation of outdoor textiles by acid rain is strongly suspected but not well documented. This study reports the effects of sunlight, aqueous acid, heat and humidity (acid rain conditions) on spun delustered nylon 6,6 fabric. Untreated nylon and nylon treated with sulfuric acid of pH 2.0, 3.0, and 4.4 were exposed to light in an Atlas Xenon-arc fadeometer at 63/sup 0/C and 65% R.H. for up to 640 AATCC Fading Units. The untreated and acid treated nylon fabrics were also exposed to similar temperature and humidity condition without light. Nylon degradation was determined by changes in breaking strength, elongation, molecular weight, color, amino end group concentration (NH/sub 2/) and /sup 13/C NMR spectra. Physical damage was assessed using SEM.

  18. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  19. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  20. Atmospheric dust and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.O.; Likens, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Why is acid rain still an environmental problem in Europe and North America despite antipollution reforms? The answer really is blowing in the wind: atmospheric dust. These airborne particles can help neutralize the acids falling on forests, but dust levels are unusually low these days. In the air dust particles can neutralize acid rain. What can we do about acid rain and atmospheric dust? Suggestions range from the improbable to the feasible. One reasonable suggestion is to reduce emissions of acidic pollutants to levels that can be buffered by natural quantities of basic compounds in the atmosphere; such a goal would mean continued reductions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, perhaps even greater than those prescribed in the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act in the U.S. 5 figs.

  1. Geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity over China

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Xing Wang; Yan-Bo Pang; Guo-An Ding

    1996-12-31

    In recent decade, large areas of acid rain have appeared in China. With the increasing emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} year by year, the acidity of precipitation has increased, and the acid rain area is expanding. Presently, the acid rain in China has become the third largest area of acid rain in the world, next to Europe and North America. The Chinese government took action against acid rain and planned a five-year National Acid Deposition Research Project. The space-time distribution and variation of rain acidity described in this paper is a part of this project. China is a large country. The area is almost equal to that of Europe. Its climate varies greatly and spans the tropics, subtropics, temperate and frigid zone. There is a varied topography including mountain, hilly country, desert and plain, on the other hand the distribution of anthropogenic sources are not even. All of the human and natural factors caused different chemical composition in different parts of China, the acidity of precipitation varies also. The acidity of the precipitation is the most important parameter in the acid rain research. In order to obtain the regional representative distribution of rain acidity, National Acidic Deposition Research Monitoring Network with 261 monitoring sites was established in 1992. This paper summarizes the rain acidity of 21355 precipitation samples, and gave the annual, seasonal, and the monthly pH contours. Results show that the acid rain area has expanded from the south during winter. Regional differences of monthly acid precipitation exists, generally, the rain acidity level is higher during summer and fall and lower during winter and spring in the northern provinces. The 9 opposite is the case in the southern provinces. The central areas are in a transitional situation. The geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity are quite different from North America and Europe.

  2. ACID RAIN MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides an overview of existing statistical methodologies for the estimation of site-specific and regional trends in wet deposition. The interaction of atmospheric processes and emissions tend to produce wet deposition data patterns that show large spatial and tempora...

  3. Scientist, researchers, and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of the hidden participants in agenda-setting for environmental issues is discussed. These personnel involve academics, researchers, career bureaucrats, congressional staffers, consultants, and administration appointees below the top level. Scientists have been publicly involved in the acid rain issue from the beginning, using the media to dramatize the possible catastrophic consequences of acid rain. Presently, the scientific community is not in consensus about the solutions to the problem. Since the initial enactment of the National Acid Precipitation Act in 1980, not a single acid rain law has been passed, although many bills have been proposed. Spokesman for the coal and utility industries and Reagan administration personnel have used the scientific disagreements to delay abatement actions and refute claims that acid rain is a severe problem. Another result of the confusion is a distrust and even disdain for academic work. One possible solution to the stalemate is an accurate form for resolving scientific disputes that have a strong political component and that the forum should have a mechanism for converging on accurate science. 19 refs.

  4. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  5. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  6. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  7. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  8. Acid rain control: the costs of compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This document is the proceedings from a conference sponsored by the Illinois Energy Resources Commission and the Coal Extraction and Utilization Research Center, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and held in Carbondale on March 18, 1984. Topics addressed include: the sources and impacts of acid rain, the problems inherent in modeling the impacts of acid rain legislation, the effects of acid rain legislation on the socio-economic sector, compliance costs, and the impact of acid rain legislation on related industries (railroads).

  9. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  10. Trends in visibility, PM{sub 2.5}, and deposition expected from the Acid Rain Provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, J.D.; Hanson, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) are designed to reduce the deposition of SO{sub 2} and sulfate and, to a lesser extent, the deposition of NO{sub x} and nitrate through reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. However, other important benefits are anticipated from the emission control strategies, including improvement of regional visibility and reductions in concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5). In this study, the authors coupled utility emissions forecasts with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model and the Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) to calculate and compare the relative improvements by 2010 in visual impairment, PM2.5 concentrations, and sulfate wet deposition at selected sites in the eastern United States.

  11. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  12. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  13. `Scientific uncertainty` scuttles new acid rain standard

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, R.

    1995-10-01

    An EPA report to Congress due this month will report on the controversial question of whether the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) adequately protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain, and recommends against establishing a new `acid deposition standard` to protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain. Rebecca Renner reports on the scientific issues underlying that decision and the efforts of one state to overturn it. The report to Congress, required by the CAAA, asked the Agency to report on the feasibility of setting an acid deposition standard to protect sensitive areas. EPA missed the original 1993 deadline and is under court order to issue the final report by October 15. The draft report identifies the lakes and streams of the Appalachian mountains as sensitive resources that receive damaging concentrations of acidic deposition. Three areas where sensitive water resources have been well studied were selected as providing the best available data for modeling case studies: the Adirondacks; the mid-Appalachian region, including parts of Pennsylvania. West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia; and the Southern Blue Ridge in Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia. Results are discussed. 6 refs.

  14. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Acid rain and electricity conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, H.; Miller, E.; Ledbetter, M.; Miller, P.

    1987-01-01

    Conservation directly lowers the emissions of SO/sub 2/ and other pollutants by reducing the amount of coal and other fuels that must be burned to meet electricity demand. This book is the first report to provide an integrated analysis of electricity supply, acid raid abatement, and conservation opportunities. The authors use a utility simulation model to examine SO/sub 2/ emissions, electric rates, and overall costs to consumers for different load growth and emissions control scenarios. The study also suggests how acid rain legislation can be designed to encourage electricity conservation.

  16. Acid Rain in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Deviney, Frank A., Jr.; Olson, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Visitors to Shenandoah National Park (SNP) enjoy the animal and plant life and the scenery but may not realize how vulnerable these features are to various threats, such as invasion of exotic plants and insects, improper use of park resources by humans, and air and water pollution. The National Park Service strives to protect natural resources from such threats to ensure that the resources will be available for enjoyment now and in the future. Because SNP has limited influence over the air pollution that envelops the region, acidic deposition--commonly known as acid rain--is one of the more challenging threats facing park managers. With the help of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, park managers can understand how acid rain interacts with ground- and surface-water resources, which enables them to explain why reductions in air pollution can help preserve park resources. Such understanding also provides essential insight into ecosystem processes, as managers strive to unravel and resolve other environmental problems that are interrelated to acid rain.

  17. Two groups challenge US acid rain efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    In its report, Acid Rain Invades Our National Parks, the National Parks and Conservation Association (NPCA) says acid rain is being detected at all 27 national park monitoring sites. In 1980, 87 national parks expressed concern in a NPCA survey over acid rain. Repolled in 1986, more than half of the respondents reported that no research on acid rain was under way. The NPCA report concludes that the alarm that was sounded in 1980 fell largely on deaf ears, and calls for the structural and scientific reorganization of the National Park Service. The National Audubon Society shares NPCA's dissatisfaction with federal efforts to tackle the problem of acid rain and has taken testing into its own hands. Through its Citizens Acid Rain Monitoring Network, Audubon volunteers have collected readings of acidity at 64 monitoring stations in 31 states since July.

  18. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  19. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  20. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  1. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set of resources that…

  2. Acid deposition, land-use change and global change: MAGIC 7 model applied to Aber, UK (NITREX project) and Risdalsheia, Norway (RAIN and CLIMEX projects)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, R. F.; Emmett, B. A.; Jenkins, A.

    Nitrogen processes are now included in a new version of MAGIC (version 7), a process-oriented catchment-scale model for simulating runoff chemistry. Net retention of nitrogen (N) is assumed to be controlled by plant uptake and the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio of soil organic matter, the latter as evidenced by empirical data from forest stands in Europe. The ability of this version of MAGIC 7 to simulate and predict inorganic N concentrations in runoff is evaluated by means of data from whole-ecosystem manipulation experiments at Aber, Wales, UK, (nitrogen addition as part of the NITREX project) and Risdalsheia, Norway (exclusion of acid deposition as part of the RAIN project and climate change as part of the CLIMEX project). MAGIC 7 simulated the changes in N leaching satisfactorily as well as changes in base cations and acid neutralising capacity observed at these two sites. MAGIC 7 offers a potential tool for regional assessments and scenario studies of the combined effects of acid deposition, land-use and climate change.

  3. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations in vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.

  4. Lake sensitivity to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Shurkin, J.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-06-01

    Research in the Adirondacks suggests that watershed dynamics are the key to a lake's vulnerability to acidification. The Electric Power Research Institute's Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) produced a computer model that successfully integrated the physical and chemical factors that determine these dynamics. The research required an unprecedented level of awareness of how watersheds work and how rain, soil, forests, and rocks interact. One outcome of the field and laboratory studies was the finding that some soils act as buffers, taking certain ions out of the water, while some added ions. While the ability of the watershed as a whole to neutralize acid is the main determinant of a lake's vulnerability, seasonal changes demonstrate that time is a factor. The model is in demand to test water in other locations and to explore buffering agents. 2 figures.

  5. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  6. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  7. EPA releases study describing potential acid rain damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acid rain researchers on August 24 offered evidence that if sulfur emissions are not reduced in the future, aquatic systems in the South will suffer damage from acid rain. Evidence also indicates that reductions in sulfur emissions could improve the health of damaged lakes in the Northeast. The study Future Effects of Long-Term Sulfur Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry: The Direct/Delayed Response Project, developed 50-year projections of watershed quality under three plausible acidic deposition, or acid rain, scenarios. Three areas were studied - the Northeast, comprising all of New England and parts of New York and Pennsylvania; the Mid-Appalachian Region, covering much of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; and the Southern Blue Ridge Province, an area covering parts of North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia. The study is a key element in the closing months of the 10-year National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program.

  8. Effect of acid rain on the soil environment: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Rechcigl, J.E.; Sparks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on acid rain, with emphasis on soils and leaching of soil elements. Several questions still exist concerning the effects of atmospheric acid deposition on soils: (1) does acid rain enhance mobilization of harmful heavy metals in soils which could leach into the groundwater; (2) does acid rain accelerate the kinetics of weathering of primary minerals and of secondary clay minerals in soils which would release large quantities of Al, Fe, and Si into the groundwater making it unfit for human consumption; and (3) do the beneficial effects of acid deposition outweigh the negative effects or vice versa. Literature pertaining to these questions is addressed in this review. 63 references.

  9. Airborne scientists begin Ohio acid rain study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Atmospheric scientists spent June flying through storm clouds over Ohio to collect rain and air samples to better understand rain chemistry, the conditions that cause acid rain and methods for controlling it. The authors will be collecting samples in the Columbus, Ohio area because many of the materials suspected of causing acid rain, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrogen peroxide, can be found in this vicinity. The study is part of the US Department of the Energy's Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation program (PRECP).

  10. Spread of acid rain over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemani, L. T.; Momin, G. A.; Rao, P. S. Prakasa; Safai, P. D.; Singh, G.; Kapoor, R. K.

    Rain water and aerosol samples were collected at a few locations representative of urban and non-urban regions in India. Also, rain water samples were collected in and around a coal-fired power plant. All the rain water and aerosol samples were analyzed for major chemical components along with pH. The rain water at all the places of measurement, except near the industrial sources, has been found to be alkaline and was characterized by the presence of excess cations, particularly by Ca 2+. The acid rain near the industrial sources was associated with excess anions, especially SO 42-. The atmospheric aerosols at all the places of measurement were found rich with basic components, suggesting that the alkaline soil dust and fly ash are responsible at present for preventing the spread of acid rain in India.

  11. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)

  12. Further emissions cuts needed for speedier acid rain recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Some people may have thought that the problem of acid deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, had been solved in the United States with the passage of the Acid Deposition Control Program under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA).Although that legislation has helped to dramatically limit emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide—gases that can react in the atmosphere and form acidic compounds, including fine particles of sulfates and nitrates— much steeper cuts are needed for a quicker recovery from acid rain in the north-eastern United States, according to a new scientific appraisal of the effectiveness of measures called for in that law. The appraisal was issued on March 26 and is entitled “Acidic Deposition in the Northeastern United States: Sources and Inputs, Ecosystem Effects, and Management Strategies.”

  13. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. ); Sherwood, S.I. )

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  14. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  15. Quantifying uncertainties in sulphur and nitrogen deposition to wales, uk using the hull acid rain model (harm) within the generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation (glue) framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, T.; Whyatt, D.; Beven, K.; Metcalfe, S.; Nicholson, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Hull Acid Rain Model (HARM) is a receptor orientated Lagrangian trajectory model used to represent the processes of emission, transformation and deposition of acidifying species. HARM employs a simplified representation of meteorological conditions. It has a coupled chemical scheme and includes a parameterisation of orographic enhancement which is believed to make a significant contribution to wet deposition in upland UK. An uncertainty analysis of the model using the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology (GLUE) is presented, as constrained on multiple observations at 25 sites across Wales, UK. The quantified uncertainty is used to investigate the effect of predictive uncertainty on critical load exceedance. The GLUE analysis comprised 100,000 model realisations from Monte Carlo sampling of pre-specified parameter ranges, which were evaluated on the basis of how well simulated fluxes matched those measured at all observation sites. Only 2101 simulations were deemed to produce adequate representations of the observed fluxes and were used to create weighted prediction bounds for each site. Overall, the uncertainty prediction bounds spanned the observed data satisfactorily for most sites, but there was a tendency for high rainfall sites to be overestimated and sites close to major source areas to be underestimated. For wet-deposited oxidised-N there was a systematic overestimation at the majority of sites. The overestimation of wet-deposited oxidised-N for Wales is in contrast to other regions of the UK, where it is underestimated. The predictive capability of HARM was tested with a ‘hindcast’ to 44 Welsh observation sites for 1984 by using the 2101 acceptable parameterizations for 1995 with a 1984 emissions inventory. The spatial pattern of model predictions was consistent between 1984 and 1995 leading to the conclusion that either: model structural change is required to improve HARMs ability to represent the spatial deposition pattern or

  16. A modeling study on acid rain and recommended emission control strategies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.; Jin, L. S.; Li, Z. K.; Lam, K. S.

    This paper presents a brief description of the sources and characteristics of air pollution in China, documenting acid rain aggravation and its regional distribution in the past years. Simulation of SO 2 ground-level concentration and sulfur deposition in 1995 was performed with the Nanjing University developed acid deposition model system (NJUADMS) and compared with the national observations and the model output of the RAINS-ASIA. Furthermore, the acid rain control policy and its countermeasures adopted for the country are presented.

  17. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  19. Air pollution, acid rain and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mellanby, K.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports on the Watt Committee's working group on acid rain, which was set up in 1981. The authors consider the relationship between natural and the man-made factors and the effects of possible remedial strategies. In the first phase of the study, the group looked at the fate of airborne pollution, vegetation and soils, freshwater and remedial strategy. In this report, which contains the results of a further phase of study, these topics are included and have been brought up to date. The scope of the report is extended to include buildings and non-living materials. Consideration is given to the problem of acid rain and air pollution worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the United Kingdom. The main conclusion is that more research is necessary on some aspects of acid rain and air pollution, but that some of the reports widespread damage caused by acid rain cannot be confirmed.

  20. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  1. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  2. (Cunninghamia lanceolata) caused by acid rain with hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaozan; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shuquan

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study is using hyperspectral data to detect the reflectance differences of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) which are sensitive to acidic stress and have been under different degrees of acid deposition stress for a long time. The hyperspectral reflectance for Chinese fir leaf is measured by Fieldspec Pro FR under three simulated acid rain levels (pH2.5, 4.0 and 5.6) during three years in order to monitor the response of leaf. The results indicated: (1) chlorophyll concentration of Chinese fir increased with the increasing of the simulated rain acidity in the late experimental period; (2) the 1st derivative values increased at the green edge (480-540nm) and red edge (680-760nm) with pH increasing; (3) the RVI550 and GNDVI values did differ significantly at pH2.5 and 5.6 treatment; (4) red edge position was found moving to longer wave bands with increasing rain acidity along with the experimental time; (5) there are significant differences vale at blue 510nm and 690nm wavelength between different treatments that can be used to be an useful parameters to distinguish the severity of acid deposition. The research also indicated that the hyperspectral parameters can be used to monitor the acid rain stress on trees.

  3. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades. PMID:18831326

  4. Canada issues booklet describing acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A booklet recently released by Environment Canada describes acid rain in terms easily understood by the general public. Although Acid Rain — The Facts tends somewhat to give the Canadian side of this intercountry controversial subject, it nevertheless presents some very interesting, simple statistics of interest to people in either the U.S. or Canada. Copies of the booklet can be obtained from Inquiry Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OH3, Canada, tel. 613-997-2800.The booklet points out that acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Once released into the atmosphere, these substances can be carried long distances by prevailing winds and return to Earth as acidic rain, snow, fog, or dust. The main sources of SO2 emissions in North America are coal-fired power generating stations and nonferrous ore smelters. The main sources of NOx emissions are vehicles and fuel combustion. From economical and environmental viewpoints, Canada believes acid rain is one of the most serious problems presently facing the country: increasing the acidity of more than 20% of Canada's 300,000 lakes to the point that aquatic life is depleted and acidity of soil water and shallow groundwater is increasing, causing decline in forest growth and water fowl populations, and eating away at buildings and monuments. Acid rain is endangering fisheries, tourism, agriculture, and forest resources in an area of 2.6 million km2 (one million square miles) of eastern Canada, about 8% of Canada's gross national product.

  5. Acid Rain Materials for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Factor, Lance; Kooser, Robert G.

    This booklet contains three separate papers suitable for use in an advanced high school or college chemistry course. The first paper provides background information on acids and bases. The second paper provides additional background information, focusing on certain aspects of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to the acid rain problem. An attempt…

  6. Acid Rain: A Student's First Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Beth Ann; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to help students better understand the science, citizen action, and research issues that are part of the acid rain problem. The guide is designed for students in grades 4-8 and their teachers. Following an introduction, the first seven sections are informative in nature. They include: (1) "Observations about Acidity";…

  7. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON GRAPEVINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid...

  8. Acid rain and electric utilities 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings contains more than 100 technical presentations dealing with a variety of topics concerning the Title IV acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Some of the major topics addressed include: emerging environmental issues impacting electric utilities (proposed revisions to the ozone and particulate matter NAAQS), acid rain program overview, continuous emissions monitoring rule revisions, global climate change and CO{sub 2}, emissions data management, Clean Air Power Initiative and regional issues, compliance/designated representative, flow monitoring, emissions control technology, allowance and trading, emission reductions, NO{sub x} control issues, hazardous air pollutants, and CEMS advances.

  9. Rain pH estimation based on the particulate matter pollutants and wet deposition study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian; Pal, Asim Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In forecasting of rain pH, the changes caused by particulate matter (PM) are generally neglected. In regions of high PM concentration like Dhanbad, the role of PM in deciding the rain pH becomes important. Present work takes into account theoretical prediction of rain pH by two methods. First method considers only acid causing gases (ACG) like CO2, SO2 and NOx in pH estimation, whereas, second method additionally accounts for effect of PM (ACG-PM). In order to predict the rain pH, site specific deposited dust that represents local PM was studied experimentally for its impact on pH of neutral water. After incorporation of PM correction factor, it was found that, rain pH values estimated were more representative of the observed ones. Fractional bias (FB) for the ACG-PM method reduced to values of the order of 10(-2) from those with order of 10(-1) for the ACG method. The study confirms neutralization of rain acidity by PM. On account of this, rain pH was found in the slightly acidic to near neutral range, despite of the high sulfate flux found in rain water. Although, the safer range of rain pH blurs the severity of acid rain from the picture, yet huge flux of acidic and other ions get transferred to water bodies, soil and ultimately to the ground water system. Simple use of rain pH for rain water quality fails to address the issues of its increased ionic composition due to the interfering pollutants and thus undermines severity of pollutants transferred from air to rain water and then to water bodies and soil. PMID:27139302

  10. Scientists Puzzle Over Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Reports on a growing concern over increased acidity in atmospheric percipitation. Explores possible causes of the increased acidity, identifies chemical components of precipitation in various parts of the world, and presents environmental changes that might be attributed to the acidity. (GS)

  11. Acid rain: the impact of local sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaite, P.; Esposito, M.P.; Szabo, M.F.; Devitt, T.W.

    1980-11-24

    It has been assumed that acid rain is predominantly a problem of long-range transport of pollutants from large fossil fuel combustion sources, namely coal-fired utilities. However, close examination of fuel use information and source emission characteristics in the Adirondacks, Florida, and California suggests that local oil burning and automotive sources may be major contributors to the occurrence of acid rain in these areas. This report describes the possible role of local combustion sources in the production of acid rain, discusses the implications of the findings, and their relevance to alternative control strategies for acid rain. Oil-fired boilers, especially the smaller commercial, industrial, and residential units, produce at least 3 to 10 times as much primary sulfate per unit of sulfur content as coal-fired units. Moreover, oil-fired units emit comparatively large quantities of catalytic compounds capable of rapidly converting still more sulfur oxide to sulfate in the atmosphere. Thus, in areas where large quantities of oil are burned, the direct impact from locally generated sulfates may equal or even exceed that produced by imported sulfates derived from distant coal-burning sources. Fuel consumption data show that large quantities of oil are being consumed in areas experiencing acid rain. Forty percent of the residual and 36 percent of the distillate oil burned in the United States is consumed in the eight-state area surrounding the Adirondacks. California is the next largest oil-consuming area and Florida is third. Nitric acid is responsible for about 30 percent of rainfall acidity in the Northeast and Florida, and for about 30 to 75 percent of the rainfall acidity in California.

  12. Foliar nutrient status of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J. )

    1991-05-01

    A direct effect of foliar exposure to acid rain may be increased leaching of nutrient elements. Ozone exposure, through degradation of the cuticle and cellular membranes, may also result in increased nutrient leaching. To test these hypotheses, the foliar concentrations of 13 nutrient elements were monitored for mature branches of three clones of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and/or acid rain. The three clones represented three distinct levels of phenotypic vigor. Branches were exposed to charcoal filtered, ambient, or 2 x ambient concentrations of ozone and received no acid rain (NAP), pH 5.1 rain (5.1), or pH 3.0 (3.0) rain. Following 10 months of continuous ozone exposure and 3 months of weekly rain applications, the concentrations of P and Mg differed significantly among rain treatments with a ranking of: 5.1 < NAP < 3.0. The S concentration increased with rain application regardless of pH. For the clones of moderate and low vigor, the concentration of N decreased with increasing rain acidity. There was no evidence of significant ozone or ozone x acid rain response. Among the three families, high phenotypic vigor was associated with significantly greater concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, B and An. These results indicate generally negligible leaching as a result of exposure to acid rain and/or ozone for one growing season. Increases in foliar concentrations of S, Mg and P are possibly the result of evaporative surface deposition from the rain solution.

  13. Acid Rain: Resource Materials for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides listings of acid rain resource material groups under: (1) printed materials (pamphlets, books, articles); (2) audiovisuals (slide/tape presentations, tape, video-cassette); (3) miscellaneous (buttons, pocket lab, umbrella); (4) transparencies; (5) bibliographies; and (6) curriculum materials. Sources and prices (when applicable) are…

  14. Acid Rain. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Colin; Barber, Jacqueline; Coonrod, Jan

    This teacher's guide presents a unit on acid rain and introduces hands-on activities for sixth through eighth grade students. In each unit, students act as real scientists and gather evidence by using science process skills such as observing, measuring and recording data, classifying, role playing, problem solving, critical thinking, synthesizing…

  15. Acid Rain: A Description of Bilingual Friesland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zondag, Koen

    1984-01-01

    Using acid rain as a metaphor, discusses the status of the Frisian language and culture as one which, though apparently thriving, is really threatened. Examines the sources of this threat, i.e., the education system, the church, mass communication and transportation, and the demise of the Frisian village community. (SED)

  16. Acid Rain Program CEM audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, K.O.T.; Alexander, T.H.; Dupree, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation will give an overview of the Acid Rain Program CEM Audit Program: electronic and field audits. The presentation will include the reasons for audits, field audit types and levels the steps used in develop in the audit program and the audit procedures.

  17. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions...

  18. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  19. Innovative role of statistics in acid rain performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Warren-Hicks, W.; Etchison, T.; Lieberman, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) of 1990 mandated that affected electric utilities reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions, the primary precursors of acidic deposition, and included an innovative market-based SO{sub 2} regulatory program. A central element of the Acid Rain Program is the requirement that affected utility units install CEMS. This paper describes how the Acid Rain Regulations incorporated statistical procedures in the performance tests for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) and how statistical analysis was used to assess the appropriateness, stringency, and potential impact of various performance tests and standards that were considered for inclusion in the Acid Rain Regulations. Described here is the statistical analysis that was used to set a relative accuracy standard, establish the calculation procedures for filling in missing data when a monitor malfunctions, and evaluate the performance tests applied to petitions for alternative monitoring systems. The paper concludes that the statistical evaluations of proposed provisions of the Acid Rain Regulations resulted in the adoption of performance tests and standards that were scientifically substantiated, workable, and effective.

  20. Effects of acid rain on crops and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Dochinger, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general treatment of the subject of acid rain and its effets are discussed along with sources of acid rain and its near-term (the last couple of decades). The effects of acid rain on terrestrial ecosystems are treated in some detail. Some treatment is given of the ecosystem-level effects of acid precipitation.

  1. Fraud in the acid rain debate

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, C.

    1984-06-01

    Electric utility executives, according to the author, and millions of other Americans are the victims of a gigantic fraud being carried on in the name of controlling acid rain. This fraud, states the author, involves the distorted, dire image of acidity in nature being created by environmental groups, politicians and others - to gain public sympathy for their legislative goals. The alleged fraud involves the very nature of the legislation being promoted as a low-cost cure for acid rain. On the basis of scientific evidence to date there is no assurance it will reduce acidity by any appreciable amount, but on the other hand it most certainly will cost users of electricity hundreds of billions of dollars in new costs. What has already happened to the nuclear industry is also meant for coal.

  2. The urban perspectives of acid rain. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-06-04

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility.

  3. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions. The following provisions of part 72...

  4. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  5. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  6. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  7. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  8. The Acid Rain Program: Monitoring the future

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of the development of the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) and their use in the market based pollution control program of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The roles of the regulatory agencies are discussed and projections are put forward as to how the roles will evolve over time. In addition a discussion of the activities the regulated community is expected to focus on is presented. Finally, a discussion occurs about the requirements that new technologies and instrument providers and purchasers should keep in mind about the Acid Rain Program`s monitoring requirements as they attempt to bring new products into this market.

  9. Court date for EPA acid rain rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-04

    In an acid rain rulemaking that appears headed straight for the courtroom, the Environmental Protection Agency this week announced new limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides from coal-fired power plants. The regulations, announced March 1, are expected to achieve a 1.8 million ton per year reduction in power plant NOx emissions, which are considered a major contributor to acid rain. The agency issued companion regulations last year to cut power plant discharges of sulfur dioxide, the other major acid rain pollutant. The NOx rulemaking elicited contradictory responses from utility industry officials. One point of contention involves the agency's definition of low-NOx burner technology, a key regulatory determination. If a utility installs EPA-defined low-NOx burner technology and still cannot meet the new NOx limits, it can apply for a less stringent [open quotes]alternative emission limit.[close quotes] The other issue likely to be raised by industry officials involves the January 1995 compliance deadline for utilities included in Phase I of the NOx program. While EPA will allow individual utilities to seek a deadline extension until April 1996 in the event of operational difficulties, the agency rejected the industry's request for an across-the-board extension.

  10. State acid rain permitting programs: A report from EPA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    States and EPA are laying the groundwork for state acid rain permitting in Phase 2 of the Acid Rain Program. Early indications suggest a high degree of state compliance with the acid rain permitting requirements of the Acid Rain Program. Phase 2 acid rain permitting forms have been revised and are available on EPA`s Technology Transfer Network. EPA has developed a policy and rationale concerning submission of Phase 2 permit applications, as well as suggested state timing and methodology regarding adoption of 40 CFR Part 76, the NO{sub x} regulation.

  11. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  12. Air pollution, acid rain, and the future of forests. Part 3. Counting the costs

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1984-09-01

    Economic losses are predicted due to the effects of acid rain on forests in Europe and the United States. Growth declines and tree damage on forest lands intensively managed for marketable timber are described. Forest industries which produce paper and other forest products which consume large amounts of energy are said to be reluctant to support acid rain control measures. Few studies have examined the effects of acid deposition combined with intensive forestry practices.

  13. Acid deposition: Atmospheric processes in Eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report examines scientific evidence on the relationship between emissions of acid-forming pollutants and damage to sensitive ecosystems from acid rain and other forms of acid deposition. The report's conclusions represent the most authoritative statement yet that reductions in emissions of these pollutants will result in proportional reductions in acid rain.

  14. Primer on acid precipitation. A killing rain: the global threat of acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlick, T.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the book A Killing Rain: The Global Threat of Acid Precipitation by Thomas Pawlick which presents an overview of the problems associated with acid rain. The book covers the effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems, forests materials, and agriculture. It also deals with abatement technologies and sociopolitical topics associated with acid rain.

  15. Technological options for acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Princiotta, F.T.; Sedman, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. One key consideration is the effect of fuel switching or control technology upon the existing dust collector, with additional air toxics legislation looming ahead. A number of likely SO2 and NOx retrofit technologies and estimated costs are presented, along with results of retrofit case studies. New hybrid particulate controls are also being developed to meet future requirements.

  16. Compliance report, 1997. Acid rain program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The 1997 Compliance Report once again announces 100 percent compliance with the Acid Rain Program, now in its third year of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) compliance and its second year of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compliance. Affected facilities continued to exceed the targets set for both pollutants by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The early reductions seen in 1995 and 1996 for SO{sub 2} continue, with affected utility units beating their 1997 target by 23 percent. The overcompliance with the NO{sub x} target also continues, achieving an average emission rate for Phase 1 units 16 percent below the compliance rate.

  17. Acid rain reduced in eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Sulfate and free hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation decreased 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern United States in 1995. The largest decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments set limitations, effective January 1, 1995, on sulfur dioxide emissions from affected coal-fired sources. Based on our analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, we conclude that substantial declines in acid rain occurred in the eastern United States in 1995 because of large reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions in the same region.

  18. The greenhouse effect and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1987-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollution is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern U.S. and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. How seasonal changes in lake transparency are related to annual acidic load was examined. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units was also examined. The utility of Thematic Mapper based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes was investigated. The potential for this optical response is related to a number of local ecophysical factors with bedrock geology being, perhaps, the most important. Other factors include sulfate deposition, vegetative cover, and terrain drainage/relief. The area of southern Ontario contains a wide variety of geologies from the most acid rain sensitive granite quartzite types to the least sensitive limestone dolomite sediments. Annual sulfate deposition ranges from 1.0 to 4.0 grams/sq m.

  20. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 3: Aquatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, D.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report is an assessment of information on the aquatic effects of acid rain, produced to act as technical support for development of an acid rain strategy. It first reviews the previous aquatic effects assessment of 1990 and aquatic effects monitoring and research conducted post-1990. It then presents and discusses results of research that proceeds from the knowledge base and status presented in the 1990 assessment. First, the chemical and biological changes observed in aquatic ecosystems since the early 1980s are assessed, including an analysis of the factors (such as declining acidic deposition) that influence the changes. Regional differences and hysteresis between acidification and recovery responses are also discussed. Second, interactions between the acidity stressor and other atmospherically based stressors such as climate change and contaminant deposition are considered. Third, the effectiveness of existing critical and target loads in protecting aquatic ecosystems is re-evaluated. Finally, the likely effect of full implementation of the planned sulphur dioxide controls in Canada and the United States on aquatic chemistry and biology is predicted using up-to-date modelling tools. Knowledge gaps are identified along with recommended actions to be implemented.

  1. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain. PMID:21479540

  2. Acid rain: the relationship between sources and receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Rain: The Relationship Between Sources and Receptors consists of a collection of papers and discussions from the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse. The conference, held in December 1986, was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute, and the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP).

  3. Red herring in acid rain research

    SciTech Connect

    Havas, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Likens, G.E.

    1984-06-01

    Five common misconceptions, red herrings, regarding the effects of acid deposition on aquatic ecosystems are described in an attempt to clarify some of the confusion they have created. These misconceptions are the following: Bog lakes have been acidic for thousands of years; thus the acidification of lakes is not a recent phenomenon. The early methods for measuring pH are in error; therfore, no statements can be made regarding historical trends. Acidification of lakes and streams results from changed land use practices (forestry, agriculture, animal husbandry) and not acid deposition. The decrease in fish populations is caused by overfishing, disease, and water pollution, not acidification. Because lakes that receive identical rainfall can have considerable different pHs, regional lake acidification cannot be due to acid precipitation. It is easy to suggest a whole series of alternative, and often unlikely, explanations of the causes and consequences of acid deposition. These keep scientists busy for years assembling and examining data only to conclude that the explanation is not valid. These tactics cause, and perhaps are designed to cause, continuous delay in remedial action. They fail to take into account the large body of information that deals with the sources of the acid deposition and the seriousness of its effects.

