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Sample records for acid resin tulsion

  1. Evaluation of anion exchange resins Tulsion A-30 and Indion-930A by application of radioanalytical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singare, P. U.

    2014-07-01

    Radioanalytical technique using 131I and 82Br was employed to evaluate organic based anion exchange resins Tulsion A-30 and Indion-930A. The evaluation was based on performance of these resins during iodide and bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction by using Tulsion A-30 resin, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log K d were 0.238, 0.477, 0.114, and 11.0, respectively, which was higher than 0.155, 0.360, 0.056, and 7.3, respectively as that obtained by using Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions of 40.0°C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.003 M labeled iodide ion solution. Also at a constant temperature of 40.0°C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases 0.001 to 0.004 M, for Tulsion A-30 resins the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 59.0 to 65.1%, and from 46.4 to 48.8% for Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions. The identical trend was observed for both the resins during bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions. The overall results indicate that under identical experimental conditions, Tulsion A-30 show superior performance over Indion-930A resins. The results of present experimental work have demonstrated that the radioanalytical technique used here can be successfully applied for characterization of different ion exchange resins so as to evaluate their performance under various process parameters.

  2. Development and Evaluation of Sustained Release Tablet of Betahistine Hydrochloride Using Ion Exchange Resin Tulsion T344

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Vijay D.; Pawar, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    An attempt was made to sustain the release of Betahistine hydrochloride by complexation technique using strong cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T344. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, swelling time, ratio of drug?:?resin, and temperature. The resinate was evaluated for micromeritic properties and characterized using XRPD and IR. For resinate sustained release tablets were formulated using hydoxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, weight variation, and in vitro drug release. Tablets thus formulated (Batch T-3) provided sustained release of drug over a period of 12?h. The release of Betahistine HCl from resinate controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. Results showed that Betahistine HCl was formulated into a sustained dosage form as an alternative to the conventional tablet. PMID:22779010

  3. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  4. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  5. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  6. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  8. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  9. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  10. Reactivity of Trametes laccases with fatty and resin acids.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, S; Holmbom, B; Spetz, P; Mustranta, A; Buchert, J

    2001-04-01

    Lipophilic extractives commonly referred to as wood pitch or wood resin can have a negative impact on paper machine runnability and product quality. The lipophilic extractives are composed mainly of fatty acids, resin acids, sterols, steryl esters and triglycerides. In this work, the suitability of laccases for the modification of fatty and resin acids was studied, using two model fractions. In the treatments, resin and fatty acid dispersions were treated with two different laccases, i.e. laccases from Trametes hirsuta and T. villosa. Different chromatographic methods were used to elucidate the effects of laccase treatments on the chemistry of the fatty and resin acids. Both laccases were able to modify the fatty and resin acids to some extent. In the case of fatty acids, a decrease in the amount of linoleic, oleic and pinolenic acids was observed, whereas the modification of resin acids resulted in a reduced amount of conjugated resin acids. PMID:11341313

  11. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  12. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  13. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  14. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  15. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  16. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  17. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  18. Antibacterial activity of rosin and resin acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, T A; Gref, R; Holm, S; Elmros, T; Hallmans, G

    1990-01-01

    The antibacterial effects of rosins and resin acids were studied in vitro using three methods, disc diffusion on agar, agar dilution, and broth dilution. Rosin and some resin acids had antibacterial effects that were restricted to Gram-positive bacteria. The abietic type of acids had a more pronounced antibacterial activity than the pimaric and labdane acids when the disc diffusion method was used but there was no inhibition of growth of Gram-negative bacteria. Among the individual resin acids, dehydroabietic acid was generally the most potent, when disc diffusion on agar was used, and prediffusion increased the inhibitory effect. The composition of the pure resin acids dehydroabietic, neoabietic, and isopimaric acid did not change during the experiment, but abietic and levopimaric acid were converted into dehydroabietic acid by the addition of Müller-Hinton agar. In conclusion the old tradition of treating wounds with pitch, sap, rosin, or rosin containing tapes might therefore have some antibacterial relevance. PMID:2281306

  19. Convenient Synthesis of a Library of Discrete Hydroxamic Acids Using the Hydroxythiophenol (Marshall) Resin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinil; Park, Jewn Giew; Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Several resins have reportedly been used to synthesize hydroxamic acids except for the hydroxythiophenol (Marshall) resin. Herein we report the use of the Marshall resin to synthesize hydroxamic acids from carboxylic acids and its application to convert a library of fourteen discrete aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids including N-protected amino acids to their corresponding hydroxamic acids in good yields. PMID:18443652

  20. Biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded acid-etched dentin.

    PubMed

    Tay, F R; Pashley, D H

    2009-08-01

    Degradation of denuded collagen within adhesive resin-infiltrated dentin is a pertinent problem in dentin bonding. A biomimetic remineralization scheme that incorporates non-classic crystallization pathways of fluidic amorphous nanoprecursors and mesoscopic transformation has been successful in remineralizing resin-free, acid-etched dentin, with evidence of intrafibrillar and interfibrillar remineralization. This study tested the hypothesis that biomimetic remineralization provides a means for remineralizing incompletely infiltrated resin-dentin interfaces created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. The remineralization medium consists of a Portland cement/simulated body fluid that includes polyacrylic acid and polyvinylphosphonic acid biomimetic analogs for amorphous calcium phosphate dimension regulation and collagen targeting. Both interfibrillar and intrafibrillar apatites became readily discernible within the hybrid layers after 2-4 months. In addition, intra-resin apatite clusters were deposited within the porosities of the adhesive resin matrices. The biomimetic remineralization scheme provides a proof-of-concept for the adoption of nanotechnology as an alternative strategy to extend the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:19734458

  1. Biomimetic Remineralization of Resin-bonded Acid-etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of denuded collagen within adhesive resin-infiltrated dentin is a pertinent problem in dentin bonding. A biomimetic remineralization scheme that incorporates non-classic crystallization pathways of fluidic amorphous nanoprecursors and mesoscopic transformation has been successful in remineralizing resin-free, acid-etched dentin, with evidence of intrafibrillar and interfibrillar remineralization. This study tested the hypothesis that biomimetic remineralization provides a means for remineralizing incompletely infiltrated resin-dentin interfaces created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. The remineralization medium consists of a Portland cement/simulated body fluid that includes polyacrylic acid and polyvinylphosphonic acid biomimetic analogs for amorphous calcium phosphate dimension regulation and collagen targeting. Both interfibrillar and intrafibrillar apatites became readily discernible within the hybrid layers after 2-4 months. In addition, intra-resin apatite clusters were deposited within the porosities of the adhesive resin matrices. The biomimetic remineralization scheme provides a proof-of-concept for the adoption of nanotechnology as an alternative strategy to extend the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:19734458

  2. Reactivity of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    King, William D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Wilmarth, William R.; Pettis, Myra E.

    2005-10-25

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. The threshold conditions promoting reaction have been identified. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  3. REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

    2006-06-14

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  4. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD...

  5. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF...

  6. Polymer resins with amino acid containing pendants for sorption of bilirubin. I. Comparison of Merrifield and polyamide resins.

    PubMed

    Henning, D S; Lajoie, G A; Brown, G R; St-Pierre, L E; St-Pierre, S

    1984-07-01

    Merrifield resins with various amino acid containing pendants and a water swellable polyamide resin with the peptide alanine-alanine-alanine-arginine as the pendant group have been prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Merrifield resins with either arginine or lysine pendants are capable of sorbing bilirubin from aqueous solution (pH = 7.8) but those with other amino acid pendants gave no indication of sorption. The polyamide-arginine resin showed, on a functional group basis, a higher capacity for bilirubin than does cholestyramine. It is proposed that the formation of salt linkages causes a strong interaction of bilirubin with arginine and lysine. PMID:6490193

  7. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, partial phosphoric acid esters of...

  8. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, partial phosphoric acid esters of...

  9. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, partial phosphoric acid esters of...

  10. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, partial phosphoric acid esters of...

  11. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section and applied on aluminum may be safely used as...

  12. Surface roughness of composite resins subjected to hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana Carolina Cabral; Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; de Godoi, Ana Paula Terossi; Colucci, Vivian; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Catirse, Alma Blásida Concepción Elizaur Benitez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hydrochloric acid on surface roughness of composite resins subjected to brushing. Sixty samples measuring 2 mm thick x 6 mm diameter were prepared and used as experimental units. The study presented a 3x2 factorial design, in which the factors were composite resin (n=20), at 3 levels: microhybrid composite (Z100), nanofilled composite (FiltekTM Supreme), nanohybrid composite (Ice), and acid challenge (n=10) at 2 levels: absence and presence. Acid challenge was performed by immersion of specimens in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) for 1 min, 4 times per day for 7 days. The specimens not subjected to acid challenge were stored in 15 mL of artificial saliva at 37 oC. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to abrasive challenge by a brushing cycle performed with a 200 g weight at a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 17.8 cycles. Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p?0.05). Surface roughness values were higher in the presence (1.07±0.24) as compared with the absence of hydrochloric acid (0.72±0.04). Surface roughness values were higher for microhybrid (1.01±0.27) compared with nanofilled (0.68 ±0.09) and nanohybrid (0.48±0.15) composites when the specimens were not subjects to acid challenge. In the presence of hydrochloric acid, microhybrid (1.26±0.28) and nanofilled (1.18±0,30) composites presents higher surface roughness values compared with nanohybrid (0.77±0.15). The hydrochloric acid affected the surface roughness of composite resin subjected to brushing. PMID:26200151

  13. Fatty and resinic acids extractions from crude tall oil

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, J.M.F.

    1996-11-01

    The separation of fatty and resinic acidic fractions from crude tall-oil soap solutions with n-heptane by the technique of dissociation extraction is discussed. The theory of the overall process is supported by a systematic study developed to cover the high selectivity demonstrated in the differential solubility and the aptness between fatty and diterpenic acids to both liquids phases. To study the main factors affecting those liquid-liquid extraction systems and the amphiphilic behavior of such molecules involved, sodium salts aqueous solutions of crude tall oil and synthetic mixtures as molecular acidic models were used.

  14. Polymer resins with amino acid containing pendants for sorption of bilirubin. II. Polyamide resins with various basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Henning, D S; Brown, G R; St-Pierre, L E

    1986-01-01

    Short peptides, three to eight amino acids in length, containing various combinations of alanine, arginine, lysine, histidine and tyrosine have been synthesized onto water-swellable polyamide resin by the solid phase peptide synthesis method. The amount of bilirubin adsorbed from aqueous buffer solution (pH = 7.8) by the resins increases with increasing basicity of the amino acids in the pendant. As the number of basic amino acids on the pendant is increased from one to five a 4.7 fold enhancement in the adsorption capacity is seen for arginine while a 9.3 fold enhancement is obtained for lysine. A corresponding increase in length for the non-basic histidine results in a 6 fold enhancement. With alanine the adsorption capacity is uneffected by an increase in pendant length. PMID:3957453

  15. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  16. Polystyrene sulphonic acid resins with enhanced acid strength via macromolecular self-assembly within confined nanospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yaopeng; Xu, Shutao; Yang, Yan; Liu, Jia; Wei, Yingxu; Yang, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    Tightening environmental legislation is driving the chemical industries to develop efficient solid acid catalysts to replace conventional mineral acids. Polystyrene sulphonic acid resins, as some of the most important solid acid catalysts, have been widely studied. However, the influence of the morphology on their acid strength—closely related to the catalytic activity—has seldom been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that the acid strength of polystyrene sulphonic acid resins can be adjusted through their reversible morphology transformation from aggregated to swelling state, mainly driven by the formation and breakage of hydrogen bond interactions among adjacent sulphonic acid groups within the confined nanospace of hollow silica nanospheres. The hybrid solid acid catalyst demonstrates high activity and selectivity in a series of important acid-catalysed reactions. This may offer an efficient strategy to fabricate hybrid solid acid catalysts for green chemical processes.

  17. Semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid jiadifenoic acid C from callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin.

    PubMed

    González, Miguel A; Zaragozá, Ramón J

    2014-09-26

    The semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid (+)-jiadifenoic acid C starting from the available methyl ester of callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin is reported. A protocol for the isolation of methyl callitrisate (methyl 4-epidehydroabietate) in gram quantities from sandarac resin is also described. Allylic C-17 oxygenation was introduced by regioselective dehydrogenation of the isopropyl group of methyl callitrisate with DDQ followed by selenium-catalyzed allylic oxidation. Ester hydrolysis afforded (+)-jiadifenoic acid C in 22% overall yield from methyl callitrisate. This semisynthetic route provides a convenient source of this anti-Coxsackie virus B natural product for further biological studies. PMID:25166492

  18. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption on macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption on synthetic macroporous resins, such as the Amberlite XAD series and Duolite A-7, is routinely used to isolate and concentrate organic acids from forge volumes of water. Samples as large as 24,500 L have been processed on site by using these resins. Two established extraction schemes using XAD-8 and Duolite A-7 resins are described. The choice of the appropriate resin and extraction scheme is dependent on the organic solutes of interest. The factors that affect resin performance, selectivity, and capacity for a particular solute are solution pH, resin surface area and pore size, and resin composition. The logistical problems of sample handling, filtration, and preservation are also discussed.

  19. Photolysis and biodegradation of selected resin acids in River Saale water, Germany.

    PubMed

    McMartin, Dena W; Headley, John V; Neu, Thomas R; Friesen, Duane A

    2003-01-01

    The River Saale is the Elbe's major tributary flowing through the state of Thuringia, Germany and receives organics inputs from several industrial facilities including pulp and paper mills. Resin acids constitute a major class of polar organics and environmental toxins derived primarily from pulp and paper processing of softwoods. Since wastewater treatment methods at pulp and paper mills are not always capable of removing the persistent resin acids prior to effluent discharge, alternative or complementary degradation methods may be required. Here, the facile photodegradation of four resin acids--abietic, dehydroabietic, isopimaric, and pimaric--was observed with pseudo-first-order kinetics when exposed to broad band and UV254-radiation. Further experimentation in rotating annular biofilm reactors with UV-exposed and unexposed River Saale water spiked with abietic and dehydroabietic acids indicated that photolysis is an effective pretreatment method for resin acid biodegradation. The bacterial toxicity of the aqueous resin acids solutions as measured with Microtox luminescence assays decreased with exposure time. Consequently, photo- and biodegradation of the resin acids did not generate any notable amounts of toxic intermediates and/or the intermediates formed were further degraded into compounds of lower toxicity than the parents. With tandem photo- and biological treatment at pulp and paper mills, as well as in-situ degradation by solar radiation and natural biofilms within the River Saale, resin acid inputs can be reduced in both concentration and toxicity to near undetectable levels with little or no ecological significance. PMID:14672312

  20. Elimination of resin acids by advanced oxidation processes and their impact on subsequent biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Ledakowicz, Stanislaw; Michniewicz, Malgorzata; Jagiella, Agnieszka; Stufka-Olczyk, Jadwiga; Martynelis, Maria

    2006-10-01

    Wood pulping and paper production generate a considerable amount of wastewater, containing many pollutants among them resin and fatty acids. Resin acids contribute substantially to effluent toxicity and were identified to be detrimental to microorganisms of activated sludge and in particular to bacteria in anaerobic wastewater treatment system and other forms of aquatic life. The objective of the present study was to check the applicability of the ozone and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to eliminate resin acids from aqueous solutions and to determine the ozone dose required. Furthermore, an investigation of the influence of the oxidation methods on subsequent biological destruction of the byproducts was performed. Aqueous solution of the resin acids: abietic, dehydroabietic and isopimaric acids with different initial composition were subjected to ozonation or AOP processes at different ozone doses. After ozonation or advanced oxidation pretreatment the model solutions were biodegraded in aerated vessels containing activated sludge. During ozonation of the resin acids aqueous solutions the resin acids were almost eliminated, however the reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was rather low. The ozone dose required to obtain reduction of resin acids >90% was in the range of 0.1-0.7mgO(3)/mgCOD, depending on the composition and concentration of model solutions. The toxicity of ozonated resin acids solutions decreased with increasing applied ozone dose up to about 0.3-0.5mgO(3)/mgCOD, thereafter increased. Ozonation and other AOP processes did not increase the rate of biodegradation of resin acids model solutions in aerated activated sludge systems compared to not pretreated solutions. PMID:16959289

  1. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Gula, Michael J.; Xue, Sui; Harvey, James T.