  4. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 4: The effects on Canada`s forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.

    1997-12-31

    This report reviews the state of acid rain assessment related to Canadian forests as it has progressed since the last assessment carried out in 1990. The assessment also highlights key policy issues and the uncertainties associated with addressing them. Sections of the report cover the following: Acid rain and current forest decline in coastal birch, sugar maple, and high elevation forests; the effects of acid rain on tree physiology and soil chemistry; results of forest health monitoring in national, North American, Ontario, and Quebec networks; the critical loads or levels of acid deposition, with reference to case studies; and international involvement in acid rain research and abatement. Finally, research and information needs are identified.

  5. Acid rain report focuses on forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent research on acid precipitation yields “increasing general concern about possible effects on forests,” according to the second annual report of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Prepared by the Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation, the report outlines the accomplishments of the national program during fiscal 1983, summarizes the current state of scientific knowledge (including a change in the baseline acidity of precipitation), and describes the outlook for current progress by federally funded acid precipitation research. Chris Bernabo is the program's executive director.NAPAP's annual report agrees with the finding of a National Research Council (NRC) committee that a linear relationship exists between sulfur dioxide emissions and wet deposition of sulfate (Eos, July 26, 1983, p. 475). NRC's Committee on Atmospheric Transport and Chemical Transformation in Acid Precipitation, which issued its report last year, was chaired by Jack G. Calvert of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  6. Aluminum: A neurotoxic product of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.B.

    1994-07-01

    Two separate but converging concerns have resulted in an upsurge in research on aluminum ion in the past 15 years. Acid rain releases Al(III) from soils into fresh waters, where it is for the first time accessible to living organisms. Though long considered benign, Al(III) has recently been found to cause bone and neurological disorders, while its role in Alzheimer`s disease remains uncertain. The greater availability of Al(III), coupled with its demonstrated harmful effects, challenges chemists to describe its chemistry and biochemistry. Many interactions of Al(III) have been described, but several questions remain unsolved. A great deal of work not within the scope of this Account is described in several edited volumes. (This Account uses Al(III) as a generic term for the 3+ ion when a specific form is not indicated). 96 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Acid rain: how great a menace

    SciTech Connect

    LaBastille, A.

    1981-11-01

    Dead lakes in the Adirondacks and Scandinavia are among the victims of the worldwide burning of fossil fuels and the release of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and other contaminants. Efforts to relieve pollution caused by industrial and utility burning by building taller smokestacks may have worsened the problem by causing pollutants to circulate with air masses making up global weather systems. This overview of the problem identifies vulnerable areas, traces the history of man's awareness of acidic rain, and describes some of the detective work involved in tracing emissions to sensitive areas. Nature's buffering mechanisms and man's efforts to sweeten lakes and soil are described. The implications for international relations are serious as nation's seek ways to control the movement of pollutants across boundaries and to work together to find a curative approach. 4 figures, (DCK)

  8. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  9. Observations on lichens, granite rock outcrops and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Lichen sensitivity to the synergistic effects of acid rain and toxic metals in the Atlanta, Georgia area is discussed. The disappearance of lichens on Stone Mountain after the placement of a safety galvinized fence lead to the observations of possible acid rain effects on population dynamics of the lichen community.

  10. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  11. Acid rain - A further look at the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenstein, A.W.

    1986-03-01

    There is widespread belief that acid rain is damaging lakes and forests in eastern North America, and that the threat of further damage is severe enough to warrant prompt remedial action. The cause of acid rain, hence ecological damage, is popularly held to be the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) created by the combustion of fossil fuels. This popular belief rests on a narrow selection of data, and is not substantiated by the broader body of knowledge which is available. Nevertheless, numerous bills have been introduced in Congress proposing large reductions in SO/sub 2/ emissions. For example, the first bill introduced in 1985 was S.52, ''The Acid Rain Control Act of 1985.'' It calls for reducing SO/sub 2/ emissions by 10 million tons annually. While the language of S.52 and similar bills is not specific on causes and effects of acid rain, the testimony before Congressional committees made it clear that the concerns focus on the actual or potential acidification of lakes and soils by acid rain, and actual or potential impacts of acid rain on fish, other aquatic life, trees, crops, and human health. This article assesses the merits of these contentions about acid rain by examining technical evidence that relates SO/sub 2/ emissions to the acidity of rain to actual or potential environmental impacts.

  12. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  13. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  14. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  15. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions. The provisions of part 72, including the...

  16. Elementary Acid Rain Kit, Interdisciplinary, Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    An interdisciplinary approach for teaching about acid rain is offered in this curriculum guide for teachers of grades 4-8. Skill and concept areas of science, math, social studies, art, and the language arts are developed in 12 activities which focus on the acid rain problems. A matrix of the activities and subject areas indicates the coverage…

  17. Acid rain compliance: The need for regulatory guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, B.D.

    1993-07-01

    This article presents a broad view of the need for regulatory guidance when confronting the problem of acid rain. The two major topics addressed are (1) Why is guidance needed and (2) What kind of guidance is needed. Discussion of rate and accounting treatment of allowances, acid rain compliance planning, and allowance trading and energy efficiency are included.

  18. Study of the mechanisms of acid rain formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F.; Nagamoto, C.; Madel, R.

    1987-11-01

    Samples of rain, snow, cloud water, aerosols and soil were collected in Colorado to study the mechanisms of acid rain formation. Chemical compositions of various types of samples were analyzed to investigate the stepwise incorporation of inpurities into precipitation. Local soil was generally alkaline; atmospheric aerosols, which are mixtures of stirred-up soil particles and anthropogenic pollution, were slightly acidic; cloud condensation nuclei, which initiate clouds at condensation level, had an average pH of approx.6. However, local clouds were very acidic (pH approx.4), indicating that further acidification takes place in clouds by adsorption of acidic gases, e.g., CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and NO/sub x/. We found that summer showers formed by coalescence of cloud droplets are likely to be as acidic as cloud water. The chemistry of snow may differ from that of clouds, depending on the mechanisms of snow formation. If snow crystals are initiated by deposition nucleation and grown by diffusion of water vapor from surrounding evaporating cloud droplets as in the Bergeron--Findeisen process, the snow crystals are purified and should not be acidic. If the snow crystals are initiated by freezing of cloud droplets and grow by vapor diffusion, then the constituents of cloud water are diluted and the snow is less acidic than cloud water. If snow grains (graupel) are formed by accretion of frozen cloud drops or by riming, the snow can be as acidic as cloud water. Raindrops formed by melting snow inherit the chemistry of the parent snow, but differentiate in scavenging coefficiencies of gases and aerosols below the clouds. Both atmospheric chemical reactions and cloud microphysical processes are responsible for chemical variations in precipitation.

  19. Interactions between greenhouse gas policies and acid rain control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.E.; Kane, R.L.; Mansueti, L.

    1997-12-31

    Conventional wisdom and much of the public policy debate have usually drawn a clean delineation between acid rain issues and global warming concerns. This traditional approach of evaluating one policy at a time is too simplistic to serve as a framework for electric utilities making major capital investment and fuel procurement decisions to comply with various environmental requirements. Potential Climate change regulation can affect acid rain compliance decisions, and acid rain compliance decisions will affect future GHG emissions. This paper explores two categories of linkages between these different environmental issues. First, the assumptions one makes regarding future climate change policies can have a profound impact on the economic attractiveness of various acid rain compliance strategies. Second, decisions regarding acid rain compliance strategy can have greenhouse gas implications that might prove more or less difficult to address in future climate change legislation.

  20. Acid soil and acid rain, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, I.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the basic chemical processes involved in acidification in order to better assess their long-term effects on the status of soils, the health of plants and other living species that depend on them. It also discusses acidity, pH and protons their significance in bioenergetics and the consequent role of autotrophic organisms in acidifying ecosystems. This edition incorporates and integrates recent findings that render more explanations of the causes of the environmental impacts of acidity, especially in forests and lakes. Also explores current research into acid rain and soil in order to devise appropriate measures for their amelioration.

  1. Is There Scientific Consensus on Acid Rain? -- Excerpts from Six Governmental Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Compiles a series of direct quotations from six governmental reports that reflect a scientific consensus on major aspects of acid deposition. Presents the statements in a question and answer format. Also reviews the sources, extent, and effects of acid rain. (ML)

  2. Acid rain stimulation of Lake Michigan phytoplankton growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Fahnenstiel, G.L.; Gardner, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    Three laboratory experiments demonstrated that additions of rainwater to epilimnetic lake water collected in southeastern Lake Michigan stimulated chlorophyll a production more than did additions of reagent-grade water during incubations of 12 to 20 d. Chlorophyll a production did not begin until 3–5 d after the rain and lake water were mixed. The stimulation caused by additions of rain acidified to pH 3.0 was greater than that caused by additions of untreated rain (pH 4.0–4.5). Our results support the following hypotheses: (1) Acid rain stimulates the growth of phytoplankton in lake water; (2) phosphorus in rain appears to be the factor causing this stimulation. We conclude that acid rain may accelerate the growth of epilimnetic phytoplankton in Lake Michigan (and other similar lakes) during stratification when other sources of bioavailable phosphorus to the epilimnion are limited

  3. Atmospheric deposition of 7Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H.; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M.

    2008-08-01

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of 7Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, 176Lu, 138La and 40K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the 176Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The 7Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l-1. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l-1). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l-1, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of 7Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  4. Acid rain reduced in Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J.A.; Bowersox, V.C.; Grimm, J.W.

    2000-03-15

    Concentrations of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and free hydrogen ions (H{sup +}) in precipitation decreased from 10% to 25% over a large area of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 as compared to the previous 12-year (1983--1994) reference period. These decreases were unprecedented in magnitude and spatial extent. In contrast, nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) concentrations generally did not change over this period. The largest decreases in both H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations, which nearly mimicked one another, occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set limitations on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from a large number of utility-owned coal-fired sources. Phase 1 of the CAAA required that these limitations be met by January 1, 1995. On the basis of their analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, the authors conclude that significant declines in acid rain occurred in many parts of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 because of large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions in this region and a corresponding reduction in SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations in precipitation.

  5. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  6. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Although science has largely determined that man made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to avail better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weight the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. The implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain are examined.

  7. Long-Term Effects of Acid Rain: Response and Recovery of a Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likens, G. E.; Driscoll, C. T.; Buso, D. C.

    1996-04-01

    Long-term data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, suggest that although changes in stream pH have been relatively small, large quantities of calcium and magnesium have been lost from the soil complex and exported by drainage water because of inputs of acid rain and declines in atmospheric deposition of base cations. As a result, the recovery of soil and streamwater chemistry in response to any decreases in acid deposition will be delayed significantly.

  8. Long-term suppression of wetland methane flux following a pulse of simulated acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy; Blake, Stephen

    2005-06-01

    Wetlands are a potent source of the radiatively important gas methane (CH4). Recent findings have demonstrated that sulfate (SO42-) deposition via acid rain suppresses CH4 emissions by stimulating competitive exclusion of methanogens by sulfate-reducing microbial populations. Here we report data from a field experiment showing that a finite pulse of simulated acid rain SO42- deposition, as would be expected from a large Icelandic volcanic eruption, continues to suppress CH4 emissions from wetlands long after the pollution event has ceased. Our analysis of the stoichiometries suggests that 5 years is a minimum CH4 emission recovery period, with 10 years being a reasonable upper limit. Our findings highlight the long-term impact of acid rain on biospheric output of CH4 which, for discrete polluting events such as volcanic eruptions, outlives the relatively short-term SO42- aerosol radiative cooling effect.

  9. Federal-provincial agreements for the Eastern Canada Acid Rain Program: Annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report on the Eastern Canada Acid Rain Program compares the previous year`s emissions of sulphur dioxide in the 7 easternmost provinces to the emission targets in the program. The objective is to cap sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions until the year 2000. Coupled with the US Acid Rain Program it is intended to protect sensitive ecosystems from acid deposition. This report discusses emissions for the latest year, concerns, and steps to be taken. Statistical tables give emissions by province and industry, with information for some major air pollution sources in mineral extraction or electric power generation.

  10. Soil-calcium depletion linked to acid rain and forest growth in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Huntington, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    Since the discovery of acid rain in the 1970's, scientists have been concerned that deposition of acids could cause depletion of calcium in forest soils. Research in the 1980's showed that the amount of calcium in forest soils is controlled by several factors that are difficult to measure. Further research in the 1990's, including several studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, has shown that (1) calcium in forest soils has decreased at locations in the northeastern and southeastern U.S., and (2) acid rain and forest growth (uptake of calcium from the soil by roots) are both factors contributing to calcium depletion.

  11. Rain water composition and influence of dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshreetha, U.C.; Jain, M.; Sarkar, A.K.; Parashar, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    This study reports the influence of dry deposition of pollutants on the chemical composition rain water at Delhi (India) by collecting the samples of wet-only, bulk and dry depositions. The wet-only samples were collected at a height of 30 m above the ground level using an automatic collector supplied by IMI, Stockholm. Simultaneously, bulk samples from two different heights, i.e., 30 m and 13 m were also collected. The samples of dry deposition were collected at 13 m height only. pH and conductance were measured immediately after collection of samples. The anions, F, Cl, NO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} were analyzed by an ion chromatograph while cations viz, Na, K, Ca and Mg were analyzed by an AAS. The NH{sub 4} was estimated calorimetrically by the indo-phenol method.

  12. Acid rain in the West: separating politics and environmental fact

    SciTech Connect

    Erbes, R.E.

    1985-05-16

    A review of findings of scientific studies characterizing the phenomenon of acidification of rainwater concludes, by separating out political considerations, that there is no acid rain emergency or crisis in the West. There are no data to indicate that acid rain is even a problem. Important regional differences distinguish the situation in the East from the West. These include physical differences in rain chemistry; in natural and man-made emissions densities; in the interactions among climate, soils, geology, vegetation, and other factors; and especially in relative proportions of utility versus other man-made and natural emissions. 1 table.

  13. LIMESTONE AND MARBLE DISSOLUTION BY ACID RAIN: AN ONSITE WEATHERING EXPERIMENT.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.; Doe, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe an experimental research program, conducted in conjunction with the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), to quantify acid-rain damage to commercial and cultural carbonate-rock resources. Initial results of this experiment show that carbonate-rock dissolution and associated surface recession increase with increasing acid deposition to the rock surface. A statistically significant linear relation has been found between carbonate-rock surface-recession rate and hydrogen ion loading to the rock surface.

  14. Health risks from acid rain: a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Franklin, C A; Burnett, R T; Paolini, R J; Raizenne, M E

    1985-11-01

    Acidic deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, is causing serious environmental damage in eastern Canada. The revenues from forest products, tourism and sport fishing are estimated to account for about 8% of the gross national product. The impact on human health is not as clearcut and a multi-department program on the Long-Range Transport of Airborne Pollutants (LRTAP) was approved by the federal government in June 1980. The objectives of the LRTAP program are to reduce wet sulfate deposition to less than 20 kg/ha per year in order to protect moderately sensitive areas. This will require a 50% reduction in Canadian SO2 emissions east of the Saskatchewan/Manitoba border and concomitant reductions in the eastern U.S.A. The objectives of the health sector of the program are to assess the risk to health posed by airborne pollutants which are subjected to long-range transport and to monitor the influence of abatement programs. Two major epidemiology studies were undertaken in 1983, one in which the health effects related to acute exposure to transported air pollutants were studied in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children, and another in which the effects of chronic exposure to these pollutants were studied in school children living in towns with high and low levels of pollutants. Preliminary analysis of the data do not indicate major health effects, but definitive conclusions must await final analysis. Studies on the indirect effects of acid deposition on water quality have shown that acidified lake water left standing in the plumbing system can adversely affect water quality and that federally set guidelines for copper and lead are exceeded. Flushing of the system before using the water rectifies the situation. Additional studies are planned to further delineate the magnitude of the health effects of acidified lake water. PMID:4076081

  15. Health risks from acid rain: a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, C A; Burnett, R T; Paolini, R J; Raizenne, M E

    1985-01-01

    Acidic deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, is causing serious environmental damage in eastern Canada. The revenues from forest products, tourism and sport fishing are estimated to account for about 8% of the gross national product. The impact on human health is not as clearcut and a multi-department program on the Long-Range Transport of Airborne Pollutants (LRTAP) was approved by the federal government in June 1980. The objectives of the LRTAP program are to reduce wet sulfate deposition to less than 20 kg/ha per year in order to protect moderately sensitive areas. This will require a 50% reduction in Canadian SO2 emissions east of the Saskatchewan/Manitoba border and concomitant reductions in the eastern U.S.A. The objectives of the health sector of the program are to assess the risk to health posed by airborne pollutants which are subjected to long-range transport and to monitor the influence of abatement programs. Two major epidemiology studies were undertaken in 1983, one in which the health effects related to acute exposure to transported air pollutants were studied in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children, and another in which the effects of chronic exposure to these pollutants were studied in school children living in towns with high and low levels of pollutants. Preliminary analysis of the data do not indicate major health effects, but definitive conclusions must await final analysis. Studies on the indirect effects of acid deposition on water quality have shown that acidified lake water left standing in the plumbing system can adversely affect water quality and that federally set guidelines for copper and lead are exceeded. Flushing of the system before using the water rectifies the situation. Additional studies are planned to further delineate the magnitude of the health effects of acidified lake water. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. PMID:4076081

  16. Air quality monitor and acid rain networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.

    1980-01-01

    The air quality monitor program which consists of two permanent air monitor stations (PAMS's) and four mobile shuttle pollutant air monitor stations (SPAMS's) is evaluated. The PAMS measures SO sub X, NO sub X particulates, CO, O3, and nonmethane hydrocarbons. The SPAMS measures O3, SO2, HCl, and particulates. The collection and analysis of data in the rain monitor program are discussed.

  17. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  18. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  19. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  20. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  1. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  2. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  3. The Effects of Acid Rain on Forest Nutrient Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale W.; Turner, John; Kelly, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. In all cases the anion associated with acid inputs must be mobile in the soil if leaching is to occur; immobilization of anions can effectively prevent cation leaching. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur in theory, at least, given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitritication as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Little is known about tree Al toxicity levels as yet, however. It must be emphasized that assessment of acid rain effects is a problem of quantification. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H2O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural

  4. Relative contributions of sulfuric and nitric acids in acid rain to the acidification of the ecosystem: implications for control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.A.N.

    1981-11-01

    Much of northeastern North America has been receiving precipitation of pH 4.6 or less, i.e. more than ten times more acid than normal rain (pH = 5.6) for at least the past 20 to 30 years. Originally, this acidity was almost totally due to sulfuric acid. These inputs of sulfuric acid in the very acid sensitive Adirondacks may have removed much of the neutralizing and nitrate-utilizing ability of the soils and water. Thus, this area may now be more sensitive to atmospheric inputs of nitric acid. Further work is required on the impact of acid nitrate deposition on the ecosystem but with equal certainty it can be stated that sulfur deposition remains the princpial long term threat to acid sensitive ecosystems. It can be concluded that: much of the nitric acid in acid rain is decomposed in the soils and waterway, and is not a significant contributor to long-term acidification of soils and waters; although in the long term, nitric acid in atmospheric deposition is not likely to be contributing to the overall acidification of the environment, during the spring thaw, in areas which have been heavily impacted by acid rain for a number of years, nitric acid which has concentrated in the snow pack over the winter may cause ecological damage, especially to fish populations; though there is little doubt that tighter control strategies are necessary to diminish the effects of acid rain on remote ecosystems the existing control strategies, which have put more emphasis on the control of emissions of sulfur oxides than nitrogen oxides, have a reasonable scientific basis given our present limited knowledge of their effects on the ecosystem.

  5. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  6. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  7. Effects of acid rain on soil humic compounds.

    PubMed

    Calace, N; Fiorentini, F; Petronio, B M; Pietroletti, M

    2001-06-21

    The modifications induced by acid rain on the solubility, molecular configuration and molecular weight distribution of humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids were studied. A natural soil was subjected to simulated acid rain until a soil pH of 4 was obtained; HA and FA acids were then extracted and characterised. The results obtained were compared both with those of natural soil and with those of a soil subjected to acid rain. Elute analysis indicates the continuous release of soluble organic compounds as a consequence of acid rain simulation, although no relationship was found with the process of soil acidification. The yields of HA and FA show that HA values are the same while FA amount is higher in the natural soil; in acid soils their water solubility increases. The molecular weight distribution shows that HA consist of a mixture of compounds of different molecular weights; they are molecules for the most part larger than 100 kDa and their distribution is not changed by soil acidification. FA can be considered to form a much more homogeneous system; in natural soil, the molecules are larger than 50 kDa, while in acidified soil they are for the most part smaller than 3 kDa. PMID:18968306

  8. Swedish scientists take acid-rain research to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1995-12-01

    In the realm of acid-rain research, Sweden looms large on the world stage. It is the country where scientists first proved more than 30 years ago that airborne chemicals could and did cross international boundaries to acidify lakes and forests far from where the pollution was generated. Now, Swedish scientists are leading an international effort to map acid-rain patterns in the developing countries of Asia, where new industrial activity seems to be recreating problems that European and North American policy makers have already taken steps to solve. Topics covered in this article include acid rain on the rise in Asia; visualizing and validating the data; funding as the key to steady research.

  9. Acid rain and electric utilities: Permits, allowances, monitoring and meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, P.

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held January 23--25, 1995 in Tempe, Arizona. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the environmental effects electric utilities have in relation to air pollution and acid rain. Attention is focused on many of the permitting and monitoring issues facing the electric utilities industry. Sulfur dioxide allowances, Title IV and Title V issues, Acid Rain Program implementation and Continuing Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) are some of the relevant topics covered in this proceedings. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. Acid Monsoonal Rains in Nepal in August 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazis, C. A.; Best, B.; Johnson, J.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Hodges, D.; Johansen, A. M.; Upreti, B.

    2010-12-01

    Monsoonal rains between the months of May and September constitute approximately 80% of Nepal’s annual precipitation, controlling river discharge and flooding patterns, sustaining native vegetation and agriculture, and influencing physical and chemical weathering rates. Acid rain events, if common during the monsoon season, could have significant impact on regional ecosystems as well as chemical weathering rates and patterns. In this study, precipitation samples were collected in August 2008 and August 2009 from a site in the town of Bhulbhule on the Marsyandi River in north-central Nepal. These samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, major ion chemistry and trace element chemistry. In 2008, daily samples were collected between August 12 and August 25. Of these fourteen samples, eleven were acid rain, with pH between 4.1 and 4.8. The remaining three, collected between August 14 and August 16 had pH vaules between 6.6 and 7.0. In 2009, samples were collected again between August 12 and August 25. During the first four days of this interval, samples were collected after each precipitation event and thereafter they were collected daily. In 2009, all but one sample collected had a pH above 6.1 and five samples had values above 8.0. The lowest pH measured was 5.5. Major ion chemistry reveals a number of differences between the 2008 precipitation samples and the 2009 samples. For example, 2009 samples have higher K and Cl concentrations and thus tend to have lower Ca/K and SO4/Cl ratios. When comparing the acid rain and non-acid rain samples collected in 2008, the most distinct difference is the presence of PO4 in measurable amounts (0.2 to 1.1 ppm) in the acid rain samples. In this poster we discuss these differences in major ion chemistry in terms of local and regional weather patterns and potential ion sources.

  11. The effects of acid rain on forest nutrient status

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Turner, J.; Kelly, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitrification as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H/sub 2/O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural practices, and amount of atmospheric inputs. (JMT)

  12. Effects of acid rain on mycorrhizal infection and N cycling in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Stroo, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Increasing the acidity of simulated rain from pH 5.6 to 3.0 reduced the number of mycorrhizal roots on white pine seedlings by 20% after 16 weeks of exposure. Mycorrhizal infection of red oaks was 25% less at a rain pH of 3.5 than at pH 5.6. Simulated acid rain also caused increases in the N contents, net photosynthesis, and growth of seedlings, as well as decreases in root:shoot ratios and in the concentration of sucrose in the roots. To measure the effects of acid rain on N mineralization, nitrification, and total inorganic N, columns containing samples from the surface horizons of 12 forest soils were exposed to simulated rain at 3 times ambient deposition rates for 16 weeks. The effects on N mineralization varied between soils, with the greatest inhibitions being observed in soils with low organic matter contents. The apparent protection by organic matter was associated with an increase in short-term buffering capacity. The average amount of N mineralized after exposure was not significantly affected by rain pH. Similarly, nitrification was inhibited during exposure to simulated rain at pH 3.5, but was unaffected after exposure. Enrichments from an acid forest soil failed to show the presence of autotrophic nitrifiers, and the effects of temperature and selective inhibitors indicated that fungi were primarily responsible for nitrification in this soil. A fungus capable of heterotrophic nitrification at pH 4.0 was isolated and identified as Absidia cylindrospora Hagem.

  13. Emerging acid deposition research and monitoring issues

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.

    1997-12-31

    The research baselines established for acid rain in the 1980s position scientists and policy makers to evaluate the environmental effectiveness of the acid rain control program and to test the variety of scientific hypotheses made regarding the chemical, transport and biological processes involved in acidic deposition. Several new research questions have evolved. How effective are the emissions reductions? What is the residual risk? How have ecological recovery rates been affected and what other environmental factors influence recovery? What are the critical requirements to measure ecological change including the extent and rate while also capturing the extent and severity of emerging ecological stressors (such as watershed nitrogen saturation)? These and other questions are currently being synthesized within and outside of EPA to develop a long-term strategy to provide guidance to emerging research and monitoring issues.

  14. A Gaming Approach to the Acid Rain Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, Norio; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an educational microcomputer gaming system for dealing with the acid rain problem in Western Europe and discusses its objectives, rules, problems, and future perspectives. Usefulness of gaming as an operational aid in formulating appropriate energy policies worldwide is emphasized. (MBR)

  15. Acid rains`s dirty business: Stealing minerals from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.

    1996-04-12

    This article describes the hidden environmental effects of acid rain - leaching of base mineral ions from the soil, often changing soil chemistry dramatically. The primary information comes from Ecosystem studies at Hubbard Brook of Likens and Buso. The article also discusses both other opinions and possible solutions.

  16. ACID RAIN MITAGATION STUDY. VOLUME III: INDUSTRIAL BOILERS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a 4-month study of existing industrial sources of SO2 emissions in the Acid Rain Mitigation Study (ARMS) region, including all the states east of the Mississippi River, as well as MN, IA, MO, AR, LA, ND, SD, NE, KS, OK, and TX. Study aims were to: (1) ...

  17. COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO MODEL PLANT RESPONSE TO ACIDIC RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, IL; Ithaca & Upton, NY; Corvallis, OR; Oak Ridge, TN; and Toronto, Canada. niform genotype, soil media and planting te...

  18. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  19. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  20. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  1. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  2. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  3. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  4. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  5. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  6. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the goals of research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone surfaces is to define the incremental impact of acidic deposition relative to natural weathering processes on the rate of carbonate stone erosion. If rain that impacts carbonate stone surfaces is resident on the surface long enough to approach chemical equilibrium, the incremental effect of hydrogen ion is expected to be small (i.e., 6% for a rain of pH 4.0). Under nonequilibrium (i.e., high flow rate) conditions, kinetic considerations suggest that the incremental effect of hydrogen ion deposition could be quite significant. Field run-off experiments involving the chemical analysis of rain collected from inclined stone slabs have been used to evaluate stone dissolution processes under ambient conditions of wet and dry deposition of acidic species. The stoichiometry of the reaction of stone with hydrogen ion is difficult to define from the field data due to scatter in the data attributed to hydrodynamic effects. Laboratory run-off experiments show that the stoichiometry is best defined by a reaction with H+ in which CO2 is released from the system. The baseline effect caused by water in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 is identical in the field and in laboratory simulation. The experiments show that the solutions are close enough to equilibrium for the incremental effect of hydrogen ion to be minor (i.e., 24% for marble for a rain of pH 4.0) relative to dissolution due to water and carbonic acid reactions. Stone erosion rates based on physical measurement are approximately double the recession rates that are due to dissolution (estimated from the observed calcium content of the run-off solutions). The difference may reflect the loss of granular material not included in recession estimates based on the run-off data. Neither the field nor the laboratory run-off experiments indicate a pH dependence for the grain-removal process.

  7. Corrosion of 85-5-5-5 bronze in natural and synthetic acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morselli, L.; Bernardi, E.; Chiavari, C.; Brunoro, G.

    In order to investigate the decay of bronzes exposed to acid wet depositions, a comparative study has been performed by following the corrosion behaviour of different sets of bronze specimens exposed either to natural rain or to a similar solution, without organic compounds, artificially reproduced in laboratory. The as cast G85 bronze specimens were exposed to aggressive solutions for different periods through a wet-dry technique. The pH trend of the solutions and the amount of metals transferred into the solutions were periodically monitored. OM, SEM, XRD, RAMAN analyses and ac electrochemical measurements were performed on the artificially weathered specimens. Preliminary results, showing the difference between the ageing in natural and synthetic rain, suggest the influence of the organic components on the corrosion process. In particular, the growth of a more uniform protective layer of corrosion products on the metal surface exposed to the natural rain could be attributed to these components.

  8. Acid Rain Education and Its Implications for Curricular Development: A Teacher Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Germann, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Describes a survey which was designed to obtain information on acid rain education. Reviews results pertaining to instructional time, instructional topics, use of labs from a common resource guide, and preference of materials related to acid rain education. (ML)

  9. A collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Irving, P.; Kuja, A.; Lee, J.; Shriner, D.; Troiano, J.; Perrigan, S.; Cullinan, V.

    1989-01-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain on dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. 14 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Adirondack tourism: perceived consequences of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, W.C.

    1984-03-01

    This report seeks to place in perspective the perceived effects of acid precipitation on the tourist industry in the Adirondacks. The 9375-square mile park is host to almost nine million tourists annually, not including seasonal residents. Since the park was established almost 100 years ago, there have been many changes in tourist characteristics, available recreational facilities, kinds of activities, accessibility of the area, and land use and resource management policies. The tourist industry has been influenced by both controllable and uncontrollable factors. At present the overwhelming majority of recreational opportunities and natural resources important to the Adirondack tourist industry are relatively unaffected by acid precipitation. Fishing, a significant component of the tourist industry, is the most vulnerable, but any presumed adverse economic effect has to be weighed against the location of the impacted waters, total Adirondack fishing habitat, substitution available, habitat usage, fisherman characteristics, resource management, and the declining importance of fishing as an Adirondack recreational attraction. Concern is expressed as to whether present minimal acidification impacts are the precursor of major future impacts on Adirondack terrestrial and aquatic environments, and ultimately tourism. Tourism in the Adirondacks is increasing, while many other regional employment sectors are declining. It is becoming a more stable multiseason industry. Its future growth and character will be affected by government, private organization, business community, and resident controversies regarding land use and resource management attitudes, policies, budgets, and regulations. The acid precipitation issue is only one of many related controversies. 65 references, 2 figures.

  11. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general. 72.71 Section 72.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs—general. (a) Each...

  12. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. 72.69 Section 72.69 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits....

  13. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. 72.31 Section 72.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain...

  14. Acid rain: commentary on controversial issues and observations on the role of fuel burning

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, M.F.; Esposito, M.P.; Spaite, P.W.

    1982-03-01

    Even though much information has been accumulated on the subject of acid precipitation, lack of knowledge in certain technical areas precludes an adequate understanding of (1) how serious the acid precipitation problem really is and (2) what effect controlling sources of acid precipitation precursors would have in reducing acidification. It is nevertheless possible to draw some broad conclusions regarding the problem and to ascertain the direction that the required further work should take. This report presents the results of an investigation of various issues associated with acid rain. The following topics are addressed: occurrence of acid precipitation; effects of acid precipitation; sources of acid precipitation; transport, transformation, and deposition of acid pollutants; and fuel trend analysis. Recommendations for further research are included. (DMC)

  15. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1986-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollutants is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. The principle objective is to examine how seasonal changes in lake water transparency are related to annual acidic load. Further, the relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes is being investigated.

  16. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1986-01-01

    A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forests. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is thought to be enormous. Seasonal changes in lake transparency are examined relative to annual acidic load. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations is being used to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes.

  17. Evaluation of the Acid Rain approach to monitor certification

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    November 15, 1990 saw the passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Within this law are the requirements for all electric utility units greater than 25 megawatts of generated electrical capacity to monitor SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}. This paper summarizes the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) certification testing requirements and their purpose in this market based pollution control program, created as a result of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper presents a brief introduction to the theory behind the required tests. The author then presents summary evaluation of the certification test results for CEMS installed at the Phase 1 sources affected by the Acid Rain Program.

  18. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  19. European views on controlling acid rain. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    The National Governors Association (NGA) will be considering a plan for alleviating acid rain effects by reduction of emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. This plan, in some respects similar to current legislative proposals in Congress, was formulated by the northeastern governors with administrative support from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Lt. Governor John Kerry has undertaken to prepare this plan for consideration by the NGA. In order to provide a better understanding of how other industrialized nations are dealing with the acid rain problem, the office of Lt. Gov. Kerry arranged for a tour of European countries during the week beginning 10 January 1984. Norway, Sweden, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), Belgium and the United Kingdom (UK) were visited, as well as the Commission of the European Communities (EEC) in Brussels.

  20. Interactions of gaseous-pollutant and acid-rain effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This research addresses the significance of individual and combined effects of gaseous pollutants and acid rain on plant growth and development. It is specifically structured to determine the importance of pollutant interactions at concentrations, combinations and exposure frequencies typical of the eastern regional environment. Laboratory, greenhouse, and field studies are designed to establish pollutant-concentration thresholds for damage from SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, and acid rain. Research to date has determined visible-injury thresholds and growth-and-yield thresholds for a variety of cultivars of bean, wheat, radish, tomato, and loblolly pine. The thresholds vary within cultivars of a species and between species.

  1. Acid deposition control benefits as problematic

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The author argues that the government's mistaken beliefs downgrade the benefits of acid deposition control, and may misdirect research of the effects of acid rain upon natural and human systems. It can be argued as to whether or not the factors (generally existing prices and yield changes from current standing stocks of environmental goods) upon which the $5 billion estimate for control was built have a major or minor influence upon the true economic consequences of acid deposition. As the application of Bayes' rule demonstrates, any lessening in arbitrariness of numerical assignments to the factors could lead to a major revision in the estimate. Assessment stories probably contribute to the paralysis of political will even though their truth value is small.

  2. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 2: Atmospheric science assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The introduction to this report summarizes the approach and conclusions of a 1990 assessment of long-range transport and acid deposition in Canada from the perspective of the atmospheric sciences. It then presents the results of research activities conducted since the previous assessment. Chapter 2 examines the impact to date of the emission control programs in reducing wet and dry sulfate deposition, effects on acid aerosols and visibility, and regional-scale model development, evaluation, and application. Section 3 describes the application of two regional-scale acid deposition models, the Atmospheric Environment Service Lagrangian long-range transport model and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model, to develop projections of the efficacy of currently legislated sulfur dioxide emission control programs in reducing sulfate deposition. The focus is on eastern Canada from 1986--1990 to 2010, when controls will have been fully implemented. The final chapter summarizes key findings of the atmospheric science component of the acid deposition program with a view to identifying requirements for additional scientific work to support policy development on the acid rain and other air issues.

  3. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  4. DRY DEPOSITION MODULE FOR REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to compute surface dry deposition velocities for sulfur dioxide, sulfate, ozone, NO plus NO2, and nitric acid vapor over much of the North American continent have been developed for use with atmospheric numerical models of long-range transport and deposition. The resultin...

  5. Acid rain in China. Rapid industrialization has put citizens and ecosystems at risk

    SciTech Connect

    Thorjoern Larssen; Espen Lydersen; Dagang Tang

    2006-01-15

    Acid rain emerged as an important environmental problem in China in the late 1970s. Many years of record economic growth have been accompanied by increased energy demand, greater coal combustion, and larger emissions of pollutants. As a result of significant emissions and subsequent deposition of sulfur, widespread acid rain is observed in southern and southwestern China. In fact, the deposition of sulfur is in some places higher than what was reported from the 'black triangle' in central Europe in the early 1980s. In addition, nitrogen is emitted from agriculture, power production, and a rapidly increasing number of cars. As a result, considerable deposition of pollutants occurs in forested areas previously thought to be pristine. Little is known about the effects of acid deposition on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in China. This article presents the current situation and what to expect in the future, largely on the basis of results from a five-year Chinese-Norwegian cooperative project. In the years ahead, new environmental challenges must be expected if proper countermeasures are not put into place. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors. The policy dispute between Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schmandt, J.; Roderick, H.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors is a source book that summarizes the results of the various studies of acid rain and traces the issues historically. Contents: Part One: The Search for a Bilateral Agreement. Acid rain is different; The nature and effects of acid rain: a comparison of assessments; U.S.-Canadian negotiations on acid rain; Part Two: Domestic Policy Development. Canada's acid rain policy: federal and provincial roles; The U.S. policy response to acid rain; Environmental and economic interests in Canada and the United States; Part Three: Supportive Structures. The international joint commission: the role it might play; Lessons from the Great Lakes water quality agreements; Supporting structures for resolving environmental disputes among friendly neighbors.

  7. Troubled skies, troubled waters: the story of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Luoma, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Ecosystems of the canoe waters and wilderness in the northern border of Minnesota and Ontario appear, despite their seeming isolation, to be affected by industrial pollution and acid rain. This book describes the history and ecology of the area, the efforts by the author and local residents to halt destructive development, and evidence from air pollution studies that pollution is taking its toll in an area of particular sensitivity to acid precipitation. The author traces the evolution of awareness about the problem to the political response of concerned environmental groups. A highly personal account, the book begins and ends with observations and impressions during the author's canoe trips.

  8. Streams in Catskill Mountains still susceptible to acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    Precipitation in North America has become less acidic over the past 2 decades because of reduced power plant emissions and compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments [Sirois, 19937rsqb;. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were developed to reduce the acidity of sensitive surface waters, which are primarily in upland forested environments, where acidified waters and associated high aluminum concentrations are toxic to many species of aquatic flora and fauna [Schindler et al., 1989]. Our studies show that in spite of less acidic precipitation, the buffering capacity of streams in upland forests of the Catskill Mountains in southeastern New York has not increased in recent years. These data suggest that long-term leaching by acid rain has lowered exchangeable calcium ion concentrations in the soil in upland areas, where the underlying, slow-weathering bedrock provides an inadequate supply of cations to neutralize acidity.

  9. Accelerated aging of outdoor insulation under acid rain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Nancy Ellen

    2000-11-01

    Outdoor insulation has evolved from glass to ceramics to epoxy in the past decades, and more recently into the area of polymer composites. Accelerated aging must be performed to examine the effectiveness of materials prior to use under actual service conditions. Traditionally this aging has been performed with sodium chloride as the conductive component in the high humidity and wet tests. This approach does not necessarily represent actual service conditions, as globally the precipitation is acidic in nature and contains many constituents in addition to sodium and chloride. The main focus of this work was to examine the effect of acid precipitation on materials used in outdoor insulation applications. This was achieved through the use of a rotating tracking wheel and a controlled high humidity chamber with the application of a synthetic acid rain solution. The analysis techniques utilized to examine the results of the accelerated aging were leakage current monitoring, evaluation of changes in dielectric properties as well as electron microscopy. In addition, changes in hydrophobicity were quantified. Based on experimental observations, a first order life prediction model was developed to investigate the usefulness of the acid rain aging technique. This model was founded on the results of a series of tests conducted with varying solution conductivity, while maintaining constant acid content. This model permits the prediction of the life of a material at normal precipitation conductivity levels.

  10. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0. PMID:25351717

  11. Collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Kuja, A.; Shriner, D.; Perrigan, S.; Irving, P.; Lee, J.; Troiano, J.; Cullinan, V.

    1988-06-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain or dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. When the laboratory by trial effect was removed, lack of fit to the Mitscherlich function was insignificant. Thus, a single mathematical model satisfactorily characterized the relationship between acidity and mean plant response.

  12. Analysis of acid rain patterns in northeastern China using a decision tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuying; Jiang, Hong; Jin, Jiaxin; Xu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qingxin

    2012-01-01

    Acid rain is a major regional-scale environmental problem in China. To control acid rain pollution and to protect the ecological environment, it is urgent to document acid rain patterns in various regions of China. Taking Liaoning Province as the study area, the present work focused on the spatial and temporal variations of acid rains in northeastern China. It presents a means for predicting the occurrence of acid rain using geographic position, terrain characteristics, routinely monitored meteorological factors and column concentrations of atmospheric SO 2 and NO 2. The analysis applies a decision tree approach to the foregoing observation data. Results showed that: (1) acid rain occurred at 17 stations among the 81 monitoring stations in Liaoning Province, with the frequency of acid rain from 0 to 84.38%; (2) summer had the most acid rain occurrences followed by spring and autumn, and the winter had the least; (3) the total accuracy for the simulation of precipitation pH (pH ≤ 4.5, 4.5 < pH ≤ 5.6, and pH > 5.6) was 98.04% using the decision tree method known as C5. The simulation results also indicated that the distance to coastline, elevation, wind direction, wind speed, rainfall amount, atmospheric pressure, and the precursors of acid rain all have a strong influence on the occurrence of acid rains in northeastern China.

  13. California's fog is far more polluted than acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1982-11-01

    In the Los Angeles area, measurements reveal that the fog has a pH between 2.5 and 3. Near congested areas, the fog is consistenly acidic and is laden with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium ion, lead, copper, nickel, vanadium and aldehydes. Acid fog formation involves a conversion of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ to sulfuric and nitric acids. Unlike acid rain, acid fog remains suspended in the air for hours and is a threat to human health as well as vegetation and materials. Fog forms close to the ground where concentrations of pollutants are higher than they are further aloft. Acid fog seems to be related to ground-based pollution sources, particularly power plant and automobile emissions. Samples were collected in locations far from major pollution sources and used to test the composition and acidity of normal fog. The pH values ranged from 3, near Los Angeles, to 7, near Morro Bay. Mathematical models are used to explain changes in acidity over time and to indicate a cyclical pattern.

  14. Acid rain in Europe and North America: national responses to an international problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstone, G.S.; Rosencranz, A.

    1983-01-01

    This study examines in detail the nature and severity of the acid rain problem, what nations are doing about it, and how national and international laws ad policies might ultimately respond. It analyzes the effectiveness of national and international air-pollution control structures in coping with acid deposition and related problems. Further, it discusses the complex scientific issues in lay terms, examines how the laws in major Western countries are not responding to the emerging scientific information on acid-deposition impacts, criticizes international legal structures, and analyzes the activities of the key multilateral organizations and bilateral efforts to cooperate in resolving the North American problem. The report also suggests ways to deal with the longer-term problems of carbon dioxide buildup and ozone depletion in the atmosphere and toxic contaminations of oceans. One of the major conclusions is that the acid rain problem is in many respects so subtle, and the research so new and complex, that a clear picture of its nature and precise impacts will probably not be available for many years. 815 references, 9 figures.

  15. SOIL REACTION AND ACIDIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses the major chemical processes by which acidic deposition interacts with soils. he focus is on forest soils, as the effects of acidic deposition on soils used for production of food and fiber are generally small compared to effects of agricultural practices s...

  16. Erosion by acid rain, accelerating the tracking of polystyrene insulating material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, L.; Yoshimura, N.

    2000-05-01

    Because outdoor insulating materials in service are subjected to numerous wet and dry cycles, it is necessary to establish their performance in acid rain. The erosion effect of acid rain on atactic polystyrene insulating material is investigated using accelerated ageing by artificial acid rain. The degradation mechanisms of material structure and tracking resistance are discussed. The experimental results reported here show that the erosion of acid rain causes the degradation of the surface chemical and physical structures of polystyrene (PS) material so that the surface conductivity of aged material increases. Under electrical stress, the surface discharge current increases, and the local surface is deteriorated so that the tracking is initiated earlier and the material rapidly fails. The degradation rate of PS material in acid rain varies as function of the ion concentration, pH and conductivity of acid rain. Only the severe acid rain of high acidity and conductivity can exert an influence on PS insulating material. The concentration of actual rainwater is insufficient to lead to obvious erosion on PS insulation. PS insulation could resist on the erosion of normal acid rainwater. Even though clear degradation occurs with strong acid rain, PS could behave quite well in mild acid rain conditions.

  17. Alkalization of yellow sand and its long-term effects on acid rain in East Asia: Observed Evidence and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Uno, I.; Akimoto, H.

    2001-05-01

    Acid rain has been one of the serious environmental problems in East Asia for the rapid industrialization in the last two decades. The contour line of pH value less than 5 has come up to the Yellow River region (35 deg N) from the southern China bounded by the Yangtze River (25 deg N) during these ten years. The objective of EANET ( Acid Deposition Moniroring Network in East Asia) is to create a common understanding of the state of the acid deposition problems in East Asia. There are 38 monitoring sites for wet deposition monitoring and data was collected since January 1999. The analysis of datasets in 1999 shows that aerosol has alkalization effects on pH of rain, especially in spring. An Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS) was used to investigate the neutralization of acid rain by the yellow-sand in East Asia. The AQPMS includes all the major processes such as emission, advection, diffusion, chemistry, dry deposition, wet deposition and micro-physical processes. A new deflation module for the dust uptake is designed to estimate the dust loading (Wang et. al.,2000). The gas-phase chemical reaction scheme is a slightly modified version of the CBM-IV. Changes in trace species concentrations due to chemical reactions of soluble and reactive gases in in-cloud and below-cloud droplets are computed using a box aqueous chemical model. Numerical simulation was performed for two cases, that is, with and without the neutralization effects of Kosa in 1999. The predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with measured datasets of EANET and a reasonable agreement was obtained. The simulation results of 1999 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow-sand in the spring. The aerosol has alkalization effects on pH of rain, which reduces the H+ of rain.

  18. Interactive effects of acid rain and gaseous air pollutants on natural terrestrial vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Baes, C.F. III; Taylor, G.E.; Walker, R.F.; Sigal, L.L.; McConathy, R.K.; Norby, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    This research is designed to identify concentration thresholds for individual and combined effects of acid rain and O/sub 3/ on growth and growth processes of both forest tree seedlings and lichens and to document the significance of changing patterns of deposition and/or mobilization of trace metals and nutrients in tree rings. Greenhouse studies have focused on effects of varying levels of rainfall acidity on growth (amount and distribution) and nutrient uptake efficiency of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal seedlings of white oak and loblolly pine from soil nutrient pools. Results to date show significant diameter preduction in mycorrhizal infected white oak seedlings at pH 4.2, compared to pH 4.8. Combined effects of rainfall acidity (pH 4.0 and 5.0), mist acidity (pH 3.5 and 5.0), and ozone (0 and 0.12 ppM) and soil type on growth and physiology of red spruce in two soil types have also been examined. Preliminary results indicate no adverse effects of acid rain, acid mist, or ozone on seedling growth but significant differences in response of seedlings on different soil types. Studies of the uptake and distribution of trace metals in tree rings of shortleaf pine have documented increases in aluminum, cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc in recent decades which appear to reflect changing regional and/or local availability of those elements. 8 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Review of acid rain potential in India: Future threats and remedial measures

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, M.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    Acid rain is a necessary fall out of rapid development process in India. Any increase in Gross Domestic Product has direct influence on the rate of energy consumption and its pattern. Thermal Power plants are the major source of wet and dry deposition of sulfur while transportation sector has a larger share in the increase of NO{sub x}. The process is complex and the effect can be felt hundreds of kilometers away. Redistribution of both the plant nutrients and toxic substances within the biosphere results from such deposition and biogeochemically important trace species are threatened. These have a destabilising effect on several ecosystems. However, tropical climatic conditions and alkaline rich soil has hitherto not allowed any such destabilising effect in India. The sea and the soil derived aerosols are responsible for neutralizing process and maintaining the pH in the alkaline range in the most part of India. The higher temperature and sunlight, increases the efficiency of atmospheric chemical reactions, particularly those transforming SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to acidic sulfates and nitrates. The major contribution to acid rain is reported to be due to sulfur component (70%). Therefore, the emission of sulfur requires more attention. It has been observed that pH has a declining trend due to population growth, changing agricultural practices and a very rapid economic development. An estimated 2500 tonnes of sulfur are released in the atmosphere due to the thermal power plants alone as per data available for 1993-94 thermal power generation which is 50 times more than that released in 1950-51 due to thermal power generation. This paper is an overview of the present trends, their likely effects, factors contributing to acid rain and possible remedial action.

  20. Growth parameter and yield component response of field corn to simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Banwart, W.L.; Porter, P.M.; Ziegler, E.L.; Hassett, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain occurs in the midwest. Studies to date have suggested minimal yield response of field corn to acid rain. However, small but significant reductions in yield have been shown for some cultivars under extreme conditions. To define further these yield changes the study examined the effect of simulated acid rain on parameters associated with corn yield. Cultivars B73 x Mo17 and Pioneer 3377 were shielded from ambient rain by two movable rain exclusion shelters. Six simulated rain treatments were applied biweekly within these shelters through the use of a nozzle distribution system. For the most part, growth and yield parameters were unaffected by simulated rain treatment. While the only significant yield reduction was a contrast of pH 3.0 and the average of all other treatments for B73 x Mo17, the reduction appears to be the result both of slightly fewer ears and slightly less successful ear fill.

  1. Sulfuric acid rain effects on crop yield and foliar injury. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Neely, G.E.; Perrigan, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the relative sensitivity of major U.S. crops to sulfuric acid rain. Plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions and exposed to simulated acid rain of three sulfuric acid concentrations (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.7). Injury to foliage and effects on yield were common responses to acid rain. However, foliar injury was not a good indicator of effects on yield.

  2. Acid rain and our nation`s capital: A guide to effects on buildings and monuments

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.

    1997-03-01

    This booklet focuses on acid rain and its impact on our Nation`s capital. This booklet will define acid rain, explain what effects it has on marble and limestone buildings, and show, on a walking tour, some of the places in our Nation`s capital where you can see the impact of acid precipitation.

  3. 76 FR 71559 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid...

  4. 78 FR 64496 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid...

  5. Acid Rain: A Selective Bibliography. Second Edition. Bibliography Series Twenty-One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Gertrudis, Comp.

    Acid rain is a term for rain, snow, or other precipitation produced from water vapor in the air reacting with emissions from automobiles, factories, power plants, and other oil and coal burning sources. When these chemical compounds, composed of sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide, react with water vapor, the result is sulfuric acid and nitric acid.…

  6. [Analysis of acid rain characteristics of Lin'an Regional Background Station using long-term observation data].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Quan; Ma, Hao; Mao, Yu-Ding; Feng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Using long-term observation data of acid rain at Lin'an Regional Background Station (Lin'an RBS), this paper studied the interannual and monthly variations of acid rain, the reasons for the variations, and the relationships between acid rain and meteorological factors. The results showed that interannual variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS had a general increasing trend in which there were two obvious intensifying processes and two distinct weakening processes, during the period ranging from 1985 to 2012. In last two decades, the monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS indicated that rain acidity and frequency of severe acid rain were increasing but the frequency of weak acid rain was decreasing when moving towards bilateral side months of July. Acid rain occurrence was affected by rainfall intensity, wind speed and wind direction. High frequency of severe acid rain and low frequency of weak acid rain were on days with drizzle, but high frequency of weak acid rain and low frequency of severe acid rain occurred on rainstorm days. With wind speed upgrading, the frequency of acid rain and the proportion of severe acid rain were declining, the pH value of precipitation was reducing too. Another character is that daily dominant wind direction of weak acid rain majorly converged in S-W section ,however that of severe acid rain was more likely distributed in N-E section. The monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS was mainly attributed to precipitation variation, the increasing and decreasing of monthly incoming wind from SSE-WSW and NWN-ENE sections of wind direction. The interannual variation of acid rain could be due to the effects of energy consumption raising and significant green policies conducted in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shanghai. PMID:24812937

  7. Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand in east Asia—a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Hiroaki; Ueda, Hiromasa; Wang, Zifa

    Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were investigated numerically by an Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS). AQPMS consists of advection, diffusion, dry and wet deposition, gas-phase chemistry and the liquid-phase chemistry. A new deflation module of the yellow sand (Asian soil dust) was designed to provide explicit information on the dust loading. Different from the previous ones for Sahara and Australian deserts, this new one includes three major predictors, i.e., the friction velocity, the surface humidity and the predominant weather system, while this module was linked to the AQPMS. For model validation, the predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with the measured values at atmospheric monitoring stations, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants emission was investigated, and a remarkably rapid increase of acid rain area was predicted in the period from 1985 to 1995, the monthly mean pH values showing the decrease of 0.3-0.8 in the area from the center to northeast in China, and 0.1-0.2 even in Japan and Korea. Secondly, the simulation results of April 1995 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow sand. The monthly mean pH values in the northern China showed a remarkable increase of 0.6-1.8 by neutralization effect of the yellow sand, while the increases in the southern China were less than 0.1. Even in Korea and Japan the yellow sand caused the increase of the pH value of rain by 0.1-0.2.

  8. Witwatersrand gold deposits formed by volcanic rain, anoxic rivers and Archaean life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa is one of the best-preserved records of fluvial sedimentation on an Archaean continent. The basin hosts the worlds biggest gold resource in thin pebble beds, but the process for gold enrichment is debated. Mechanical accumulation of gold particles from flowing river water is the prevailing hypothesis, yet there is evidence for hydrothermal mobilization of gold by fluids invading the metasedimentary rocks after their burial. Earth's atmosphere three billion years ago was oxygen free, but already sustained some of the oldest microbial life on land. Here I use thermodynamic modelling and mass-balance calculations to show that these conditions could have led to the chemical transport and precipitation of gold in anoxic surface waters, reconciling the evidence for fluvial deposition with evidence for hydrothermal-like chemical reactions. I suggest that the release of sulphurous gases from large volcanic eruptions created acid rain that enabled the dissolution and transport of gold in surface waters as sulphur complexes. Precipitation of the richest gold deposits could have been triggered by chemical reduction of the dissolved gold onto organic material in shallow lakes and pools. I conclude that the Witwatersrand gold could have formed only during the Archaean, after the emergence of continental life but before the rise of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere.

  9. Acid rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida - Recent observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    During the period July, 1977 to September, 1979, rainfall was collected in the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center and subjected to appropriate chemical analysis for purposes of characterization of general composition and acidity. Results obtained form the basis for future comparisons, should significant alteration of the chemical composition of rain occur during the space shuttle era. Acidity extremes calculated on a monthly basis from event samples collected from five sites within a 200 sq km area varied from pH 5.1 in November, 1977, and April, 1978 to pH 4.3 in July, 1978 and July, 1979. Weighted average pH for the entire period was 4.55. Acidity was due to the presence of sulfuric and nitric acids. The mole ratio of excess SO4(-2):NO3(-) was typically greater than one. Monthly weighted average Cl(-) concentrations ranged from 20-240 micromoles/liter. The Cl(-):Na(+) ratio was slightly lower than that present in sea water.

  10. Changes in poultry litter toxicity with simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Krishnamurthy, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Delmarva Peninsula on the Eastern Shore of Maryland ranks 4th in the nation in poultry production and generates 9,500 metric tons of poultry manure/litter per day. The poultry litter contains many macro and micro nutrients and is an excellent source of fertilizer. The litter also contains antibiotics, heavy metals, hormones and many microorganisms. Land application of this litter has been the only means of its utilization and disposal. With rainfall, surface water run-off (leachate), from land on which litter has been applied, reaches the Cheasapeake Bay from this region. This leachate with its high organic and inorganic salt contents and high biochemical oxygen demand can severely disrupt the aquatic life and cause fish kills. The objective of this research was to study the effect of simulated acid rain (pH 3, 4 and 5) on the toxicity of poultry litter extracts.

  11. Acid Rain Affecting the Electrical Properties of Outdoor Composite Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinsheng; Kumagai, Seiji; Yoshimura, Noboru

    1998-12-01

    Acid rain is precipitation with acidity, i.e., pH, below 5.6. There is an increasing interest in the degradation of the electrical properties of outdoor composite dielectric materials under severe contaminant conditions such as acid rain. In this study, the degradation effects of acid rain on the outdoor composite dielectrics are investigated by accelerated aging due to artificial acid rain. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the composition of artificial acid rain is chosen to agree with the actual composition of precipitation. The surface potential, breakdown voltage, tracking resistance, and surface discharge current of dielectric materials are studied. Furthermore, the degradation mechanisms of electrical properties of composite dielectrics are discussed by investigating the degradation of the chemical and physical microstructures of material surface using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the X-ray diffraction spectrum (XDS), and the metalloscope. Experimental results show that the outdoor polymeric dielectrics suffer severely and degrade due to acid rain so that their surface electrical properties deteriorate after aging. The erosion, by acid rain, of the energized dielectric materials is larger than that of outdoor materials used for other purposes.

  12. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN APPLIED ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH AMBIENT RAIN ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF FIELD-GROWN SNAP BEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-grown snap bean plants were treated with simulated acidic rain applied either alone or in combination with ambient rain and the effects on growth and yield were determined. In plots where ambient rain was excluded, a retractable canopy was activated to shield the crop. Four...

  13. Application of the nested grid STEM to an early summer acid rain in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungtae; Cho, SeogYeon

    The nested grid Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model (STEM) was developed and used to simulate the acid rain in Korea that occurred on 10 June 1996. The present nested grid system consists of three-grid systems. The coarsest grid system includes China, Korean Peninsula and Japan with the horizontal grid size of 80 km and the finest grid system includes only Korea with the horizontal grid size of 8.9 km. The calculated gas-phase SO 2 and O 3 concentrations agree relatively well with the field measurements. In addition, the model successfully reproduces the measured sulfate and nitrate concentrations in the rain water and futhermore identified the high concentration regions of liquid-phase sulfate and nitrate. In the present simulation conditions, most of the gas-phase of SO 2 and HNO 3 were washed out. A close relationship between wet deposition fluxes and precipitation rates were found for sulfate and nitrate. Finally, the model results also showed that a fine grid size is required to accurately calculate gas-phase concentrations as well as acid deposition fluxes.

  14. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Marshall, E. M.

    1989-01-01

    The lake acidification in Northern Ontario was investigated using LANDSAT TM to sense lake volume reflectance and also to provide important vegetation and terrain characteristics. The purpose of this project was to determine the ability of LANDSAT to assess water quality characteristics associated with lake acidification. Results demonstrate that a remote sensor can discriminate lake clarity based upon reflection. The basic hypothesis is that seasonal and multi-year changes in lake optical transparency are indicative of sensitivity to acidic deposition. In many acid-sensitive lakes optical transparency is controlled by the amount of dissolved organic carbon present. Seasonal changes in the optical transparency of lakes can potentially provide an indication of the stress due to acid deposition and loading.

  15. EFFECT OF SIMULATED ACID RAIN ON NITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN MINERALIZATION IN FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100cm of simulated acid rain (pH3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2...

  16. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. (a) General....

  17. Sex Differences in Environmental Concern and Knowledge: The Case of Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a telephone survey of 516 adults which focused on sex differences in concern and knowledge about one environmental issue, acid rain. The findings contradict predictions that women are more concerned about environmental issues: if there is a sex difference, men are found to be more concerned and knowledgeable about acid rain.…

  18. Acid Rain: Federal Policy Action 1983-1985. A Guide to Government Documents and Commercial Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovenburg, Susan, Comp.

    The problems associated with acid rain as well as strategies on what to do and how to do it are addressed in this resource guide. The first section identifies and describes the U.S. agencies and congressional committees which play a role in acid rain research, legislation, and regulation. Actions already taken by the executive and legislative…

  19. Acid Rain: A Resource Guide for Classroom, Laboratory, Field, and Debate Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoss, Frederick W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a partially annotated bibliography of journals and book chapters which deal with acid rain. Includes selections which provide background information, ideas for introducing acid rain into science or social studies curricula, inventories of audio-visual aids, and non-print media to supplement classroom, laboratory, and field instruction.…

  20. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  1. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings. PMID:25087500

  2. EFFECT OF ADDED WATER AND ACIDITY OF SIMULATED RAIN ON GROWTH OF FIELD-GROWN RADISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radish plants were grown in field plots and exposed to simulated rain at four levels of acidity: pH 5.6, pH 4.2, pH 3.5 and pH 2.8. Simulated rain solutions, containing background ions and acidified with a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids, were applied intermittently between...

  3. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACID RAIN ON YIELD RESPONSE OF TWO SOYBEAN CULTIVARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important component of the effects of acid rain on our ecosystem is its impact on the yield of agricultural crops. ield experiments were conducted for 3 yr to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on seed yield of two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. 'Amsoy 7...

  4. Effects of acidic rain and ozone on nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis in the lichen lobaria pulmonaria (L. ) Hoffm

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, L.L.; Johnston, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The lichen Lobaria pulmonaria was subjected to ozone fumigations at 118, 235 and 353 mcg/cu m and simulated acidic rain at pH levels of 2.6, 4.2 and 5.6 for 5 days (M,W,F,M,W) during a 10-day period. Acidic rain at pH 2.6 caused significant reduction in nitrogen fixation and gross photosynthesis of 100 and 90%, respectively, and thallus bleaching was apparent. There were no significant differences between the pH 5.6 and 4.2 treatments in either gross photosynthesis or nitrogen fixation, and the color of the lichen thalli was unchanged. The effect of ozone on nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis over the range of concentrations used was not significant, but there was a trend toward reduced nitrogen fixation with increasing O/sub 3/ concentration. There were no significant ozone-acidic rain interactions. The threshold for response to rain acidity for L. pulmonaria lies between pH 2.6 and 4.2, and the acidity of wet deposition in parts of the United States may fall in the range.

  5. ACID DEPOSITION AND FOREST DECLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The location, topography and other characteristics of the high-elevation forests of eastern North America cause them to be receptors of high levels of acid deposition and airborn trace metals. No other major forested areas in the U.S. are subjected to such intensely acid cloud mo...

  6. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  7. Energy technology and emissions control for acid rain abatement in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    After more than ten years of research, acid rain is a sufficiently serious problem in North America to warrant control action. The acid rain problem has become a threat to the Asian continent as well. Emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are already high and announces plans for increases in coal use by countries in the region imply a major increase in emissions in the future. This will inevitably lead to greater incidence of acid rain and probably significant environmental damage in some locations. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the issues relating to acid-rain-control technology in Asia and to suggest ways to include technology options in integrated simulation models of acid rain in Asia. 14 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (FL)

  8. Effects of simulated acid rain on glucose mineralization and some physicochemical properties of forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Alexander, M.

    1981-10-01

    To study the effects of acid rain, samples of forest soils were exposed to a continuous application of 100 cm of simulated acid rain (pH 3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour, or to intermittent 1-hour applications of 5 cm of simulated acid rain three times per week for 7 weeks. The major effects of the simulated acid rain were localized at the top of the soil and included lower pH values and glucose mineralization rates, and higher exchangeable Al and total and exchange acidity. The acidity penetrated further in the more acid soils. The mineralization of /sup 14/C-glucose was measured at concentrations of 1.5-54 ..mu..g glucose/g of soil. Glucose mineralization in the test soils (pH values of 4.4-7.1) was inhibited by the continuous exposure to simulated acid rain at pH 3.2 but not a pH 4.1. The extent of inhibition depended on the soil and the initial glucose concentration. Exposure of one soil to 7 weeks of intermittent applications of simulated acid rain at pH 3.2 reduced the mineralization rate at the three glucose concentrations tested. These data suggest that acid rain may have a significant impact on microbial activity.

  9. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. PMID:25048927

  10. A numerical study of the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter season

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Sen; Deng, Zen-Sing

    1996-12-31

    Two-thirds of the land mass of Taiwan island is covered by mountains. In winter precipitation could occur in northern Taiwan when the prevailing wind was from northeastern direction. In northern Taiwan the acid rain (pH value less than 5.0) in winter time could contribute about 30 rain in the whole year. A three-dimensional numerical model with terrain following coordinated system was used to simulate the precipitation system and the characteristics of acid rain. A smooth terrain was assumed in the model. A mean sounding was used to initialize the numerical model when acid rain occurred in northern Taiwan during winter time from 1991 to 1993. Investigations of the effect of pollutions from abroad on the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter are considered for the future.

  11. Acid rain publications by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villella, Rita F.

    1989-01-01

    Pollution of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems has been a concern to society since the burning of fossil fuels began in the industrial revolution. In the past decade or so, this concern has been heightened by evidence that chemical transformation in the atmosphere of combustion by-products and subsequent long-range transport can cause environmental damage in remote areas. The extent of this damage and the rates of ecological recovery were largely unknown. "Acid rain" became the environmental issue of the 1980's. To address the increasing concerns of the public, in 1980 the Federal government initiated a 10-year interagency research program to develop information that could be used by the President and the Congress in making decisions for emission controls. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been an active participant in acid precipitation research. The Service provided support to a number of scientific conferences and forums, including the Action Seminar on Acid Precipitation held in Toronto, Canada, in 1979, an international symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Fishery Impacts in Northeastern North America in 1981, and a symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Atmospheric Deposition: A Western Perspective in 1982. These meetings as well as the growing involvement with the government's National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program placed the Service in the lead in research on the biological effects of acidic deposition. Research projects have encompassed water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Water quality surveys have been conducted to help determine the extent of acid precipitation effects in the northeast, Middle Atlantic, and Rocky Mountain regions. In addition to lake and stream studies, research in wetland and some terrestrial habitats has also been conducted. Specific projects have addressed important sport species such as brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and striped bass (Morone

  12. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrification and nitrogen mineralization in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Lin, C.J.; Alexander, M.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100cm of simulated acid rain (pH3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2 cm of simulated acid rain twice weekly for 19 weeks. The upper 1.0- to 1.5-cm portions of soil from treated columns were used to determine the changes in inorganic N levels in the soil. Nitrification of added ammonium (NH4(+)) was inhibited following continuous exposure of soil to simulated acid rain of pH 4.1-3.2. The extent of the inhibition was directly related to the acidity of the simulated rain solutions. The production of inorganic N in the absence of added NH(+) was either stimulated or unaffected following continuous treatment of soils with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. The addition of nitrapyrine, an inhibitor of autotrophic nitrification, caused a decrease in nitrification in water-treated soil but had little effect on nitrification in soil treated with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain.

  13. Combined effects of lead and acid rain on photosynthesis in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Liao, Chenyu; Fan, Caixia; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To explore how lead (Pb) and acid rain simultaneously affect plants, the combined effects of Pb and acid rain on the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence reaction, Hill reaction rate, and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in soybean seedlings were investigated. The results indicated that, when soybean seedlings were treated with Pb or acid rain alone, the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, and maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) were decreased, while the initial fluorescence (F 0) and maximum quantum yield (Y) were increased, compared with those of the control. The combined treatment with Pb and acid rain decreased the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F(v)/F(m), and Y and increased F 0 in soybean seedlings. Under the combined treatment with Pb and acid rain, the two factors showed additive effects on the chlorophyll content in soybean seedlings and exhibited antagonistic effects on the Hill reaction rate. Under the combined treatment with high-concentration Pb and acid rain, the two factors exhibited synergistic effects on the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F 0, F v/F m, as well as Y. In summary, the inhibition of the photosynthetic process is an important physiological basis for the simultaneous actions of Pb and acid rain in soybean seedlings. PMID:25069575

  14. Acid rain: Delays and management changes in the federal research program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program is to help resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with acid rain and determine if and how it should be controlled. It has yet to issue its first assessment report originally scheduled for release in 1985. NAPAP officials believe that, by 1990, their ongoing research program will provide sufficient new information about the causes and effects of acid rain to serve as the basis for policy recommendations.