    2002-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  2. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato

    2001-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  3. Microbiology and biodegradation of resin acids in pulp mill effluents: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Liss, S N; Bicho, P A; Saddler, J N

    1997-07-01

    Resin acids, a group of diterpenoid carboxylic acids present mainly in softwood species, are present in many pulp mill effluents and toxic to fish in recipient waters. They are considered to be readily biodegradable. However, their removal across biological treatment systems has been shown to vary. Recent studies indicate that natural resin acids and transformation products may accumulate in sediments and pose acute and chronic toxicity to fish. Several resin acid biotransformation compounds have also been shown to bioaccumulate and to be more resistant to biodegradation than the original material. Until recently, the microbiology of resin-acid degradation has received only scant attention. Although wood-inhabiting fungi have been shown to decrease the level of resin present in wood, there is no conclusive evidence that fungi can completely degrade these compounds. In contrast, a number of bacterial isolates have recently been described which are able to utilize dehydroabietic or isopimaric acids as their sole carbon source. There appears to be an unusually high degree of substrate specificity with respect of the utilization of abietane congeners and the presence of substituents. Pimaranes do not appear to be attacked to the same extent as the abietanes. This paper reviews the occurrence, chemistry, toxicity, and biodegradation of resin acids in relation to the biological treatment of pulp and paper mill effluents. PMID:9246738

  4. Resin microtensile bond strength to feldspathic ceramic: hydrofluoric acid etching vs. tribochemical silica coating.

    PubMed

    Pelógia, Fernanda; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Brigagão, Vinicius; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Bottino, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic submitted to acid etching or chairside tribochemical silica coating. Ten blocks of Vitadur-alpha were randomly divided into 2 groups according to conditioning method: (1) etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid or (2) chairside tribochemical silica coating. Each ceramic block was luted to the corresponding resin composite block with the resin cement (Panavia F). Next, bar specimens were produced for microtensile testing. No significant difference was observed between the 2 experimental groups (Student ttest, P > .05). Both surface treatments showed similar microtensile bond strength values. PMID:17944345

  5. SuperLig(TM) 644 Ion Exchange Resin Stability in Nitric Acid at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2003-01-06

    In the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plan (RPP-WTP) flowsheet, opportunity exists for the organic SuperLig 644(TM) cation exchange resin to come in contact with concentrated (5 M) nitric acid at elevated temperatures in the acid recovery evaporator. These are similar conditions where other ion exchange resin (albeit usually anion) column explosions have occurred. The objective of these tests was to examine potential hazards by exposing the resin to conditions expected in the facility and examining the composition of the reaction products and their reactivity.

  6. Contact allergy due to colophony (III). Sensitizing potency of resin acids and some related products.

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M; Krueger, A; Mohnert, J; Hahn, H; König, W A

    1989-01-01

    7 resin acids, 3 synthetically prepared derivatives and the neutral fraction of Chinese colophony were studied by experimental sensitization using a modified FCA method. 4 resin acids, laevopimaric, abietic, podocarpic and tetrahydroabietic, proved to be weak sensitizers. Neoabietic, dehydroabietic, isopimaric acid and larixol remained negative. However, the derivatives, methyl abietate and calcium abietate, were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and the maleic-modified adduct to be a moderate to strong sensitizer. As laevopimaric acid plays only a minor rôle in colophony, abietic acid must be considered a major, even if weak, allergen in non-modified colophony. The neutral fraction of colophony is also partially involved in colophony allergy. PMID:2914435

  7. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  8. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  9. Separation of salvianic acid A from the fermentation broth of engineered Escherichia coli using macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen-Long; Zhao, Guang-Rong

    2015-08-01

    Salvianic acid A (also known as danshensu) is a plant-derived polyphenolic acid, and has a variety of physiological and pharmacological activities. Our laboratory previously constructed an unprecedented artificial biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli and established the fermentation process to produce salvianic acid A. Here, we developed an efficient method for separating salvianic acid A from the fermentation broth of engineered Escherichia coli by macroporous resins. Among ten tested macroporous resins, the static and dynamic adsorption/desorption experiments demonstrated that X5 resin was the best to separate salvianic acid A from fermentation broth. Other parameters during static and dynamic procedures were also investigated. Under the optimum separation conditions, the average adsorption capacity of SAA were 10.66±0.54 mg/g dry resin and the desorption ratio was 85.6±4.1%. The purity and recovery yield of salvianic acid A in the final dry product were 90.2±1.5 and 81.5±2.3%, respectively. The results show that adsorption separation with macroporous resin X5 was an efficient method to prepare salvianic acid A from fermentation broth. This work will benefit the development and application of plant-derived salvianic acid A and its derivatives. PMID:26097085

  10. Elution profiles of lanthanides with ?-hydroxyisobutyric acid by ion exchange chromatography using fine resin.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Rahul; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Sabharwal, Kanwal Nain; Prabhu, Krishan

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were carried out using a strong acid cation exchange resin with a particle size of 75-150 ?m, termed as "fine resin" in hydrogen ion form for the elution of individual lanthanides Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, and Dy that are produced as fission products in the spent nuclear fuel and generated in the effluent during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of concentration of nitric acid on distribution coefficient. The distribution coefficient values for these individual lanthanides were determined in nitric acid medium in the concentration range of 0.01-4.0 N. Uptake of each individual lanthanide by resin was increased with increased nitric acid concentration from 0.01 to 0.5 N and remained similar from 0.5 to 1.0 N and decreased thereafter up to 4.0 N. Column experiments were also carried out using the same resin to study the parameters like pH of the eluent, flow rate, and resin bed height under isocratic elution conditions for eluting lanthanide elements using ?-hydroxyisobutyric acid as eluent. The results of this study have indicated the possibility for the elution of individual lanthanides. PMID:26333182

  11. Isolation of hydrophilic organic acids from water using nonionic macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.; McKnight, Diane M.; Thorn, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for the isolation of hydrophilic organic acids from aquatic environments using Amberlite* * Use of trade names in this report is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey. XAD-4 resin. The method uses a two column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in series. The hydrophobic organic acids, composed primarily of aquatic fulvic acid, are removed from the sample on XAD-8, followed by the isolation of the more hydrophilic organic acids on XAD-4. For samples from a number of diverse environments, more of the dissolved organic carbon was isolated on the XAD-8 resin (23-58%) than on the XAD-4 resin (7-25%). For these samples, the hydrophilic acids have lower carbon and hydrogen contents, higher oxygen and nitrogen contents, and are lower in molecular weight than the corresponding fulvic acids. 13C NMR analyses indicate that the hydrophilic acids have a lower concentration of aromatic carbon and greater heteroaliphatic, ketone and carboxyl content than the fulvic acid. ?? 1992.

  12. Large scale purification of puerarin from Puerariae Lobatae Radix through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Qing-Feng; Chen, Ji-Guang; Shangguang, Xin-Cheng; Guo, Yu-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Puerarin is the major isoflavone of Puerariae Lobatae Radix. A method for large scale purification of puerarin was developed through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis. The adsorption properties of six macroporous resins (D101, S-8, H103, X-5, HPD600, AB-8) were compared through the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium adsorption isotherms. Results showed that H103 resin had the best adsorption rate and capacity. The mass transfer zone motion model was further used for analyzing the fixed bed adsorption of H103 resin. Its length of mass transfer zone with 2mg/ml of puerarin in water and 10% ethanol at flow rate of 10ml/min were 41.6 and 47.5cm, while the equilibrium adsorption capacity was 165.03 and 102.88mg/g, respectively. By using 75% ethanol, puerarin could be well desorbed from the resin with recovery of 97.4%. Subsequently, H103 resin was successfully used for puerarin purification from Puerariae Lobatae Radix. The content of total isoflavones and puerarin in the resin adsorption product were 69.25% and 41.78%, respectively, which were about three times increased compared to the crude extract. Then, the product was hydrolyzed by 2.5M HCl at 90°C for 1h. Puerarin with purity of 90% and a byproduct daidzein with purity of 78% were obtained. PMID:25553536

  13. Determination of resin acid composition in rosin samples using cyclodextrin-modified capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Louise; Regan, Fiona; Burns, Barry; Leonard, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Rosins are used in a wide variety of industries in varnishes, adhesives, drug coatings, etc. In this project a novel capillary electrophoresis method was developed to investigate the resin acid composition of rosins. The acids were separated and the concentrations of individual acids present in gum rosin samples determined in order to investigate any links between the presence and concentration of these acids and the tendency of rosins to crystallize. The capillary electrophoresis method successfully separated nine resin acids in various rosin samples where previously they could not all be separated. Calibration curves were created to determine acid concentration. Abietic, dehydroabietic, neoabietic, pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric, sandaracopimaric, palustric, and 7-oxo-dehydroabietic acids were separated using a 20 mM tris buffer at pH 9 containing 15% methanol 5 mM (2-hydroxypropyl)-?-cyclodextrin 10 mM sulfobutylether-?-cyclodextrin. Their concentrations in a crystallizing and a noncrystallizing rosin sample were determined. PMID:25066937

  14. Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

  15. Biological degradation of resin acids in wood chips by wood-inhabiting fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Chen, T; Gao, Y; Breuil, C; Hiratsuka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Resin acids in many pulp mill effluents are primary sources of toxicity to fish. Inconsistent biological detoxification of chlorinated and nonchlorinated resin acids in secondary treatment of pulp mill effluents is a continuing source of concern. An alternative approach to effluent detoxification is to remove or modify the toxic compounds present in wood chips prior to pulping. Results from experiments in which lodgepole pine sapwood chips were inoculated with several fungal candidates indicate that the total resin acid content can be reduced by up to 67% after fungal growth. Such a treatment could be an efficient and environmentally acceptable way for deresinating wood chips and so decreasing the toxicity of pulp mill effluents. PMID:7887603

  16. Exposure to acid anhydrides in three resin and one cushioned flooring manufacturing plants.

    PubMed

    van Tongeren, M J; Barker, R D; Gardiner, K; Harris, J M; Venables, K M; Taylor, A J; Harrington, J M

    1995-10-01

    Acid anhydrides are reactive organic chemicals of low molecular weight which cause occupational asthma. No previous research on the relationship between exposure to these chemicals and respiratory sensitization and development of occupational asthma has been reported. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in four factories (three alkyd resin factories and one cushioned flooring factory) to investigate the nature of exposure-response relationships for sensitization to phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and maleic anhydride (MA). This paper describes the results of full-shift and task-specific exposure measurements. Exposure to PA was low in relation to the Occupational Exposure Standard (OES). The highest full-shift PA exposures occurred among resin operators in the resin factory that used solid PA as compared to other resin factories where liquid PA was used. Arithmetic mean exposure levels to TMA and MA in the resin factories were well below their respective OESs. Short-term high exposures occurred during loading of acid anhydrides into the reactors and sampling and testing of the resin. Relatively high full-shift exposure to TMA occurred in the cushioned flooring factory, although no high peak exposures were detected. PMID:8526391

  17. Diterpene resin acids: Major active principles in tall oil against Variegated cutworm,Peridroma saucia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Isman, M B; Feng, Y; Wong, A

    1993-06-01

    Tall oil, a by-product of the kraft process for pulping softwood, has been shown to have insecticidal properties. In the present study, the active principles in tall oil against the variegated cutworm,Peridroma saucia Hübner, were investigated. GC-MS analysis showed that abietic, dehydroabietic, and isopimaric acids were major resin acid components of crude tall oil and depitched tall oil. When crude tall oil samples of differing resin acid composition were incorporated into artificial diet at a concentration of 2.0% fresh weight, they suppressed larval growth by 45-60% compared to controls. This suppression was significantly (P?0.05) correlated with the equivalent contents of abietic, dehydroabietic, isopimaric, and total resin acids. These results were also evident from a diet choice test, showing that the second-instar larvae obviously selected diets with low levels of resin acids when different diets were randomly arranged in a Petri dish. Bioassays with pure resin acids (abietic, dehydroabietic, and isopimaric acids) demonstrated that all individual chemicals have similar bioactivity against this insect. Comparison of the bioactivities of depitched tall oil and an equivalent mixture of pure resin acids in thePeridroma chronic growth bioassay indicated that pure resin acids and depitched tall oil share a common mode of action to this insect. This study confirms that resin acids are major active principles in tall oil against the variegated cutworm, but other chemicals likely also contribute to the bioactivity of tall oil. PMID:24249127

  18. Crypthophilic acids A, B, and C: resin glycosides from aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila.

    PubMed

    Cali?, Ihsan; Sezgin, Yükselen; Dönmez, Ali A; Rüedi, Peter; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2007-01-01

    The water-soluble part of the methanolic extract from the aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila, through chromatographic methods, yielded three new resin glycosides, crypthophilic acids A - C (1-3). Compounds 1-3 are tetraglycosides of (+)-3S,12S-dihydroxypalmitic acid. The structures of these and 10 known compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical means. All natural resin glycosides known so far have been obtained from Convolvulaceae plants; this is the first report of such glycosides from another, taxonomically unrelated family (Scrophulariaceae). PMID:17253848

  19. Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

  20. In situ separation of lactic acid from fermentation broth using ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Seyed Ahmad; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim

    2008-11-01

    Lactic acid fermentation is an end product inhibited reaction. In situ separation of lactic acid from fermentation broth using ion exchange resins was investigated and compared with conventional fermentation system. Amberlite resin (IRA-400, Cl-) was used to separate lactic acid from fermentation broth and pH was controlled online with an automatic pH controller. The effect of process variables on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei in whey permeate was studied. The maximum productivity was obtained at pH=6.1, T=37 degrees C and impeller speed=200 rpm. The maximum concentration of lactic acid at optimum condition was found to be 37.4 g/L after 38 h of fermentation using in situ separation system. The productivity of in situ separation system was five times increased in comparison with conventional system. PMID:18712554

  1. Synthesis, characterization and applications of a new cation exchanger tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Rathore, Abhay S

    2012-01-01

    A new composite cation exchanger, tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin has been synthesized. The chemically modified TSA ion exchange resin has been used for the removal and preconcentration of Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Cu2+ ions in aqueous solution and effluent from the Laxmi steel plant in Jodhpur, India. This type of composite represents a new class of hybrid ion exchangers with good ion exchange capacity, stability, reproducibility and selectivity for toxic metal ions found in effluent from the steel industry. The characterization of the resin was carried out by determining the ion-exchange capacity, elemental analysis, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of toxic metal ions were determined in a reference aqueous solution and the steel plant effluent at different pH values; the absorbency of different metal ions on the TSA resin was studied for up to 10 cycles. The adsorption of different metal ions on TSA resin follows the order: Co2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Cd2+. The ion exchange capacity of TSA resin is 2.87%. PMID:22629619

  2. A method for the production of weakly acidic cation exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H.; Werner, F.; Mitschker, A.; Diehl, H. V.; Schaefer, A.

    1991-12-01

    The invention relates to a nonpolluting method for the production of weakly acidic cation exchange resins by saponification of cross-linked acrylonitrile bead polymers, with an alkaline saponification agent at elevated temperature, according to which method the bead polymer and alkaline saponification agent are jointly added only at elevated temperature.

  3. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  4. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  5. Evaluation of liquid chromatography-negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry for the determination of selected resin acids in river water.

    PubMed

    McMartin, Dena W; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Winkler, Marcus; Gillies, Jon A

    2002-04-01

    A liquid chromatography-negative ion electrospray mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) method was evaluated for detection of four prevalent softwood-derived resin acids in natural water. Method detection limits based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1 in river water samples of 0.40, 0.40, 0.30 and 0.25 microg l(-1) for abietic, dehydroabietic, isopimaric and pimaric acids, respectively, are comparable or lower than reported GC methods. Unlike the majority of GC methods, however, the three structural resin acid isomers (abietic, isopimaric and pimaric acids) do not separate sufficiently under the various LC conditions evaluated in this work. Therefore, LC-ESI-MS may not be suitable for instances where measurement of individual isomeric resin acids is required. However, the method is suitable for trace analysis of resin acids in natural waters where isomeric speciation is not required. PMID:12064541

  6. Embryo resorptions in mice induced by diterpene resin acids of Pinus ponderosa needles.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Y M; Jackson, L L

    1981-01-01

    Ingestion of hexane extract of Pinus ponderosa needles causes reproductive failure in mice during the early stages of gestation. Virgin mice of the ICR strain were mated with males of proven fertility. The day the copulatory plug was observed was designated day 1 of gestation. Hexane extracts were administered daily via stomach tube at various concentrations and for various feeding periods. Implantation sites were stained by injections of pontamine sky blue dye on day 8 of gestation, fifteen minutes before sacrifice by cervical dislocation. Embryonic resorptions were observed in the uterus. The active components of the hexane extracts were isolated and identified as a mixture of diterpene resin acids. The diterpene resin acids are pimaric, isopimaric, sandaracopimaric, palustric/levopimaric, abietic, dehydroabietic and neoabietic acid. PMID:7226845

  7. Acute effects of chlorinated resin acid exposure on juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.J.; Sweeting, R.M.; Farrell, A.P.; McKeown, B.A.; Johansen, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    The effects of an acute exposure to either 14-monochlorodehydroabietic acid (MCDHAA) or 12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid (DCDHAA) were examined in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The experimentally determined 96-h LC50 values (and their 95% confidence limits) were 1.03 (0.72, 1.48) and 0.91 (0.70, 1.21) mg/L, for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively. To measure effects on several biochemical parameters, swimming performance, and disease resistance, juvenile trout were exposed for 24 h to sublethal concentrations of one or the other resin acid in an intermittent-flow respirometer. Hematocrit, plasma lactate, and liver protein were significantly affected by exposure to the highest dose (80% of the 96-h LC50 value) of either of the resin acids. Plasma cortisol levels were 14- and 3-fold higher than were controls. Resistance to infection by Aeromonas salmonicida was significantly reduced; the cumulative percent mortalities due to furunculosis in fish exposed to MCDHAA or DCDHAA reached 20 and 26%, respectively. Swimming performance, measured as critical swimming speed (mean values 6.32 {+-} 0.20 and 5.93 {+-} 0.15 body lengths per second for MCDHAA and DCDHAA, respectively), was not significantly affected by resin acid exposure.

  8. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks. PMID:26830822

  9. Mutagenicity of resin acids identified in pulp and paper mill effluents using the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Nestmann, E R; Lee, E G; Mueller, J C; Douglas, G R

    1979-01-01

    Ten resin acids which have been identified as constituents of pulp and paper mill effluents have been examined for potential mutagenicity in the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome assay. Only neoabietic acid has been found to be mutagenic. Neoabietic acid showed dose-related increases in mutagenicity in strains TA1535, TA100, TA1538, and TA98, but not in strain TA1537. Metabolic activation with a preparation of Aroclor 1254-induced liver homogenate (S9) slightly reduced the mutagenic responses. Negative responses were found for abietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, levopimaric acid, 7-oxodehydroabietic acid, monochlorodehydroabietic acid, dichlorodehydroabietic acid, pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. PMID:399918

  10. Influence of diterpene resin acids on feeding and growth of larch sawfly,Pristiphora erichsonii (Hartig).

    PubMed

    Wagner, M R; Benjamin, D M; Clancy, K M; Schuh, B A

    1983-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids significantly affect consumption rates, feeding efficiencies, and growth rates of the larch sawfly,Pristiphora erichsonii (Hartig) when topically applied to their natural food, tamarackLarix laricina (DuRoi) K. Koch. Abietic acid, neoabietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and isopimaric acid significantly reduced consumption rates, feeding efficiencies, and growth rates. Sandaracopimaric acid reduced growth and efficiency but did not influence consumption rate. Two-way analysis of variance indicates a significant interaction between chemical and concentration for growth rate, feeding efficiency, and consumption rate. This interaction indicates that increasing chemical concentrations do not influence the larch sawfly in a uniform manner, supporting the concept of concentration-dependent biological activity of allelochemics. PMID:24408625

  11. The application of macroporous resins in the separation of licorice flavonoids and glycyrrhizic acid.

    PubMed

    Fu, Boqiang; Liu, Jie; Li, Huan; Li, Lei; Lee, Frank S C; Wang, Xiaoru

    2005-09-30

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and licorice flavonoids (LF) are the two classes of bioactive components in licorice with known pharmacological effects. But long-term excessive intake of GA may cause sodium retention and hypertension. In this study, the performance and adsorption characteristics of four widely used macroporous resins for the separation of deglycyrrhizinated, flavonoids enriched licorice has been critically evaluated. The sorption and desorption properties of LF and GA on macroporous resins including XDA-1, LSA-10, D101 and LSA-20 have been compared. The adsorption capacity was found to depend strongly on the pH of the feed solution. XDA-1 offers much higher adsorption capacity for GA and LF than other resins, and its adsorption data fit the best to the Freundlich isotherm. XDA-1 also shows much higher adsorption affinity towards LF than that of GA based on calculated results from the measured adsorption isotherms. Dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments have been carried out on a XDA-1 resin packed column to obtain optimal parameters for separating GA and LF. An enriched LF extract (about 21.9% purity) free of GA, and an enriched GA extract with 66% purity can be separated from crude licorice extract in one run. PMID:16130766

  12. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-22

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

  13. Fabrication of dissolved O2 metric uric acid biosensor using uricase epoxy resin biocomposite membrane.

    PubMed

    Arora, Jyoti; Nandwani, Seep; Bhambi, Manu; Pundir, C S

    2009-08-11

    Uricase purified from 20-day-old leaves of cowpea was immobilized on to epoxy resin membrane with 80% retention of initial activity of free enzyme and a conjugation yield of 0.056 mg/cm(2). The uricase epoxy resin bioconjugate membrane was mounted over the sensing part of the combined electrode of 'Aqualytic' dissolved O(2) (DO) meter to construct a uric acid biosensor. The biosensor measures the depletion of dissolved O(2) during the oxidation of uric acid by immobilized uricase, which is directly proportional to uric acid concentration. The biosensor showed optimum response within 10-12s at a pH 8.5 and 35 degrees C. A linear relationship was found between uric acid concentration from 0.025 to 0.1 mM and O(2) (mg/l) consumed. The biosensor was employed for measurement of uric acid in serum. The mean value of uric acid in serum was 4.92 mg/dl in apparently healthy males and 3.11 mg/dl in apparently healthy females. The mean analytic recoveries of added uric acid in reaction mixture (8.9 and 9.8 mg/dl) were 93.6 +/- 2.34 and 87.18 +/- 3.17% respectively. The within and between batch CVs were < 6.5 and < 5.0%, respectively. The serum uric acid values obtained by present method and standard enzymic colorimetric method, showed a good correlation (r - 0.996) and regression equation being y - 0.984x + 0.0674. Among the various metabolites tested only, glucose (11%), urea (38%), NaCl (25%) and cholesterol (13%) and ascorbic acid (56%) caused decrease, while, MgSO(4) and CaCl(2) had no effect on immobilized enzyme. The enzyme electrode showed only 32% decrease during its use for 100 times over a period of 60 days at 4 degrees C. PMID:19591705

  14. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37? for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (?=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  15. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2009-10-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: (I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse adhesive using moist bonding; (II) XP Bond using dry bonding; (III) Adper Prompt L-Pop, a self-etching adhesive. The control medium contained only set Portland cement and a simulated body fluid (SBF) without any biomimetic analog. Two experimental Portland cement/SBF remineralization media were evaluated: the first contained PAA as the sole biomimetic analog, the second contained PAA and PVPA as dual biomimetic analogs. No remineralization of the resin-dentin interfaces could be identified from specimens immersed in the control medium. After 2-4 months in the first experimental medium, specimens exhibited either no remineralization or large crystal formation within hybrid layers. Only specimens immersed in the second remineralization medium produced nanocrystals that accounted for intrafibrillar remineralization within hybrid layers. The null hypothesis could not be rejected; phosphoric acid esters in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during biomimetic remineralization of adhesive-bonded dentin. PMID:19481792

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  17. Beyond cholesterol lowering: pleiotropic effects of bile acid binding resins against cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Tojo, Taiki; Izumi, Tohru

    2008-10-01

    Prospective epidemiologic studies have shown that dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia are major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Undesirable metabolic conditions are observed to coexist in patients with metabolic syndrome, which is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To prevent cardiovascular disease, a pleiotropic agent is needed to improve the metabolic disorder in patients with metabolic syndrome. Bile acid binding resins increase the fecal excretion of bile acids. The decrease in bile acids returned to the liver leads to an up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity, which decreases LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) in the circulation and increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. On the other hand, bile acids can also regulate the transcription of genes involved in LDL-C synthesis and cholesterol homeostasis via nuclear hormone receptors. Consequently, these receptors may represent novel therapeutic targets for dyslipidemia and provide insight into the role of the bile acid pathway in other metabolic processes. This review focuses on the recent findings on bile acid binding resins and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Moreover, known and proposed mechanisms of how bile acid binding resins may improve glucose and energy metabolism are discussed; these effects may help to explain the mechanisms by which bile acid binding resins may reduce cardiovascular disease. PMID:18855715

  18. Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Sara M; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-03-15

    Asphaltene precipitation occurs in petroleum fluids under certain unfavorable conditions, but can be controlled by tuning composition. Aromatic solvents in large quantities can prevent precipitation entirely and can dissolve already precipitated asphaltenes. Some polymeric surfactants can dissolve asphaltenes when added at much lower concentrations than required by aromatic solvents. Other dispersants can truncate asphaltene precipitation at the sub-micron length scale, creating stable colloidal asphaltene dispersants. One particular asphaltene dispersant, dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA), can do both, namely: (1) stabilize asphaltene colloids and (2) dissolve asphaltenes to the molecular scale. Acid-base interactions are responsible for the efficiency of DBSA in dissolving asphaltenes compared to aromatic solvents. However, many details remain to be quantified regarding the action of DBSA on asphaltenes, including the effect of petroleum fluid composition. For instance, resins, naturally amphiphilic components of petroleum fluids, can associate with asphaltenes, but it is unknown whether they cooperate or compete with DBSA. Similarly, the presence of metals is known to hinder asphaltene dissolution by DBSA, but its effect on colloidal asphaltene stabilization has yet to be considered. We introduce the concepts of cooperativity and competition between petroleum fluid components and DBSA in stabilizing and dissolving asphaltenes. Notably, we find that resins cooperatively interact with DBSA in dissolving asphaltenes. We use UV-vis spectroscopy to investigate the interactions responsible for the phase transitions between unstable suspensions, stable suspensions, and molecular solutions of asphaltenes. PMID:23351475

  19. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-05-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL- and Cu2L22-) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids.

  20. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu(2+) and CuHL(0)) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL(-) and Cu2L2(2-)) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids. PMID:25962970

  1. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL− and Cu2L22−) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids. PMID:25962970

  2. Solid phase extraction purification of carboxylic acid products from 96-well format solution phase synthesis with DOWEX 1x8-400 formate anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Bookser, B C; Zhu, S

    2001-01-01

    The anion exchange resin DOWEX 1x8-400 formate has been developed for the isolation or resin capture of carboxylic acids from solution phase reactions in a 96-well format using a batchwise solid phase extraction technique. Eleven different anion exchange resins (formate forms) were evaluated for their efficiency at scavenging aryl and aliphatic carboxylic acids from solution. The model carboxylic acids had pK(a)s ranging from 3.40 to 4.89. Exchange efficiency onto the resin was pK(a) dependent with the carboxylic acids but not with their diisopropylethylammonium salts. Exchange off of the resin also showed pK(a) dependence with the stronger acids requiring more concentrated solvent acid for exchange. DOWEX 1x8-400 formate was determined to have superior capacity and the fastest exchange rate. Solvents suitable for exchanging the acids onto the resin were CH2Cl2, methanol, and various solvent/water mixtures. Solvents suitable for exchanging the carboxylic acids off of the resin were TFA/solvent or HCO2H/solvent mixtures. The resin was found to swell best in CH2Cl2 and in polar protic solvents such as water, alcohols, and acids. Application of this technique to the crude product mixtures from an arrayed reductive amination and an arrayed Stille reaction provided product carboxylic acids in yields averaging 57% and purities averaging 89%. PMID:11300862

  3. Identification of dehydroabietc acid from Boswellia thurifera resin as a positive GABAA receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Diana C; Raith, Melanie; De Mieri, Maria; Schöffmann, Angela; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay with Xenopus laevis oocytes, a petroleum ether extract (100 ?g/mL) of the resin of Boswellia thurifera (Burseraceae) potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through receptors of the subtype ??????s by 319.8% ± 79.8%. With the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, three known terpenoids, dehydroabietic acid (1), incensole (2), and AKBA (3), were identified in the active fractions of the extract. Structure elucidation was achieved by means of HR-MS and microprobe 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 induced significant receptor modulation in the oocyte assay, with a maximal potentiation of IGABA of 397.5% ± 34.0%, and EC?? of 8.7 ?M ± 1.3 ?M. This is the first report of dehydroabietic acid as a positive GABAA receptor modulator. PMID:25200370

  4. Antibacterial and Biofilm-Disrupting Coatings from Resin Acid-Derived Materials.

    PubMed

    Ganewatta, Mitra S; Miller, Kristen P; Singleton, S Parker; Mehrpouya-Bahrami, Pegah; Chen, Yung P; Yan, Yi; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Decho, Alan W; Tang, Chuanbing

    2015-10-12

    We report antibacterial, antibiofilm, and biocompatible properties of surface-immobilized, quaternary ammonium-containing, resin acid-derived compounds and polycations that are known to be efficient antimicrobial agents with minimum toxicities to mammalian cells. Surface immobilization was carried out by the employment of two robust, efficient chemical methods: Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition click reaction, and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were strong. Hemolysis assays and the growth of human dermal fibroblasts on the modified surfaces evidenced their biocompatibility. We demonstrate that the grafting of quaternary ammonium-decorated abietic acid compounds and polymers from surfaces enables the incorporation of renewable biomass in an effective manner to combat bacteria and biofilm formation in biomedical applications. PMID:26324023

  5. Development and validation of chemical and biological analyses to determine the antiestrogenic potency of resin acids in paper mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Shiraishi, Fujio; Fukazawa, Hitoshi; Makino, Masakazu

    2009-12-15

    This study combined chemical analysis and bioassays of paper mill effluents and their components in order to determine their antiestrogenic activity. The bioassay comprised a yeast two-hybrid assay incorporating the estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and an hERalpha competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples were fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE) with a C18 disk and a Florisil cartridge to obtain four fractions. The final fraction, eluted with methanol from the Florisil cartridge after pre-extraction by the C18 disk, was the most active in the two-hybrid assay, and its antiestrogenic potency, expressed as the equivalent concentration to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), was 277 nM. Seven resin acids had antiestrogenic activity in the active fraction as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and their concentration levels ranged from 0.11 to 12 microg/L. All the resin acids exhibited greater activity than OHT; their activity relative to OHT ranged from 2.8- to 4.0-fold in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Based on the chemical analysis data and relative potency of resin acids from the yeast two-hybrid assay, the contribution ratio of resin acids accounted for 72% of the observed antiestrogenic activity of the extract. Furthermore, no resin acid showed any affinity for the estrogen receptor in the ELISA. This study showed that analysis combining the SPE method and the yeast two-hybrid assay is likely to be effective for the comprehensive monitoring of resin acids in paper mill industrial discharge areas. PMID:20000523

  6. Affinity purification of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from electroplax with resins selective for sialic acid

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.M.; Emerick, M.C.; Agnew, W.S. )

    1989-07-11

    The voltage-sensitive sodium channel present in the eel (Electrophorus electricus) has an unusually high content of sialic acid, including {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-linked polysialic acid, not found in other electroplax membrane glycopeptides. Lectins from Limax flavus (LFA) and wheat germ (WGA) proved the most effective of 11 lectin resins tried. The most selective resin was prepared from IgM antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-polysialic acid which were affinity purified and coupled to Sepharose 4B. The sodium channel was found to bind to WGA, LFA, and IgM resins and was readily eluted with the appropriate soluble carbohydrates. Experiments with LFA and IgM resins demonstrated binding and unbinding rates and displacement kinetics, which suggest highly specific binding at multiple sites on the sodium channel protein. In preparative-scale purification of protein previously fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, without stabilizing TTX, high yields were reproducibly obtained. Further, when detergent extracts were prepared from electroplax membranes fractionated by low-speed sedimentation, a single step over the IgM resin provided a 70-fold purification, yielding specific activities of 3,200 pmol of ({sup 3}H)TTX-binding sites/mg of protein and a single polypeptide of {approximately}285,000 Da on SDS-acrylamide gels. No small peptides were observed after this 5-h isolation. The authors describe a cation-dependent stabilization with millimolar levels of monovalent and micromolar levels of divalent species.