  15. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN ON ONE SPECIES EACH OF 'PSEUDOPARMELIA', 'USNEA', AND 'UMBILICARIA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lichens Pseudoparmelia caperata (L.) Hale, Usnea of subfusca Stirt., and Umbilicaria mammulata (Ach.) Tuck. were exposed to simulated acidic rain with pH levels of 2.3, 3.0, 3.3, 4.3, or 5.6 and other ions in concentrations normally found in rain in the eastern United States....

  16. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN ON YIELDS OF FIELD-GROWN RADISHES AND GARDEN BEETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of simulated acidic rain on yields of garden beet and radish grown under standard agronomic practices. Plots were exposed to small additions of simulated rain with pH levels of 5.7, 4.0, 3.1, and 2.7. The spray to wet simulated ...

  17. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  18. Seasonal variation of ozone deposition to a tropical rain forest in southwest Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, U.; Ammann, C.; Kirkman, G. A.; Moura, M. A. L.; Foken, T.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2007-10-01

    Within the project EUropean Studies on Trace gases and Atmospheric CHemistry as a contribution to Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH), we performed tower-based eddy covariance measurements of O3 flux above an Amazonian primary rain forest at the end of the wet and dry season. Ozone deposition revealed distinct seasonal differences in the magnitude and diel variation. In the wet season, the rain forest was an effective O3 sink with a mean daytime (midday) maximum deposition velocity of 2.3 cm s-1, and a corresponding O3 flux of -11 nmol m-2 s-1. At the end of the dry season, the ozone mixing ratio was about four times higher (up to maximum values of 80 ppb) than in the wet season, as a consequence of strong regional biomass burning activity. However, the typical maximum daytime deposition flux was very similar to the wet season. This results from a strong limitation of daytime O3 deposition due to reduced plant stomatal aperture as a response to large values of the specific humidity deficit. As a result, the average midday deposition velocity in the dry burning season was only 0.5 cm s-1. The large diel ozone variation caused large canopy storage effects that masked the true diel variation of ozone deposition mechanisms in the measured eddy covariance flux, and for which corrections had to be made. In general, stomatal aperture was sufficient to explain the largest part of daytime ozone deposition. However, during nighttime, chemical reaction with nitrogen monoxide (NO) was found to contribute substantially to the O3 sink in the rain forest canopy. Further contributions were from non-stomatal plant uptake and other processes that could not be clearly identified. Measurements, made simultaneously on a 22 years old cattle pasture enabled the spatially and temporally direct comparison of O3 dry deposition values from this site with typical vegetation cover of deforested land in southwest Amazonia to the results from the primary rain

  19. Seasonal variation of ozone deposition to a tropical rain forest in southwest Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, U.; Ammann, C.; Kirkman, G. A.; Moura, M. A. L.; Foken, T.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2007-05-01

    Within the project EUropean Studies on Trace gases and Atmospheric CHemistry as a contribution to Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH), we performed tower-based eddy covariance measurements of O3 flux above an Amazonian primary rain forest at the end of the wet and dry seasons. Ozone deposition revealed distinct seasonal differences in the magnitude and diel variation. In the wet season, the rain forest was an effective O3 sink with a mean daytime (midday) maximum deposition velocity of 2.3 cm s-1, and a corresponding O3 flux of -11 nmol m-2 s-1. At the end of the dry season, the ozone mixing ratio was about four times higher (up to maximum values of 80 ppb) than in the wet season, as a consequence of strong regional biomass burning activity. However, the typical maximum daytime deposition flux was very similar to the wet season. This results from a strong limitation of daytime O3 deposition due to reduced plant stomatal aperture as a response to large values of the specific humidity deficit. As a result, the average midday deposition velocity in the dry burning season was only 0.5 cm s-1. The large diel ozone variation caused large canopy storage effects that masked the true diel variation of ozone deposition mechanisms in the measured eddy covariance flux, and for which corrections had to be made. In general, stomatal aperture was sufficient to explain the largest part of daytime ozone deposition. However, during nighttime, chemical reaction with nitrogen monoxide (NO) was found to contribute substantially to the O3 sink in the rain forest canopy. Further contributions were from non-stomatal plant uptake and other processes that could not be clearly identified. Measurements, made simultaneously on a 22 years old cattle pasture enabled the spatially and temporally direct comparison of O3 dry deposition values from this site with typical vegetation cover of deforested land in southwest Amazonia to the results from the primary rain

  20. (International conference on acidic deposition)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. Jr.

    1990-10-05

    The traveler took the opportunity to participate in a mini-sabbatical at the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in Edinburgh, Scotland, as a part of planned travel to Glasgow, Scotland, to attend the International Conference on Acidic Precipitation. The purpose of the sabbatical was to provide quality time for study and interchange of ideas with scientists at ITE working on physiological effects of acidic deposition and to allocate significant time for writing and synthesizing of results of physiological studies from the National Forest Response Program's Spruce/Fir Research Cooperative. The study focused on the very significant cytological and physiological effects of calcium deficiency in trees, a response that appears to be amplified in spruce by acidic deposition.

  1. Atmospheric deposition of {sup 7}Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, J. Juri; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M.; Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H.

    2008-08-07

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of {sup 7}Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 138}La and {sup 40}K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the {sup 176}Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The {sup 7}Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l{sup -1}. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l{sup -1}). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l{sup -1}, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of {sup 7}Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  2. Acidic Depositions: Effects on Wildlife and Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of 'acid rain' is not new; it was recognized in the mid-1800s in industrialized Europe. In the 1960s a synthesis of information about acidification began in Europe, along with predictions of ecological effects. In the U.S. studies of acidification began in the 1920s. By the late 1970s research efforts in the U.S. and Canada were better coordinated and in 1980 a 10-year research program was undertaken through the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Plan (NAPAP) to determine the causes and consequences of acidic depositions. Much of the bedrock in the northeastern U.S. and Canada contains total alkalinity of 20 kg/ha/yr of wet sulphate depositions and are vulnerable to acidifying processes. Acidic depositions contribute directly to acidifying processes of soil and soil water. Soils must have sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity or acidity of soil will increase. Natural soil-forming processes that lead to acidification can be accelerated by acidic depositions. Long-term effects of acidification are predicted, which will reduce soil productivity mainly through reduced availability of nutrients and mobilization of toxic metals. Severe effects may lead to major alteration of soil chemistry, soil biota, and even loss of vegetation. Several species of earthworms and several other taxa of soil-inhabiting invertebrates, which are important food of many vertebrate wildlife species, are affected by low pH in soil. Loss of canopy in declining sugar maples results in loss of insects fed on by certain neotropical migrant bird species. No definitive studies categorically link atmospheric acidic depositions with direct or indirect effects on wild mammals. Researchers have concentrated on vegetative and aquatic effects. Circumstantial evidence suggests that effects are probable for certain species of aquatic-dependent mammals (water shrew, mink, and otter) and that these species are at risk from the loss of foods or contamination of these foods by metals

  3. Analysis of Natural Buffer Systems and the Impact of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, David C.; Yoder, Claude H.; Higgs, Andrew T.; Obley, Matt L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental significance of acid rain on water systems of different buffer capacities is discussed. The most prevalent natural buffer system is created by the equilibrium between carbonate ions and carbon dioxide.

  4. From the Fur Trade to Acid Rain: A Study of Canadian Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winans, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Presents a teaching module for upper elementary students that devotes eight class periods of study to Canadian resources. Includes study of the Canadian fur trade, fishing industry, forestry, and the problems caused by acid rain. Includes the unit evaluation. (DB)

  5. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  6. Supporting document for the Canada-wide acid rain strategy for post-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-01

    This report presents background and other information on the Canada-Wide Acid Rain Strategy for Post-2000, which puts in place a framework for addressing the remaining acid rain problem in eastern Canada, for ensuring that new acid rain problems do not occur elsewhere in Canada, and for ensuring that Canada meets its international commitments on acid rain. Background information is included on the first and second Sulphur Protocols of 1985 and 1994, the 1991 Canada-United States Air Quality Agreement, and progress to date in meeting emission targets. Key features of the strategy are then presented with respect to such matters as sulphur dioxide emission reductions, pollution prevention, and research. Finally, the positions of members of the multi-stakeholder task group who developed the supporting documentation for the strategy are outlined.

  7. Characterization and Evaluation of Acid Rain in East Central Florida from 1978 to 1995 and Evaluation of Some Chromatographic/Spectroscopic Results from Leachate Samples from CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Brooks C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of monitoring the chemical composition of rain in east-central Florida have shown that the rain is moderately acid. The measured acidity of rain is less than that observed in other regions of the U. S., however, it does suggest that the level of acidity is substantial. The annual chemical composition of rain at UCF and at KSC has shown moderate variability. Extreme daily and monthly variations are observed, however these variations are not addressed here. The total ionic composition of rain collected at FL99 is greater than that for rain collected at UCF, however this can be accounted for by site proximity to the ocean with the accompanying marine influence. Difference in acidity data collected from the UCF and FL99 sites which are separated by 50 km may be due in part to the differences that have been observed between laboratory and field pH measurements. Trend assessment for precipitation composition requires evaluation of data that covers some minimum time period. In fact, the subdivision of the multi-year UCF record into individual 10 year records as described above can lead to the conclusion that a significant increase, a significant decrease or no trend exists for acidity depending upon the time period chosen for evaluation. Trend evaluation has also been accomplished by linear and nonlinear regression analysis using monthly volume weighted average concentrations and deposition using the UCF data set and some of the Florida NADP data set.

  8. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrification and nitrogen mineralization in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Lin, C.J.; Alexander, M.

    1981-10-01

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100 cm of simulated acid rain (pH 3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2 cm of simulated acid rain twice weekly for 19 weeks. The upper 1.0- to 1.5-cm portions of soil from treated columns were used to determine the changes in inorganic N levels in the soil. Nitrification of added ammonium (NH/sub 4//sup +/) was inhibited following continuous exposure of soil to simulated acid rain of pH 4.1-3.2. The extent of the inhibition was directly related to the acidity of the simulated rain solutions. The production of inorganic N in the absence of added NH/sub 4//sup +/ was either stimulated or unaffected following continuous treatment of soils with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. The addition of nitrapyrin (2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)pyridine), an inhibitor of autotrophic nitrification, caused a decrease in nitrification in water-treated soil but had little effect on nitrification in soil treated with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. Intermittent applications of simulated acid rain (pH 3.5-4.1) for 19 weeks partially inhibited nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup -/) production in soil amended with NH/sub 4//sup +/ following the exposure period, but NO/sub 3//sup -/ production in unamended soil was either unaffected or stimulated.

  9. Integrated Title V/acid rain permits: Transitioning through initial permit issuance and reopenings

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, C.

    1995-12-31

    Titles IV and V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Act or CAA) created two new stationary source permitting programs, one specific to acid rain (Title IV), and a second for operating permits in general (Title V). The Phase 2 portion of the acid rain program was designed to be implemented through the Title V operating permit program, thereby subjecting all Phase 2 acid rain sources to the requirements of Title V. Permits issued pursuant to Phase 2 of the acid rain program will be viewed as a self-contained portion of the Title V operating permit and will be governed by regulations promulgated under both Title IV and Title V. The requirements imposed by Title IV may not always be consistent with the broader operating permit program requirements of Title V, and when inconsistency occurs, the acid rain requirements will take precedence. This nonalignment will perhaps be most apparent during two stages of initial permitting: (1) the transition period following Title V program approval when permit application, issuance, and effective dates differ between the two programs, and (2) at the point when acid rain permits must be reopened to incorporate Phase 2 NO{sub x} requirements. This paper explores strategies for streamlining implementation of the two programs with particular focus on these two coordination issues.

  10. Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Xueqiao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 μeq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 μeq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 μeq/L (VWM of 33.39 μeq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments. PMID:26841776

  11. Effects of pretreatment with simulated acid rain on the severity of dogwood anthracnose

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, K.O.; Berrang, P.; Mavity, E.

    1996-06-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain on dogwood anthracnose severity were evaluated in a series of greenhouse and field experiments over a 4-year period. In 1990 and 1991, Cornus florida seedlings received 10 weekly foliar applications of simulated rain adjusted to pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5. They were then placed under mature dogwoods naturally infected with Discula destructive. In both years, the percent leaf area infected increased significantly as the pH of the simulated rain solution decreased. In 1992 and 1993, seedlings were wrapped in plastic bags below the root collar to permit separate application of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5) or normal rain (pH 5.5) to the foliage or the growing medium or both. Application of pH 2.5 rain to the growing medium increased disease severity. Foliar applications alone did not increase disease. These results suggest that changes in nutrient availability, rather than foliar damage, are responsible for the increase in anthracnose severity in dogwoods pretreated with simulated acid rain. 41 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively. PMID:19459394

  13. Simulated acid-rain effects on yield response of two corn cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Banwart, W.L.; Porter, P.M.; Hasset, J.J.; Walker, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain is a documented phenomenon over much of the eastern and midwestern United States, including major portions of the Corn Belt. However, few studies report the effect of acid rain on yield of corn (Zea mays L.). Field experiments were conducted in 1983 and 1984 on a Flanagan silt loam (fine, montmorillonitic, mesic Aquic Argiudoll) soil at Urbana, IL. Two corn cultivars (Pioneer 3377 and B73 X Mo17) were protected from ambient rain by two automated movable rain exclusion shelters and were exposed to one of six simulated rain acidities ranging from pH 5.6 to 3.0. Analysis of the effect of rainfall pH on grain yield showed no significant linear or quadratic trend (alpha = 0.10) for either cultivar in individual years or with both years combined. Comparisons among treatments for both cultivars showed rain simulants with no added acid (pH 5.6) resulted in grain yields that were not significantly different from the average grain yields of the other five pH treatments. These results imply that under normal environmental conditions and agronomic practices, rainfall at its present levels of acidity has little if any effect on corn yields.

  14. A Simulation of the Interaction of Acid Rain with Soil Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Amber L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric issue of acid rains is subjected to a five-part laboratory experiment by concentrating on the chemistry of the infiltration process of acid rainwater through soils. This procedure of quantitative scrutiny helps students realize the efficacy of soil minerals in the consumption of surplus acidity in rainwater.

  15. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  16. Seasonal and rainfall-type variations in inorganic ions and dicarboxylic acids and acidity of wet deposition samples collected from subtropical East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wu, Pei-Ling

    2011-07-01

    Rainfall samples were collected over a period of 3 years and 8 months in subtropical East Asia. They are categorized into different rainfall types and analyzed to assess the ionic composition and its effect on the acidity of wet deposition in southern Taiwan. Only 4% of samples had a pH of <5.0, indicating that the study area is not impacted significantly by acid rain. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH by rainfall type was Spring Rain 5.74, Typhoon Rain 5.56, Summer Rain 5.46, Typhoon Outer Circulation (TOC) Rain 5.45, Plum Rain 5.32 and Autumn-Winter Rain 5.29. Dilution effects were important to the equivalent ionic concentration of different rainfall types. HCO 3-, SO 42- and Cl - were detected as major anions whereas NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ were major cations. CO 2-derived HCO 3- was the major ionic species in all but Typhoon Rain and Spring Rain, in which the major species were Na + and Cl - and Ca 2+, respectively. Excluding HCO 3-, the major species were NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ in Plum Rain, the secondary photochemical products SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ in TOC Rain and Summer Rain, and Na + and Ca 2+ in Autumn-Winter Rain. Calculation of arithmetic means showed that dicarboxylic acids contributed between 0.25% and 0.53% of the total ionic concentration and of these, oxalic acid contributed the least (81.3% of the dicarboxylic acid) to TOC Rain and the most (96.1% of the dicarboxylic acid) to Spring Rain, suggestive of long-range transport in the latter. Differences in wet deposition composition were shown to be a result of differences in local emissions and long-range transport (hence of prevailing wind direction) during the period of rainfall and of the frequency and volume of rain that typifies each rainfall type. Principal component analysis (PCA) further revealed that traffic-related and industrial organic and inorganic pollutants, their secondary photochemical products, sea salts, and dust are important contributors to wet deposition. Moreover, the ratio of

  17. Preliminary study of synergism of acid rain and diflubenzuron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.J.S.; Clark, J.M.; Edman, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Diflubenzuron{sup 1} (Dimilin{reg_sign}) was used on over 7 million acres in the U.S. in 1990 to control forest pests, particularly the gypsy moth. This chitin synthesis inhibitor affects insects and other anthropods. It is a restricted use pesticide due to its nontarget effects on aquatic macroinvertebrates. The effects of a single aerial application on nontarget aquatic macroinvertebrate communities were reviewed by Eisler (1992). Crustacea and immature insects (especially the true flies, mosquitoes, midges and black flies) are the most sensitive nontarget aquatic organisms to diflubenzuron. Diflubenzuron, N-[[4-(chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2,6-difluorobenzamide, is not the only mortality factor aquatic organisms face from human pollution. Acid deposition is a frequent stress factor in freshwater habitats in the Northeast USA. Acidic pulses can drop vernal pools (e.g., temporary, springtime, snowmelt pools) to pH levels below 3.0. Aquatic invertebrates vary in their tolerance to acidification. Reduced pH completely eliminates some species. A combination of stress factors could lead to synergistic effects, over and above the impact seen with a single stressor. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are synergist effects of diflubenzuron and lowered pH on the mortality of a nontarget aquatic organism. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  19. Quantum mechanical study of atmospheric nitrogen oxides and nitric acid: Implications on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.D.; Davey, C.A.; Evanseck, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The energetics of the nonhydrated and monohydrated reaction NO2 + OH {r_arrow} HNO3 were studied using computational methods. Energetic and structural data were obtained using high level ab initio calculations (up to MP4 for energetics). The activation energy was calculated to be around 8 kcal/mol for the nonhydrated system, but the presence of a single water molecule completely eliminated the barrier to nitric acid formation. The hydration of this atmospheric reaction significantly stabilizes the transition structure, leading to an activation energy of about -1 kcal/mol for the reaction. This suggests that enthalpically the reactants may spontaneously form nitric acid in the lower atmosphere where water is available for catalysis, resulting in further production of acid rain.

  20. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes. Progress report, 1 August 1986-1 February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollution is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern U.S. and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. How seasonal changes in lake transparency are related to annual acidic load was examined. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units was also examined. The utility of Thematic Mapper based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes was investigated. The potential for this optical response is related to a number of local ecophysical factors with bedrock geology being, perhaps, the most important. Other factors include sulfate deposition, vegetative cover, and terrain drainage/relief. The area of southern Ontario contains a wide variety of geologies from the most acid rain sensitive granite quartzite types to the least sensitive limestone dolomite sediments. Annual sulfate deposition ranges from 1.0 to 4.0 grams/sq m.

  1. Geochemical investigations of selected Eastern United States watersheds affected by acid deposition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, O.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of acid deposition on surface waters in eastern USA watersheds of similar size, physiography, climate and land-use are related to the composition of the underlying bedrock. Watersheds developed on greenstone, calcareous shale, sandstone, granite and schist differ in their ability to neutralize acid rain; consequently, stream acidity is similar to that of precipitation. Watersheds developed on granite and schist are intermediate in their capacity to neutralize acid deposition. Bedrock composition appears to be the major property controlling surface-water chemistry in these systems; hydrological flowpaths and the nature of surficial materials and vegetation also influence chemical responses to acid deposition in watersheds. 453This and the following 10 abstracts are for papers forming a thematic set on geochemical aspects of acid rain. -P.Br.

  2. Acid rain phenomenon in niger delta region of Nigeria: economic, biodiversity, and public health concern.

    PubMed

    Nduka, J K C; Orisakwe, O E; Ezenweke, L O; Ezenwa, T E; Chendo, M N; Ezeabasili, N G

    2008-01-01

    Rain samples were collected from Warri and Port Harcourt, two major oil-producing cities of Nigeria in April-June, July-August, and September-October 2005 and 2006. Awka, a "non-oil" city was used as control. Samples were collected from three points, using clean plastic basins fastened to a table, 2 m above ground level and 115 m away from tall buildings and trees. Water samples were filtered and acidity determined using digital pH meter. The results show that the rain samples were acidic. The pH values for the 2 years under study show that the rainfall in Warri was more acidic than that of Port Harcourt. Oil exploration and other anthropogenic sources may be responsible for the acid rain in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. PMID:18758657

  3. Effects of air pollution and acid rain on agriculture: an annotated bibliography. Staff report

    SciTech Connect

    Barse, J.R.; Ferguson, W.; Whetzel, V.

    1985-10-01

    Ozone and sulfur dioxide-gaseous air pollutants--can reduce the yields of key agricultural crops such as soybeans, corn, wheat, citrus fruit, cotton, and peanuts by interfering with plant photosynthesis. In general, the greater the pollutant concentration, the greater the yield reduction. Based on this biological evidence, economists are now estimating dollar impacts of ozone pollution on agriculture. By contrast, evidence on the biological impacts of acid rain on crops, soils, and forests is much less clear, often ambiguous. Some acid rain impacts can be favorable, because rainfall acids contain nitrogen and sulfur--major plant nutrients.

  4. A field test of the effect of acidic rain on ion balance in a woodland salamander

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, M.P.; Wyman, R.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Earlier laboratory studies demonstrated that red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, are susceptible to osmotic disruption by low pH substrates. In natural systems, however, acidic input from precipitation may be mediated by soils before it impacts salamanders. We tested the effect of acidic rain on sodium balance in salamanders by confining individuals in enclosure in two forest types (hemlock, beech) for 34 d. Enclosures received artificial rain of either pH 3 or 5 every 3-4 d. Soils inside enclosures in the hemlock forest were more acidic than those in the beech forest at the outset. At termination, [H[sup +

  5. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots. PMID:23726884

  6. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  7. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  8. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  9. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  10. Effects of acid rain, alone and in combination with gaseous pollutants, on growth and yield of crop plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Greenhouse, growth chamber, and field experiments were conducted to determine the response of crop plants to levels of acidity in simulated rain. The major objectives were: to determine the levels of acidity in rain that alter crop productivity; to evaluate varietal differences in crop response; and to determine the response of crop plants to the combined stress of acid rain and gaseous pollutants, primarily ozone. Results showed additive effects rather than synergistic ones.

  11. Why Isn't My Rain as Acidic as Yours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajicek, O. T.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses three topics that have been improperly applied to the acidic precipitation issue. They are: (1) use of the pH scale; (2) acidity; and (3) solution equilibria of strong and weak acids. Implications for instruction are considered. (JN)

  12. Losses of biota from American aquatic communities due to acid rain.

    PubMed

    Schindler, D W; Kasian, S E; Hesslein, R H

    1989-07-01

    Models based on chemical survey data and geochemical assumptions were calibrated for areas where rates of acidification are known, then used to predict the declines in alkalinity and pH of lakes in the eastern and midwestern U.S.A. These results were combined with known acid tolerances of different taxonomic groups to estimate the extent of damage caused by acid rain to biological assemblages.An average of over 50% of the species in some taxonomic groups have probably been eliminated from lakes in the Adirondacks, Poconos-Catskills and southern New England. Moderate damage to biotic communities was predicted for lakes in central New England, and north-central Wisconsin. Damage predicted in Maine, upper Michigan, northeastern Minnesota and the remainder of the upper Great Lakes region was slight. Crustaceans, molluscs, leeches and insects were among the most severely affected groups. Among fishes, species of minnows (Cyprindae) were depleted in the most heavily acidified regions, with some declines in salmonid and centrarchid species.Predicted damage to individual lakes in all areas was highly variable. In areas receiving highly acidic deposition, 100% of the species in acid-sensitive taxonomic groups were eliminated in some lakes, while damage to other lakes was predicted to be slight.Estimated damage varied from lake to lake within each subregion, based on chemical characteristics. The most heavily damaged lakes in the Adirondacks and Pocono-Catskills have probably lost all species of molluscs, leeches and crustaceans. On the other hand, lakes of the Midwest showed either slight increases or decreases in the richness of predicted biotic communities.The possible ranges of original sulfate concentrations in lakes and the proportion of sulfuric acid in precipitation that liberated base cations from catchments were confined to relatively narrow limits by the model. PMID:24249192

  13. Mercury cycling in boreal ecosystems: The long-term effect of acid rain constituents on peatland pore water methylmercury concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branfireun, Brian A.; Bishop, Kevin; Roulet, Nigel T.; Granberg, Gunnar; Nilsson, Mats

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria have been identified as primary methylators of mercury (Hg) in the laboratory and in field investigations. However, no studies have investigated the effect of long-term deposition of sulphate on methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in peatlands, which are known to be significant sources of MeHg to downstream waters in the boreal forest zone. As an ancillary experiment to a larger project investigating the effects of acid rain constituents on peatland carbon dynamics, the influence of experimentally elevated Na2SO4 and/or NH4NO3 deposition on peat pore water MeHg concentrations was determined using a simple mesocosm experimental design. After three years, additions of S in amounts equivalent to the 1980s dry and wet deposition in Southern Sweden resulted in peat pore water MeHg concentrations up to six times above background levels. Elevated N loads had no effect on pore water MeHg concentrations.

  14. Simulated acid rain alters litter decomposition and enhances the allelopathic potential of the invasive plant Wedelia trilobata (Creeping Daisy)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species and acid rain cause global environmental problems. Limited information exists, however, concerning the effects of acid rain on the invasiveness of these plants. For example, creeping daisy, an invasive exotic allelopathic weed, has caused great damage in southern China where acid ra...

  15. Effects of simulated sulfuric acid rain on yield, growth, and foliar injury of several crops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Neely, G.E.; Perrigan, S.C.; Grothaus, L.C.

    1980-10-01

    This study was designed to reveal patterns of response of major United States crops to sulfuric acid rain. Potted plants were grown in field chambers and exposed to simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5 or 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.6). At harvest, the weights of the marketable portion, total aboveground portion and roots were determined for 28 crops. Of these, marketable yield production was inhibited for 5 crops (radish, beet, carrot, mustard greens, broccoli), stimulated for 6 crops (tomato, green pepper, strawberry, alfalfa, orchardgrass, timothy), and ambiguously affected for 1 crop (potato). In addition, stem and leaf production of sweet corn was stimulated. Visible injury of tomatoes might have decreased their marketability. No statistically significant effects on yield were observed for the other 15 crops. The results suggest that the likelihood of yield being affected by acid rain depends on the part of the plant utilized, as well as on species. Effects on the aboveground portions of crops and on roots are also presented. Plants were regularly examined for foliar injury associated with acid rain. Of the 35 cultivars examined, the foliage of 31 was injured at pH 3.0, 28 at pH 3.5, and 5 at pH 4.0. Foliar injury was not generally related to effects on yield. However, foilar injury of swiss chard, mustard greens and spinach was severe enough to adversely affect marketability.

  16. Acid rain program: CEMS submission instructions for monitoring plans, certification test notifications, and quarterly reports

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-12

    The Acid Rain Program regulations require all affected utility units to continuously measure, record and report SO2, NOx, volumetric flow data and CO2 emissions. All affected units also must continuously measure and record opacity, and must report opacity exceedances to the appropriate State or Local Agency. To ensure that your CEMS and fuel flowmeters are performing at an acceptable level, and providing quality assured data, you are required under 40 CFR 75.53, 75.62 (a) to submit a monitoring plan and certification test data for acid rain CEM certificaton. The purpose of this handbook is to help you fulfill your requirements under the Acid Rain Program. This handbook will walk you through the necessary steps for gaining CEMS certification, including filling out and mailing the proper forms, administering the required tests, and applying for certification and sending in electronic data to EPA.

  17. The major role of dust in explaining 1954--1993 acid rain trends

    SciTech Connect

    Stensland, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    Calcium and other base cation levels in air and precipitation from the 1950`s to the 1990`s can be as important as sulfate and other acidic species in understanding acid rain trends (or basic rain trends). Precipitation quality data, air quality data, and estimates of sources of dust emissions are used to address the issue of calcium trends in the atmosphere. The apparent downward trend for calcium in precipitation from the 1950`s to the 1970`s is suggested to be due mainly to a change in sample collection methods while the decrease since the mid-1970`s is due to a real decrease in atmospheric calcium dust levels in the atmosphere.

  18. Reply [to “Comment on ‘Acid rain: Controllable?’”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Dr. McTaggart-Cowan's letter states as a fact that enough is now known to take appropriate action to alleviate the transboundary acid rain issue. Others have stated equally as a fact the diametric opposite. I agree that some pollution control measures have already been taken with no more certainty than exists for the acid rain issue. But the costs to society were far smaller than for sulfur dioxide controls. In effect, science only plays part of the role in decisions about environmental protection, and my own personal, proenvironmental views, which might be shared with you, may not be shared by others.

  19. Reply [to “Comment on “Acid rain: Controllable?””

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Dr. McTaggart-Cowan's letter states as a fact that enough is now known to take appropriate action to alleviate the transboundary acid rain issue. Others have stated equally as a fact the diametric opposite. I agree that some pollution control measures have already been taken with no more certainty than exists for the acid rain issue. But the costs to society were far smaller than for sulfur dioxide controls. In effect, science only plays part of the role in decisions about environmental protection, and my own personal, proenvironmental views, which might be shared with you, may not be shared by others.

  20. A bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution with application to acid rain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, J.; Mohsin, M.; Gebhardt, A.

    2012-04-01

    Univariate and bivariate Gamma distributions are extensively used for statistical modeling in climatology. In this paper, a bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution is used to model the proportion of acidity and major ions in rain. The model parameters of the bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution are estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The plots of the distribution of the proportions are compared to the histograms of the observed data of the proportions of acidity and major ions in rain. The fitted pdf appears to follow the general pattern in the histograms closely.

  1. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26815371

  2. Modeling wet deposition of acid substances over the PRD region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xingcheng; Fung, Jimmy Chi Hung; Wu, Dongwei

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China has suffered heavily from acid rain in the last 10 years due to the anthropogenic emission of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Several measurement-based studies about this issue have been conducted to analyze the chemical composition of precipitation in this area. However, no detailed, high resolution numerical simulation regarding this topic has ever been done in this region. In this study, the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was applied to simulate the wet deposition of acid substances (SO42- and NO3-) in the PRD region from 2009 to 2011 with a resolution of 3 km. The simulation output agreed well with the observation data. Our results showed that Guangzhou was the city most affected by acid rain in this region. The ratio of non-sea-salt sulfate to nitrate indicated that the acid rain in this region belonged to the sulfate-nitrate mixed type. The source apportionment result suggests that point source and super regional source are the ones that contribute the pollutants most in the rain water over PRD Region. The sulfate and nitrate input to some reservoirs via wet deposition was also estimated based on the model simulation. Our results suggest that further cross-city cooperation and emission reduction are needed to further curb acid rain in this region.

  3. Antioxidant response of soybean seedlings to joint stress of lanthanum and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Excess of rare earth elements in soil can be a serious environmental stress on plants, in particular when acid rain coexists. To understand how such a stress affects plants, we studied antioxidant response of soybean leaves and roots exposed to lanthanum (0.06, 0.18, and 0.85 mmol L(-1)) under acid rain conditions (pH 4.5 and 3.0). We found that low concentration of La3+ (0.06 mmol L(-1)) did not affect the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and peroxidase) whereas high concentration of La3+ (≥0.18 mmol L(-1)) did. Compared to treatment with acid rain (pH 4.5 and pH 3.0) or La3+ alone, joint stress of La3+ and acid rain affected more severely the activity of catalase and peroxidase, and induced more H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. When treated with high level of La3+ (0.85 mmol L(-1)) alone or with acid rain (pH 4.5 and 3.0), roots were more affected than leaves regarding the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, physiological function, and growth. The severity of oxidative damage and inhibition of growth caused by the joint stress associated positively with La3+ concentration and soil acidity. These results will help us understand plant response to joint stress, recognize the adverse environmental impact of rare earth elements in acidic soil, and develop measures to eliminate damage caused by such joint stress. PMID:23653318

  4. Assessing the effectiveness of federal acid rain policy using remote and high elevation lakes in northern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Adam J.

    The 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set target reductions for both sulfur and nitrogen emissions to reduce acidic deposition and improve the biologically-relevant chemistry of low ANC surface waters in the United States. The Maine High Elevation Lake Monitoring (HELM) project was designed to complement other acid rain status and trend assessments in the northeast that were known to have underestimated the number of acidic lakes. HELM lakes are more susceptible to the effects of acid deposition than lowland lakes typically included in other surveys because they receive higher amounts of precipitation, and the watersheds are less able to neutralize acidic inputs because of steep slopes, shallow soils, and resistant bedrock. Furthermore, development impacts that affect water quality and cloud our interpretation of recovery from deposition in many lowland lakes are absent in the HELM lakes. Since 1986, HELM surface water SO4-2 concentration has decreased at a rate of 1.6mueq/L/yr.. HELM lake ANC has increased at a rate of 0.58 mueq/L/yr. and hydrogen ion has decreased at a rate of 0.05 mueq/L/yr. since 1986, highlighting the positive effect the CAAA is having on HELM acidity. Over the same time period, HELM DOC has increased at rate of 0.03 mg/L/yr., raising the median DOC in HELM lakes by 21%. Furthermore, we calculate that organic anions (OA-) now contribute 10% to 15% more to total anionic charge while at the same time, the lakes have become 23% more dilute. The increase in DOC has led to a shift in the source of acidity from anthropogenic inorganic (acid rain), to natural organic DOC sources. While this shift appears to complicate the interpretation of acid-base data coming from acid-sensitive lakes, in reality it highlights recovery to a more natural state for these surface waters. A comparison of HELM recovery data to recent data from the New Hampshire Remote Pond (NHRP) project serves to put the NHRP in regional perspective as well as enabling us to

  5. Acid Rain Advisory Committee meeting. Held on March 20-22, 1991. Permits and technology issue papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Index: (Permits and Technology Subcommittee Papers): Permits and Technologies Conference Call Minutes January 22, 1991; Subcommittee Meeting Minutes; January 28, 1991; Principles for Acid Rain Permits; Fact Sheet: Reduced Utilization; Topics Covered in Acid Rain Permit Regulations; and Primer on the Clean Water Act Permit Program.