  7. Disinfecting the acrylic resin plate using electrolyzed acid water and 2% glutaraldehyde: a comparative microbiological study.

    PubMed

    Jnanadev, K R; Satish Babu, C L; Shilpa Shetty, S; Surendra Kumar, G P; Sheetal, H S

    2011-03-01

    Marked bactericidal activity of the electrolyzed acid water (EAW) and its less undesirable effects on biological tissues and the environment has been successfully utilized in dental practice. A review of literature reveals that not many studies have been performed to determine the disinfection effect of EAW on heat cured acrylic denture bases. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of EAW in disinfecting heat cured acrylic resin specimens as compared to the efficacy of disinfecting the specimens using 2% glutaraldehyde. Heat cured acrylic resin plates were immersed in Bacteria suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus and later disinfected using EAW which was produced using a custom made electrolyzing apparatus and 2% glutaraldehyde for different time intervals. The numbers of surviving bacteria were counted. As the control, the bacteria attached on the specimens were counted with out any disinfection treatment. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc test. The disinfection potential of 2% glutaraldehyde was better than EAW when the specimens were disinfected for 1 and 3 min. Where as when the disinfection time was increased to 5 min there was no difference between EAW and 2% glutaraldehyde. However considering that the disinfecting time can be easily extended to 5 min, EAW can be effectively used for disinfecting the acrylic denture. PMID:22379304

  8. Impregnated resins containing di-(2-ethylhexyl) thiophosphoric acid for the extraction of palladium(II). 2: Selective palladium(II) recovery from hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rovira, M.; Cortina, J.L.; Arnaldos, J.; Sastre, A.M.

    1999-03-01

    The extraction of Pd(II) from HCl solutions by impregnated resins containing di(2-ethylhexyl) thiophosphoric acid (DEHTPA or HL) on the Amberlite XAD2 polymeric support has been studied. Graphical and computer analysis with the program LETAGROP-DISTR demonstrated that the Pd(II) extraction can be explained by the formation of metal complexes in the resin phase having the composition PdL{sub 2}(HL){sub 2}. DEHTPA/XAD2 resins extracted Pd(II) in the presence of other metals: Pt(IV), Rh(III), Cu(II), Fe(III) as well as Zn(II). The stripping of Pd(II) loaded on the organic phase and the lifetime of the resins were also investigated.

  9. Sorption of dicyanoaurate anions by novel resins containing N,N{prime}-substituted diamides of malonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Trochimczuk, A.W.; Kolarz, B.N.; Jermakowicz-Bartkowiak, D.; Apostoluk, W.

    1999-08-01

    Two novel ion-exchange/coordinating resins have been synthesized and used in the sorption of dicyanoaurate anions, Au(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}, from aqueous solution from their mixtures with Fe(III) cyano complexes, Ag(I) cyano complexes, Zn(II) cyano complexes, Fe(II) cyano complexes, Cu(II) cyano complexes, and from solutions containing all of the above species. It has been found that Resin 1 containing the N,N{prime}-substituted amide of malonic acid with terminal guanidyl groups is able to remove ca. 10 mg Au/g, and Resin 2 containing the N,N{prime}-substituted amide of malonic acid with terminal imidazole groups removes ca. 13 mg Au/g from the above solutions when there is an initial concentration of 5.08 mg Au/dm{sup 3}. Resin 1 is selective toward gold over all metals but Fe(II). Resin 2 is more selective, and when sorption is carried out from the solution formulated with all the metals displays the following selectivity coefficients: of gold over Fe(II) + Fe(III), +{infinity}; of gold over Ag(I), +{infinity}; of gold over Zn(II), 3.79; and of gold over Cu(II), 2.81.

  10. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  11. Microplate filtration assay for nicotinamide release from NAD using a boronic acid resin.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Thomas; Hixon, Jeffrey; DiStefano, Peter S; Curtis, Rory; Napper, Andrew D

    2005-08-01

    We describe a microplate-based assay for NAD-dependent Class III histone deacetylases (also known as SIRTs) that measures the enzyme-catalyzed release of nicotinamide from radiolabeled NAD, using a boronic acid resin to selectively capture the NAD. This method avoids the need for fluorogenic or radiolabeled peptides or separation of the reaction products using solvent extraction. The protocol reported here is rapid and uses commercially available materials. The use of a simple microplate filtration device allows for the simultaneous processing of 96 samples, facilitating enzyme kinetic analyses and inhibition studies. Furthermore, monitoring nicotinamide release rather than peptide deacetylation obviates the need for chemical modification of protein and peptide substrates. This assay is applicable to SIRTs and other enzymes that cleave nicotinamide from NAD. PMID:16085423

  12. Fixed bed adsorption of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid from aqueous solution by composite resin.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dong M; Li, Ya P; Li, Yue J; Li, Yong G; Li, Chang H

    2014-02-01

    Adsorption behavior of the iron impregnated, weakly basic resin D301 (Fe-D301) for removal of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (2-NSA) from aqueous solution was studied by using a fixed-bed column. The effects of process variables such as bed height, flow rate, and coexisting ions were investigated. The results indicated that the breakpoint and exhaustion point increased with increasing bed height and decreased with increasing 2-NSA flowrate. Experimental data showed a strong fit to the Bed Depth Service Time model. The coexisting ions in the 2-NSA solution had a clear effect on the breakthrough volume. The high extent of recovery of 2-NSA with good reproducibility provided an effective method for the separation of 2-NSA by the adsorbent Fe-D301. PMID:24645539

  13. Recovery of nickel and cobalt from organic acid complexes: adsorption mechanisms of metal-organic complexes onto aminophosphonate chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Deepatana, A; Valix, M

    2006-09-21

    This study examined the recovery of nickel and cobalt from organic acid complexes using a chelating aminophosphonate Purolite S950 resin. These metal complexes are generated by bioleaching nickel laterite ores, a commercial nickel and cobalt mineral oxide, with heterotrophic organism and their metabolites or organic acid products. Equilibrium adsorption tests were conducted as a function of Ni and Co concentrations (15-2000 mg/L), solution pH (0.01 and 0.1 M acids) and three metabolic complexing agents (citrate, malate and lactate). It was shown that the adsorption of the various Ni- and Co-complexes on Purolite were quite low, 16-18 and 5.4-9 mg/g of resin, respectively, in comparison to the smaller nickel ions and nickel sulfate. This was attributed to the bulky organic ligands which promoted crowding effect or steric hindrance. The adsorption of these complexes was further hampered by the strong affinity of the resin to H+ ions under acidic conditions. Mechanisms of adsorption, as inferred from the fitted empirical Langmuir and Freundlich models, were correlated to the proposed steric hindrance and competitive adsorption effects. Nickel and cobalt elution from the resin were found be effective and were independent of the type of metal complexes and metal concentrations. This study demonstrated the relative challenges involved in recovering nickel and cobalt from bioleaching solutions. PMID:16698178

  14. Bile Acid Binding Resin Improves Metabolic Control through the Induction of Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Houten, Sander M.; Kaneko-Iwasaki, Nao; Sugizaki, Taichi; Horai, Yasushi; Mataki, Chikage; Sato, Hiroyuki; Murahashi, Karin; Arita, Eri; Schoonjans, Kristina; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Itoh, Hiroshi; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Background Besides well-established roles of bile acids (BA) in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, it has recently become clear that BA is also a biological signaling molecule. We have shown that strategies aimed at activating TGR5 by increasing the BA pool size with BA administration may constitute a significant therapeutic advance to combat the metabolic syndrome and suggest that such strategies are worth testing in a clinical setting. Bile acid binding resin (BABR) is known not only to reduce serum cholesterol levels but also to improve glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in animal models and humans. However, the mechanisms by which BABR affects glucose homeostasis have not been established. We investigated how BABR affects glycemic control in diet-induced obesity models. Methods and Findings We evaluated the metabolic effect of BABR by administrating colestimide to animal models for the metabolic syndrome. Administration of BABR increased energy expenditure, translating into significant weight reduction and insulin sensitization. The metabolic effects of BABR coincide with activation of cholesterol and BA synthesis in liver and thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Interestingly, these effects of BABR occur despite normal food intake and triglyceride absorption. Administration of BABR and BA had similar effects on BA composition and thermogenesis, suggesting that they both are mediated via TGR5 activation. Conclusion Our data hence suggest that BABR could be useful for the management of the impaired glucose tolerance of the metabolic syndrome, since they not only lower cholesterol levels, but also reduce obesity and improve insulin resistance. PMID:22952571

  15. Separation of Technetium in Nitric Acid Solution With an Extractant Impregnated Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Jei Kwon Moon; Eil Hee Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Byung Chul Lee

    2006-07-01

    An extractant impregnated resin (EIR) was prepared by impregnation of Aliquat 336 into Amberlite XAD-4 for separation of technetium from rhodium in nitric acid solution. The prepared EIR showed high preference for rhenium (chemical analogue of technetium) over rhodium. The adsorption isotherms for rhenium were described well by Langmuir equation in both the single and multi-component systems. Maximum adsorption capacities obtained by modelling the isotherms of rhenium were 2.01 meq g{sup -1} and 1.97 meq g{sup -1} for the single and the multi-component systems, respectively. Column tests were also performed to confirm the separation efficiency of rhenium using a jacketed glass column (diam. 11 x L 150). The EIR column showed successful separation of rhenium with the breakthrough volume of about 122 BV for the breakthrough concentration of 0.08. Also the breakthrough data were modelled successfully by assuming a homogeneous diffusion model in the particle phase. The diffusivities obtained from the modelling were in the order of 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} min{sup -1} for a rhenium. The rhenium adsorbed on the bed could be eluted with a high purity by using a nitric acid solution. (authors)

  16. Novel bioactive polyester scaffolds prepared from unsaturated resins based on isosorbide and succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Smiga-Matuszowicz, Monika; Janicki, Bartosz; Jaszcz, Katarzyna; ?ukaszczyk, Jan; Kaczmarek, Marcin; Lesiak, Marta; Siero?, Aleksander L; Simka, Wojciech; Mierzwi?ski, Maciej; Kusz, Damian

    2014-12-01

    In this study new biodegradable materials obtained by crosslinking poly(3-allyloxy-1,2-propylene succinate) (PSAGE) with oligo(isosorbide maleate) (OMIS) and small amount of methyl methacrylate were investigated. The porous scaffolds were obtained in the presence of a foaming system consisted of calcium carbonate/carboxylic acid mixture, creating in situ porous structure during crosslinking of liquid formulations. The maximum crosslinking temperature and setting time, the cured porous materials morphology as well as the effect of their porosity on mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation process were evaluated. It was found that the kind of carboxylic acid used in the foaming system influenced compressive strength and compressive modulus of porous scaffolds. The MTS cytotoxicity assay was carried out for OMIS using hFOB1.19 cell line. OMIS resin was found to be non-toxic in wide range of concentrations. On the ground of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and energy X-ray dispersive analysis (EDX) it was found that hydroxyapatite (HA) formation at the scaffolds surfaces within short period of soaking in phosphate buffer solution occurs. After 3h immersion a compact layer of HA was observed at the surface of the samples. The obtained results suggest potential applicability of resulted new porous crosslinked polymeric materials as temporary bone void fillers. PMID:25491802

  17. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  18. Resin bonding to Er: YAG laser-irradiated dentin: combined effects of pre-treatments with citric acid and glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, A; Oda, Y; Hirai, Y; Kawada, E; Takizawa, M

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of citric acid and glutaraldehyde (GA) on the resin bonding to Er: YAG laser-irradiated dentin. Bovine dentin was prepared with 180- to 600-grit SiC paper and then uniformly irradiated with an Er: YAG laser (laser-irradiated group) or immersed in water at 60 degrees C for 15 min (heated group). The samples were then acid-conditioned with 10% citric acid (10-0) or 10% citric acid/3% ferric chloride (10-3) for 15 s and treated with GA for 10 min before bonding to an acrylic rod with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. These samples were trimmed to prepare miniaturized dumbbell-shaped specimens. After storage in water at 37C for 1 d, the tensile bond strength was measured, and the fractured surface was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the laser-irradiated and heated groups, the 10-3+GA-treated specimen had higher bond strength than that of 10-0+GA. On the other hand, the tensile bond strength of 10-3 +GA in the non-irradiated group was lower that that of 10-0+GA. In conclusion, the combination of 10-3 and GA for bonding with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was the most effective for Er: YAG laser-irradiated dentin and heated dentin, but it was not effective for the non-irradiated dentin. PMID:11695758

  19. Resin acid conversion with CYP105A1: an enzyme with potential for the production of pharmaceutically relevant diterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Janocha, Simon; Zapp, Josef; Hutter, Michael; Kleser, Michael; Bohlmann, Jörg; Bernhardt, Rita

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome P450s are very versatile enzymes with great potential for biotechnological applications because of their ability to oxidize unactivated C?H bonds. CYP105A1 from Streptomyces griseolus was first described as a herbicide-inducible sulfonylurea hydroxylase, but it is also able to convert other substrates such as vitamin D(3) . To extend the substrate pool of this interesting enzyme further, we screened a small diterpenoid compound library and were able to show the conversion of several resin acids. Binding of abietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and isopimaric acid to the active site was assayed, and V(max) and K(m) values were calculated. The products were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and identified as 15-hydroxyabietic acid, 15-hydroxydehydroabietic acid, and 15,16-epoxyisopimaric acid. As the observed products are difficult to obtain by chemical synthesis, CYP105A1 has proved to be a promising candidate for biotechnological applications that combine bioconversion and chemical synthesis to obtain functionalized resin acids. PMID:23371760

  20. Effect of acidic primers on adhesive bonding of tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin to alumina.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Oba, Yusuke; Yamada, Kazuya; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-12-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of acidic primers on adhesive bonding to sintered alumina. Alumina disk specimens were primed with one of the following acidic materials: Acryl Bond, All Bond II Primer B, Alloy Primer, Estenia Opaque Primer, Eye Sight Opaque Primer, M.L. Primer, MR. Bond, and Super-Bond Liquid. The disks were bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond) initiated with a tri-n-butylborane (TBB) derivative, and bond strengths were determined. Average bond strength before thermocycling varied from 42.9 to 44.3 MPa, whereas post-thermocycling bond strength ranged from 22.0 to 42.8 MPa. Of the nine groups assessed, reduction of bond strength after thermocycling was not significant in three: Alloy Primer, Estenia Opaque Primer, and Eye Sight Opaque Primer. It can be concluded that phosphate-based primers are recommended for bonding sintered alumina with Super-Bond resin. PMID:21206159

  1. Comparative evaluation of retentive properties of acid etched resin bonded fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vimal; Sharma, M.C.; Dwivedi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Background Little consensus exist in suitable tooth preparation design and alloy pre-treatment methods for improving the retention of resin bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs). Methods An in-vitro experiment was done with four designs. Group A: standard form, B: wings and proximal slices, C: wings, proximal slice and grooves, D: wings, proximal slice, grooves and occlusal coverage. Alloys were subjected to pre-treatment procedures like Group I: control, II: sand blasting, III: electro etching, IV: tin plating. Debonding forces of the castings were recorded in a universal testing machine and results were analyzed by student's ‘t’ test. Results Group B, C and D showed higher debonding forces compared to A. However, there were no significant differences in mean force values among Groups B, C and D. Group II, III and IV with different alloy pre-treatment methods demonstrated higher values against control. Inter group variations among Group II, III and IV were not significant. Conclusion Tooth preparation with adequate surface extensions and pre-treatment procedures of casting alloys are two parameters that play important role in determining the retentive features of RBFPDs. Different types of tooth preparation designs and alloy pre-treatment methods exert almost similar influence in increasing the retention of acid etched RBFPDs. PMID:24623948

  2. Protic acid resin enhanced 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride pretreatment of Arundo donax Linn.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Sukun; Xu, Feng

    2014-09-01

    To improve the cellulose digestibility of energy crop Arudo donax Linn. with cost-efficient, a novel pretreatment of protic acid resin Amberlyst 35DRY catalyzed inexpensive ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl) was developed in this work. The pretreatment was performed at 160°C with [C4mim]Cl for 1.5h, followed by Amberlyst 35DRY catalyzed at 90°C for 1h. The IL-Amberlyst pretreatment was demonstrated to be effective, evidenced by the reduction in cellulose crystallinity (31.4%) and increased porosity caused by extensive swelling the undissolved biomass and partial depolymerization of the longer cellulose chain of the dissolved biomass by Amberlyst. Consequently, a higher glucose yield (92.8%) was obtained than for the single [C4mim]Cl pretreatment (42.8%) at an enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g substrate. Overall, the enhanced pretreatment was competitive by using inexpensive and recyclable IL-Amberlyst 35DRY pretreated system with shorter processing time and reduced enzyme usage. PMID:25001325

  3. Relative sensitivity of five benthic invertebrate species to reference toxicants and resin-acid contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    Five sediment-dwelling native New Zealand freshwater invertebrate species (amphipod, Chaetocorophium c.f. lucasi; clam, Sphaerium novaezelandiae; oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus; tanaid, Tanais standfordi; and the burrowing mayfly, Ichthybotus hudsoni) were assessed for their suitability for sediment toxicity testing by comparison of sensitivity to reference toxicants [phenol and pentachlorophenol (PCP)] and contaminated sediments. The 96-h EC50 values at 20 C showed a greater range in test sensitivity for phenol (30-fold range) from the most sensitive test, amphipod (8.1 mg/L), to the least sensitive one, clam (243 mg/L), compared with PCP (14-fold range), with amphipod the most sensitive test species (0.13 mg/L) and tanaid the least sensitive (1.8 mg/L). Clam reburial was a more sensitive end point than was lethality for phenol (by 20-fold) and PCP (by 2.4-fold). Four of the test species, excluding the tanaid, showed good 10-d survival in reference muds ({ge}87%) but lower survival in sand sediments ({ge}79%). Bleached kraft mill sediment containing high resin-acid concentrations (total 1,900 mg/kg dry weight) showed significant reductions in amphipod survival (15%), clam reburial (30%), and oligochaete survival (17%), and reproduction (49%). Amphipods, clams, and oligochaetes were the most promising species for sublethal test development.

  4. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (?=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of other groups (p<0.05). While higher mean bond strengths were obtained in group 1 (EPHF(9.5)) (11.5 ± 2.1) and group 2 (EPHF(5)) (7.3 ± 0.6), lower results were obtained when HF acid gels were applied prior to phosphoric acid (EHF(9.5)P: 5.0 ± 1.1, EHF(5)P: 3.6 ± 0.1) (p<0.05). On dentin, the results were the lowest in group 8 (DHF(5)P: 1.5 ± 1.6), being significantly lower than those of group 5 (DPHF(9.5)) (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images revealed predominantly mixed failures with less than half of the composite left on both enamel and dentin surfaces (64 out of 80) (p<0.05), indicating that in general, adhesion was not ideal. Contamination of the enamel or dentin surfaces with HF acid gel impairs the bond strength of composites. Considering both the bond strength results and failure types, when dental tissues are to be repaired next to ceramic, application of phosphoric acid before HF acid gel application can be recommended. HF acid gel concentration did not influence the results except on enamel. PMID:21859315

  5. Preparative separation of lithospermic acid B from Salvia miltiorrhiza by polyamide resin and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y X; Zhou, L L; Li, T; Wang, L H

    2011-07-22

    Adsorption on polyamide resin was investigated as a means of separating lithospermic acid B (LAB) from a crude extract of the roots of the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge ("Danshen"). Variables affecting adsorption capacity (solution pH, contact time on resin, initial LAB concentration) were studied. Adsorption was strongly dependent upon the initial concentration of LAB and pH. In all conditions, the polyamide resin gave optimal adsorption of LAB at an initial concentration of 2.66 mg/mL and pH <3.0. The adsorption isotherm correlated well with the Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm. Maximal adsorption capacity was calculated to be 380 mg/g at pH 2.0 and 25°C. LAB purity of 85.30% could be obtained by polyamide resin adsorption followed by elution with 70% ethanol solution, and the recovery was 87.1%. After preparative HPLC, the maximum HPLC purity obtained was 99.28% with a recovery of 75.2%. This method provides an efficient and low-cost method for LAB purification for industrial applications. PMID:21652037

  6. Effect of copper salts added to primer on bonding of MMA-TBB resin to dentin treated with phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Saito, A

    1994-12-01

    The effects of addition of various copper salts to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) primer were studied with regard to tensile bond strength of methyl methacrylate-tributylborane (MMA-TBB) resin to dentin. Bovine dentin surfaces were treated with 10% phosphoric acid, then with a primer consisting of aqueous 35% HEMA and a copper salt, and finally bonded to acrylic rods with MMA-TBB resin. The types of copper salts and concentrations in the primers were varied. The optimal concentration of copper salts in the primers was 0.5-3 mumol/g. The primers containing copper salts of sulfate, methacrylate, methacryloyloxyethyl phthalate, or methacryloyloxyethyl succinate were especially effective among the eight copper salts studied in increasing bond strength, producing mean bond strengths of 14.2-16.1 MPa and mean minimum values of 9.9-11.7 MPa. These bond strengths were higher than those obtained with the commercial 4-META/MMA-TBB resin system. A model experimental study concerning the molecular weight of poly (MMA) formed in the presence of some copper salts suggested that the increase in bond strength was produced through an increase in molecular weight of MMA-TBB resin by the copper salts. PMID:7758279

  7. Solid-Phase Synthesis with Attachment of Peptide to Resin through an Amino Acid Side Chain: [8-Lysine]-Vasopressin

    PubMed Central

    Meienhofer, Johannes; Trzeciak, Arnold

    1971-01-01

    It is proposed that the scope of solid-phase peptide synthesis could be considerably broadened by attaching peptides to the solid-phase through functional side-chain groups rather than through the commonly used ?-carboxyl groups. Side-chain attachment offers the use of a large variety of chemical linkages to solid supports. Attachment through the ?-amino group of the lysine residue to a polystyrene resin has been applied to a solid-phase synthesis of lysine-vasopressin. N?-tert-butyl-oxycarbonyl-L-lysyl-glycinamide was condensed with chloroformoxymethyl polystyrene-2% divinylbenzene resin. After removal of the N?-protecting tert-butyloxycarbonyl group, the peptide chain was elongated by standard Merrifield procedures to give Tos-Cys(Bzl)-Tyr-Phe-Glu-(NH2) - Asp(NH2) - Cys(Bzl) - Pro - Lys(Z - resin) - Gly-NH2. Cleavage from the resin with HBr in dioxane or trifluoroacetic acid gave a partially protected nonapeptide hydrobromide. For purification, it was converted into a fully protected peptide by treatment with benzyl p-nitro-phenyl carbonate and crystallized. Deprotection by sodium in liquid ammonia, oxidative cyclization, IRC-50 desalting, and ion-exchange chromatography gave lysinevasopressin with high potency in a rat-pressor assay. PMID:5280519

  8. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  9. Effects of N-methacryloyl-omega-amino acid primer pretreatment on the bond strength of the resin to acid-etched dentin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Nishiyama, N; Nemoto, K; Asakura, T; Nakai, H

    1997-11-01

    To ascertain the adhesion mechanism of resins to etched dentin treated with hydrophilic primers such as N-methacryloyl-omega-amino acids (NM omega A), the effect of the application of NM omega A primers on the bond strength of the resin and also the characteristics of the "hybrid layer" were investigated. Here, the concept of "hybrid layer" has been proposed previously by Nakabayashi et al. When the demineralized dentin was treated with the NM omega A solution, the bond strength increased remarkably, thus indicating the formation of a hybrid layer. It can be construed that NM omega A primers allowed for diffusion of the bonding agent to the dentinal collageous layer that was exposed by acid etching, and thereby the creation of a hybrid layer. To obtain an understanding of how NM omega A primers improved bond strength at the interface between the resin and dentinal collagen, the 13C-NMR spectra of NM alpha A were observed in the absence and presence of demineralized dentin. The 13C peak intensities of all of the carbons of the NM alpha A species were dramatically reduced in the presence of the dentin. Specifically, the reduction of the carbon peak intensity of carboxylic acid in the NM alpha A species was reduced by 30%. This indicated that the unionized carboxylic acid in the NM alpha A primer interacted with the dentinal collagen. Thus, the composite resin can be considered to adhere to the dentinal collagen through the unionized NM alpha A that interacts with the dentinal collagen. PMID:9358320

  10. Selected resin acids in effluent and receiving waters derived from a bleached and unbleached kraft pulp and paper mill.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian P; Booth, Matthew M; Delfino, Joseph J; Holm, Stewart E; Gross, Timothy S

    2003-01-01

    Water samples were collected on three dates at 24 sites influenced by effluent from Georgia-Pacific's Palatka Pulp and Paper Mill Operation, a bleached and unbleached kraft mill near Palatka, Florida, USA. The sampling sites were located within the mill retention ponds, Rice Creek, and the St. John's River. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for abietic, dehydroabietic, and isopimaric acids, all of which are potentially toxic by-products of pulp production. Isopimaric acid concentrations greater than 12 mg/L were measured at the mill's effluent outfall but were less than 20 microg/L at the end of Rice Creek. This result indicates that the waters of Rice Creek provide dilution or conditions conducive for degradation or sorption of these compounds. Large differences in resin acid concentrations were observed between sampling events. In two sampling events, the maximum observed concentrations were less than 2 mg/L for each analyte. In a third sampling event, all of the compounds were detected at concentrations greater than 10 mg/L. Data from the three sample dates showed that resin acid concentrations were below 20 microg/L before the confluence of Rice Creek and the St. John's River in all cases. PMID:12503767

  11. The protective effect of zinc on rosin and resin acid toxicity in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and human gingival fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sunzel, B; Söderberg, T A; Johansson, A; Hallmans, G; Gref, R

    1997-10-01

    Combinations of rosin and zinc are used in dentistry as components of periodontal dressings and cements and as root canal sealers. The composition and properties of rosins differ largely depending on source and refinement processes. Rosin (colophony) is composed of approximately 70% resin acids. In order to study the toxic effects of different natural rosins and purified resin acids and the detoxifying effects of zinc, these compounds were analyzed and tested on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cells) and human gingival fibroblasts using the radiochromium release method. The rosins and the pure resin acids showed a strong dose-related cytotoxicity, which was inhibited by increased zinc concentrations. The purified resin acids (isopimaric, levopimaric, and neoabietic acid) were more toxic than the natural rosins. The contents of these resin acids might explain the difference in toxicity of the rosins tested. It is concluded that rosin and zinc are not to be considered inert compounds and that the cytoprotective effects of zinc and its role in dentistry products merit further investigations. PMID:9335345

  12. [Bonding of MMA-TBB resin to bovine tooth coated by poly (methyl methacrylate-co-p-styrene sulfonic acid)].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Yamamoto, T; Ishihara, K; Nagata, K; Nakabayashi, N

    1989-11-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a new type water soluble bonding agent, methyl methacrylate (MMA)-p-styrene sulfonic acid copolymer (MS), and to investigate the effect of MS on bonding between resins and tooth substrates. MS is cross-linked with Ca2+ supplied by hydroxyapatite in a smeared layer on ground enamel and dentin and sticks to their surface. Samples were prepared by bonding an acrylic rod with MMA-TBB resin to ground enamel and dentin coated with an aqueous mixture of FeCl3 and 10 wt% MS. After immersed in water for 24 hrs, the tensile bond strength was measured. The bond strengths to both enamel and dentin were higher than 11 MPa and cohesive failure of cured MMA-TBB resin was observed in every case. This suggested that MS could adhere to tooth substrates with a new bonding mechanism different from the previously reported mechanism of the monomer interpenetration and polymerization. PMID:2489605

  13. Long-term impact of acid resin waste deposits on soil quality of forest areas I. Contaminants and abiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Madejón, Engracia; Cabrera, Francisco; Buegger, Franz; Fuss, Roland; Pritsch, Karin; Schloter, Michael

    2008-11-15

    Acid resins are residues characterised by elevated concentrations of hydrocarbons and trace elements, which were produced by mineral oil industries in Central Europe during the first half of the last century. Due to the lack of environmental legislation at that time, these wastes were dumped into excavated ponds in public areas without further protection. In this work, the long-term effects of such resin deposits on soil quality of two forest areas (Bayern, Germany) were assessed. We evaluated the distribution and accumulation of contaminants in the surroundings of the deposits, where the waste was disposed of about 60 years ago. General soil chemical properties such as pH, C, N and P content were also investigated. Chemical analysis of resin waste from the deposits revealed large amounts of potential contaminants such as hydrocarbons (93 g kg(-1)), As (63 mg kg(-1)), Cd (24 mg kg(-1)), Cu (1835 mg kg(-1)), Pb (8100 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (873 mg kg(-1)). Due to the location of the deposits on a hillside and the lack of adequate isolation, contaminants have been released downhill despite the solid nature of the waste. Five zones were investigated in each site: the deposit, three affected zones along the plume of contamination and a control zone. In affected zones, contaminants were 2 to 350 times higher than background levels depending on the site. In many cases, contaminants exceeded the German environmental guidelines for the soil-groundwater path and action levels based on extractable concentrations. Resin contamination yielded larger total C/total N ratios in affected zones, but no clear effect was observed on absolute C, N and P concentrations. In general, no major acidification effect was reported in affected zones. PMID:18775554