  6. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  7. Learning about Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide for Grades 6 through 8. EPA 430-F-08-002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Acid rain is a complex environmental problem which affects the United States and many other countries around the world. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established in 1970 to address environmental issues, such as acid rain. Through its programs, EPA works to protect human health and the environment in the United States…

  8. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON APPLE TREE PRODUCTIVITY AND FRUIT QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mature 'McIntosh', 'Empire', and 'Golden Delicious' apple trees (Malus domestica) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed o...

  9. GROWTH CHANGES OF APPLE SEEDLINGS IN RESPONSE TO SIMULATED ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a greenhouse experiment, Malus hupehensis seedlings were treated weekly with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.25 to pH 7.0. Necrotic lesions developed on leaves at pH 2.25 and pH 2.50 immediately after the first application at the 8-node stage. Following the 9th...

  10. Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of acid rain electronic data reports

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.

    1997-12-31

    Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily of natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company under acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NO{sub x}Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

  11. Chemistry For Kids: Pre-Chemistry Acid Rain Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1985-01-01

    Presents two activities on acid rain for students in intermediate grades. Materials needed and procedures used are included. Also describes "chemical magic" shows performed by high school students for sixth-grade students in seven elementary schools in Altus, Oklahoma. (JN)

  12. The Fugitive Literature of Acid Rain: Making Use of Nonconventional Information Sources in a Vertical File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovenburg, Susan L.; Stoss, Frederick W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of vertical file collections for nonconventional literature, and describes the classification scheme used for fugitive literature by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse at the Center for Environmental Information. An annotated list of organizations and examples of titles they offer is provided. (8 notes with…

  13. The Influence of a Collaborative Learning Environment on Primary Students' Conceptions about Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stavridou, Heleni

    2002-01-01

    Investigates primary students' conceptions of acid rain formation and its consequences to people and the environment before and after a 10-hour constructivist teaching intervention. Reports improvement in conceptions of physical and chemical phenomena among the experimental group participants. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Environmental Policy-Making and Their Impacts in the Case of Acid Rain Abatement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehmer-Christiansen, Sonja

    1992-01-01

    Great Britain and Germany accepted European Community acid rain reduction directives. Discusses the differences in the amount of reduction required from each country, the strategies adopted to attain those reductions, and the levels of emission reductions already achieved.(52 references) (MDH)

  15. Student Teacher Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect, Ozone Layer Depletion, and Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Jane

    1996-01-01

    Describes the results of a survey designed to ascertain details of student teachers' knowledge and misconceptions about the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and ozone layer depletion. Results indicate familiarity with the issues but little understanding of the concepts involved and many commonly held misconceptions. (JRH)

  16. Acid rain compliance and coordination of state and federal utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhaus, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) impose new controls on emissions by electric utilities of the two major precursors of acid rain: sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen. Utilities, and the utility holding company systems and power pools of which they are members, will be subject to extensive and costly compliance obligations under the new stature. Most of these utilities, utility systems, and power pools are regulated by more than one utility regulatory authority. Utility regulators will need to coordinate their policies for ratemaking and for review of acid rain compliance strategies if least-cost solutions are to be implemented without imposing on rate payers and utility shareholders the costs and risks of inconsistent regulatory determinations. This article outlines the scope of the coordination problem and spells out possible approaches that utility regulators may take in dealing with it. Topics covered include the following: the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments; acid rain (SO2); acid rain (NOx); costs of compliance; implications for utility regulation - federal and state utility regulatory framework; potential jurisdictional conflicts under existing state/federal utility regulatory scheme - single utility, holding companies, power pools; Utility regulatory issues under the 1990 amendments - planning conflicts, operational conflicts; methods for dealing with potential jurisdictional conflicts; coordination mechanisms - informal consultation, rulemaking,coordination of adjudicatory proceedings, FERC rate filings.

  17. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID RAIN ON TWO MODEL HARDWOOD FORESTS: THROUGHFALL, LITTER LEACHATE, AND SOIL SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.6) was applied to model forests containing either sugar maple (Acer saccharum) or red alder (Alnus rubra). Water samples were collected above and below the canopy, below the litter, and from 20 cm and 1 m below the surface of ...

  18. A Fresh Look at the Benefits and Costs of the US Acid Rain Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Acid Rain Program (Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments) has achieved substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from power plants in the United States. We compare new estimates of the benefits and costs of Title IV to th...

  19. Effects of simulated acid rain on the allelopathic potential of invasive weed Wedelia trilobata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acid rain continues to pose a major threat to natural ecosystems in rapidly-developing industrialized regions such as southern China. Despite the significant environmental impact of this phenomenon, relatively little is known concerning its effects on important aspects of ecosystem dynamics such as ...

  20. PRODUCTIVITY OF FIELD-GROWN SOYBEANS EXPOSED TO SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two experiments were performed during the summer of 1981 to determine the effects of simulated acidic rain on seed yields of soybeans grown using standard agronomic practices. In one experiment, plants were shielded from all ambient rainfall and exposed to simulated rainfall in q...

  1. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN ON YIELDS OF FIELD-GROWN SOYBEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experiment was performed during the summer of 1982 to determine the effects of simulated acidic rain on seed yields on two commercial cultivars of soybeans grown according to standard agronomic practices. Plants were shielded from all ambient rainfalls automatically by two mov...

  2. MODELING THE RESPONSE OF GREENHOUSE-GROWN RADISH PLANTS TO ACIDIC RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emphasis being placed on the need for assessments to determine the impacts of acidic rain has resulted in the initiation of many dose-response studies. Experimental design parameters and model evaluation play important roles in the overall conclusions of such studies. To illu...

  3. The missing piece in the acid-rain puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Powicki, C.R.

    1989-09-01

    This article discusses the role of geology in acid precipitation research and water quality. Knowledge of the composition and reactivity of the soil and bedrock through which acid precipitation flows is necessary to predict its effects on a body of water. Acidification not only has direct impacts, through water quality changes in water bodies, but also indirect long-term effects attributable to weathering rates. Once the capacity of the soil to buffer acidic loading is exceeded, sudden changes in soil chemistry may occur with dramatic effects on dependent biota.

  4. Monitoring responses of Mason Pine to acid rain in China based on remote sensing vegetation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiaxin; Jiang, Hong; Hou, Chunliang; Zhang, Xiuying; Wang, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Since the 1970s, acid rain has remained in the public spotlight in both Europe and the United States and recently has emerged as an important problem in other regions such as Southeast Asia. To reveal responses of Masson Pine to acid rain during a long time series in central China, we used the interpolation dataset of acid rain and the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to derive the monthly pH and NDVI trajectories based on acidity gradients from 1992 to 2006. Then we analyzed inter-annual and seasonal variation of vegetation growth by improved sinusoidal fitting and regression analysis. In the environment of strong acidity and moderate acidity, the growth of Masson Pine was inhibited during the study period, while the slight acidity promoted growth of Masson Pine to some extent. For the multi-year monthly changing trend of NDVI, late spring to mid autumn, the NDVI showed a decreasing trend, especially in June, while from late autumn to the following spring, the NDVI showed a rising tendency, specifically in December and March.

  5. ADVANCES IN CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Causes and effects of acid deposition are the subject of widespread discussion both in the U.S. and Europe. Two major concerns are the acidification of lakes and streams, and forest damage. The proposed mechanism for acidification of lakes and streams is the deposition of acidic ...

  6. ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND CISTERN DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water quality charecteristics, including the trace element Cd, cu, Pb, and Zn, in rainwater cistern supplies representing an area receiving acidic deposition were compared to cistern water chemistry in a control area that does not receive a significant input of acidic deposit...

  7. Dispelling the North American acid rain clouds: Developing a framework for political consensus through the identification of elite viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.

    1988-01-01

    Acidic deposition has simultaneously been referred to as an environmental curiosity and as an ecological holocaust. This polarization of opinion on this pollutant has resulted in the policy stalemate in Congress over this issue and is responsible for the major part of the friction which currently besets Canada-United States relations. This study identified the distinctive viewpoints which characterize opposing attitudes. In addition, the specific areas of consensus and disagreement among these elite groups were determined. All of these objectives were carried out using the results of the Q-sort technique and interviews with members of the acid rain elite in both Canada and the United States (i.e. politicians, scientists, regulators, environmental/advocacy groups, and industry/utility personnel). Furthermore, a comprehensive, in-depth review of the scientific, legal, economic, social and political aspects of this tissue was conducted. Results show that implementation of the Acid Rain Experimental Control Program (ARECP) and the Clean Coal Technology project has the potential to break the existing stalemates over this issue and, at the same, could avert damage to many ecosystems, man-made structures and human health.

  8. The politics of markets: The acid rain control policy in the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Kete, N.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis is a review and critique of the development of the acid rain control policy codified as Title IV of the Clean Air Act. The amendments include provisions to address acid rain-air pollution that has been transformed and transported over long distances. Title IV also embodies the first large scale adoption of market principles and economic incentives in the cause of environmental protection. The acid rain control amendments are being hailed as a break with past environmental protection practice and are being offered as a model for further regulatory reform. The thesis looks at the roots of the acid rain policy and considers the set of legal, social, and economic relations embedded in the policy which define the nature of its legal controls over pollution and its inverse, environmental quality. It explores whether the creation of the emissions allowance trading system changes the social relationships that prevailed under the pre-amended Clean Air Act. It responds to and rebuts the concerns of some critics that the policy represents an alienation of the public's right to clean air. A review of the acid rain policymaking process provides a recent and concrete example of the two central concerns inherent in public policy: the making of decisions that establish institutional arrangements, or structures, that both constrain and liberate individual action at the operational level; and the search for the boundary between autonomous behavior and collective decision making. The policy responds to regulatory reform recommendations concerned with improving the effectiveness, accountability, and cost-effectiveness of environmental protection. As a model for future policymaking, the policy goes beyond and encompasses more than the welfare economics ideal of static economic efficiency and the [open quotes]free market environmentalism[close quotes] emphasis on private property and common law.

  9. Mesoscale acid deposition modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, John W.; Karyampudi, V. Mohan; Price, P. E.; Bousquet, M. D.; Coats, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed in support of the EPA/DOE MADS (Mesoscale Acid Deposition) Project included the development of meteorological data bases for the initialization of chemistry models, the testing and implementation of new planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes in the MASS model, the simulation of transport and precipitation for MADS case studies employing the MASS model, and the use of the TASS model in the simulation of cloud statistics and the complex transport of conservative tracers within simulated cumuloform clouds. The work performed in support of the NASA/FAA Wind Shear Program included the use of the TASS model in the simulation of the dynamical processes within convective cloud systems, the analyses of the sensitivity of microburst intensity and general characteristics as a function of the atmospheric environment within which they are formed, comparisons of TASS model microburst simulation results to observed data sets, and the generation of simulated wind shear data bases for use by the aviation meteorological community in the evaluation of flight hazards caused by microbursts.

  10. Spatio-temporal patterns of throughfall and solute deposition in an open tropical rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Germer, Sonja; Neill, Christopher; Krusche, Alex V.; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe brief interaction of precipitation with a forest canopy can create a high spatial variability of both throughfall and solute deposition. We hypothesized that (i) the variability in natural forest systems is high but depends on system-inherent stability, (ii) the spatial variability of solute deposition shows seasonal dynamics depending on the increase in rainfall frequency, and (iii) spatial patterns persist only in the short-term. The study area in the north-western Brazilian state of Rondônia is subject to a climate with a distinct wet and dry season. We collected rain and throughfall on an event basis during the early wet season ( n = 14) and peak of the wet season ( n = 14) and analyzed the samples for pH and concentrations of NH4+, Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Cl -, NO3-, SO42- and DOC. The coefficient of variation for throughfall based on both sampling intervals was 29%, which is at the lower end of values reported from other tropical forest sites, but which is higher than in most temperate forests. Coefficients of variation of solute deposition ranged from 29% to 52%. This heterogeneity of solute deposition is neither particularly high nor particularly low compared with a range of tropical and temperate forest ecosystems. We observed an increase in solute deposition variability with the progressing wet season, which was explained by a negative correlation between heterogeneity of solute deposition and antecedent dry period. The temporal stability of throughfall patterns was low during the early wet season, but gained in stability as the wet season progressed. We suggest that rapid plant growth at the beginning of the rainy season is responsible for the lower stability, whereas less vegetative activity during the later rainy season might favor the higher persistence of "hot" and "cold" spots of throughfall quantities. The relatively high stability of throughfall patterns during later stages of the wet season may influence processes at the forest floor

  11. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis was performed to interpret the spatial aspects of lake acidification. Three types of relationships were investigated based upon the August to May seasonal scene pairing. In the first type of analysis ANOVA was used to examine the mean Thematic Mapper band one count by ecophysical strata. The primary difference in the two ecophysical strata is the soil type and depth over the underlying bedrock. Examination of the August to May difference values for TM band one produced similar results. Group A and B strata were the same as above. The third type of analysis examined the relationship between values of the August to May difference from polygons which have similar ecophysical properties with the exception of sulfate deposition. For this case lakes were selected from units with sandy soils over granitic rock types and the sulfate deposition was 1.5 or 2.5 g/sq m/yr.

  12. Effects of simulated acid rain on yield response of two soybean cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.M.; Banwart, W.L.; Hassett, J.J.; Finke, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted for 3 yrs. to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on seed yield of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, 'Amsoy 71' and 'Williams 82'. Plants were treated biweekly with simulated rain of pH 5.6, 4.6, 4.2, 3.8, 3.4, and 3.0. For Amsoy 71 there was a linear decrease in yield with increasing rainfall acidity for 1 of 3 yrs but no significant effects for the other two. Thus, acid rain appears to reduce the yield of some soybean cultivars slightly, but this effect is not consistent from year to year. Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean treated with the most-acidic rain, pH 3.0, resulted in average yields for the 3 yrs of the study of approximately 3% and 4% lower than the average yields for the other treatments, respectively. However, calculations from the response functions developed have shown that, at current levels of rainfall acidities, the effects on yield are very small. With an increase in rainfall acidity of 50% in Illinois, the predicted yield decrease for Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean would be less than 1%. Similarly, the expected increase in yield of these cultivars would be 1% or less if acidity in the rainfall were reduced by 50%. While there may be beneficial effects of reduced S and N oxide emissions, these results suggest the resultant lower rainfall acidities are not likely to produce noticeable changes in soybean yields.

  13. H.R. 474: A Bill to repeal provisions of the Clean Air Act dealing with acid rain. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The text of this proposed legislation reads as follows: `Section 1. Repeal of Clean Air Act provisions relating to Acid Rain. Title IV of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 and following), relating to acid deposition control, is hereby repealed.`

  14. Response of citrus and other selected plant species to simulated HCL - acid rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.; Heagle, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    Mature valencia orange trees were sprayed with hydrochloric acid solutions (pH 7.8, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5) in the field at the full bloom stage and at one month after fruit set. Potted valencia orange and dwarf citrus trees, four species of plants native to Merritt Island, and four agronomic species were exposed to various pH levels of simulated acid rain under controlled conditions. The acid rain was generated from dilutions of hydrochloric acid solutions or by passing water through an exhaust generated by burning solid rocket fuel. The plants were injured severely at pH levels below 1.0, but showed only slight injury at pH levels of 2.0 and above. Threshold injury levels were between 2.0 and 3.0 pH. The sensitivity of the different plant species to acid solutions was similar. Foliar injury symptoms were representative of acid rain including necrosis of young tissue, isolated necrotic spots or patches, and leaf abscission. Mature valencia orange trees sprayed with concentrations of 1.0 pH and 0.5 pH in the field had reduced fruit yields for two harvests after the treatment. All experimental trees were back to full productivity by the third harvest after treatment.

  15. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON WATER SUPPLIES IN THE NORTHEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of the first study concerning the impact of acid precipitation on drinking water are reported in terms of health effects in humans as measured by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels. The study focused on sampling surface water and groundwat...

  16. Red spruce decline in the northeastern US: hypotheses regarding the role of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.H.

    1983-11-01

    Red spruce have died in abnormal numbers in the high elevation forests of New York and New England during the past two decades while spruce in the southern Appalachians remain healthy. Investigations of insect damage, fungai pathogens, successional dynamics, competitive status, climate and weather patterns, and possible pollutant effects indicate that the decline was triggered by abiotic stress during the dry years of the 1960s. Tree response, as recorded in the pattern of annual rings, and the wide range of soil conditions in which spruce are declining, suggest drought or dry summers as key factors. Hypotheses regarding the role of acid deposition induced stress have been offered, but at present there is not evidence which clearly links acid deposition to spruce decline. Indirect effects of acid deposition on soils, direct effects of acid deposition on foliage, and interactions of acid deposition and drought stress are possible but unproven pathways by which acid deposition could be involved. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. Acid rain effects on aluminum mobilization clarified by inclusion of strong organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Boylen, C.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. W.; Momen, B.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of acidic deposition effects on aquatic ecosystems have often been hindered by complications from naturally occurring organic acidity. Measurements of pH and ANCG, the most commonly used indicators of chemical effects, can be substantially influenced by the presence of organic acids. Relationships between pH and inorganic Al, which is toxic to many forms of aquatic biota, are also altered by organic acids. However, when inorganic Al concentrations are plotted against ANC (the sum of Ca2+, Mg 2+, Na+, and K+, minus SO42-, NO3-, and Cl-), a distinct threshold for Al mobilization becomes apparent. If the concentration of strong organic anions is included as a negative component of ANC, the threshold occurs at an ANC value of approximately zero, the value expected from theoretical charge balance constraints. This adjusted ANC is termed the base-cation surplus. The threshold relationship between the base-cation surplus and Al was shown with data from approximately 200 streams in the Adirondack region of New York, during periods with low and high dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and for an additional stream from the Catskill region of New York. These results indicate that (1) strong organic anions can contribute to the mobilization of inorganic Al in combination with SO42- and NO 3-, and (2) the presence of inorganic Al in surface waters is an unambiguous indication of acidic deposition effects. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  18. Analysis of acid rain effects on vegetation in eco-regions in China based on AVHRR/NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiaxin; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Xu, Xiaobin

    2010-09-01

    The vegetation, as the main component of the ecosystems, is the main receptor of acid rain pollution. Because of the discrepancy of the vegetation characteristics and environment, the responses of the different types of vegetation to acid rain in different regions are different. In this paper, we chose 9 eco-regions in southern China as study area, based on the acid rain and NOAA/NDVI data from 1992 to 2006, and revealed the impact of acid rain on the vegetation by using spatial interpolation, cluster analysis and curve fitting. The result shows that the most tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests were positively correlated with the acidity of precipitation and the growth was inhibited obviously. On the contrary, the growth of temperate coniferous forests was promoted by acid rain to some extent. In generally, the vegetation in the condition of the weak acid rain grew better, especially the Qin Ling Mountains deciduous forests and the Changjiang Plain evergreen forests. For South China-Vietnam subtropical evergreen forest, Yunnan Plateau subtropical evergreen forests and Qionglai-Minshan conifer forests, the significant difference of NDVI between the different gradients of acid rain lasted almost the whole year, while that of the other eco-regions only appeared most obviously in Winter.

  19. Growth and xylem water potential of white oak and loblolly pine seedlings as affected by simulated acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F. ); McLaughlin, S.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Effects of simulated acidic rainfall on the growth and water relations of white oak (Quercus albya L.) and loblolly pin (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings grown under two fertility regimes were examined. Seedling of each species grown in a loam soil were exposed to two simulated rains per week of pH 4.8, 4.2 or 3.6 for 26 wk. High and low fertility regimes were imposed by monthly application of one-half and one-quarter concentration, respectively, of Hoagland's solution No. 2. Diameter growth of both species was reduced by exposure to rains of the higher acidities regardless of fertility treatment, and seedlings that received pH 4.2 and 3.6 rains also exhibited greater foliar chlorosis and necrosis than those that received rains of pH 4.8. The high fertility treatment stimulated diameter growth of white oak, but height growth, shoot and root dry weights and total root length were no substantially affected b acid rain or fertility treatments in either species. Following the final rain applications, drought was simulated by withholding irrigation for 2 wk, and seedling xylem pressure potential was then measured using the pressure chamber technique. Xylem pressure potential of white oak seedlings which had received rains of pH 3.6 was significantly lower than that of seedlings which had received rains of higher pH, a result that became more pronounced as soil water potential decreased. Rain acidity had little effect on the xylem pressure potential of loblolly pine, however. Soil pH analyses before initiation and after completion of the rain applications indicated that rainfall of pH 3.6 increased soil acidity more than rains of pH 4.2 or 4.8, although changes in soil pH were small overall. 26 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  20. Early smelter sites: A neglected chapter in the history and geography of acid rain in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, M.-L.

    Dominant spatial and temporal theories of acid rain in the U.S. are identified, followed by brief comments on how historical data have generally been used in modern acid rain research. A frequently-cited 1982 article by E.B. Cowling is examined, one that has influenced much thinking on the history of acid rain. The article overlooks early American smelters, however, and the role they played in the true history and geography of acid rain in the United States. Continuing with this theme, a connection is established between acid rain and turn-of-the-century smelter smoke problems. Literature on the latter subject is discussed, and American and German examples are given. A beginning is then made on writing acid rain's neglected chapter, focusing on Tennessee's Copper Basin (Ducktown District) where copper smelting dates back to the 1850s. A short historical overview of this area's smelting operations is given, with particular attention to the air pollution and other environmental problems resulting from large emissions of sulfur dioxide. Five additional early smelter sites for potential study are mentioned as well. The paper concludes with some observations regarding the way in which expanded research of early smelter sites could affect the general perception of acid rain in the U.S. It is also suggested that such research might contribute to a better atmosphere for making decisions and policies pertaining to the phenomenon as it exists today.

  1. Trend analysis of weekly acid rain data, 1978-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schertz, Terry L.; Hirsch, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    There are 19 stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program which operated over the period 1978-83 and were subsequently incorporated into the National Trends Network in 1983. The precipitation chemistry data for these stations for this period were analyzed for trend, spatial correlation, seasonality, and relationship to precipitation volume. The intent of the analysis was to provide insights on the sources of variation in precipitation chemistry and to attempt to ascertain what statistical procedures may be most useful for ongoing analysis of the National Trends Network data. The Seasonal Kendall test was used for detection of trends in raw concentrations of dissolved constituents, pH and specific conductance, and residuals of these parameters from regression analysis. Forty-one percent of the trends detected in the raw concentrations were downtrends, 4 percent were uptrends, and 55 percent showed no trends at a = 0.2. At a more restrictive significance level of a = 0.05, 24 percent of the trends detected were downtrends, 2 percent were uptrends, and 74 percent showed no trends. The two constituents of greatest interest in terms of human generated emissions and environmental effects, sulfate and nitrate, showed only downtrends, and sulfate showed the largest decreases in concentration per year of all the ions tested.

  2. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types. PMID:23626790

  3. Rhizosphere pH responses to simulated acid rain as measured with glass microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Conkling, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a useful experimental system for studying the rhizosphere of growing roots, and to investigate the effects of bulk soil pH and foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn and soybeans. First, a study was done to compare soil pH measurements made with a standard glass pH electrode with those made using an antimony (Sb) microelectrode. Because of uncertainty with the Sb microelectrodes' response, glass pH-sensitive microelectrodes were made and tested for rhizosphere pH measurements. The influence of soil water pressure gradients in the range of {minus}10 to {minus}1500 kPa in the proximity of the pH and reference electrodes on pH measurements made with microelectrodes was studied. The effect of foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn, and soybean as a function of soil pH were studied. Alfalfa, corn, and soybean were grown into minirhizotrons containing reformed samples of both Seymour A and Bt soil horizons, and the rhizosphere pH measured. The measured in situ bulk soil pH ranged from 4.9 to 6.2 in the A horizon and from 4.0 to 5.7 in the Bt horizon. Plants received acid or non-acid foliar rain applications. Rhizosphere pH was measured using a glass pH-sensitive microelectrode. Acid rain applications caused foliar damage, but had little effect on the rhizosphere pH. The general trend was for the lateral root pH values to be slightly higher than the main root values.

  4. Response of Soil Respiration to Acid Rain in Forests of Different Maturity in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types. PMID:23626790

  5. Growth responses of 53 open-pollinated loblolly pine families to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Edwards, N.T.; Hanson, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    Field exposures of 9950 containerized 12-wk-old loblolly pine (Pinustaeda L.) seedlings representing 53 commercially important, open-pollinated families were conducted to evaluate individual and interactive effects of acid rain and O{sub 3} on growth response. A 36-plot field research facility comprised of 33 open-top chambers and three open plots was used to test effects of five O{sub 3} levels that included ambient (A) and seasonally integrated levels that were 0.53, 1.10, 1.58, or 2.15 times ambient. Individual effects of three levels of simulated acid rain (pH 3.3, 4.5, and 5.2) as well as their interaction with O{sub 3} at 0.53A, 1.58A, and 2.15A levels were also included. Exposure to ambient air reduced average growth in height (26%), diameter (5%), and volume (14%) compared with growth of seedlings exposed to a 47% lower dose in charcoal filtered (CF) air. Responses to increasing O{sub 3} above ambient levels varied widely between families, became increasingly inhibitory at the highest O{sub 3} levels, but did not significantly exceed growth reductions found in ambient air. Diameter growth was reduced in most families by all levels of O{sub 3} addition. Acid rain caused a general stimulation of height growth at ambient levels (pH 4.5), while both height and diameter growth were reduced at a mean pH of 3.3. Significant antagonism between rainfall acidity and O{sub 3} effects on height and biomass increment was detected with increasing pollutant concentrations. Ozone reduced root/shoot biomass in most families, while acid rain did not. 51 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Effects of simulated acid rain on microbial characteristics in a lateritic red soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-qin; Zhang, Jia-en; Ouyang, Ying; Lin, Ling; Quan, Guo-ming; Zhao, Ben-liang; Yu, Jia-yu

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed to examine the impact of simulated acid rain (SAR) on nutrient leaching, microbial biomass, and microbial activities in a lateritic red soil in South China. The soil column leaching experiment was conducted over a 60-day period with the following six SAR pH treatments (levels): 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 and one control treatment (pH = 7). Compared with the control treatment, the concentrations of soil organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), and average well color density (AWCD) in the Ecoplates were all significantly decreased by leaching with SAR at different pH levels. The decrease in MBC and MBN indicated that acid rain reduced the soil microbial population, while the decrease in AWCD revealed that acid rain had a negative effect on soil bacterial metabolic function. Soil basal respiration increased gradually from pH 4.0 to 7.0 but decreased dramatically from pH 2.5 to 3.0. The decrease in soil nutrient was the major reason for the change of soil microbial functions. A principal component analysis showed that the major carbon sources used by the bacteria were carbohydrates and carboxylic acids. PMID:26201661

  7. Sulfate metabolism. I. Sulfate uptake and redistribution of acid rain sulfate by edible plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dallam, R.D.

    1987-03-23

    Sulfur is the major component of polluted air in industrialized societies. Atmospheric sulfur is converted to sulfuric acid through a series of chemical reactions which can eventually reenter many ecosystems. When edible plants are grown in soils containing varying amounts of sulfate, the roots take up and transport inorganic sulfate to the stems and leaves. The sulfate taken up by the roots and the amount transported to the stem and leaves was found to be a function of the concentration of sulfate in the soil. Inorganic sulfate taken up by a corn plant seedling can be rapidly converted to organic sulfate by the root system. Nine days after one of a pair of pea plants was inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate (dilute H/sub 2//sup 35/SO/sub 4/) it was found that the sulfate was translocated not only in the inoculated plant, but also to the uninoculated pea plant in the same container. Also, when the leaves of a mature potato plant were inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate it was found that the sulfate was translocated into the edible potatoes. Fractionation of the potatoes showed that most of the sulfate was water soluble of which 30% was inorganic sulfate and 70% was in the form of organic sulfur. One third of the non-water soluble translocated acid rain sulfate was equally divided between lipid and non-lipid organic sulfur of the potato. 9 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Effects of acid deposition on agricultural production

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Coveney, E.A.; Jacobson, J.S.; Rosenthal, R.E.; Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Allen, F.L.

    1985-09-01

    A preliminary assessment, both qualitative and quantitative, was carried out on the effects of acid deposition on agriculture. An inventory was made of US crops exposed to different acid deposition levels in 1982. Most crops (valued at more than $50 billion) were exposed to annual average acid deposition levels greater than pH 4.6, but crops worth more than $220 billion were exposed to even lower pH levels. Published results of experiments on crop response to acid deposition have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive, and suggest that present levels of acidic precipitation in the US are not significantly affecting growth and yield of crops. Because relatively few experiments appropriate to a quantitative acid deposition assessment have been conducted, the quantitative section is necessarily based on a restricted data set. Corn, potatoes, and soybeans have been studied in experimental environments which simulate agronomic conditions and which have adequate statistical power for yield estimates; only some varieties of soybeans have demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity to acid deposition.

  9. Acid Rain Effects on Adirondack Streams - Results from the 2003-05 Western Adirondack Stream Survey (the WASS Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Roy, Karen M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, Howard A.; Passy, Sophia I.; Bode, Robert W.; Capone, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally lakes have been the focus of acid rain assessments in the Adirondack region of New York. However, there is a growing recognition of the importance of streams as environmental indicators. Streams, like lakes, also provide important aquatic habitat, but streams more closely reflect acid rain effects on soils and forests and are more prone to acidification than lakes. Therefore, a large-scale assessment of streams was undertaken in the drainage basins of the Oswegatchie and Black Rivers; an area of 4,585 km2 in the western Adirondack region where acid rain levels tend to be highest in New York State.

  10. ACIDIC DEPOSITION PHENOMENON AND ITS EFFECTS: CRITICAL ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Assessment Document (CAD) is a summary, integration, and interpretation of the current scientific understanding of acidic deposition. It is firmly based upon The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Asse...

  11. The Quality Assurance Manual and EPA`s acid rain data quality

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.; Winkler, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    November 15, 1990 saw the passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Within this law was the requirements for all electric utility units greater than 25 megawatts of generated electrical capacity to monitor SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, opacity, and volumetric flow of the stack gases. This paper summarizes the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) Quality Control and Quality Assurance requirements and their use in the market based pollution control program of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper attempts to present the perspective of the authors as to what is important for excellent monitoring system availability and ensuring accurate data acquisition. Emphasis is placed upon the Quality Assurance Manual required by the Acid Rain Regulations for affected unit`s to maintain and follow.

  12. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed acid-rain implementation regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    This regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was developed in response to Executive Order (EO) 12291, which requires Federal Agencies to assess the costs, benefits, and impacts of all 'major' regulations. In compliance with EO 12291, this RIA assesses costs, benefits and impacts for the important provisions of Title IV. EPA divided its analysis of the Acid Rain Program into two parts. First, EPA analyzed the effects of the statute in the absence of any implementation regulations. In the second part of the analysis, EPA examined a 'regulatory' case that included both the SO2 reductions and the implementation regulations. By comparing costs under the regulatory case to those under the absent regulations case, EPA was able to isolate the incremental savings provided by the regulations. At the same time, by combining the two parts of the analysis, EPA was able to show the total costs imposed by the Acid Rain Program (the statute and the regulations) as a whole.

  13. Performance of Vicia faba plants in relation to simulated acid rain and/or endosulphan treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Yunus, M.; Singh, S.N.; Ahmad, K.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The increasing human population in India is necessitating the optimum use of cultivable land for increased food production. Eradication and control of pests and pathogens is an essential component of any strategy for increased agricultural production. In this context, the use of pesticides to control the incidence of disease in crops becomes inevitable. Most of the pesticides used for foliar spraying invariably contain surfactants in their formulation, which not only increase the surface wettability but also enhance permeability of the cuticle for more cation infusion/effusion and hence they may make the leaf more susceptible to direct effects of acid rain. To evaluate the validity of this assumption, an experiment using endosulphan, the most commonly used insecticide in India, and acid rain of different pH was conducted on Vicia faba.

  14. Evaluation of candidate rain gages for upgrading precipitation measurement tools for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) was established in 1977 to investigate atmospheric deposition and its effects on the environment. Since its establishment, precipitation records have been obtained at all NADP sites using a gage developed approximately 50 years ago-the Belfort 5-780 mechanical rain gage. In 1998 and 1999, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate four recently developed, technologically advanced rain gages as possible replacement candidates for the mechanical gage currently (2002) in use by the NADP. The gage types evaluated were the Belfort 3200, Geonor T-200, ETI Noah II, and the OTT PLUVIO. The Belfort 5-780 was included in the study to compare the performance of the rain gage currently (2002) used by NADP to the performance of the more recently developed gages. As a reference gage, the NovaLynx Model 260-2510 National Weather Service type stick gage also was included in the study. Two individual gages of each type were included in the study to evaluate precision between gages of the same type. A two-phase evaluation was completed. Phase I consisted of indoor bench tests with known amounts of simulated rainfall applied in 20 individual tests. Phase II consisted of outdoor testing by collecting precipitation during a 26-week period near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The ETI Noah II, OTT PLUVIO, and NovaLynx stick gages consistently recorded depths more commensurate with the amounts of applied simulated rainfall in Phase I testing than the Geonor T-200, Belfort 5-780, and Belfort 3200 gages. Gages where both the median difference between the measured and applied simulated rainfall and the interquartile range of all of their measured minus applied simulated rainfall differences were small (less than or equal to 0.01 inch) were judged to have performed very well in Phase I testing. The median and interquartile-range values were 0.01 inch or less for each of the ETI Noah II gages, OTT PLUVIO gages, and NovaLynx stick

  15. ATMOSPHERIC ACID DEPOSITION DAMAGE TO PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Available data from laboratory and field studies of damage to paints by erosion have been analyzed to develop an atmospheric acid deposition damage function for exterior house paints containing calcium carbonate or silicate extenders. Regression analysis coefficients associated w...

  16. A novel approach for structure quantification of fatty acids films on rain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, Adriana Z.; Pogorzelski, Stanisław J.; Kogut, Anna D.