  14. Resin-acid derivatives as potent electrostatic openers of voltage-gated K channels and suppressors of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ottosson, Nina E; Wu, Xiongyu; Nolting, Andreas; Karlsson, Urban; Lund, Per-Eric; Ruda, Katinka; Svensson, Stefan; Konradsson, Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate cellular excitability, cause diseases when mutated, and act as drug targets in hyperexcitability diseases, such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia and pain. Unfortunately, many patients do not satisfactorily respond to the present-day drugs. We found that the naturally occurring resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a potent opener of a voltage-gated K channel and thereby a potential suppressor of cellular excitability. DHAA acts via a non-traditional mechanism, by electrostatically activating the voltage-sensor domain, rather than directly targeting the ion-conducting pore domain. By systematic iterative modifications of DHAA we synthesized 71 derivatives and found 32 compounds more potent than DHAA. The most potent compound, Compound 77, is 240 times more efficient than DHAA in opening a K channel. This and other potent compounds reduced excitability in dorsal root ganglion neurons, suggesting that resin-acid derivatives can become the first members of a new family of drugs with the potential for treatment of hyperexcitability diseases. PMID:26299574

  15. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-09-01

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

  16. Synthetic resin-bound truncated Candida antarctica lipase B for production of fatty acid alkyl esters by transesterification of corn and soybean oils with ethanol or butanol.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Robinson, Samantha; Cox, Elby J; Harmsen, Amanda J; Friesen, Jon A; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Liu, Siqing; Saha, Badal C; Jackson, John S; Cotta, Michael A; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2012-05-31

    A gene encoding a synthetic truncated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was generated via automated PCR and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Western blot analysis detected five truncated CALB variants, suggesting multiple translation starts from the six in-frame ATG codons. The longest open reading frame, which corresponds to amino acids 35-317 of the mature lipase, appeared to be expressed in the greatest amount. The truncated CALB was immobilized on Sepabeads® EC-EP resin and used to produce ethyl and butyl esters from crude corn oil and refined soybean oil. The yield of ethyl esters was 4-fold greater from corn oil than from soybean oil and was 36% and 50% higher, respectively, when compared to a commercially available lipase resin (Novozym 435) using the same substrates. A 5:1 (v/v) ratio of ethanol to corn oil produced 3.7-fold and 8.4-fold greater yields than ratios of 15:1 and 30:1, respectively. With corn oil, butyl ester production was 56% higher than ethyl ester production. Addition of an ionic catalytic resin step prior to the CALB resin increased yields of ethyl esters from corn oil by 53% compared to CALB resin followed by ionic resin. The results suggest resin-bound truncated CALB has potential application in biodiesel production using biocatalysts. PMID:22342374

  17. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  18. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.

    2011-10-23

    Ion Exchange column loading and elution of cesium from spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been conducted for two potential non-acid eluants -(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}. The results revealed encouraging cesium elution performance. 100% elution was achieved in at most 22 hours ({approx}28 bed volumes) of elution. Elution performance was fairly high at 6 hours ({approx}8 bed volumes) of elution for some of the eluants and also practically comparable to the benchmark acid eluant (HNO{sub 3}). Hence, it is quite possible 100% percent elution will be closer to the 6th hour than the 22nd hour. Elution is generally enhanced by increasing the concentration and pH of the eluants, and combining the eluants.

  19. Separation of silver from zinc, cadmium, copper, nickel and other elements in nitric acid with a macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Strelow, F W

    1985-10-01

    Traces of silver and amounts up to 50 mg can be separated from up to gram amounts of Zn, Cu(II), Ni, Co(II), Mg, Be, Ti(IV), V(IV), Li and Na by eluting these with 2.0M nitric acid from a column containing 54 ml (20 g) of macroporous AG MP-50 cation-exchange resin of 100-200 mesh particle size, in the H(+)-form. Silver is retained and can be eluted with 0.5M hydrobromic acid in 9:1 v v acetone-water. Separations are sharp and quantitative and only a few microg of the other elements are found in the silver fraction. Cadmium and manganese (II) can also be separated quantitatively but show tailing and require larger elution volumes. Some typical elution curves and results of analyses of synthetic mixtures are presented. PMID:18963925

  20. Synergic Catalysis of PdCu Alloy Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohsuke; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Dojo, Masahiro; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2015-08-17

    Highly dispersed PdCu alloy nanoparticles have been successfully prepared within a macroreticular basic resin bearing ?N(CH3 )2 functional groups. This previously unappreciated combination of alloy is first proven to be responsible for the efficient production of high-purity H2 from formic acid (HCOOH) dehydrogenation for chemical hydrogen storage. By the addition of Cu, the electronically promoted Pd sites show significantly higher catalytic activity as well as a better tolerance towards CO poisoning as compared to their monometallic Pd counterparts. Experimental and DFT calculation studies revealed not only the synergic alloying effect but also cooperative action by the ?N(CH3 )2 groups within the resin play crucial roles in achieving exceptional catalytic performances. In addition to the advantages such as, facile preparation method, free of additives, recyclable without leaching of active component, and suppression of unfavorable CO formation less than 3?ppm, the present catalytic system is cost-effective because of the superior catalytic activity compared with that of well-established precious PdAg or PdAu catalysts. The present catalytic system is particularly desirable for an ideal hydrogen vector in terms of potential industrial application for fuel cells. PMID:26178687

  1. Highly efficient co-removal of copper (II) and phthalic acid with self-synthesized polyamine resin.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Long, Chao; Wei, Meng-Meng; Li, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    A novel method was proposed for efficient co-removal of Cu (II) and phthalic acid (PA) using self-synthesized polyamine resin (R-NH(2)). The adsorption properties of R-NH(2) were thoroughly investigated by equilibrium, kinetic and dynamic tests in sole and binary systems at pH 5.0. The Freundlich model was a good fit for all the isotherm data, showing higher Kf values in the binary system than the sole system. The pseudo-second-order kinetic equation showed a better correlation to the experimental data in all cases and PA uptake was much faster than that of Cu (II). R-NH(2) showed highest adsorption capacities to both Cu (II) and PA among the five tested resins. Moreover, the presence of PA markedly enhanced the adsorption of Cu (II), being around 3.5 times of that of the sole system. The adsorption of PA was also slightly increased when Cu (II) was coexistent. Furthermore, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and species calculations, possible mechanisms were proposed that Cu (II) coordinated with -NH(2) and negative PA species interacted with -NH(3)(+) by electrostatic attraction. [Cu-PA] complex in the binary system possessed a much higher affinity than free Cu (II) to chelating with -NH(2), resulting in mutual enhancement. PMID:24804663

  2. Binding and elution behavior of small deoxyribonucleic acid fragments on a strong anion-exchanger multimodal chromatography resin.

    PubMed

    Matos, Tiago; Queiroz, João A; Bülow, Leif

    2013-08-01

    The separation behavior of small single-stranded from double-stranded DNA molecules has been determined on a multimodal (mixed-mode) chromatography system. The resin used is a strong anion exchanger which also modulates hydrophobic recognition. The intrinsic differences between single- and double-stranded DNAs concerning charge, hydrophobicity and three-dimensional structure render this form of MMC suitable for separation of the different nucleic acid molecules. All DNAs tested bound strongly to the resin and they could be eluted with increasing NaCl concentrations. Each homopolymeric ssDNA sample resulted in a base-specific elution pattern when using a linear NaCl gradient. The elution order was poly(dA)

  3. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    Studies of the chemical properties of superheavy elements (SHE) pose interesting challenges due to their short half-lives and low production rates. Chemical systems must have extremely fast kinetics, fast enough kinetics to be able to examine the chemical properties of interest before the SHE decays to another nuclide. To achieve chemistry on such time scales, the chemical system must also be easily automated. Most importantly however, a chemical system must be developed which provides suitable separation and kinetics before an on-line study of a SHE can be performed. Relativistic effects make studying the chemical properties of SHEs interesting due to the impact these effects could have on the SHEs chemical properties. Relativistic effects arise when the velocity of the s orbital electrons approach the speed of light. As this velocity increases, the Bohr radius of the inner electron orbitals decreases and there is an increase in the particles mass. This contraction results in a destabilization of the energy of the outer d and f electron orbitals (5f and 6d in the case of SHE), which can cause these to expand due to their increased shielding from the nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the spin-orbit splitting for p, d, and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. This can lead most interestingly to a possible increased stability of element 114, which due to large spin-orbit splitting of the 7p orbital and the relativistically stabilized 7p{sub 1/2} and 7s orbital gives rise to a closed shell ground state of 7s{sup 2}7p{sub 1/2}{sup 2}. The homologs of element 105, dubnium (Db), Ta and Nb and the pseudo-homolog Pa, are well known to hydrolyze and form both neutral and non-neutral monoatomic and polyatomic species that may cause issues with extraction from a given chemical system. Early ion-exchange and solvent-extraction studies show mixed results for the behavior of Db. Some studies show Db behaving most similar to Ta, while others show it behaving somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent, which separates analytes based on steric interactions between the cavity of the crown ether and electrostatic interactions between the oxygen's of the ether and cations in the mobile phase. This particular resin has been shown to have an extremely high uptake affinity for Pb, a direct homolog of element 114, and is thus a good initial extractant to examine for a potential element 114 chemical system. Figure 1.1 shows the respective extractant molecules from the DGA and Pb resins. Batch uptake experiments were conducted to examine the uptake behavior of Ta on the DGA resin. Batch uptake experiments were also conducted to examine the uptake behavior of Ge on the Pb resin. Column experiments were designed based on batch uptake experiments of Ta, Am, Pa, Np, Zr, and Nb to establish a sequential extraction of Group IV/V homologs as well as Am for potential use as a Db chemical system.

  4. In vitro metabolism, permeation, and brain availability of six major boswellic acids from Boswellia serrata gum resins.

    PubMed

    Gerbeth, Kathleen; Hüsch, Jan; Fricker, Gert; Werz, Oliver; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Boswellia serrata gum resin extracts (BSE) revealed potent anti-inflammatory actions in preclinical and clinical studies. In 2002 BSE was assigned an orphan drug status by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of peritumoral edema. In the past pharmacological effects of BSE were mainly attributed to 11-keto-?-boswellic acid (KBA) and 3-acetyl-11-keto-?-boswellic acid (AKBA). Therefore pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies focused mainly on these two boswellic acids (BAs). However, other BAs, like ?-boswellic acid (?BA), might also contribute to the anti-inflammatory actions of BSE. Here, we determined the metabolic stability, permeability and brain availability of six major BAs, that is, KBA, AKBA, ?BA, 3-acetyl-?-boswellic acid (A?BA), ?-boswellic acid (?BA), and 3-acetyl-?-boswellic acid (A?BA). For permeability studies, the Caco-2 model was adapted to physiological conditions by the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the basolateral side and the use of modified fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) on the apical side. Under these conditions the four BAs lacking the 11-keto moiety revealed moderate permeability. Furthermore the permeability of AKBA and KBA was improved compared to earlier studies. In contrast to A?- and A?BA, ?BA and ?BA were intensively metabolized after incubation with human and rat liver microsomes. Finally, the availability of all six major BAs could be confirmed in rat brain 8h after oral administration of 240mg/kg BSE to rats showing mean concentrations of 11.6ng/g for KBA, 37.5ng/g for AKBA, 485.1ng/g for ?BA, 1066.6ng/g for ?BA, 43.0ng/g for A?BA and 163.7ng/g for A?BA. PMID:23103296

  5. Polar modified post-cross-linked resin and its adsorption toward salicylic acid from aqueous solution: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenyu; He, Chunlian; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-08-01

    A novel polar modified post-cross-linked resin PDMPA was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for adsorption of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PDMPA was prepared by a suspension polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and divinylbenzene (DVB), a Friedel-Crafts reaction and an amination reaction. After characterization of the chemical and pore structure of PDMPA, the adsorption behaviors of salicylic acid on PDMPA were determined in comparison with the precursor resins. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on PDMPA was much larger than the precursor resins and the equilibrium data were correlated by both of the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The pseudo-second-order rate equation fitted the kinetic data better than the pseudo-first-order rate equation, and the micropore diffusion model could characterize the kinetic data very well. The dynamic experimental results showed that the breakthrough point and saturated point of salicylic acid on PDMPA were 40.3 and 92.4BV (1BV=10mL) at a feed concentration of 995.8mg/L and a flow rate of 1.4mL/min, and the resin column could be regenerated by 16.0BV of a mixture desorption solvent containing 0.01mol/L of NaOH (w/v) and 50% of ethanol (v/v). PMID:25863446

  6. Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-02-04

    Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

  7. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  8. UPS on Weinreb resin: a facile solid-phase route to aldehyde and ketone derivatives of "unnatural" amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, M J; Drew, M D; Pottorf, R S; Scott, W L

    2000-01-01

    The solid-phase synthesis of "unnatural" amino aldehydes, amino ketones, peptide aldehydes, and peptide ketones was accomplished from commercially available resin in a series of room temperature reactions. The initial step involved addition of an "unnatural" side chain to the N-terminus of a benzophenone imine-activated Weinreb resin-bound amino acid or peptide derivative. The alkylated imine was hydrolyzed, and the amine was converted to the Boc-, Cbz-, or naphthoyl derivative. The resin-bound substrate was then cleaved with DIBAL-H or a Grignard reagent to give the amino aldehyde, amino ketone, peptide aldehyde, or peptide ketone products. Twenty-four reactions were carried out simultaneously using a "Billboard" reaction apparatus to give products in 27-87% (59% average) isolated yield. PMID:10757096

  9. Synthesis of multifunctional Ag@Au@phenol formaldehyde resin particles loaded with folic acids for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-07-23

    Multifunctional Ag@Au@ phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR) particles loaded with folic acids (FA) have been designed for killing tumor cells through photothermy conversion under the irradiation of near-infrared (NIR) light. Possessing the virtue of good fluorescence, low toxicity, and good targeting, the nanocomposite consists of an Ag core, an Au layer, a PFR shell, and folic acids on the PFR shell. The Ag@PFR core-shell structure can be prepared with a simple hydrothermal method after preheating. We then filled the PFR shell with a layer of Au by heating and modified the shell with polyelectrolyte to change its surface charge state. To capture tumor cells actively, FA molecules were attached onto the surface of the Ag@Au@PFR particles in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethly aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Owing to the excellent property of Au NPs and Ag NPs as photothermal conversion agents, the Ag@Au@ PFR@FA particles can be utilized to kill tumor cells when exposed to NIR light. PMID:22744779

  10. Efficiency of macroporous poly(vinylphosphoramidic acid) resin adsorbing of selected elements and determination of trace dysprosium, holmium, erbium, and ytterbium in waste water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan Guangyao; Su Zhixing; Lou Xingyin; Chang Xijun )

    1992-03-01

    A macroporous poly(vinylphosphoramidic acid) resin is synthesized through the reaction of macroporous poly(vinylethylenediamine) resin with formaldehyde and phosphorus acid. The adsorption efficiency of the resin to selected elements is determined. An ICP-OES method has been established for the resin enrichment and separation of trace Dy, Ho, Er and Yb ions in waste water. The ability of the Na-form resin to adsorb Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb ions is far better than the H-form resin. The IR spectra of the resin before and after adsorbing Dy are shown. The mechanism of resin adsorption of Dy is explored. The results of resin enriched waste water analysis from a smelter plant are 31.0 ng/ml for dy, 41.1 ng/ml for Hl, 20.6 ng/ml for Er and 20.2 ng/ml for Yb ions. The recovery of standard additions of Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb to the waste water is in the range of 97.0-98.5%.