    A complete compositional or structural description of naturally occurring surfactants on rainwater is not currently feasible. A main limitation of previous work has been the lack of means for correlating force-area characteristics with the chemical makeup of the films. Instead of analyzing the chemical composition of rain water film-forming organics, it is postulated here to introduce the novel scaling procedures (2D virial equation of state and 2D polymer film scaling theory) applied to the surface pressure-area ( π- A) isotherms and surface pressure-temperature ( π- T) isochors, and resulting from generalized physical formalisms modified to a multicomponent surfactant film. A set of the introduced structural film state parameters could become sensitive indicators for surface-active source-specific organic matter pathways tracing, where the measurement of surfactant concentration and chemical analyses are avoided. Performed comprehensive film studies on rain, marine and snow-melted water samples exhibited significant and differentiated film structural parameters variability. The developed procedure allows one to recover the film parameters ( π, Γ, Alim, Eisoth) present originally at the raindrop surface from the Langmuir trough data supplemented with the simultaneously taken rain event characteristics (rain rate and rain drop diameter distribution). It requires the partitioning effect of the surfactant molecules between the surface and bulk phases to be estimated where the entering quantities are: the partitioning coefficient Kp= Γ/ c and a degree of the rain water interfacial system area development Ar/ Vr evaluated here using the fatty acids concentrations as model input data. The latter parameter depends on the rain rate and the form of the drop size distribution function differing significantly from the Marshall-Palmer one at low Ir (<1 mm h -1). The partitioning factor Kp related to the physicochemical composition of the film-composing material exhibited

  17. PERSISTENT EPISODIC ACIDIFICATION OF STREAMS LINKED TO ACID RAIN EFFECTS ON SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indic...

  18. Mobility and speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhao-hui; Liao, Bo-han; Huang, Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil (CRS) and yellow red soil (CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values. PMID:16295916

  19. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    EIA Publications

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  20. Florida acid deposition study - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.D.; Hendrickson, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the areas of source attribution and long-range transport and ecological and material effects. The literature searches were designed to determine the impacts of acid deposition that are specific to Florida. In January 1982 the results of Phase I programs were issued. These reports were: (1) Monitoring Program Phase I Summary Report; (2) Source Attribution Phase I Summary Report; and (3) A Literature Review of the Ecological and Materials Effects of Acid Deposition.

  1. Effect of acid rain on calcium carbonate saturation in the Albemarle sound of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, K.A.; Burgess, S.K.; Willey, J.D.; Kieber, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of acidic rainwater additions on calcium carbonate solubility and alkalinity in the poorly buffered, biologically active and commercially important waters of the Albemarle Sound, NC are reported. Samples collected monthly at four sites were analyzed for salinity, pK total alkalinity, and calcium concentrations. Five percent and 10% dilutions of sulfuric acid at pH 4, mimicking acid rain additions, were added and total alkalinity and calcium concentrations again determined. The addition of acid decreased the alkalinity in the Albemarle samples by as much as 15%, although the magnitude of the impact depended both on site and season. The effects of acid additions on dissolved calcium concentrations were more variable,. and also displayed a site and season dependency. Calcium concentrations, alkalinity, and pH values were also determined during controlled laboratory experiments, where 25 mg/L Callinectes sapidus shells were added to Albemarle Sound water. All three analytes increased significantly upon acid additions relative to controls.

  2. Effects of simulated acidic rain on one species each of Pseudoparmelia, Usunea, and umbilicaria

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, L.L.; Johnston, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The lichens Pseudoparmelia caperata (L.) Hale, Usnea of subfusca Stirt., and Umbilicaria mammulata (Ach.) Tuck. were exposed to simulated acidic rain with pH levels of 2.3, 3.0, 3.3, 4.3, or 5.6 and other ions in concentrations normally found in rain in the eastern United States. The pH levels of the most-acidic treatments (3.3, 3.0, 2.3) were similar to those found in fog, cloud water, and occasional rainfall events. The pH 4.3 and 5.6 treatments compared to average ambient conditions in the eastern and western United States, respectively, and caused no significant effects on photosynthesis. However, after the first week of treatment, significant effects of rain pH at the most-acidic treatments on gross photosynthesis were detected in P. caperata and U. mammulata, but not in U. of subfusca. Visible effects of injury were also observed and included bleaching, necrotic spots, and necrotic margins, which resembled damage seen in field populations of U. mammulata, the most-sensitive species.

  3. Isotopic anomaly in peat nitrogen is a probable trace of acid rains caused by 1908 Tunguska bolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. M.; Kolesnikova, N. V.; Boettger, T.

    1998-02-01

    In peat sampled at the Tunguska Cosmic Body (TCB) explosion area, the sharp increase of the N concentration (about three-fold) and the positive N isotopic anomaly (δ 15N = + 3.5‰, see eqn) have for the first time been revealed. In contrast with the C and H effects observed earlier which were clearly limited to the epicentre area (Kolesnikov et al., 1997 in press), the same N effect has also been shown in peat sampled near the Vanavara settlement, 65 km south of the explosion epicentre. A clear connection of the observed anomalies in peat to the 1908 permafrost boundary, synchronism of the changes of δ 15N and the N concentration and also good agreement with data on the K/T boundary deposits allow us to connect the observed effects to acid rain fall-out after passage and an explosion of the TCB.

  4. Differences between nipher and slter shielded rain gages at two Colorado deposition monitoring sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigelow, David S.; Denning, A. Scott

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade the United States and Canada have made significant progress in establishing spatial ad temporal estimates of atmospheric deposition throughout North America. Fundamental to the wet-deposition portion of these estimates is the accurate and precise measurement of precipitation amount. Goodison and others (I-3) have reported on a new type of shielded snow gage known as the Canadian MSC Nipher shielded snow gage. Because this shielded snow gage has been shown to be superior to other precipitation gages for the estimation of snowfall amount, its design was adapted to the Universal Belfort precipitation gage (4), the dominant precipitation gage used at deposition monitoring sites in the United States. Favorable results taken from monitoring sites using this modified Nipher shielded snow gage (3-6) have prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute to adopt the Nipher shielded Belfort gage as a standard piece of equipment in the Acid MODES and Operational Evaluation Network (OEN) monitoring programs and to propose that is be included as a standard snow gage in other North American deposition monitoring programs. This communication details preliminary results from two of nine NADP/NTN deposition monitoring sites selected by the Environmental Protection Agency to compare Nipher shielded Belfort precipitation gage volumes to volumes obtained from the standard Belfort gage used in the NADP/NTN monitoring program.

  5. The emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.A.; Birnbaum, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    The oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) have long been recognized as a principal precursor to acid deposition. Until recently, however, scientific knowledge about the nature and extent of NO{sub x}`s contribution to acidity in the atmosphere and to acid deposition damages on earth has been nascent; the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) and related research during the 1980s focused primarily on the linkage between sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions with acid deposition. This paper summarizes an integrative assessment on the science of NO{sub x} and acid deposition and the multiple environmental benefits associated with decreases in NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired power plants. The Acid Rain Program performed this staff assessment to support the Phase II Acid Rain NO{sub x} Emission Reduction Rule, proposed on January 19, 1996 (61 FR 1442), and the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Integrated NO{sub x} Strategy. Model projections from EPA`s Acid Deposition Standard Feasibility Study (October 1995) provided the initial indication of the important role of NO{sub x} in the future chronic acidification of certain sensitive watershed ecosystems. Corroborative findings from the Bear Brook Watershed Manipulation Experiment and other recent field studies are discussed. This paper also presents an overview discussion of the current state-of-knowledge with respect to NO{sub x}`s role in the acidification of forests, soils, and vegetation as well as acidic-related damage to materials and structures. Basic terms and processes such as {open_quotes}atmospheric nitrogen deposition,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}nitrogen saturation,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}chronic vs. episodic acidification,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}direct vs. soil-mediated acidification effects{close_quotes} are defined in context so as to facilitate understanding of the emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition.

  6. Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia: Observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifa; Akimoto, Hajime; Uno, Itsushi

    2002-10-01

    A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System is applied to simulate the pH values in precipitation and to investigate neutralization by soil aerosols and their influence on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia. A modified deflation module is designed to provide explicit information on the soil aerosol loading. Numerical simulation was performed for 1 year, from 15 December 1998 to 31 December 1999. Wet deposition monitoring data at 17 sites of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in east Asia in addition to State Environmental Protection Agency data were used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Observed evidence clearly shows that in northern China acid deposition is heavily influenced and buffered by natural soil dust from desert and semiarid areas. The observed mean rainwater pH value in northern China is the highest, between 6.0 and 7.2, while in southern China, where many areas severely impacted by acid precipitation are located, the pH value is much lower, between 3.5 and 5. In Japan the mean pH value is 4.7, significantly higher than that in southern China, while in South Korea the pH value is intermediate between those in northern China and Japan. The model is capable of reproducing this geographical distribution of rainwater pH over east Asia. The simulation results for 1999 demonstrated strong neutralization of precipitation by soil aerosols over northeast Asia, and the distribution pattern of acid rain was also altered. The annual mean pH values in northern China and Korea show a remarkable increase of 0.8-2.5, while the increase in mean pH values over southern China and Japan are less than 0.1. The neutralization effects vary by season, with the greatest influence in spring, when pH values increased by 0.1-0.4 in Japan, 0.5-1.5 in Korea, and more than 2 in northern China.

  7. Acid rain and particulate matter dynamics in a mid-sized Andean city: The effect of rain intensity on ion scavenging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C. M.; Aristizábal, B. H.

    2012-12-01

    Acid rain phenomenon (average WVM pH = 4.9) and a strong association of sulfate scavenging and rain intensity (R2 = 0.8118) were observed over a seven-month period (October 2010-April 2011) at a densely populated mid-sized Andean city (pop 380,000) that occupies mountain ridge topography (2150 m.a.s.l.). Rain chemistry and PM10 were fairly consistent over four sampling sites representing various scenarios of urban density and topography. All stations exhibited differences in the sulfate content in PM10 between dry and wet periods, further illustrating the sulfate scavenging dynamic. Concentration of major ions evaluated in rain were in order of sulfates (35.2-53.5 μeq L-1) > calcium (14.6-17.3 μeq L-1) > chlorides (3.5-5.1 μeq L-1) > nitrates (2.1-3.1 μeq L-1). Major chemical constituents of PM10 were related with ionic composition of rainwater through scavenging ratios (SRs). High sulfate SRs associated with increased rain intensity reflected higher sulfate ion solubility. Significant contribution of sulfates to total ionic content, higher than 50% at all monitoring stations, suggests important contributions of SO2 emissions, which could come from three principal sources: vehicular emissions due to Colombian fuels with elevated sulfur content, industrial emissions at southeast of the city, and sulfur gas emissions from a nearby active volcano, Nevado del Ruiz, located 27 km southeast of the city.

  8. [Responses of rhizosphere nitrogen and phosphorus transformations to different acid rain intensities in a hilly red soil tea plantation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Fu-sheng; Ye, Su-qiong; Yu, Su-qin; Fang, Xiang-min; Hu, Xiao-fei

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) plantation in hilly red soil region has been long impacted by acid deposition, however its effects on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transformations in rhizosphere soils remain unclear. A 25-year old tea plantation in a typical hilly red soil region was selected for an in situ simulation experiment treated by pH 4.5, pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and control. Rhizosihere and bulk soils were collected in the third year from the simulated acid deposition experiment. Soil mineral N, available P contents and major enzyme activities were analyzed using the chemical extraction and biochemical methods, and N and P mineralization rates were estimated using the indoor aerobic incubation methods. Our results showed that compared to the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5, respectively decreased 7.1%, 42.1% and 49.9% NO3(-)-N, 6.4%, 35.9% and 40.3% mineral N, 10.5%, 41.1% and 46.9% available P, 18.7%, 30.1% and 44.7% ammonification rate, 3.6%, 12.7% and 38.8% net N-mineralization rate, and 31.5%, 41.8% and 63.0% P mineralization rate in rhizosphere soils; however, among the 4 treatments, rhizosphere soil nitrification rate was not significantly different, the rhizosphere soil urease and acid phosphatase activities generally increased with the increasing intensity of acid rain (P<0.05). In bulk soil, compared with the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5 did not cause significant changes in NO3(-)-N, mineral N, available P as well as in the rates of nitrification, ammonification, net N-mineralization and P mineralization. With increasing the acid intensity, the rhizosphere effects of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N, mineral N, ammonification and net N-mineralization rates were altered from positive to negative effects, those of urease and acid phosphatease showed the opposite trends, those of available P and P mineralization were negative and that of nitrification was positive. In sum, prolonged elevated acid rain could reduce N and P transformation

  9. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    PubMed

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains. PMID:20701974

  10. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN ON YIELDS OF 'RAPHANUS SATIVUS', 'LACTUCA SATIVA', 'TRITICUM AESTIVUM' AND 'MEDICAGO SATIVA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to determine effects of simulated acidic rain on radishes (Raphanus sativus), wheat(Triticum aestivum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown under greenhouse conditions. Experimental designs allowed the detection of statistically significant differences a...

  11. Impacts of simulated acid rain on recalcitrance of two different soils.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhongmin; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to estimate the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) on recalcitrance in a Plinthudult and a Paleudalfs soil in south China, which were a variable and a permanent charge soil, respectively. Simulated acid rains were prepared at pH 2.0, 3.5, 5.0, and 6.0, by additions of different volumes of H2SO4 plus HNO3 at a ratio of 6 to 1. The leaching period was designed to represent 5 years of local annual rainfall (1,200 mm) with a 33 % surface runoff loss. Both soils underwent both acidification stages of (1) cation exchange and (2) mineral weathering at SAR pH 2.0, whereas only cation exchange occurred above SAR pH 3.5, i.e., weathering did not commence. The cation exchange stage was more easily changed into that of mineral weathering in the Plinthudult than in the Paleudalfs soil, and there were some K(+) and Mg(2+) ions released on the stages of mineral weathering in the Paleudalfs soil. During the leaching, the release of exchangeable base cations followed the order Ca(2+) >K(+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) for the Plinthudult and Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) >K(+) for the Paleudalfs soil. The SARs above pH 3.5 did not decrease soil pH or pH buffering capacity, while the SAR at pH 2.0 decreased soil pH and the buffering capacity significantly. We conclude that acid rain, which always has a pH from 3.5 to 5.6, only makes a small contribution to the acidification of agricultural soils of south China in the short term of 5 years. Also, Paleudalfs soils are more resistant to acid rain than Plinthudult soils. The different abilities to prevent leaching by acid rain depend upon the parent materials, types of clay minerals, and soil development degrees. PMID:23247514

  12. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 5: The effects on human health

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this report is to provide a broad framework from the latest available data, mostly since 1990, in an attempt to estimate the specific agents within the air pollution mixture of acid rain that are related to adverse effects on human health. Direct and indirect health effects of sulphur dioxide and its derivatives, sulfate, particulate matter, and acid aerosols are reviewed separately. Information is included on the distribution of sulphur oxides across Canada and on epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies related to the direct health effects. In addition, indirect health effects such as changes in visibility and climate, and leaching of metals into water supplies, are also reviewed.

  13. Judicial recourse against foreign air polluters: a case study of acid rain in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Pallemaerts, M.

    1985-01-01

    Many European nations suffering acid damage caused primarily by pollution originating outside of their borders have had little success in persuading polluters to voluntarily reduce emissions. The author explores the opportunities for private litigation by victims against foreign sources of long-range transboundary air pollution. Such private actions would establish the illegality of transboundary air pollution and draw public attention to the magnitude of the damage as well as generate compensation. Recent actions in Norway and Britain suggest that is is procrastination to insist upon more research into the cause and effects of acid rain.

  14. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  15. EFFECTS OF ACIDIC RAIN AND OZONE ON NITROGEN FIXATION AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN THE LICHEN 'LOBARIA PULMONARIA' (L.) HOFFM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lichen Lobaria pulmonaria was subjected to ozone fumigations at 118, 235 and 353 mcg/cu m and simulated acidic rain at pH levels of 2.6, 4.2 and 5.6 for 5 days (M,W,F,M,W) during a 10-day period. Acidic rain at pH 2.6 caused significant reduction in nitrogen fixation and gros...

  16. Effects of calcium on seed germination, seedling growth and photosynthesis of six forest tree species under simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Li, Zhen-Ji; Dong, Xue-Jun; Patton, Janet; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-04-01

    We selected six tree species, Pinus massoniana Lamb., Cryptomeria fortunei Hooibr. ex Otto et Dietr., Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook., Liquidambar formosana Hance, Pinus armandii Franch. and Castanopsis chinensis Hance, which are widely distributed as dominant species in the forest of southern China where acid deposition is becoming more and more serious in recent years. We investigated the effects and potential interactions between simulated acid rain (SiAR) and three calcium (Ca) levels on seed germination, radicle length, seedling growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and Ca content in leaves of these six species. We found that the six species showed different responses to SiAR and different Ca levels. Pinus armandii and C. chinensis were very tolerant to SiAR, whereas the others were more sensitive. The results of significant SiAR × Ca interactions on different physiological parameters of the six species demonstrate that additional Ca had a dramatic rescue effect on the seed germination and seedling growth for the sensitive species under SiAR. Altogether, we conclude that the negative effects of SiAR on seed germination, seedling growth and photosynthesis of the four sensitive species could be ameliorated by Ca addition. In contrast, the physiological processes of the two tolerant species were much less affected by both SiAR and Ca treatments. This conclusion implies that the degree of forest decline caused by long-term acid deposition may be attributed not only to the sensitivity of tree species to acid deposition, but also to the Ca level in the soil. PMID:21470980

  17. Yield Responses of Field-Grown Soybeans Exposed to Simulated Acid Rain

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L. S.; Conway, C. A.; Lewin, K. F.

    1980-03-01

    An important area of interest is to determine the effects of acid precipitation on the yield of agronomic crops under field conditions. Experiments described herein were performed with field-grown soybeans at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the summer of 1979. A preliminary experiment was performed the preceding year at the same site to estimate the most appropriate plot design and statistical analyses. Soybeans were seeded to provide six Latin Squares. Five treatments (no rain, simulated rainfalls of pH levels of 4.0, 3.1, 2.7, and 2.3) replicated five times in each Latin Square were used to produce a total of 30 plots per treatment. These results show that additions of small amounts of simulated acid rain to soybeans decreased the number of pods per plant. This decrease in the number of pods per plant produced a small but significant decrease in seed mass. The decreases (3, 5 and 8% at simulated rain pH levels of 4.0, 3.1, and 2.7) were present in soybeans already exposed to rainfalls at Brookhaven National Laboratory with an average H+ concentration of about pH 4.0 over the period of this experiment.

  18. Air pollution and acid rain in Chongqing City: The source and formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xu

    1996-12-31

    Chongqing, the biggest city of Southwestern China, is suffered from air pollution and acid rain for a long time. Studies have shown that coal-burning results in pollution of sulfur dioxide and causes acid rain on a wide range in the area. Emission of sulfur dioxide has met by 0.8 million tons in Chongqing a year. Concentrations of sulfur dioxide in ambient air are above 0.20 mg/m{sup 3} during the recent thirty years. Results of precipitation monitoring show annual precipitation-weighted mean pH ranged from 3.91 to 4.70 and sulfate concentrations ranged from 8.71 mg/1 to 26.29 mg/1 in Chongqing for the past decades. The equivalent ratio of SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} / NO{sup -}{sub 3} in Chongqing (also in China) is higher than those in other countries. It is found that fog water is also acidified in Chongqing City and the concentrations of pollutants in fog water are much higher than those in rain.

  19. [Effects of simulating acid rain on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of Quercus glauca Quercus glauca].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Yi, Li-Ta; Yu, Shu-Quan; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jing-Jing

    2014-08-01

    At three levels of simulated acid rainfall intensities with pH values of 2.5 (severe), 40 (medium) and 5.6 (light) respectively, the responses of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters of Quercus glauca seedlings were studied in three acid rainfall treatments, i. e. only the aboveground of seedlings exposed to acid rain (T1), both of the seedlings and soil exposed to acid rain (T2), only the soil exposed to acid rain (T3) compared with blank control (CK). Under the severe acid rainfall, T1 significantly inhibited chlorophyll synthesis, and thus reduced the primary photochemical efficiency of PS II ( F(v)/F(m)), potential activity of PS II (F(v)/F(o)) , apparent quantum (Y), net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), and transpiration rate (T(r)), but increased the light compensation point (LCP) and dark respiration rate (R(d)) of Q. glauca seedlings. T2 inhibited, but T3 played a little enhancement on the aforementioned parameters of Q. glauca seedlings. Under the conditions of medium and light acid rainfall intensities, the above parameters in the three treatments were higher than that of CK, except with lower R(d). The chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters showed a similar tendency in the three treatments, i. e. T2>T3 >T1. It indicated that T1 had the strongest inhibition on seedlings in condition of the severe acid rainfall, while T2 had the most dramatic facilitating effect on seedlings under the medium and light acid rainfall. Intensity of acid rainfall had significant influences on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F(o), Y, P(n), T(r), and maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)), whereas treatments of acid rainfall affected SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n), T(r), A(max) and light saturation point (LSP). The interaction of acid rainfall intensities and treatments played significant effects on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n) and A(max). PMID:25509066

  20. Patterns of Phakopsora pachyrhizi spore deposition detected in North America rain and their use to calibrate IAMS soybean rust forecasts in 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2007, rain was assayed for Phakopsora pachyrhizi spores (the causal agent of Asian soybean rust) at 75 National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites in the US and at 12 sites in Canada using two types of rain collectors. A nested real-time PCR assay was used to detect P. pachyrhizi DNA in the fil...

  1. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  2. [THE EFFECT OF ACID RAIN ON ULTRASTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS OF PEA LEAVES].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, A V; Vodka, M V; Belyavskaya, N A; Khomochkin, A P; Zolotareva, E K

    2016-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) on the ultrastructure and functional parameters of the photosynthetic apparatus were studied using 14-day-old pea leaves as test system. Pea plants were sprayed with an aqueous solution containing NaNO₃(0.2 mM) and Na₂SO₄(0.2 mM) (pH 5.6, a control variant), or with the same solution, which was acidified to pH 2.5 (acid variant). Functional characteristics were determined by chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. Acid rain application caused reduction in the efficiency of the photosynthetic electron transport by 25%, which was accompanied by an increase by 85% in the quantum yield of thermal dissipation of excess light quanta. Ultrastructural changes in chloroplast were registered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after two days of the SAR-treatment of pea leaves. In this case, the changes in the structure of grana, heterogeneity of thylakoids packaging in granum, namely, the increase of intra-thylakoid gaps and thickness of granal thylakoids compared to the control were found. The migration of protein complexes in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts isolated from leaves treated with SAR was suppressed. It was shown also that carbonic anhydrase activity was inhibited in chloroplast preparations isolated from SAR-treated pea leaves. We proposed a hypothesis on the possible inactivation of thylakoid carbonic anhydrase under SAR and its involvement in the inhibition of photochemical activity of chloroplasts. The data obtained allows to suggest that acid rains negatively affect the photosynthetic apparatus disrupting the membrane system of chloroplast. PMID:27220252

  3. [Effects of simulated acid rain and its acidified soil on soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanhe; Liang, Huiling

    2005-08-01

    The study showed that the cation release of simulated rain caused soil acidification and base ions release. With the decrease of simulated acid rain pH from 5.6 to 2.5, the acid rain-leached soil pH decreased from 6.06 to 3.41, and its total amount of exchange base ions decreased from 56.5 to 41.1 mmol x kg(-1). Spraying simulated acid rain on the shoots of wheat seedlings planted on such acidified soils caused a rapid decrease in the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings, and reduced some of their physiological activities. The effect of spraying simulated acid rain on the soluble sugar, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic rate of wheat stems and leaves was larger than that of acidified soil, while the effect of the latter on the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents and the physiological activity of NR and GOGAT in root system of wheat seedlings was larger than that of the former. The intensive acid rain of pH < or = 3.0 and the corresponding acidified soil had an obvious harm to the growth and physiological activity of wheat seedlings. PMID:16262064

  4. Acidic deposition and soil processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, R.M.; April, R.H.

    1985-08-01

    The results of the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) show that the sensitivity of a watershed to surface water acidification is determined by the flow paths of water through the terrestrial system. If the water infiltrates through the soils into the groundwater system, acid neutralization occurs through weathering reactions involving minerals in the soils and till. Runoff and shallow interflow result in acid surface waters. Flow paths are determined in the ILWAS watersheds by the thickness of the glacial till. Complete neutralization can occur even in areas underlain by sensitive bedrock if the flow path through the mineral horizons is long enough. This appears to hold even in areas outside of the Adirondacks. 11 references, 5 figures.

  5. An overview of a 5-year research program on acid deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; He, K.; Xu, X.; Zhang, P.; Bai, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Duan, L.; Li, W.; Chai, F.

    2011-12-01

    Despite concerted research and regulative control of sulfur dioxide in China, acid rain remained a serious environmental issue, due to a sharp increase in the combustion of fossil fuel in the 2000s. In 2005, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China funded a five-year comprehensive research program on acid deposition. This talk will give an overview of the activities and the key findings from this study, covering emission, atmospheric processes, and deposition, effects on soil and stream waters, and impact on typical trees/plants in China. The main results include (1) China still experiences acidic rainfalls in southern and eastern regions, although the situation has stabilized after 2006 due to stringent control of SO2 by the Chinese Government; (2) Sulfate is the dominant acidic compound, but the contribution of nitrate has increased; (3) cloud-water composition in eastern China is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions; (4) the persistent fall of acid rain in the 30 years has lead to acidification of some streams/rivers and soils in southern China; (5) the studied plants have shown varying response to acid rain; (6) some new insights have been obtained on atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric transport, soil chemistry, and ecological impacts, some of which will be discussed in this talk. Compared to the situation in North America and Europe, China's acid deposition is still serious, and continued control of sulfur and nitrogen emission is required. There is an urgent need to establish a long-term observation network/program to monitor the impact of acid deposition on soil, streams/rivers/lakes, and forests.

  6. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrate and ammonium production in soils from three ecosystems of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Like, D.E.; Klein, R.M.

    1985-11-01

    The authors removed intact soil columns from the Harwood (550 to 790 m), Transition (790 to 1050 m), and Conifer (1050 to 1160 m) ecological zones of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont, treated them with simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) or nonacidic (pH 5.6) rain, and examined the percolates for ammonium and nitrate ions. Nitrification in soils from all three ecosystems was unaffected by acidic treatments, but mineralization was stimulated by acidic treatment of soil from the Transition Zone. Irrespective of treatment, Conifer Zone soils released less nitrate than did either Transition or Hardwood Zone soils. Soil columns from the Hardwood Zone were treated with acidic or nonacidic simulated rainfall supplemented with nitrate, ammonium, or both N sources. NO3-N in percolates increased when acidic simulated rain was supplemented with ammonium ion or both ammonium and nitrate ions. Efflux of NH4-N was unaffected by supplementing precipitation with either ammonium or nitrate ions.

  7. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  8. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  9. Persistent episodic acidification of streams linked to acid rain effects on soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indicates that episodic acidification of streams in upland regions in the northeastern United States persists, and is likely to be much more widespread than chronic acidification. Depletion of exchangeable Ca in the mineral soil has decreased the neutralization capacity of soils and increased the role of the surface organic horizon in the neutralization of acidic soil water during episodes. Increased accumulation of N and S in the forest floor from decades of acidic deposition will delay the recovery of soil base status, and therefore, the elimination of acidic episodes, which is anticipated from decreasing emissions.

  10. Persistent episodic acidification of streams linked to acid rain effects on soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indicates that episodic acidification of streams in upland regions in the northeastern United States persists, and is likely to be much more widespread than chronic acidification. Depletion of exchangeable Ca in the mineral soil has decreased the neutralization capacity of soils and increased the role of the surface organic horizon in the neutralization of acidic soil water during episodes. Increased accumulation of N and S in the forest floor from decades of acidic deposition will delay the recovery of soil base status, and therefore, the elimination of acidic episodes, which is anticipated from decreasing emissions.

  11. Acid rain program offers free-market incentives, portends future regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cozza, A.; Faulkner, K.F. )

    1993-05-01

    The burning of fossil fuels, particularly coal and oil, results in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxide (NOx). Such emissions and their by-products damage ecosystems and man-made materials, and threaten human health. In 1985, 23 million tons of SO[sub 2] and 19 million tons of NOx were emitted from US sources. Nearly 70% of the SO[sub 2] and almost 40% of the NOx emissions originated from electric utilities. Title IV of the CAA Amendments requires EPA to establish an acid rain program designed to reduce SO[sub 2] and NOx emissions from electric utility plants.

  12. Toward integrating environmental and economic education: lessons from the US acid rain program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Ellerbrock; Ann M. Regn

    2004-04-15

    This field report presents an actual case study which illustrates that the natural and social sciences, in this case ecology and economics, can and should be integrated in environmental education and the formulation of public policy. After outlining basic economic approaches for addressing environmental problems, it focuses on the process and principles involved in the marketable permit system established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for preventing acid rain by reducing emissions of sulfur and nitrous oxides in the United States. The system has generated significant reductions in emissions and projected costs of compliance.

  13. An evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1970-80 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH, alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1970-80 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time.

  14. Seasonal changes in dominant bacterial taxa from acidic peatlands of the Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Etto, Rafael Mazer; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães; da Conceição Jesus, Ederson; Galvão, Carolina Weigert; Galvão, Franklin; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Reynaud Steffens, Maria Berenice

    2014-09-01

    The acidic peatlands of southern Brazil are essential for maintenance of the Atlantic Rain Forest, one of the 25 hot-spots of biodiversity in the world. While these ecosystems are closely linked to conservation issues, their microbial community ecology and composition remain unknown. In this work, histosol samples were collected from three acidic peatland regions during dry and rainy seasons and their chemical and microbial characteristics were evaluated. Culturing and culture-independent approaches based on SSU rRNA gene pyrosequencing were used to survey the bacterial community and to identify environmental factors affecting the biodiversity and microbial metabolic potential of the Brazilian peatlands. All acidic peatlands were dominated by the Acidobacteria phylum (56-22%) followed by Proteobacteria (28-12%). The OTU richness of these phyla and the abundance of their Gp1, Gp2, Gp3, Gp13, Rhodospirillales and Caulobacteriales members varied according to the period of collection and significantly correlated with the rainy season. However, despite changes in acidobacterial and proteobacterial communities, rainfall did not affect the microbial metabolic potential of the southern Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest peatlands, as judged by the metabolic capabilities of the microbial community. PMID:24893336

  15. [Effects of simulated acid rain on seed germination and seedling growth of different type corn Zea mays].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2013-06-01

    Taking normal corn, waxy corn, pop corn, and sweet corn as test materials, this paper studied their seed germination and seedling growth under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 6.0, 5.0, 4.0, 3.0, 2.0, and 1.0). Simulated acid rain at pH 2.0-5.0 had no significant effects on the seed germination and seedling growth, but at pH 1.0, the germination rate of normal corn, waxy corn, pop corn, and sweet corn was 91.3%, 68.7%, 27.5%, and 11.7%, respectively. As compared with those at pH 6.0 (CK), the germination rate, germination index, vigor index, germination velocity, shoot height, root length, shoot and root dry mass, and the transformation rate of stored substances at pH 1.0 had significant decrease, and the average germination time extended apparently. At pH 1.0, the effects of acid rain were greater at seedling growth stage than at germination stage, and greater on underground part than on aboveground part. Due to the differences in gene type, normal corn and waxy corn had the strongest capability against acid rain, followed by pop corn, and sweet corn. It was suggested that corn could be categorized as an acid rain-tolerant crop, the injury threshold value of acid rain was likely between pH 1.0 and pH 2.0, and normal corn and waxy corn would be prioritized for planting in acid rain-stricken area. PMID:24066549

  16. Effects of acid rain on plant microbial associations in California. Research report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.; Paul, E.A.

    1984-04-13

    The effects of simulated acid rain of pH 5.6 to 3.0, with ionic composition similar to that found in California, on Trifolium repens, Lupinus densiflorus and L. benthamii grown in two soils were tested. The interactions of treatment intensity, soil type, phosphorus uptake and mycorrhizal influences on growth, carbon fixation and allocation and nitrogen fixation were determined. Acidic treatments generally decreased plant growth, nodulation and nitrogenase activity. The exposure of plants to a large number of simulated rainfall conditions of shorter duration did not result in the negative growth effects. Plants adequately supplied with P, either as fertilizer or by mycorrhizal fungi, were much more resistant to conditions caused by acidic precipitation and in some cases growth increases were found.

  17. [Combined effects of copper and simulated acid rain on copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa].

    PubMed

    He, Shan-Ying; Gao, Yong-Jie; Shentu, Jia-Li; Chen, Kun-Bai

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the combined effects of Cu (0-1500 mg x kg(-1)) and simulated acid rain (pH 2.5-5.6) on the copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa. With the increasing concentration of soil Cu, the Cu accumulation in R. acetosa increased, being higher in root than in stem and leaf. The exposure to low pH acid rain promoted the Cu uptake by R. acetosa. With the increase of soil Cu concentration and/or of acid rain acidity, the biomass of R. acetosa decreased, leaf and root MDA contents increased and had good correlation with soil Cu concentration, and the SOD and POD activities in leaf and root displayed a decreasing trend after an initial increase. This study showed that R. acetosa had a strong adaptive ability to Cu and acid rain stress, exhibiting a high application potential in the remediation of Cu-contaminated soil in acid rain areas. PMID:21608265

  18. RESULTS FROM THE MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the. requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The main ob...

  19. Effects of acid deposition on terrestrial ecosystems and their rehabilitation strategies in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zong-wei; Miao, Hong; Zhang, Fu-zhu; Huang, Yi-zong

    2002-04-01

    South China has become the third largest region associated with acid deposition following Europe and North America, the area subject to damage by acid deposition increased from 1.75 million km2 in 1985 to 2.8 million km2 in 1993. Acid deposition has caused serious damage to ecosystem. Combined pollution of acid rain and SO2 showed the obvious multiple effects on crops. Vegetable was more sensitive to acid deposition than foodstuff crops. Annual economic loss of crops due to acid deposition damage in eleven provinces of south China was 4.26 billion RMB Yuan. Acid deposition caused serious damage to forest. Annual economic loss of wood volume was about 1.8 billion RMB Yuan and forest ecological benefit loss 16.2 billion in eleven provinces of south China. Acid deposition in south China was typical "sulfuric acid type". According to the thoughts of sustainable development, some strategies were brought forward as follows: (1) enhancing environmental management, specifying acid-controlling region, controlling and abating the total emission amount of SO2; (2) selecting practical energy technologies of clean coal, for example, cleansing and selecting coal, sulfur-fixed-type industrial briqutting, abating sulfur from waste gas and so on; (3) developing other energy sources to replace coal, including water electricity, atomic energy and the new energy such as solar energy, wind energy and so on; (4) in acid deposition region of south China, selecting acid-resistant type of crop and tree to decrease agricultural losses, planting more green fertilizer crops, using organic fertilizers and liming, in order to improve buffer capacities of soil. PMID:12046292

  20. Spatial and spectral characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Elizabeth J.; Tanis, Frederick J.

    1989-01-01

    Results from this study demonstrate that a remote sensor can discriminate lake clarity based upon reflection. The basic hypothesis was that seasonal and multiyear changes in lake optical transparency are indicative of sensitivity to acidic deposition. In many acid-sensitive lakes optical transparency is controlled by the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present. DOC is a strong absorbing, nonscattering material which has the greatest impact at short visible wavelengths, including Thematic Mapper band 1. Acid-sensitive lakes have high concentrations of aluminum which have been mobilized by acidic components contained in the runoff. Aluminum complexing with DOC is considered to be the primary mechanism to account for observed increases in lake transparency in acid-sensitive lakes. Thus seasonal changes in the optical transparency of lakes should provide an indication of the stress due to acid deposition and loading.

  1. The role of EPA`s Acid Rain Division in the Ozone Transport Commission`s NOx budget program

    SciTech Connect

    Schary, C.; Culligan, K.

    1997-12-31

    The Ozone Transport Commission`s (OTC) Nitrogen Oxides (NO{sub x}) Budget Program will implement the emissions reduction goal of the 1994 Memorandum of Understanding between its twelve member states and the District of Columbia. The program will achieve its significant NO{sub x} reductions from electric utilities and industrial boilers using a {open_quotes}cap-and-trade{close_quotes} approach modeled after the US Environmental Protection Agency`s sulfur dioxide emissions trading under the Acid Rain Program. The similarity of the two programs has led to the development of an important partnership between the OTC states and EPA`s Acid Rain Division, Over the past two years, Acid Rain Program staff have shared their technical expertise and assisted extensively in the development of the program`s rules. Leveraging the investment EPA made in the systems used to run the Acid Rain Program, the OTC states have asked the Acid Rain Division to administer the data systems for them, and together are working to expand its existing Emissions Tracking System and to modify a clone of the sulfur dioxide Allowance Tracking System, to fulfill the unique requirements of the NO{sub x} Budget Program. This partnership is an important example of the new type of cooperation and sharing of expertise and resources that should develop between EPA and states as they launch multi-state programs to address regional pollution problems that defy a single-state solution.

  2. Efficient inhibition of heavy metal release from mine tailings against acid rain exposure by triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt).

    PubMed

    Gong, Beini; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Li, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Dang, Zhi; Ruan, Bo; Kang, Chunxi

    2016-11-15

    The potential application of triethylenetetramine intercalated montmorillonite (TETA-Mt) in mine tailings treatment and AMD (acid mine drainage) remediation was investigated with batch experiments. The structural and morphological characteristics of TETA-Mt were analyzed with XRD, FTIR, DTG-TG and SEM. The inhibition efficiencies of TETA-Mt against heavy metal release from mine tailings when exposed to acid rain leaching was examined and compared with that of triethylenetetramine (TETA) and Mt. Results showed that the overall inhibition by TETA-Mt surpassed that by TETA or Mt for various heavy metal ions over an acid rain pH range of 3-5.6 and a temperature range of 25-40°C. When mine tailings were exposed to acid rain of pH 4.8 (the average rain pH of the mining site where the mine tailings were from), TETA-Mt achieved an inhibition efficiency of over 90% for Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) release, and 70% for Pb(2+) at 25°C. It was shown that TETA-Mt has a strong buffering capacity. Moreover, TETA-Mt was able to adsorb heavy metal ions and the adsorption process was fast, suggesting that coordination was mainly responsible. These results showed the potential of TETA-Mt in AMD mitigation, especially in acid rain affected mining area. PMID:27450331

  3. Detection system of acid rain pollution using light-induced delayed fluorescence of plant leaf in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lizhang; Xing, Da

    2006-09-01

    Photosynthetic apparatus is susceptible to environmental stress. Light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) in plant is an intrinsic label of the efficiency of charge separation at P680 in photosystem II (PS II). In this investigation, we have developed a biosensor that can accurately inspect acid rain pollution by means of DF in vivo. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed technique can continuously monitor environmental changes, making fast, real-time and noninvasive inspection possible. The biosensor is an all-weather measuring instrument; it has its own illumination power and utilizes intrinsic DF as the measurement marker. With soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedling as a testing model, which is sensitive to acid rain pollution, the relationship that delayed fluorescence properties and capability of photosynthetic apparatus after being affected by simulated acid rain with different pH value was studied. The current investigation has revealed that the changes of delayed fluorescence (equation available in paper) can probably characterize the pollution degree of simulated acid rain, Inspecting the changes in DF characteristics (φ i) of plant leaf in vivo may be a new approach for the detection of acid rain pollution and its impact on the ecosystem.

  4. Acid rain and deterioration of monuments: How old is the phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camuffo, Dario

    The first known articles on acid rain appeared when atmospheric pollution reached high levels in the industrial towns of England. Research was carried out to ascertain and interpret earlier documentation, mainly written or printed in Italy, that could throw new light on both the environmental history and the relationship between present-day pollution and weathering of monuments. Very important discussions on dispersion and transport of airborne pollutants, atmospheric scavenging, acid rain, as well as descriptions of effects on fruit, monuments and people, were found in scientific treatises of the 1600s and 1700s. The cause of acidification can be found in volcanic activity, especially that of Stromboli, Vulcano, Vesuvius and Etna, which increased in the 17th and 18th century. Although in the past some pollutants may have reached higher concentrations locally than at present, nowadays air pollution has become a global problem; there are many new species of pollutants and catalysts, and their combined action has increased impressively the environmental risk and the deterioration rate of historic buildings and monuments.

  5. The Acid Rain Program`s 1995 annual reconciliation: Design and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Schary, C.; Shellabarger, M.; Smith, K.

    1997-12-31

    The completion of the first year of compliance under the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Acid Rain Program provides an excellent opportunity to analyze its results for early indications on the effectiveness of the program`s design. Established under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the implementation of the program`s two-phased approach to reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from electric utilities proved to be more complex and more costly than its supporters anticipated. An unanticipated complication was the difficult task of accounting for shifts in electric generation from Phase I sources to those not affected until Phase II. This paper examines the results of the 1995 reconciliation process and analyzes the value of the two-phased approach in accomplishing the stated goals of the Acid Rain Program: to achieve significant emissions reductions at the lowest possible cost to the affected sources, and to society in general. The paper concludes that Phase I implementation costs were disproportionately large, imposed sizeable costs on Phase II sources as well, who had to install monitors early but did not receive any of its benefits - additional allowances. A better design might have been to include all sources in both phases while maintaining the two-step reduction schedule.

  6. Acid rain, ozone depletion, and the climate response to pulsed Siberian Traps magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Lamarque, J.; Shields, C. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Siberian Traps flood basalts have been invoked as a trigger for the catastrophic end-Permian mass extinction. Widespread aberrant plant remains across the Permian-Triassic boundary provide evidence that atmospheric stress contributed to the collapse in terrestrial diversity. Here, we use recent detailed estimates of magmatic degassing from the Siberian Traps to complete the first 3-D global modeling of atmospheric chemistry during eruption of a large igneous province. We also explore the effects of volcanic gases on climate. Our results show that both strongly acidic rain and global ozone collapse are possible transient consequences of episodic pyroclastic volcanism and heating of volatile-rich Siberian country rocks. We suggest that in conjunction with abrupt warming from greenhouse gas emissions, these repeated, rapidly applied atmospheric stresses directly linked Siberian magmatism to end-Permian ecological failure on land. Our comprehensive modeling describes the global distribution and severity of acid rain and ozone depletion, providing testable predictions for the geography of end-Permian environmental proxies.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of 35CrMn and Q235 Steel in Simulated Acid Rain Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xiu-li; Xiang, Bin; Li, Xing; Wei, Zi-dong

    2012-04-01

    Effects of pH value, chloride ion concentration and alternation of wetting and drying time in acid rain on the corrosion of 35CrMn and Q235 steel were investigated through the measurement of polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and quantum mechanical calculations. The corrosion rate of 35CrMn and Q235 steel increased with decreasing pH values of the simulated acid rain, whereas the corrosion potential of 35CrMn and Q235 steel became more negative. The impedance became higher and the corrosion rate decreased with increasing test time. The dissolution rate of samples increased with chloride ion concentration. Results suggested that the corrosion rate of 35CrMn steel was obviously lower than that of Q235 steel for a more compact rust, α-FeOOH. Quantum chemical calculations further revealed that the increase in corrosion rate of the steel resulted from pitting corrosion caused by the corrosive chloride ion.

  8. Runoff changes in Czech headwater regions after deforestation induced by acid rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchtele, J.; Buchtelova, M.; Hrkal, Z.; Koskova, R.

    2003-04-01

    Tendencies in water regime resulting from land-use change represent an important subject for research and in the region of so called Black Triangle at the borders of Czech Republic, Germany and Poland urgent practical problem. Namely extensive deforestation in Czech hilly basins induced by acid rains, which appeared in seventies and eighties, requires attention. Discussions among professionals and public, sometimes having emotional character, took place after large floods on the rivers Odra and Morava in 1997 and in Vltava and Elbe river basins in August 2002. The influence of deforestation induced by acid rains in the Central Europe has been considered as important contribution to disastrous character of floods. Simulations of rainfall-runoff process in several catchments and experimental basins in two distinct headwater regions along German borders, with different extent of deforestation have been carried out using daily time series up to 40 years long. The outputs of two hydrological models of different structure have been compared in these investigations: - the conceptual model SAC-SMA - Sacramento soil moisture accounting - physically based 1- D model BROOK´90 The differences between observed and simulated discharge, which could show the tendencies in the runoff have been followed. They indicate increase of runoff after deforestation.

  9. CASTNet mountain acid deposition monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, J.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Edgerton, E.S.; Mohnen, V.; Baumgardener, R.

    1994-12-31

    Concern over the influence of air pollution on forest decline has led the USEPA to establish the Mountain Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (MADMP) to quantify total deposition at high altitudes, i.e., above cloud base. Clouds can be a major source of atmospheric deposition to sensitive, mountain ecosystems. This program is a part of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), a national assessment of the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act. The objectives of MADMP are to estimate total deposition, measure cloud chemistry, and characterize spacial and temporal trends at four selected high altitude sites in the Eastern US. Four MADMP sites have been established for the 1994 field season: Clingman`s Dome, Great Smoky Mountain Nat. Park, TN; Slide Mountain, Catskill State Park, NY; Whiteface Mountain, Adirondack State Park, NY; and Whitetop Mountain, Mt. Rogers Nat`l Recreational Area, VA. An automated cloud collection system will be utilized in combination with continuous measurements of cloud liquid water content in order to estimate cloudwater deposition. Other relevant data will include continuous meteorological measurements, ozone and sulfur dioxide concentrations, wet deposition from rainfall analysis, and dry deposition from filter pack analysis. Quality assurance and quality control measures will be employed to maximize accuracy and precision.

  10. Direct damage to vegetation caused by acid rain and polluted cloud: definition of critical levels for forest trees.

    PubMed

    Cape, J N

    1993-01-01

    The concept of critical levels was developed in order to define short-term and long-term average concentrations of gaseous pollutants above which plants may be damaged. Although the usual way in which pollutants in precipitation (wet deposition) influence vegetation is by affecting soil processes, plant foliage exposed to fog and cloud, which often contain much greater concentrations of pollutant ions than rain, may be damaged directly. The idea of a critical level has been extended to define concentrations of pollutants in wet deposition above which direct damage to plants is likely. Concentrations of acidity and sulphate measured in mountain and coastal cloud are summarised. Vegetation at risk of injury is identified as montane forest growing close to the cloud base, where ion concentrations are highest. The direct effects of acidic precipitation on trees are reviewed, based on experimental exposure of plants to simulated acidic rain, fog or mist. Although most experiments have reported results in terms of pH (H(+) concentration), the accompanying anion is important, with sulphate being more damaging than nitrate. Both conifers and broadleaved tree seedlings showing subtle changes in the structural characteristics of leaf surfaces after exposure to mist or rain at or about pH 3.5, or sulphate concentration of 150 micromol litre(-1). Visible lesions on leaf surfaces occur at around pH 3 (500 micromol litre(-1) sulphate), broadleaved species tending to be more sensitive than conifers. Effects on photosynthesis and water relations, and interactions with other stresses (e.g. frost), have usually been observed only for treatments which have also caused visible injury to the leaf surface. Few experiments on the direct effects of polluted cloud have been conducted under field conditions with mature trees, which unlike seedlings in controlled conditions, may suffer a growth reduction in the absence of visible injury. Although leaching of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+)) is

  11. Acid-rain publications by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Villella, R.F.

    1989-08-01

    This report is an annotated bibliography of acid-rain and related air-quality publications authored or co-authored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees or that have been supported by Service funding. The bibliography covers 10 years of research from 1979 to 1989. Research projects have covered the effects of acidity on water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Specific projects have addressed important fish species such as rainbow trout, brook trout, Atlantic salmon, and striped bass. In addition to lake and stream studies, wetland and some terrestrial habitat work has also been conducted. Also included in the report is research on the ecological effects of liming surface waters and surrounding watersheds.

  12. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  13. Regional characters of cloud water chemistry over severe acid rain areas of China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilai Shen; Hui Xiao; Hengchi Lei; Meiyuan Huang

    1996-12-31

    The results and discussion are presented of measurements of cloud water chemistry made over severe add rain areas, such as Chongqing, Chengdu, Guiyang, Guangzhou, Nanchang, and Changsha in China from 1985 to 1993. Analyses indicate that acid cloud water is widespread in these areas, the range of cloud water pH is large within an area, the highest acidity is not over big city, and the difference of average values of pH is not obvious in different areas. In some areas, for example Chongqing, the annual variation of average pH is large. The range of average of total ion concentrations of cloud water is also large and the maximum is six more than minimum. The relationship between the acidity and ion concentration of cloud water is unlinear. The chemistry parameters of cloud water exhibit an obvious region character in Southwest China (Chongqing, Chengdu and Guiyang) SO4= is a dominant anion and SO4=/NO3- is more than 8, Ca++ and NH4+ are the main cation, Ca++/NH4+>1 (in the remaining areas, Ca++/NH4+<1), the cloud water acidity is higher than that of ground rain, indicating that there is an acidification process below cloud. In South China (Guangzhou and Guiyang) NO3 is same important as SO4= and SO4=/NO3- is about 1. In Central China (Nanchang and Changsha) the total ion concentration is highest on comparison with other areas and the value is more than that of ground rainwater, meaning probably that there is an influence of cloud microphysical process on cloud water and rainwater chemistry.

  14. Surface discharge and tracking phenomena induced on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer dielectric material by acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yoshimura, N.

    1999-05-01

    The discharge and tracking phenomena induced on the polymer dielectric materials by acid rain are investigated by the accelerated aging of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer in artificial rainwater in this article. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the artificial rainwater is chosen to agree well with the actual ingredients of precipitation. The influence of hydrophobicity degradation on the surface discharge and tracking is studied. The relations among the surface discharge, tracking, hydrophobicity, and microchemical structure and physical morphology of material are furthermore discussed. Experimental results show that the polymer dielectric materials suffer a large attack and degradation from acid rain. The dielectric surface degrades and becomes rough, and the hydrophobicity decreases so that the surface discharge and tracking may occur on them.

  15. [Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on physiological characteristics of longan (Dimocarpus longana) seedlings under acid rain stress].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-fu; Wang, Ming-yuan; Yang, Chen; Zhu, Ai-jun

    2013-08-01

    This paper studied the effects of exogenous nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activities, and osmotic regulation substances of longan (Dimocarpus longana 'Fuyan') seedlings under acid rain (pH 3.0) stress. Under the acid rain stress, the seedling leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activities and chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents decreased obviously, while the leaf malondialdedyde content had a remarkable increase, suggesting the toxic effect of the acid rain on the seedlings. Exogenous nitric oxide had dual nature on the physiological characteristics of longan seedlings under acid rain stress. Applying 0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP improved the SOD, POD and CAT activities and the chlorophyll, soluble protein and soluble sugar contents significantly, and decreased the malondialdedyde content. Low concentrations SNP reduced the oxidative damage caused by the acid rain stress, and 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP had the best effect. Under the application of 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP, the total chlorophyll, soluble protein, and soluble sugar contents and the SOD, POD and CAT activities increased by 76.0%, 107.0%, 216.1%, 150. 0%, 350.9% and 97.1%, respectively, and the malondialdedyde content decreased by 46.4%. It was suggested that low concentration (0.1-0.5 mmol x L(-1)) SNP could alleviate the toxic effect of acid rain stress on longan seedlings via activating the leaf antioxidant enzyme activities and reducing oxidative stress, while high concentration SNP (1.0 mmol x L(-1)) lowered the mitigation effect. PMID:24380343

  16. Acid deposition coverage in five North American newspapers, 1979-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffeld, J.A.; Fortner, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Daily newspapers in some areas receiving acid rain, in some areas reported to be producing acid rain, and in some areas apparently ''neutral'' in the issue were content analyzed for their coverage of acid rain between 1979 and 1982. Of the five papers, the greatest amount of coverage was in the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Toronto Globe and Mail. Coverage of acid rain effects was greatest in the Washington Post, as was the number of items suggesting remedies for the problem. Articles from papers in areas receiving acid rain contained more indications of urgency than those from areas blamed for the problem.

  17. Correlation between microstructural characteristics and weight loss of natural stones exposed to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Elisa; Sassoni, Enrico

    2011-12-15

    The correlation between stone microstructural characteristics and material degradation (in terms of weight loss), in given environmental conditions, was investigated. Seven lithotypes, having very different microstructural characteristics, were used. Four acidic aqueous solutions were prepared to simulate acid rain (two adding H(2)SO(4) and two adding HNO(3) to deionized water, in order to reach, for each acid, pH values of 5.0 and 4.0), and deionized water at pH=5.6 was used to simulate clean rain. Stone samples were then immersed in such aqueous solutions, the surface alteration being periodically inspected and the weight loss periodically measured. After 14 days of immersion, a good correlation was found between weight loss and the product of carbonate content and specific surface area in the starting materials. This was explained considering that this product accounts for the weight loss owing to the sample's fraction actually composed of calcite (the most soluble fraction) and the effective surface area exposed to dissolving solution (which depends on stone porosity and pore size distribution). Such correlation between stone microstructure and degradation may be useful for comparing the durability of different lithotypes, in given environmental conditions, and quantitatively predicting the weight loss of a lithotype, compared to another one. Hence, the correlation found in this study may be used to specifically tailor to various stone types, with different microstructural characteristics, some results that have been calculated in literature for specific stone types and then proposed as possibly representative for a broad category of stones with similar characteristics. PMID:22030245

  18. (Acidic deposition: Its nature and impacts)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Turner, R.S. ); Ryan, P.F. )

    1990-10-18

    The travelers presented papers on various aspects of modeling performed as part of the US National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts. The meeting was sponsored by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was attended by over 800 scientists, primarily from Europe and North America. The conference focused on nine aspects of the nature and impacts of atmospheric pollutants, including ozone: chemistry of atmospheric pollutants; processes controlling the deposition of pollutants; effects of pollutants on soils; physiology of plant responses to pollutants; effects of pollutants in agricultural and natural or seminatural ecosystems; atmospheric pollutants and forests; effects of pollutants on the chemistry of freshwater streams and lakes; effects of pollutants on freshwater plants and animals; and effects of pollutants, indoors and outdoors, on materials and buildings.

  19. The character for the boundary layer and mechanism of acid rain formation in the Tsingdao area

    SciTech Connect

    Baozhang Liu; Jinlong Li

    1996-12-31

    The vertical distribution of the wind field and temperature field of the boundary layer was very peculiar in Tsingdao area, China. Under the height of 1500m, the wind field appeared as one-front-two-valleys type: the wind speed was relatively low near surface, got bigger between 300m to 400m, decreased over 500m, and increased again gradually over 1000m. The temperature stratification was stable in the morning and evening, and it became unstable below 200m after noon. As far as mixed layer was concerned, it was not very high, generally about 400m, sometimes it reached 700m high. Multiple-layer inversion often appeared in low altitude. Northern wind was prevailing in winter, so southern in summer. The wind field were often influenced by Jianghuai cyclone and Huanghuai cyclone. Convergence air current between lower level and higher level emerged when the cyclones passed Tsingdao area. Introducing straight and shear air current, pollutants emitted from point sources were modeled by advection-diffusion equation. The result indicated that pollutants were transported far away under one straight air current. In rainy days, pollutants were accumulated in local area and the concentrations were high. When wind direction appeared shear between higher level and lower level, the transportation of pollutants was more limited. In rain days, acid rain was form by chemical process at a near distance.

  20. Effect of simulated acid rain on the mutualism between tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and an endophytic fungus (Acremonium coenophialum)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheplick, G.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Biotic interactions between plants and microorganisms have the potential to be affected by acidic precipitation. I examined the effect of simulated sulfuric acid rain on the mutualism between a perennial forage grass (Festuca arundinacea) and a fungal endophyte (Acremonium coenophialum). Acid water was supplied as mists sprayed onto leaf surfaces or as water added to the soil for two groups in a greenhouse: one group had high levels of endophyte infection, while the other was predominantly noninfected. Control plants received distilled water (pH 6), while others received sulfuric acid water at pH 4.5 or pH 3. Plants were harvested after 4, 6, 8, and 23 wk. Leaf endophyte infection intensity as measured by hyphal counts was not affected by acid water treatment. Root mass and root: shoot ratios generally decreased with increasing acidity of both foliar sprays and soil water, but shoot mass was mostly not affected. There was a significant pH x infection interaction for plants exposed to acidic foliar sprays for 4 wk; root and shoot mass decreased with acidity, but only for infected plants. It was found that acid rain may be deleterious to tall fescue growth at specific stages of development, but biomass production in response to acid rain is not likely to be influenced by fungal endophytes within mature plants. 55 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered. PMID:20199068

  2. Physiological responses of root-less epiphytic plants to acid rain.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Bačkor, Martin; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2011-03-01

    Selected physiological responses of Tillandsia albida (Bromeliaceae) and two lichens (Hypogymnia physodes and Xanthoria parietina) exposed to simulated acid rain (AR) over 3 months were studied. Pigments were depressed in all species being affected the most in Tillandsia. Amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were elevated and soluble proteins decreased only in AR-exposed Hypogymnia. Free amino acids were slightly affected among species and only glutamate sharply decreased in AR-exposed Xanthoria. Slight increase in soluble phenols but decrease in flavonoids in almost all species suggests that the latter are not essential for tolerance to AR. Almost all phenolic acids in Tillandsia leaves decreased in response to AR and activities of selected enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase) were enhanced by AR. In lichens, considerable increase in metabolites (physodalic acid, atranorin and parietin) in response to AR was found but amount of ergosterol was unchanged. Macronutrients (K, Ca, Mg) decreased more pronouncedly in comparison with micronutrients in all species. Xanthoria showed higher tolerance in comparison with Hypogymnia, suggesting that could be useful for long-term biomonitoring. PMID:21161375

  3. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Burns, Douglas A; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2016-08-15

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment. PMID:27092419

  4. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Burns, Douglas A.; Murray, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment.

  5. Acid rain and ozone influence mycorrhizal infection in tree seedlings. [Pinus strobus; Quercus rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, P.B.; Stroo, H.F.; Schoettle, A.W.; Amundson, R.G.

    1986-06-01

    Atmospheric pollution may be causing reduced growth and increased mortality of trees in forests in Europe and North America. Acid rain and ozone are the two pollutants most frequently mentioned as causal agents in the forest decline problem. One plant-environment interface where atmospheric pollution may be having an impact is the symbiotic association between roots and soil fungi known as mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae are essential for the survival and growth of most forest tree species in the natural environment. Mycorrhizal fungi can affect the nutrient uptake and translocation, water uptake, root morphology, carbon metabolism and disease resistance of the host plant. In specific instances, mycorrhizal infection has been observed to enhance tree growth increase seedling survival or protect plants from root disease. Therefore, sensitivity of the mycorrhizal association to atmospheric pollution could be harmful to forest trees and might influence the decline of forests.

  6. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings: Evidence from the US Acid Rain Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The US Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate in allowance trading, and whether regulatory activity at the state level would further complicate utilities` decision to trade allowances. This paper finds that public utility commission regulation has encouraged allowance trading activity in states with regulatory rulings, but that allowance trading activity has not been limited to states issuing regulations. Until there is evidence suggesting that significant additional cost savings could have been obtained if additional allowance trading activity had occurred in states without regulations or that utilities in states with regulations are still not taking advantage of all cost saving trading opportunities, this analysis suggests that there is little reason to believe that allowance trading activity is impeded by public utility commission regulations.

  7. Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Maibodi, M. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper discusses the impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments related to acid rain controls, as they apply to industrial boilers. Emphasis is placed on explaining the Title IV provisions of the Amendments that permit nonutility sources to participate in the SO{sub 2} allowance system. The allowance system, as it pertains to industrial boiler operators, is described, and the opportunities for operators to trade and/or sell SO{sub 2} emission credits is discussed. The paper also reviews flue gas desulfurization system technologies available for industrial boiler operators who may choose to participate in the system. Furnace sorbent injection, advanced silicate process, lime spray drying, dry sorbent injection, and limestone scrubbing are described, including statements of their SO{sub 2} removing capability, commercial status, and costs. Capital costs, levelized costs and cost-effectiveness are presented for these technologies.

  8. Evaluation of ionic pollutants of acid fog and rain using a factor analysis and back trajectories.

    PubMed

    Adzuhata, T; Inotsume, J; Okamura, T; Kikuchi, R; Ozeki, T; Kajikawa, M; Ogawa, N

    2001-01-01

    Fog and rain water samples were collected at the same time in the Akita Hachimantai mountain range in northern Japan from June to September in 1998 and 1999. The various ion concentrations in these samples were analyzed, and the fog droplet sizes were measured for each fog event. As the fog droplet size increased, the ion concentration decreased. The slope of log-log plots of the concentration versus the droplet size differed with the kind of ion. In order to characterize the air pollutant, moreover, these data were quantitatively analyzed by an oblique rotational factor analysis. We found that three factors were extracted as the air pollutant source: (NH4)2SO4, acids (HNO3 + H2SO4) and sea-salt. Combining the factor analysis with the 72 h back-trajectory at 850 hPa level, we found that the contribution of each factor varied with the transport pattern of air masses. PMID:11993680

  9. Bibliography on air pollution and acid rain effects on fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This bibliography is the result of the development of a series of nine reports synthesizing information from scientific research related to the effects of air pollution and acid deposition on fish and wildlife resources. The reports include an Introduction, Deserts and Steppes, Forests, Grasslands, Lakes, Tundra and Alpine Meadows, Rivers and Streams, Urban Ecosystems, and Critical Habitats of Threatened and Endangered Species.

  10. Bibliography on air pollution and acid rain effects on fish, wildlife, and their habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography results from the development of nine reports synthesizing information from scientific research related to the effects of air pollution and acid deposition on fish and wildlife. The reports cover deserts, steppes, forests, grasslands, lakes, tundra, alpine meadows, rivers, streams, urban ecosystems, and critical habitats of threatened and endangered species.

  11. Acid rain mitigation experiment shifts a forested watershed from a net sink to a net source of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Bernhardt, Emily S; Buso, Donald C; Driscoll, Charles T; Likens, Gene E

    2016-07-01

    Decades of acid rain have acidified forest soils and freshwaters throughout montane forests of the northeastern United States; the resulting loss of soil base cations is hypothesized to be responsible for limiting rates of forest growth throughout the region. In 1999, an experiment was conducted that reversed the long-term trend of soil base cation depletion and tested the hypothesis that calcium limits forest growth in acidified soils. Researchers added 1,189 kg Ca(2+) ha(-1) as the pelletized mineral wollastonite (CaSiO3) to a 12-ha forested watershed within the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Significant increases in the pH and acid-neutralizing capacity of soils and streamwater resulted, and the predicted increase in forest growth occurred. An unanticipated consequence of this acidification mitigation experiment began to emerge a decade later, with marked increases in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) exports in streamwater from the treated watershed. By 2013, 30-times greater DIN was exported from this base-treated watershed than from adjacent reference watersheds, and DIN exports resulting from this experiment match or exceed earlier reports of inorganic N losses after severe ice-storm damage within the study watershed. The discovery that CaSiO3 enrichment can convert a watershed from a sink to a source of N suggests that numerous potential mechanisms drive watershed N dynamics and provides new insights into the influence of acid deposition mitigation strategies for both carbon cycling and watershed N export. PMID:27335456

  12. Acidic Deposition along the Appalachian Trail Corridor and its Effects on Acid-Sensitive Terrestrial and Aquatic Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Sullivan, T. J.; Burns, D. A.; Bailey, S. W.; Cosby, B. J., Jr.; Dovciak, M.; Ewing, H. A.; McDonnell, T. C.; Riemann, R.; Quant, J.; Rice, K. C.; Siemion, J.; Weathers, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT) spans 3,500 km from Georgia to Maine. Over its length, the trail passes through a corridor with wide variations in climate, bedrock type, soils, and stream water quality. These factors create a diverse range of ecosystems. The health of these ecosystems is a cause for concern because the AT passes through the heavily populated eastern U.S. with its many sources of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions that produce acidic deposition. To address concerns about the health of the AT, a study was designed to evaluate the condition and sensitivity of the AT corridor with respect to acidic deposition. Collections of stream water (265 sites), soil (60 sites), tree cores (15 sites) and atmospheric deposition samples (4 sites) were made along with understory and overstory vegetation measurements (30 sites) over the full trail length within a 40 km-wide corridor. Existing data on atmospheric deposition, geology, vegetation, stream chemistry, and soil chemistry were also used in the analysis. Mean acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) was lowest in the streams in the North section, intermediate in the Central section and highest the South section, despite the South having the highest acid rain levels. At least 40% of the study streams exhibited pH and/or Ali measurements that indicated potential harm to biota. Approximately 70% of the soil sites had values of base saturation under 20%, the threshold below which acidic deposition can mobilize inorganic aluminum (Ali), the form harmful to terrestrial and aquatic life. Compositional similarity of understory and canopy species was positively correlated with acidic deposition, suggesting that during past decades, species poorly adapted to acidic deposition were replaced with tolerant species. Target loads modeling indicated that exceedance of sulfur target loads to achieve stream ANC = 50 μeq/L by the year 2100occurred throughout the trail corridor.

  13. Potential human health effects of acid rain: report of a workshop

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, Robert A.; Bachmann, John; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Ferris, Benjamin G.; Graham, Judith; Mushak, Paul; Perl, Daniel P.; Rall, David P.; Schlesinger, Richard; Sharpe, William; Wood, John M.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the potential impact of the acid precipitation phenomenon on human health. There are two major components to this phenomenon: the predepositional phase, during which there is direct human exposure to acidic substances from ambient air, and the post-depositional phase, in which the deposition of acid materials on water and soil results in the mobilization, transport, and even chemical transformation of toxic metals. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. PMID:3896772

  14. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, F.J.; Marshall, E.M.

    1989-03-01

    The lake acidification in Northern Ontario was investigated using LANDSAT TM to sense lake volume reflectance and also to provide important vegetation and terrain characteristics. The purpose of this project was to determine the ability of LANDSAT to assess water quality characteristics associated with lake acidification. Results demonstrate that a remote sensor can discriminate lake clarity based upon reflection. The basic hypothesis is that seasonal and multi-year changes in lake optical transparency are indicative of sensitivity to acidic deposition. In many acid-sensitive lakes optical transparency is controlled by the amount of dissolved organic carbon present. Seasonal changes in the optical transparency of lakes can potentially provide an indication of the stress due to acid deposition and loading.

  15. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  16. Bolide impacts, acid rain, and biospheric traumas at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Two plausible projectiles are considered: an ice-rich long-period comet and a much smaller rock-metal asteroid. In the framework of a proposal addressed by Lewis et al. (1982), it is shown that, while the impact projectiles themselves do not shock-heat the atmosphere very extensively, the supersonic plume of water vapor and rock produced on impact does shock the atmosphere up to global scales and the shock is of sufficient intensity to produce abundant nitric oxide. For example, an ice-rich long-period comet with a mass of 1.25 x 10 to the 16th kg and a velocity of 65 km/s striking the earth would produce about 7 x 10 to the 40th molecules NO through shock-heating of the atmosphere by the high-velocity ejecta plume fragments. Specific attention is given to the fraction of the atmosphere shock-heated, the global circulation of the nitrogen oxides, the effects of the ejecta plume water on acid rain (AR) predictions, the effects of AR on continental soils, the relationship between AR production rates and the total amount of acid needed to acidify the surface oceans, and the longevity of the oceanic acidity event and the exhaled CO2 event and their implications for the environment in the first millenia or so after the impact.