  11. Wear-resistant and electromagnetic absorbing behaviors of oleic acid post-modified ferrite-filled epoxy resin composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Chongguang; Jiao, Qingjie

    2015-03-01

    The post-modified Mn-Zn ferrite was prepared by grafting oleic acid on the surface of Mn-Zn ferrite to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the particle surfaces. The friction and electromagnetic absorbing properties of a thin coating fabricated by dispersing ferrite into epoxy resin (EP) were investigated. The roughness of the coating and water contact angle were measured using the VEECO and water contact angle meter. Friction tests were conducted using a stainless-steel bearing ball and a Rockwell diamond tip, respectively. The complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composite coating were studied in the low frequency (10 MHz-1.5 GHz). Surface modified ferrites are found to improve magnetic particles dispersion in EP resulting in significant compatibility between inorganic and organic materials. Results also indicate that modified ferrite/EP coatings have a lower roughness average value and higher water contact angle than original ferrite/EP coatings. The enhanced tribological properties of the modified ferrite/EP coatings can be seen from the increased coefficient value. The composite coatings with modified ferrite are observed to exhibit better reflection loss compared with the coatings with original ferrite.

  12. Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, a constituent of a herbal medicine from Boswellia serrata resin, attenuates experimental ileitis.

    PubMed

    Krieglstein, C F; Anthoni, C; Rijcken, E J; Laukötter, M; Spiegel, H U; Boden, S E; Schweizer, S; Safayhi, H; Senninger, N; Schürmann, G

    2001-04-01

    The gum resin extract from Boswellia serrata (H15), an herbal product, was recently shown to have positive therapeutic effects in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the mechanisms and constituents responsible for these effects are poorly understood. This study examined the effect of the Boswellia extract and its single constituent acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in an experimental model of IBD. Ileitis was induced by two subcutaneous injections of indomethacin (7.5 mg/kg) in Sprague-Dawley rats 24 h apart. Rats also received oral treatment with the Boswellia extract (H15) or AKBA at two different doses (low and high) equivalent to recommendations in human disease over 2 days. Controls received only the carriers NaHCO3 (subcutaneously) and tylose (orally). Effects of treatment were assessed by intravital microscopy in ileal submucosal venules for changes in the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and by macroscopic and histological scoring. Increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and severe tissue injury accompanied indomethacin-induced ileitis. Treatment with the Boswellia extract or AKBA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in rolling (up to 90%) and adherent (up to 98%) leukocytes. High-dose Boswellia extract as well as both low- and high-dose AKBA significantly attenuated tissue injury scores. Oral therapy with the Boswellia extract or AKBA significantly reduces macroscopic and microcirculatory inflammatory features normally associated with indomethacin administration, indicating that the anti-inflammatory actions of the Boswellia extract in IBD may be due in part to boswellic acids such as AKBA. PMID:11355324

  13. Using of chelating resin to study the kinetic desorption of Eu(III) from humic acid-Al 2O 3 colloid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangke; Zhou, Xiang; Du, Jinzhou; Hu, Wenping; Chen, Changlun; Chen, Yixue

    2006-01-01

    The association of organic-inorganic colloid-borne trace elements was investigated. Radionuclide 152+154Eu(III) was chosen as a representative and chemical homologue for trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions present in radioactive nuclear waste. Effect of pH and contact time of organic-inorganic/Eu(III) on the kinetic dissociation of Eu(III) from HA-Al 2O 3 colloids was studied. The kinetic desorption behavior of sorbed 152+154Eu(III) from humic acid-?-Al 2O 3 colloids was studied at pH values of 4.5 ± 0.2, 5.3 ± 0.2 and 6.5 ± 0.2, respectively, by the addition of the chelating resin. The experimental results suggest that the fractions of irreversible sorption of radionuclide 152+154Eu(III) to HA-Al 2O 3 colloids increase with increasing pH values, and are independent of aging time. At least two different species, "weak" and "strong" dissociation fractions, are required to simulate the kinetic desorption of 152+154Eu(III) from HA-Al 2O 3 colloids. The species of Eu(III) sorbed on HA-Al 2O 3 colloids move from "weak" sites to "strong" sites with increasing aging time, whereas the fractions of irreversible sorption are independent of aging time. The results are important for the evaluation of radionuclides' behavior in the environment.

  14. Effect of hybridization on bond strength and adhesive interface after acid-base challenge using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Tomohiro; Nikaido, Toru; Tsuchiya, Satoko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-03-01

    The purposes of this study were twofold, namely to evaluate: (1) the effect of hybridization on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin, and (2) the ultrastructure of the dentin-adhesive interface with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin after acid-base challenge. Dentin surfaces, which received no treatment (NT), 65% phosphoric acid (PA), or 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3), were bonded with a 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. To evaluate dentin bond strength, microTBS test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. For ultrastructural evaluation of the adhesive interfaces, SEM was used to examine the interfaces of the bonded specimens after acid-base challenge. The microTBS of NT was not determined, while that of 10-3 was significantly higher than that of PA (p < 0.05). With PA and 10-3, the hybrid layer was clearly observed, but no so for the acid-base resistant zone. Wall lesion was found in NT only. In conclusion, hybridization is vital to improving microTBS to dentin and enhancing resistance at the adhesive interface against acid-base challenge. PMID:19496398

  15. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 ?g/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-?, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P?.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P?.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P?.05 and P?.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P?.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation. PMID:21612460

  16. Effect of the Acidic Dental Resin Monomer 10-methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate on Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Haejin; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-11-01

    Although 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) is frequently used as an acidic resin monomer in dental adhesives, its effect on dental pulp cells (DPCs) has been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10-MDP on the inflammatory response and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs at minimally toxic concentrations. We found that 10-MDP caused the release of inflammatory cytokines including NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 10-MDP reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization nodule formation and mRNA expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osterix and Runx2 in a concentration-dependent manner with low toxicity. In addition, 10-MDP induced activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated whether the effect of 10-MDP was related to the induction of HO-1 and found that treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the production of 10-MDP-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines and the inhibition of differentiation markers. Pre-treatment with either a GSH synthesis inhibitor or antioxidants blocked 10-MDP-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Nrf2 and NF-?B pathways. Taken together, the results of this study showed that minimally toxic concentrations of 10-MDP promoted an inflammatory response and suppressed odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction through MAPK and NF-?B signalling. PMID:25847254

  17. Phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The production of fire-resistant resins particularly useful for making laminates with inorganic fibers such as graphite fibers is discussed. The resins are by (1) condensation of an ethylenically unsaturated cyclic anhydride with a bis(diaminophenyl) phosphine oxide, and (2) by addition polymerization of the bisimide so obtained. Up to about 50%, on a molar basis, of benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid anhydride can be substituted for some of the cyclic anhydride to alter the properties of the products. Graphite cloth laminates made with these resins show 800 C char yields greater than 70% by weight in nitrogen. Limiting oxygen indexes of more than 100% are determined for these resins.

  18. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  19. Enrichment and low-level determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water after cleanup by cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Küsters, Markus; Gerhartz, Michael

    2010-04-01

    For the determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water, different procedures of enrichment and cleanup were examined using anion exchange or SPE. In many cases interactions of, e.g. alkaline earth metal ions especially calcium could be observed during enrichment and cleanup resulting in loss of analytes. For that reason, a novel cleanup and enrichment procedure for the determination of these phosphonic acid herbicides has been developed in drinking water using cation-exchange resin. In summary, the cleanup procedure with cation-exchange resin developed in this study avoids interactions as described above and is applicable to calcium-rich drinking water samples. After derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate followed by LC with fluorescence detection, LOD of 12, 14 and 12 ng/L and mean recoveries from real-world drinking water samples of 98+/-9, 100+/-16 and 101+/-11% were obtained for glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate, respectively. The low LODs and the high precision permit the analysis of these phosphonic acid herbicides according to the guidelines of the European Commission. PMID:20183819

  20. Multilayer Hydrophilic Poly(phenol-formaldehyde resin)-Coated Magnetic Graphene for Boronic Acid Immobilization as a Novel Matrix for Glycoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxi; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-29

    Capturing glycopeptides selectively and efficiently from mixed biological samples has always been critical for comprehensive and in-depth glycoproteomics analysis, but the lack of materials with superior capture capacity and high specificity still makes it a challenge. In this work, we introduce a way first to synthesize a novel boronic-acid-functionalized magnetic graphene@phenolic-formaldehyde resin multilayer composites via a facile process. The as-prepared composites gathered excellent characters of large specific surface area and strong magnetic responsiveness of magnetic graphene, biocompatibility of resin, and enhanced affinity properties of boronic acid. Furthermore, the functional graphene composites were shown to have low detection limit (1 fmol) and good selectivity, even when the background nonglycopeptides has a concentration 100 fold higher. Additionally, enrichment efficiency of the composites was still retained after being used repeatedly (at least three times). Better yet, the practical applicability of this approach was evaluated by the enrichment of human serum with a low sample volume of 1 ?L. All the results have illustrated that the magG@PF@APB has a great potential in glycoproteome analysis of complex biological samples. PMID:26161682

  1. Di-D-fructose dianhydride-enriched products by acid ion-exchange resin-promoted caramelization of D-fructose: chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Elena; Rubio, Enrique M; Pilard, Serge; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M

    2010-02-10

    Caramelization commonly occurs when sugars, or products containing a high proportion of sugars, are heated either dry or in concentrated aqueous solutions, alone or in the presence of certain additives. Upon thermal treatment of sugars, dehydration and self-condensation reactions occur, giving rise to volatiles (principally 2-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF), pigments (melanoidines) and oligosaccharidic material, among which di-D-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs) and glycosylated DFA derivatives of different degree of polymerization (DP) have been identified. This study reports a methodology to produce caramel-like products with a high content of DFAs and oligosaccharides thereof from commercial D-fructose based on the use of acid ion-exchange resins as caramelization promotors. The rate of formation of these compounds as a function of D-fructose concentration, catalyst proportion, temperature, catalyst nature and particle size has been investigated. The use of sulfonic acid resins allows conducting caramelization at remarkable low temperatures (70-90 degrees C) to reach conversions into DFA derivatives up to 70-80% in 1-2 h, with relative proportions of HMF < 2%.The relative abundance of individual DFA structures can be modulated by acting on the catalyst nature and reaction conditions, which offers a unique opportunity for nutritional studies of DFA-enriched products with well-defined compositions. PMID:20039676

  2. Evolution of Diterpene Metabolism: Sitka Spruce CYP720B4 Catalyzes Multiple Oxidations in Resin Acid Biosynthesis of Conifer Defense against Insects1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  3. Comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel surface with laser etching versus acid etching: An in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hoshing, Upendra A; Patil, Suvarna; Medha, Ashish; Bandekar, Siddhesh Dattatray

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study is in vitro evaluation of the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel which is pretreated using acid etchant and Er,Cr:Ysgg. Materials and Methods: 40 extracted human teeth were divided in two groups of 20 each (Groups A and B). In Group A, prepared surface of enamel was etched using 37% phosphoric acid (Scotchbond, 3M). In Group B, enamel was surface treated by a an Er, Cr: YSGG laser system (Waterlase MD, Biolase Technology Inc., San Clemente, CA, USA) operating at a wavelength of 2,780 nm and having a pulse duration of 140-200 microsecond with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and 40 Hz. Bonding agent ((Scotchbond Multipurpose, 3M) was applied over the test areas on 20 samples of Groups A and B each, and light cured. Composite resin (Ceram X duo Nanoceramic restorative, Densply) was applied onto the test areas as a 3 × 3 mm diameter bid, and light cured. The samples were tested for shear bond strength. Results: Mean shear bond strength for acid-etched enamel (26.41 ± 0.66MPa, range 25.155 to 27.150 MPa) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than for laser-etched enamel (16.23 ± 0.71MPa, range 15.233 to 17.334 MPa). Conclusions: For enamel surface, mean shear bond strength of bonded composite obtained after laser etching were significantly lower than those obtained after acid etching. PMID:25125842

  4. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  5. Effect of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid on the surface roughness of acrylic resin polymerized by heated water for short and long cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). Materials and Methods: The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, divided into four groups (n = 10) depending on the polymerization time and disinfectant. After polishing, the specimens were stored in distilled deionized water. Specimens were immersed in 1% NaClO or 1% C2H4O3 for 30 min, and then were immersed in distilled deionized water for 20 min. The release of C2H4O3 and NaClO was measured via visual colorimetric analysis. Roughness was measured before and after disinfection. Roughness data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: There was no interaction between polymerization time and disinfectant in influencing the average surface roughness (Ra, P = 0.957). Considering these factors independently, there were significant differences between short and conventional long cycles (P = 0.012), but no significant difference between the disinfectants hypochlorite and C2H4O3 (P = 0.366). Visual colorimetric analysis did not detect release of substances. Conclusion: It was concluded that there was the difference in surface roughness between short and conventional long cycles, and disinfection at acrylic resins polymerized by heated water using a short cycle modified the properties of roughness. PMID:25512737

  6. Sampling and analysis of airborne resin acids and solvent-soluble material derived from heated colophony (rosin) flux: a method to quantify exposure to sensitizing compounds liberated during electronics soldering.

    PubMed

    Smith, P A; Son, P S; Callaghan, P M; Jederberg, W W; Kuhlmann, K; Still, K R

    1996-07-17

    Components of colophony (rosin) resin acids are sensitizers through dermal and pulmonary exposure to heated and unheated material. Significant work in the literature identifies specific resin acids and their oxidation products as sensitizers. Pulmonary exposure to colophony sensitizers has been estimated indirectly through formaldehyde exposure. To assess pulmonary sensitization from airborne resin acids, direct measurement is desired, as the degree to which aldehyde exposure correlates with that of resin acids during colophony heating is undefined. Any analytical method proposed should be applicable to a range of compounds and should also identify specific compounds present in a breathing zone sample. This work adapts OSHA Sampling and Analytical Method 58, which is designed to provide airborne concentration data for coal tar pitch volatile solids by air filtration through a glass fiber filter, solvent extraction of the filter, and gravimetric analysis of the non-volatile extract residue. In addition to data regarding total soluble material captured, a portion of the extract may be subjected to compound-specific analysis. Levels of soluble solids found during personal breathing zone sampling during electronics soldering in a Naval Aviation Depot ranged from below the "reliable quantitation limit" reported in the method to 7.98 mg/m3. Colophony-spiked filters analyzed in accordance with the method (modified) produced a limit of detection for total solvent-soluble colophony solids of 10 micrograms/filter. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify abietic acid present in a breathing zone sample. PMID:8711739

  7. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions. PMID:25576783

  8. Lignin pyrolysis products, lignans, and resin acids as specific tracers of plant classes in emissions from biomass combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R. ); Mazurek, M.A. ); Standley, L.J. ); Hildemann, L.M. )

    1993-11-01

    Biomass smoke aerosols contain thermally unaltered and partially altered biomarker compounds from major vegetation taxa. These compounds range from C[sub 8] to C[sub 31] and include phytosterols, lignans, phenolic products from lignin, and diterpenoids from resins. Certain of the higher molecular weight biomarkers are vaporized from the parent plant material and subsequently condense unaltered into the particle phase. Other compounds undergo pyrolytic alteration and possibly dimerization. In both cases it is possible to assign many of these compounds to the plant taxa of the unburned fuel. The diterpenoids are good indicators for smoke from burning of gymnosperm wood. The relative distribution of the OH/OCH[sub 3] substituent patterns on the phenolic products indicates the plant class of the biomass that was burned. Application of these relationships to the interpretation of ambient smoke aerosols may permit further evaluation of the sources that contribute to regional biomass burning. 80 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Processing large-diameter poly(L-lactic acid) microfiber mesh/mesenchymal stromal cell constructs via resin embedding: an efficient histologic method.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Delfo; Pertici, Gianni; Moscato, Stefania; Metelli, Maria Rita; Danti, Sabrina; Nesti, Claudia; Berrettini, Stefano; Petrini, Mario; Danti, Serena