  17. The U.S. Acid rain program: Key insights from the design, operation, and assessment of a Cap-and-Trade program

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, Sam; Schreifels, Jeremy; Stevens, Gabrielle; Witt, Maggie; LaCount, Melanie; Forte, Reynaldo; Smith, Kenon

    2007-08-15

    The authors' 15 years of experience with the Acid Rain Program suggests that for regional or larger-scale air pollution problems, such as acid rain and pollution transport, a well-designed cap-and-trade program can be cost-effective, flexible, and easy to implement with clear benefits that can be sustained into the future. (author)

  18. EFFECTS OF ACIDITY OF SIMULATED RAIN AND ITS JOINT ACTION WITH AMBIENT OZONE ON MEASURES OF BIOMASS AND YIELD IN SOYBEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experiment was performed to determine whether the presence of ozone modified the effects of acidity of simulated rain on growth and yield of soybean. Beeson, a type II cultivar, was grown in field chambers and exposed to simulated rain at 3 levels of acidity. Each level was ap...

  19. Influences of clouds and rain on the large-scale transport and deposition of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Luecken, D.J.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes the application of a three-dimensional, global-scale Eulerian model with an explicit description of cloud and chemical processes. Simulation results describing the transport of sulfur from North America and Europe across the north Atlantic Ocean during a climatological July are presented. Wet deposition was found to contribute slightly more to total sulfur deposition than dry deposition, a feature explained by the large amounts of precipitation during this month. The wet deposition patterns did not always correspond to the emissions patterns. The precipitation rate and spatial distribution had a large effect on the calculated concentrations of soluble sulfur species. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Evaluating Potential Bias in Media Coverage of the Public Debate over Acid Rain and Chlorofluorocarbons in the 1980s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tiffany Dawn; Moore, Rebecca; Markewitz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates media coverage of two important environmental issues from the 1980s (acid rain and chlorofluorocarbons), providing historical context for current media coverage analysis. Focusing on popular magazine articles, this study identifies key characteristics of content and presentation. Content-related characteristics are inclusion…

  1. Lots of data, how do we use it? Strengths and inaccuracies of utility acid rain electronic data reports

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.

    1996-12-31

    Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company tinder acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NOx are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NOx Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

  2. Development and Implementation of a Simple, Engaging Acid Rain Neutralization Experiment and Corresponding Animated Instructional Video for Introductory Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Danielle; Yennie, Craig J.; Lynch, Patrick; Lowry, Gregory; Budarz, James; Zhu, Wenlei; Wang, Li-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe an acid rain neutralization laboratory experiment and its corresponding instructional video. This experiment has been developed and implemented for use in the teaching laboratory of a large introductory chemistry course at Brown University. It provides a contextually relevant example to introduce beginner-level students with…

  3. Evaluation of accelerated H/sup +/ applications in predicting soil chemical and microbial changes due to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Killham, K.; Firestone, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison was made between three acidified, simulated rain treatments which have been used to assess the impact of acid rain on soil chemical and microbial processes. There were significant differences in effects on chemical and microbial characteristics of soil exposed to the three treatments due to differences in the rate of H/sup +/ ion application, even though the total quantity of protons supplied was the same in each case. An input of 30 cm of simulated rain of pH 3.0 over 6 months increased microbial activity and caused only slight changes in soil pH and soil nitrogen status. Treatments in which the rate of H/sup +/ input was accelerated by increasing solution volume, or acidity, inhibited microbial activity and caused soil chemical changes in excess of those produced by the more gradual yet equivalent H/sup +/ loading. We conclude that the effects of short-term, accelerated acid treatments cannot be used to realistically forecast long-term impacts of acid rain. The results of such experiments may be useful in identifying processes or parameters for studies of longer duration.

  4. Investigation of the effects of acid rain on the deterioration of cement concrete using accelerated tests established in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shaodong; Qi, Li; Zhou, Ding

    Deterioration of cement concrete specimens caused by simulated acid rain was investigated by laboratory tests. Before and after cement concrete specimens were exposed to simulated acid rain, the neutralized depth, the compressive strength and the chemical compositions in the hardened cement paste were measured. The mineralogical composition of the concrete specimens was analyzed with XRD. The results lead to the following conclusions: the neutralized depth of the concrete specimens of all experiments can be described as a power function of exposure duration, CaO loss and the reduction rate of strength increased with H + and decreased with SO 42- concentration in simulated acid rain. The original mineral compounds such as [Na K]AlSi 3O 8 and [Ca Na][SiAl] 4O 8 in the hardened cement paste are converted to CaSO 4·2H 2O, CaAl 2Si 2O 8 and Ca 3Al 6O 12·CaSO 4. And these are larger in volume so that the reaction with SO 42- ions result in volume expansion and strength decrease. The reduction rate of strength has a binary linear relation to the CaO loss rate and the ratio of SO 3 content to CaO content in the hardened cement paste. So the deterioration of acid rain on the concrete specimen is caused by both H + dissolution and SO 42- expansion.

  5. Study for Corrosion and Hydrogen Evolution Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Simulated Acid Rain Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammam, R. H.; Fekry, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements at the open circuit potentials and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a simulated acid rain containing inorganic additives. The ac circuit model for Ti-6Al-4V alloy at corrosion interface in simulated acid rain containing inorganic additives was proposed, which was based on two time constants equivalent circuit. Ti-6Al-4V alloy in a simulated acid rain of pH 1.5 containing inorganic additives showed a characteristic of a capacitive behavior. The effect of different concentrations of the inorganic additives (iodate, dichromate, phosphate, and nitrate) on the corrosion of the alloy in acid rain water (ARW) was also studied. It was found that the corrosion rate decreases drastically in the solution containing iodate, dichromate, and phosphate anions; however, nitrate anions increase the corrosion rate of the alloy. The investigated inorganic additives had inhibiting effect on the corrosion of the alloy in ARW, and their efficiency decreases according to the order: iodate > dichromate > phosphate > blank > nitrate. Polarization data results are in good agreement with EIS.

  6. Air Pollution and Acid Rain, Report 9. Effects of air pollution and acid rain on fish, wildlife, and their habitats: deserts and steppes

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, E.N.; Harper, D.; Adler, D.

    1982-06-01

    This report on desert and steppe ecosystems is part of a series synthesizing the results of scientific research related to the effects of air pollution and acid deposition on fish and wildlife resources. The features of desert and steppe ecosystems which determine the sensitivity of these ecosystems to air pollution are described. Data related to the effects of air pollutants on biota and whole ecosystems are reviewed. The data come from both field and laboratory studies. Some general information based on studies in other ecosystems is included. Suggestions are made for areas of further research. In general there has been less concern for the effects of air pollutants on the biota of deserts and steppes than for those of other ecosystems. Much of the concern for, and research on, air pollution in desert and steppe ecosystems is related to fossil fuel powered electric generating plants. 47 references, 3 figures, 8 tables.

  7. Experimental investigation of influence of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic characteristics of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated clay.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan-Jun; Jiang, Ning-Jun; Shen, Shui-Long; Jin, Fei

    2012-07-30

    Remediation of contaminated lands in China urban areas is of great concern. Degradation of construction facilities caused by acid rain is a serious environmental pollution issue in China. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic properties of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated soil. Laboratory tests including infiltration test and soaking test are conducted. It is found that the soil hydraulic conductivity decreases with increase in the pore volume of flow of permeant liquids (acid rain and distilled water). The decreasing rate in the case of the acid rain is lower than that in the case of the distilled water. The soaking test results show that pH and the presence of sulfate ions of acid rain have considerable influence on the leached concentrations and leaching rate of calcium. PMID:22614025

  8. Chance-constrained/stochastic linear programming model for acid rain abatement—I. Complete colinearity and noncolinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. H.; McBean, E. A.; Farquhar, G. J.

    A Linear Programming model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. For a system comprised of 235 large controllable point sources and 83 uncontrolled area sources, it determines the least-cost method of reducing SO 2 emissions to satisfy maximum wet sulfur deposition limits at 20 sensitive receptor locations. In this paper, the purely deterministic model is extended to a probabilistic form by incorporating the effects of meteorologic variability on the long-range pollutant transport processes. These processes are represented by source-receptor-specific transfer coefficients. Experiments for quantifying the spatial variability of transfer coefficients showed their distributions to be approximately lognormal with logarithmic standard deviations consistently about unity. Three methods of incorporating second-moment random variable uncertainty into the deterministic LP framework are described: Two-Stage Programming Under Uncertainty (LPUU), Chance-Constrained Programming (CCP) and Stochastic Linear Programming (SLP). A composite CCP-SLP model is developed which embodies the two-dimensional characteristics of transfer coefficient uncertainty. Two probabilistic formulations are described involving complete colinearity and complete noncolinearity for the transfer coefficient covariance-correlation structure. Complete colinearity assumes complete dependence between transfer coefficients. Complete noncolinearity assumes complete independence. The completely colinear and noncolinear formulations are considered extreme bounds in a meteorologic sense and yield abatement strategies of largely didactic value. Such strategies can be characterized as having excessive costs and undesirable deposition results in the completely colinear case and absence of a clearly defined system risk level (other than expected-value) in the noncolinear formulation.

  9. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Baedecker, P.A. ); Reddy, M.M. )

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone erosion. It can serve as the basis for an undergraduate (or pre college) experiment in environmental chemistry. Recent field investigations are described that provide measurements of carbonate stone dissolution and mechanical erosion under weathering conditions that are prevalent in the eastern US. The purpose of the laboratory work is to answer questions concerning the effects of hydrogen ion deposition on stone erosion processes that were difficult to resolve on the basis of field experiments alone.

  10. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  11. Effects of simulated acidic rain on yields of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa, Triticum aestivum and Medicago sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Gmur, N.F.; Mancini, D.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine effects of simulated acidic rain on radishes (Raphanus sativus), wheat(Triticum aestivum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown under greenhouse conditions. Experimental designs allowed the detection of statistically significant differences among means that differed by less than 10%. These results suggest that the efficiency of radish foliage in increasing; root mass decreases with increased rainfall acidity since only foliage was exposed to the treatments.

  12. Rainfastness of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Deposits on Vicia faba Leaf Surfaces: From Laboratory-Scale Washing to Simulated Rain.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Brett L; Thomson, Niall R; Lindsay, Christopher I; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2016-06-01

    Rainfastness is the ability of agrochemical deposits to resist wash-off by rain and other related environmental phenomena. This work reports laboratory-scale and raintower studies of the rainfastness of fluorescently labeled poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) using fluorescent microscopy combined with image analysis. Samples of hydrolyzed PVA exhibit improved rainfastness over a threshold molecular weight, which correlates with PVA film dissolution, swelling, and crystalline properties. It was also established that the rainfastness of PVA scaled with the molecular weight over this threshold. These PVA samples were further characterized in order to determine the effect of the crystallinity on rainfastness. The quantification of rainfastness is of great interest to the field of agrochemical formulation development in order to improve the efficacy of pesticides and their adjuvants. PMID:27070864

  13. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  14. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  15. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system. PMID:19968099

  16. Deposition of salicylic acid into hamster sebaceous.

    PubMed

    Motwani, M R; Rhein, L D; Zatz, J L

    2004-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we identified vehicles that are miscible with sebum, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this paper, the potential of these vehicles to deliver salicylic acid (SA) into the sebum-filled follicles of hamster ears is examined. The main objective of this study is to correlate the melting transitions of a model sebum with the follicular delivery of SA, using two different types of vehicles (fatty and polar). Generally, the fatty vehicles show higher deposition than the polar vehicles. Follicular delivery of salicylic acid correlates well with its solubility in the respective vehicles. This extent of deposition also shows a relationship with the effect of the vehicle on thermal behavior of the model sebum. The nature of the relationship depends on the vehicle (polar or fatty) tested. We conclude that DSC could be used to identify appropriate vehicles for drugs whose follicular delivery depends on solubility. The results also suggest that delivery into the sebaceous glands occurs by two different mechanisms, depending upon the polarity of the vehicle and the physicochemical properties of the drug. The results of these experiments are further extended to investigate follicular delivery of SA from two different types of oil-in-water emulsion formulations. From these studies we conclude that either increasing the volume of the oil phase or changing the emulsion to a water-in-oil emulsion would increase follicular deposition. Our research highlights the role of sebum, its compatibility with drug molecules, and vehicle selection in the transport of drugs into the follicles. The overall results of these experiments provide a reasonable understanding of the mechanisms underlying the transport of drugs to, and subsequently through, the sebaceous follicle. PMID:15645108

  17. Chronic and episodic acidification of Adirondack streams from acid rain in 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Roy, K.M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.; Capone, S.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Boylen, C.W.

    2008-01-01

    Limited information is available on streams in the Adirondack region of New York, although streams are more prone to acidification than the more studied Adirondack lakes. A stream assessment was therefore undertaken in the Oswegatchie and Black River drainages; an area of 4585 km2 in the western part of the Adirondack region. Acidification was evaluated with the newly developed base-cation surplus (BCS) and the conventional acid-neutralizing capacity by Gran titration (ANCG). During the survey when stream water was most acidic (March 2004), 105 of 188 streams (56%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 29% were acidified based on an ANCG value < 0 ??eq L-1. During the survey when stream water was least acidic (August 2003), 15 of 129 streams (12%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 5% were acidified based on ANCG value < 0 ??eq L -1. The contribution of acidic deposition to stream acidification was greater than that of strongly acidic organic acids in each of the surveys by factors ranging from approximately 2 to 5, but was greatest during spring snowmelt and least during elevated base flow in August. During snowmelt, the percentage attributable to acidic deposition was 81%, whereas during the October 2003 survey, when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were highest, this percentage was 66%. The total length of stream reaches estimated to be prone to acidification was 718 km out of a total of 1237 km of stream reaches that were assessed. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of acid rain pH on leaching behavior of cement stabilized lead-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Liu, Zhao-Peng; Jin, Fei

    2014-04-30

    Cement stabilization is a practical approach to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of lead. However, the potential for leaching of lead out of these stabilized soils under variable acid rain pH conditions is a major environmental concern. This study investigates the effects of acid rain on the leaching characteristics of cement stabilized lead contaminated soil under different pH conditions. Clean kaolin clay and the same soil spiked with 2% lead contamination are stabilized with cement contents of 12 and 18% and then cured for 28 days. The soil samples are then subjected to a series of accelerated leaching tests (or semi-dynamic leaching tests) using a simulated acid rain leachant prepared at pH 2.0, 4.0 or 7.0. The results show that the strongly acidic leachant (pH ∼2.0) significantly altered the leaching behavior of lead as well as calcium present in the soil. However, the differences in the leaching behavior of the soil when the leachant was mildly acidic (pH ∼4.0) and neutral (pH ∼7.0) prove to be minor. In addition, it is observed that the lead contamination and cement content levels can have a considerable impact on the leaching behavior of the soils. Overall, the leachability of lead and calcium is attributed to the stability of the hydration products and their consequent influence on the soil buffering capacity and structure. PMID:24637445

  19. STATUS OF RESEARCH TO DEVELOP ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING CAPABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is thought to be as important as wet deposition in acidifying ecosystems. However, at present acidic dry deposition of relevant particles and gases cannot be monitored directly in a quantitative manner. The U.S. EPA Workshop on Dry Deposition (Report No. EPA-600/9-...

  20. Influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.S.; Lin, Z.J.; Wu, M.Y.; Liu, J.I.; Yuan, C.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition both temporally and spatially in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan. During the period of January--December, 1996, both wet and dry deposition samples were collected by automatic acid precipitation samplers at six sampling sites which covered the entire metropolitan area. Major cations (NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup +2}, and Mg{sup +2}) and anions (F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) of acid deposition samples were analyzed in a central laboratory, while the pH value and conductivity of rainwater samples were measured in situ. Results from chemical analysis indicated that Ca{sup +2} was the most abundant cation in acid deposition samples. Major cations were Ca{sup +2} and NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while major anions were SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. This study also revealed that the pH value, suspended solids, Ca{sup +2}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} of rainwater decreased with rainy time in a sequential rainwater sampling process. It was estimated that approximately 80% of suspended particles could be washed out by rain droplets in the first hour of raining process. Therefore, alkaline suspended particles in the atmosphere played an very important role on the chemical composition of acid precipitation in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan.

  1. Origin of observed acidic-alkaline rains in a wet-only precipitation study in a Mediterranean coastal site, Patras, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Sotirios; Moschonas, Nektarios

    Major anions and cations were analyzed in a wet-only precipitation study for 16 months. The pH exhibited large variation, from 4.07 to 8.51 pH units. Twenty-eight percent of the observed rain volume had pH <5, whereas 42% of the rains had pH >6, as is usually observed in the Mediterranean. Comparison with our work of 15 years ago indicates a free acidity reduction by ˜18%, non-sea-salt sulfate ions reduction of ˜40% and nitrate ions reduction of 66%. Chloride and all cation concentrations were similar in the present work and that carried out in 1985-86 indicating similar sources, namely aerosol and crustal material as in MS. Calcium ions were the dominating neutralization ions. The annual wet-only deposition rates were calculated for the major species and were found to be comparable to those reported in past studies. Deposition of calcium ions dominates all deposited species, except sea salt, and indicates its significance in the neutralizing mechanisms of soils of the region, if neutralization is needed. Air mass back trajectories calculated for all analyzed samples, revealed four sectors of origin of air masses: NW to NE Europe, northern Africa, local and western Mediterranean, each with a specific chemistry. Cluster analysis and factor analysis also discriminated the samples by their sources. The main sources derived from the statistical analysis were: marine aerosols, alkalinity-acidity as inferred by the calcium ion concentrations from crustal sources and hydronium ions mainly from anthropogenic activities and ammonium salts of sulfate and nitrate also mainly from anthropogenic activities. These sources were closely correlated with the geographic sectors obtained from the air mass back trajectories.

  2. State acid rain programs: Progress & issues in Phase II SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, & opt-ins permitting

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1997-12-31

    Almost all States have adopted acid rain permitting regulations as part of their title V operating permits programs, and will be adopting acid rain NO{sub x} regulations in the near future. Phase II affected sources achieved a high degree of compliance with the statutory requirement to submit initial Phase II acid rain permit applications by January 1, 1996. The Acid Rain Opt-in Program is being implemented, sources are submitting opt-in permit applications to EPA and permits have been issued. Phase II NO{sub x} regulations are being promulgated, affected sources are submitting NO{sub x} early election plans to EPA, and Phase II NO{sub x} guidance for States will be distributed in 1997. Forty CFR part 72 (the acid rain program permits regulation) is being revised primarily to streamline the permitting process for State and local permitting authorities and to improve integration with 40 CFR part 70 (the state operating permits program regulation). Acid rain permitting demands will increase for States over the next 3 years, current State adherence to statutory and regulatory acid rain permitting requirements for Phase II affected sources remains high.

  3. The role of calcium in improving photosynthesis and related physiological and biochemical attributes of spring wheat subjected to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Dolatabadian, Aria; Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres; Gholamhoseini, Majid; Joghan, Aydin Khodaei; Majdi, Mohammad; Kashkooli, Arman Beyraghdar

    2013-04-01

    The response of photosynthesis parameters, catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, malondialdehyde, proline, chlorophyll, yield and yield components to foliar application of calcium and simulated acid rain in wheat were investigated. Foliar treatment of calcium led to significant increases in the photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, proline, chlorophyll, yield and yield components in plants subjected to acid rain. Antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation in the wheat leaves decreased because of calcium foliar application. Calcium hindered degradation of the rubisco subunits under acid rain treatment compared with water-treated plants. Results suggest that acid rain induces the production of free radicals resulting in lipid peroxidation of the cell membrane so that significant increase in antioxidant enzyme activity was observed. In addition, photosynthetic parameters i.e. photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were drastically suppressed by acid rain. The cellular damage caused by free radicals might be reduced or prevented by a protective metabolism including antioxidative enzymes and calcium. We report that foliar application of calcium before acid rain may ameliorate the adverse effects of acid rain in wheat plants. PMID:24431486

  4. Magnetic and mineral markers of atmospheric halogen and acid rains during the major Deccan episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Eric; Fabre, Sébastien; Nédélec, Anne; Adatte, Thierry; Keller, Gerta; Veiga-Pires, Cristina; Ponte, Jorge; Mirão, José; Khozyem, Hassan; Spangenberg, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and climatic changes linked to Deccan volcanism are still poorly known. A major limitation resides in the paucity of direct Deccan volcanism markers and in the geologically short interval where both impact and volcanism occurred, making it hard to evaluate their contributions to the mass extinction. We investigated the low magnetic susceptibility interval just below the Iridium-rich layer of the Bidart (France) section, which was recently hypothesized to be the result of palaeoenvironmental perturbations linked to paroxysmal Deccan phase-2. Results show a drastic decrease of detrital magnetite and presence of fine specular akaganeite, a hypothesized reaction product between FeCl2 from the volcanic plume with water and oxygen in the high atmosphere. A weathering model of the consequences of acidic rains on a continental regolith reveals nearly complete magnetite dissolution after about 33,000 years, which is consistent with our magnetic data and the duration of the Deccan phase-2. This discovery represents an unprecedented piece of evidence of the nature and importance of the Deccan-related environmental changes.

  5. [Complex effects of simulated acid rain and Cu on the physiological characteristics of Paulownia fortunei and its detoxification mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Chong-Bang; Ke, Shi-Sheng; Qian, Bao-Ying

    2010-03-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated acid rain (pH 4.0, 5.0) and Cu (0-200 mg x kg(-1)) on the physiological characteristics of Paulownia fortunei and its detoxification mechanism. With no Cu addition, the leaf chlorophyll, carotenoid, O2 division by, H2O2, and MDA contents of P. fortunei had no significant differences between the two acid rain treatments. However, with the addition of 100 and 200 mg Cu x kg(-1), the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of treatment pH 4.0 were lower, while the O2 divided by, H2O2 and MDA contents were higher thanthose of treatment pH 5.0. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of treatments Cu was higher than that of the control. The leaf Cu content decreased obviously with the increasing acidity of stimulated acid rain, but the root Cu content was in reverse. With increasing Cu addition, both the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and the total contents of phytochelatins (PCs) and glutathione (GSH) in treatment pH 5.0 increased, while the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX in treatment pH 4.0 decreased after an initial increase, and the total contents of glutathione (GSH) decreased greatly in treatment 200 mg Cu x kg(-1). All of these demonstrated that the oxidative stress of high Cu concentration to P. fortunei was aggravated by stimulated acid rain. PMID:20560310

  6. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain (V): Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xu-Hui; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Wang, Wei; Gao, Shi-Dong; Isobe, Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements (Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements (Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil. PMID:15559796

  7. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress. PMID:23379338

  8. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes. Progress report, 1 August 1985-1 February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollutants is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. The principle objective is to examine how seasonal changes in lake water transparency are related to annual acidic load. Further, the relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes is being investigated.

  9. Leaching behavior of heavy metals and transformation of their speciation in polluted soil receiving simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun-an; Zheng, Xiangqun; Chen, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals that leach from contaminated soils under acid rain are of increasing concern. In this study, simulated acid rain (SAR) was pumped through columns of artificially contaminated purple soil. Column leaching tests and sequential extraction were conducted for the heavy metals Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn to determine the extent of their leaching as well as to examine the transformation of their speciation in the artificially contaminated soil columns. Results showed that the maximum leachate concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn were less than those specified in the Chinese Quality Standards for Groundwater (Grade IV), thereby suggesting that the heavy metals that leached from the polluted purple soil receiving acid rain may not pose as risks to water quality. Most of the Pb and Cd leachate concentrations were below their detection limits. By contrast, higher Cu and Zn leachate concentrations were found because they were released by the soil in larger amounts as compared with those of Pb and Cd. The differences in the Cu and Zn leachate concentrations between the controls (SAR at pH 5.6) and the treatments (SAR at pH 3.0 and 4.5) were significant. Similar trends were observed in the total leached amounts of Cu and Zn. The proportions of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn in the EXC and OX fractions were generally increased after the leaching experiment at three pH levels, whereas those of the RES, OM, and CAR fractions were slightly decreased. Acid rain favors the leaching of heavy metals from the contaminated purple soil and makes the heavy metal fractions become more labile. Moreover, a pH decrease from 5.6 to 3.0 significantly enhanced such effects. PMID:23185399

  10. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals and Transformation of Their Speciation in Polluted Soil Receiving Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shun-an; Zheng, Xiangqun; Chen, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals that leach from contaminated soils under acid rain are of increasing concern. In this study, simulated acid rain (SAR) was pumped through columns of artificially contaminated purple soil. Column leaching tests and sequential extraction were conducted for the heavy metals Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn to determine the extent of their leaching as well as to examine the transformation of their speciation in the artificially contaminated soil columns. Results showed that the maximum leachate concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn were less than those specified in the Chinese Quality Standards for Groundwater (Grade IV), thereby suggesting that the heavy metals that leached from the polluted purple soil receiving acid rain may not pose as risks to water quality. Most of the Pb and Cd leachate concentrations were below their detection limits. By contrast, higher Cu and Zn leachate concentrations were found because they were released by the soil in larger amounts as compared with those of Pb and Cd. The differences in the Cu and Zn leachate concentrations between the controls (SAR at pH 5.6) and the treatments (SAR at pH 3.0 and 4.5) were significant. Similar trends were observed in the total leached amounts of Cu and Zn. The proportions of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Zn in the EXC and OX fractions were generally increased after the leaching experiment at three pH levels, whereas those of the RES, OM, and CAR fractions were slightly decreased. Acid rain favors the leaching of heavy metals from the contaminated purple soil and makes the heavy metal fractions become more labile. Moreover, a pH decrease from 5.6 to 3.0 significantly enhanced such effects. PMID:23185399

  11. Marginal bleaching of thalli of Rhizocarpon as evidence for acid rain in the Norra Storfjället, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Mahaney, W C; Wilson, E; Boyer, M G; Hancock, R G

    1995-01-01

    Recent lichen surveys in the foreland of The Syterbäcken glacier reveal that the crustose lichens, principally species of Rhizocarpon section Rhizocarpon, exhibit marginal bleaching, readily distinguishable from normal pigmented forms. The largest elliptical thallus of Rhizocarpon measured 290 mm maximum diameter on a bedrock outcrop beyond the margin of Little Ice Age moraines in the upper Syterbäcken Valley. Many small and large thalli of Rhizocarpon suffered damage to the periphery of individual thalli. We examine here some of the possible hypotheses explaining these occurrences. Among others, these are bedrock lithology, ice crystal blasting, long-term snowbank cover, ultraviolet exposure and acid rain. While at this time none of the possibilities can be ruled out entirely, acid rain would appear to be at least one of the factors involved. Acid rain, which is known to produce a soil pH as low as 3.3 in the field area, appears to provide a high input of H(+) ions that the lichen algal component cannot withstand. However, the lack of similar effects on associated foliose or fruticose forms raises the possibility that perhaps two or more factors specific to the environment of Rhizocarpon are operating. PMID:15091610

  12. [Relationships between soil moisture and needle-fall in Masson pine forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hao; Wang, Yan-Hui; Li, Zhen-Hua; Yu, Peng-Tao; Xiong, Wei; Hao, Jia; Duan, Jian

    2012-10-01

    From March 2009 to November 2011, an investigation was conducted on the spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture and its effects on the needle-fall in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southeast China, with the corresponding soil moisture thresholds determined. No matter the annual precipitation was abundant, normal or less than average, the seasonal variation of soil moisture in the forests could be obviously divided into four periods, i.e., sufficient (before May), descending (from June to July), drought (from August to September), and recovering (from October to November). With increasing soil depth, the soil moisture content increased after an initial decrease, but the difference of the soil moisture content among different soil layers decreased with decreasing annual precipitation. The amount of monthly needle-fall in the forests in growth season was significantly correlated with the water storage in root zone (0-60 cm soil layer), especially in the main root zone (20-50 cm soil layer). Soil field capacity (or capillary porosity) and 82% of field capacity (or 80% of capillary porosity) were the main soil moisture thresholds affecting the litter-fall. It was suggested that in acid rain region, Masson pine forest was easily to suffer from water deficit stress, especially in dry-summer period. The water deficit stress, together with already existed acid rain stress, would further threaten the health of the Masson forest. PMID:23359920

  13. [Effects of solution pH and simulated acid rain on the behavior of two sulfonylurea herbicides in soil].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2007-03-01

    By the methods of batch equilibration and leaching, this paper studied the effects of solution pH and simulated acid rain on the behavior of bensulfuron-methyl and metsulfuron-methyl in soil. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these two herbicides fitted Freundlich equation well, and their adsorbed amounts reduced obviously with the increasing pH of water-soil system, which in turn promoted the translocation of the herbicides in soil. The adsorption coefficient (Kf) was positively correlated with soil organic matter and clay contents, while negatively correlated with soil pH. The higher pH of simulated acid rain had a greater contribution on the leaching of the two sulfonylurea herbicides, and their leached amount was increased with increasing acid rain. There was a close relationship between the leaching of the herbicides and the properties of soil. The soils with higher contents of organic matter and clay had a greater retention capability to the herbicides. PMID:17552202

  14. Effects of simulated acid rain, EDTA, or their combination, on migration and chemical fraction distribution of extraneous metals in Ferrosol.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fang; Hou, Hong; Yao, Na; Yan, Zengguang; Bai, Liping; Li, Fasheng

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory repacked soil-leaching column experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated acid rain or EDTA by themselves or in combination, on migration and chemical speciation distribution of Pb and its alternative rare metals including Ag, Bi, In, Sb, and Sn. Experimental results demonstrate that leaching with simulated acid rain promoted the migration of Bi, In and Pb, and their migration reached down to 8 cm in the soil profile, no enhancement of Sb, Ag or Sn migration was observed. Addition of EDTA significantly enhanced the migration of all six metals, especially Bi, In and Pb. The migration of metals was in the order Pb>Bi>In>Sb>Sn>Ag. The individual and combined effects of acid rain and EDTA increased the environmental risk of metals, by increasing the soluble content of metals in soil solutions and the relative distribution of the exchangeable fraction. Leaching risks of Bi, In and Pb were higher than other three metals. PMID:22921654

  15. EFFECT OF SIMULATED SULFURIC ACID RAIN ON THE CHEMISTRY OF A SULFATE-ADSORBING FOREST SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated H2SO4 rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0) or control rain (pH 5.6) was applied for 3.5 yr to large lysimeter boxes containing a sulfate-adsorbing forest soil and either red alder (Alnus rubra) or sugar maple (Acer saccharum) seedlings. After removal of the plants and the litter lay...

  16. Analysis of utility acid rain compliance plans: A discussion of issues and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brick, S.

    1993-07-01

    Utility acid rain compliance plans have begun to roll into public utility commissions around the eastern half of the country. These plans typically represent the combined effort of utility staff and consultants, and have evolved since early drafts of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) began to circulate, several years back. The filings themselves often consist of many volumes of technical analysis, supporting documentation, and accompanying testimony. Hundreds of computer simulations are often presented and these, in turn, are underlain by hundreds of assumptions covering a staggering range of variables. Commissions usually have little time and few external resources with which to review and in some cases, preapprove proposed utility actions. There may be a tendency among commissions to forego a comprehensive review, approve utility plans as filed, and hope for the best. There are at least three important reasons, however, why this should not occur: (1) The magnitude of planned CAAA expenditures is large. (2) Preapproval, either formal or de facto, is becoming increasingly common. Although the approval of specific actions is certainly one outcome of the preapproval process, it should not be the sole or even principal outcome. The main focus of preapproval should involve defining an economic and institutional framework for how utilities, with input from regulators and the public, can best meet future customer needs. Done correctly, the preapproval process provides a meaningful, preexisting context which can be used to analyze outcomes. (3) Without adequate review market opportunities may be ignored and compliance costs increased unnecessarily. This article discusses the following topics in detail: CAAA Compliance Plan Review framework; Emission Reduction Alternatives: How Much is Enough?; Assumptions, Analytical Methods, and Evaluation Criteria of compliance plans; CAAA compliance costs and IRP. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  18. Acid deposition and the acidification of soils and waters

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, J.O.; Johnson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual model of acid deposition is presented consistent with established physicochemical principles and the bulk of available information. The authors seek to provide insight into probable long-term effects of acid deposition; a testable hypotheses; plus design and interpretation of the research. (PSB)

  19. Deposition of trace substances via cloud droplets in the Atlantic Rain Forest of the Serra Do Mar, São Paulo State, SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautz, W.; Pahl, S.; Pilger, H.; Schilling, M.; Klockow, D.

    The Atlantic Rain Forest of the Serra do Mar close to Cubatão, São Paulo State, SE Brazil, is severely affected by the emissions of a big industrial complex. Measurements of trace substance concentrations in air as well as in rain were carried out over a period of 6 years to investigate the interrelation of pollution and vegetation damage. Due to the local atmospheric circulation, orographic clouds occur very frequently at the top of the Serra do Mar, where vegetation damage also is very high. Therefore, additional information was required about trace substance deposition via cloud water. During three field experiments, various samples of cloud water and of the interstitial aerosol were taken by help of a sampling device especially modified for this purpose, and were analysed for the major anions and cations (hydrogen ions, ammonium, chloride, sodium, nitrate and sulphate). The trace substance concentrations found in cloud water were in the same range as for polluted sites in Europe. Over all samples, about 90-100% of the trace substances—both gaseous and particulate matter—found in the atmosphere before a cloud event were found in the cloud water. A resistance model using meteorological input data (wind speed, atmospheric liquid water content) was adapted to the characteristics of the Atlantic Rain Forest to estimate the cloud water deposition to vegetation. The results from cloud water analyses and from modelled cloud water deposition were combined to investigate the ion deposition to the vegetation. A rough estimate of the annual deposition showed, that the deposition via rain is in the order of one magnitude (factor 6-40) higher than that via cloud. The high amount of water deposition via precipitation overcompensates the higher trace substance concentrations in cloud water. Furthermore the trace substance deposition to vegetation via cloud water in the Atlantic Rain Forest is in the order of one magnitude lower than for typical German spruce forests due

  20. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress. PMID:25893616