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we performed a complete histologic analysis of constructs based on large diameter (?>100 ?m) poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) microfibers obtained via dry-wet spinning and rat Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (rMSCs) differentiated towards the osteogenic lineage, using acrylic resin embedding. In many synthetic polymer-based microfiber meshes, ex post processability of fiber/cell constructs for histologic analysis may face deterring difficulties, leading to an incomplete investigation of the potential of these scaffolds. Indeed, while polymeric nanofiber (fiber diameter = tens of nanometers)/cell constructs can usually be embedded in common histologic media and easily sectioned, preserving the material structure and the antigenic reactivity, histologic analysis of large polymeric microfiber/cell constructs in the literature is really scant. This affects microfiber scaffolds based on FDA-approved and widely used polymers such as PLLA and its copolymers. Indeed, for such constructs, especially those with fiber diameter and fiber interspace much larger than cell size, standard histologic processing is usually inefficient due to inhomogeneous hardness and lack of cohesion between the synthetic and the biological phases under sectioning. In this study, the microfiber/MSC constructs were embedded in acrylic resin and the staining/reaction procedures were calibrated to demonstrate the possibility of successfully employing histologic methods in tissue engineering studies even in such difficult cases. We histologically investigated the main osteogenic markers and extracellular matrix molecules, such as alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin, TGF-?1, Runx2, Collagen type I and the presence of amorphous, fibrillar and mineralized matrix. Biochemical tests were employed to confirm our findings. This protocol permitted efficient sectioning of the treated constructs and good penetration of the histologic reagents, thus allowing distribution and expression of almost all the tested molecules to be revealed. Our results demonstrated that it is possible to perform histologic analyses of large-diameter PLLA-based microfiber scaffold/MSC constructs that face the failure of standard histologic procedures. PMID:25029413

  10. Polyisoprenylated benzophenones from Clusia floral resins.

    PubMed

    Porto, A L; Machado, S M; de Oliveira, C M; Bittrich, V; Amaral, M C; Marsaioli, A J

    2000-12-01

    From the floral resins of various Clusia species, seven polyisoprenylated benzophenones were isolated. HPLC allowed their quantification in all resins, revealing a distribution of benzophenone derivatives distinct from each other. In some species the staminal oils were collected and oleic, stearic and palmitic acids were the main constituents. PMID:11190392

  11. On-line preconcentration with a novel alkyl phosphinic acid extraction resin coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for determination of trace rare earth elements in seawater.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2007-06-15

    A newly synthesized alkyl phosphinic acid resin (APAR) was used for on-line preconcentration of trace rare earth elements (REES, lanthanides including yttrium) and then determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. REEs in seawater could be on-line concentrated on the APAR packed column (4.6mm i.d.x50mm in length), and eluted from the column with 0.5mL 0.1molL(-1) nitric acid within 30s. An enrichment factor of nearly 400 was achieved for all REEs when the seawater sample volume was 200mL, while the matrix and coexisting spectrally interfering ions such as barium, tin and antimony could be simultaneously separated. The detection limits of this proposed method for REEs were in the range from 1.43pgL(-1) of holmium to 12.7pgL(-1) of lanthanum. The recoveries of REEs were higher than 97.9%, and the precision of the relative standard deviation (R.S.D., n=6) was less than 5%. The method has been applied to the determination of soluble REEs in seawater. PMID:19071752

  12. A novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resin and its enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Guoqiang; Guo, Deping; Zhang, Yaling; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-05-15

    Improving the surface polarity is of significance for the post-cross-linked resins to enhance their adsorption to polar aromatic compounds. In the present study, we prepared a novel polar-modified post-cross-linked PDEpc_D by the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the amination reaction, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume increased significantly after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the surface polarity improved greatly after the amination reaction. Batch adsorption showed that PDEpc_D possessed a much enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid as compared the precursors PDE and PDEpc as well as the non-polar post-cross-linked PDVBpc. The equilibrium data was characterized by the Freundlich model, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding and static interaction were the possible driving forces. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. Column adsorption-desorption experiments suggested that PDEpc_D was a potential candidate for adsorptive removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PMID:26928058

  13. Distributed Drug Discovery, Part 2: Global Rehearsal of Alkylating Agents for the Synthesis of Resin-Bound Unnatural Amino Acids and Virtual D3 Catalog Construction

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Drug Discovery (D3) proposes solving large drug discovery problems by breaking them into smaller units for processing at multiple sites. A key component of the synthetic and computational stages of D3 is the global rehearsal of prospective reagents and their subsequent use in the creation of virtual catalogs of molecules accessible by simple, inexpensive combinatorial chemistry. The first section of this article documents the feasibility of the synthetic component of Distributed Drug Discovery. Twenty-four alkylating agents were rehearsed in the United States, Poland, Russia, and Spain, for their utility in the synthesis of resin-bound unnatural amino acids 1, key intermediates in many combinatorial chemistry procedures. This global reagent rehearsal, coupled to virtual library generation, increases the likelihood that any member of that virtual library can be made. It facilitates the realistic integration of worldwide virtual D3 catalog computational analysis with synthesis. The second part of this article describes the creation of the first virtual D3 catalog. It reports the enumeration of 24?416 acylated unnatural amino acids 5, assembled from lists of either rehearsed or well-precedented alkylating and acylating reagents, and describes how the resulting catalog can be freely accessed, searched, and downloaded by the scientific community. PMID:19105725

  14. Preparation and cured properties of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tokizawa, Makoto; Okada, Hiroyoshi; Wakabayashi, Nobukatsu; Kimura, Tomiaki . Research Center)

    1993-10-20

    Preparation and characterization of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins, which are derived from octadienyl compounds, were studied. From a model peracetic acid epoxidation reaction using 2,7-octadienyl acetate-1, the structure of the liquid resins is estimated to be mainly terminal epoxides and some amount of inner epoxide depending on the epoxide content. The epoxy resins offer lower toxicity and lower vapor pressure. The reactivity of the resin with acid anhydrides is moderate but faster than that of traditional cyclohexane epoxide-type resins and slower than that of the glycidyl ester-type resins. This reactivity was also examined using model compounds. The heat deflection temperature of the hexahydro-phthalic anhydride-cured resins is shown to be directly proportional to the number of epoxy groups in the molecules. The flexural strength of the cured resins is nearly equivalent to that of the commercial resins, although the flexural elongation of the resins is larger than that of the rigid cyclohexane epoxide-type resins. The thermal stability of the cured resins is compared to typical rigid cycloaliphatic resins; furthermore, high water resistance of the cured resins is suggested to be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the C[sub 8] chain by cross-linking.

  15. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  16. Novolak resin analogs for resist applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanat, Stan F.; Jensen, Kathryn H.; Lu, Ping-Hung; McKenzie, Douglas S.

    1998-06-01

    Novolak resins, used to make typical g or i-line resists, are commonly made by condensing phenolic monomers with aldehydes. In the strictest definition of novolaks the aldehyde of choice is always formaldehyde. Under the acid catalyzed conditions generally used to make novolak the resins the carbocations formed by the protonation of the aldehydic carbonyl react with the phenolic reactant(s) to form the resins with elimination of water. Other aldehydes or low molecular weight ketones have been used on occasion to make useful analog for resist applications. Competing aldol condensations may interfere with isolation of pure polymeric resins especially in the case of ketones. Unique novolak resin analogs have been made by condensing `masked' bifunctional electrophiles with phenolic reactants under acidic conditions similar to standard novolak resin techniques. These resins were used as replacements for novolak resins and showed increased image contrast and thermal resistance. They were also used as photoactive compound backbones. Low molecular weight resins made with polyhydroxy aromatic phenolic monomers were especially useful as speed enhancing additives in thick film applications.

  17. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  18. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  19. Resin hybrid composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, A.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid composites are generally referred to as the materials that combine two or more fibers in a suitable binding resin. Resin hybrid composites described in this paper utilize two or more resins with a suitable reinforcement. The resins are rigid resin and flexible resins. The elongation of the rigid resin is less than 2% and elongation of the flexible resins are varied between 25% to 100% by blending a very flexible resin with the rigid resin. Test laminates are fabricated by using either glass, carbon or aramid reinforcement in a layered sequence. This produces rigid-flexible-rigid and flexible-rigid-flexible laminates. These laminates are tested for impact, compression, flexural and inter-laminar strengths. Results show that the resin hybriding provides a wide choice of mechanical properties to the composite industry.

  20. Stability Of A Carbon-Dioxide-Removing Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experiments determing long-term chemical stability of IRA-45, commerical ion-exchange resin candidate for use in removing CO2 from atmosphere of Space Station. In proposed system, cabin air passes through resin, and acidic CO2 absorbed by weakly-basic hydrated diethylenetriamine bonded to porous resin substrate. When resin absorbs all CO2, disconnects from airstream and heated with steam to desorb CO2. Resin reuseable. Removed by post-treating process air with phosphoric acid on charcoal. Other chemicals removed by trace-contaminant-control subsystem of Space Station.

  1. Determining resin/fiber content of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, G. G.; Houston, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Article discusses procedure where hydrazine is used to extract graphite fibers from cured polyimide resin. Method does not attack graphite fibers and is faster than hot-concentrated-acid digestion process.

  2. Antimicrobial Assessment of Resins from Calophyllum Antillanum and Calophyllum Inophyllum.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Oubada, Ahmad; Bello, Adonis; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul; Monzote, Lianet

    2015-12-01

    The Calophyllum genus is well-known for its antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, and therefore, we analyzed these biological activities for resins of Calophyllum antillanum and Calophyllum inophyllum growing in Cuba. C.?antillanum resins showed a potent activity against Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 ?=?0.3?±?0.1?µg/mL), while its cytotoxicity against MRC-5 cells was much lower (IC50 ?=?21.6?±?1.1?µg/mL). In contrary, the resin of C.?inophyllum showed an unspecific activity. The presence of apetalic acid, isoapetalic acid, calolongic acid, pinetoric acid I, pinetoric acid II, isocalolongic acid, pinetoric acid III, and isopinetoric acid III in C.?antillanum resins was also confirmed. These results demonstrated for the first time the potential activity of C.?antillanum resins against P.?falciparum. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26514875

  3. A novel star-shaped poly(carboxylic acid) for resin-modified glass-ionomer restoratives.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y; Howard, L; Xie, D

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a novel glass-ionomer cement (GIC) system composed of photo-curable star-shaped poly(acrylic acid-co-itaconic acid)s. These polyacids were synthesized via a chain-transfer radical polymerization using a newly synthesized multi-arm chain-transfer agent. The star-shaped polyacids showed significantly lower viscosities in water as compared to the linear polyacids. Due to the lower viscosities, the molecular weight (MW) of the polyacids can be significantly increased for enhancing the mechanical strengths while keeping the ease of mixing and handling. The effects of MW, GM-tethering ratio, P/L ratio, and aging on the compressive properties of the experimental cements were significant. The light-cured experimental cements showed significantly improved mechanical strengths i.e. 49% in yield strength, 41% in modulus, 25% in CS, 20% in DTS, and 36% in FS, higher than commercial Fuji II LC. After aging in water for 1 month, the compressive strength of the novel light-cured experimental cement reached 343 MPa, which was 34% and 42% higher than Fuji II and Fuji II LC, respectively. This one-month aged experimental cement was also 23% higher than itself after one day aging, indicating that aging in water can significantly enhance salt-bridge formation for this novel star-shaped polyacid-comprised GIC. PMID:24865692

  4. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  5. Cloning and expression of a CYP720B orthologue involved in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids in Pinus brutia.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases mediate a broad range of oxidative reactions involved in the biosynthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites in plants. Until now, only two P450 genes, CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, have been functionally characterised and described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the cloning and expression of CYP720B from Pinus brutia due to its suggested role in the synthesis of bioactive compounds used for chemical defence against insects. A PCR product of the P. brutia CYP720B gene was cloned into the pCR8/GW/TOPO cloning vector. After optimising the sequence for codon usage in yeast, it was transferred into the inducible expression vector pYES-DEST52 and transfected into the S. cerevisiae INVSc1 strain. Sequence analysis showed that the P. brutia CYP720B gene contains an open reading frame of 1,464 nucleotides, which encodes a 53,570 Da putative protein of 487 amino acid residues. The putative protein contains the classic heme-binding sequence motif that is conserved in all P450 enzymes. It shares 99 and 61% identity with the deduced amino acid sequences of CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, respectively. Recombinant CYP720B protein expression was confirmed using western blot analysis. Furthermore, recombinant CYP720B was functionally active, showing a Soret peak at approximately 448 nm in the reduced CO difference spectra. These data suggest that the cloned gene is an orthologue of CYP720B in P. brutia and might be involved in DRA biosynthesis. PMID:25394757

  6. Comparison of the irritation potentials of Boswellia serrata gum resin and of acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid by in vitro cytotoxicity tests on human skin-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Bruno; Parodi, Alessandro; Volante, Andrea; Bassi, Anna Maria

    2008-03-15

    Indian frankincense is a gum resin from Boswellia serrata of Burseraceae used in Ayurveda and Western medicine for the antinflammatory effects of boswellic acids, particularly 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA). We evaluated in vitro cytotoxicities of B. serrata extract and AKBA on differentiated and undifferentiated keratinocytes (HaCaT and NCTC 2544), and foetal dermal fibroblasts (HFFF2), using neutral red uptake (NRU), MTT, and DNA assays. Comparison between NRU and MTT, and between the extract and AKBA, suggested a relatively higher toxicity of both substances on lysosomes respect to mitochondria. Extract cytotoxicity on lysosomes was higher in NCTC and HFFF2 than on the more differentiated HaCaT. DNA assay showed low extract inhibition on HFFF2 proliferation, possibly due to lower growth rate, and a stronger effect on NCTC than on HaCaT, possibly related to higher proapoptotic effect on the less differentiated NCTC, as also suggested by higher AKBA toxicity on NCTC than on HaCaT. In general, gum resin and AKBA toxicities were slightly lower or higher than that of the reference compound SDS. Our in vitro model allowed to compare the sensitivities of different human skin cells to B. serrata, and indicated that the gum resin and AKBA exert moderate to low toxicity on the skin. PMID:18304763

  7. Hydrolyzable polyester resins, varnishes and coating compositions containing the same

    DOEpatents

    Yamamori, Naoki; Yokoi, Junji; Yoshikawa, Motoyoshi

    1984-01-01

    Preparation of hydrolyzable polyester resin comprising reacting polycarboxylic acid and polyhydric alcohol components, which is characterized by using, as at least part of said polyhydric alcohol component, a metallic salt of hydroxy carboxylic acid of the formula defined and effecting the polycondensation at a temperature which is no more than the decomposition temperature of said metallic salt. The polyester resins are useful as resinous vehicle of varnishes and antifouling paints.

  8. Evolution of Conifer Diterpene Synthases: Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis in Lodgepole Pine and Jack Pine Involves Monofunctional and Bifunctional Diterpene Synthases1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L.; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  9. Evolution of conifer diterpene synthases: diterpene resin acid biosynthesis in lodgepole pine and jack pine involves monofunctional and bifunctional diterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Hall, Dawn E; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  10. Morphology of resin-dentin interfaces after Er,Cr:YSGG laser and acid etching preparation and application of different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Beer, Franziska; Buchmair, Alfred; Körpert, Wolfram; Marvastian, Leila; Wernisch, Johann; Moritz, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to show the modifications in the ultrastructure of the dentin surface morphology following different surface treatments. The stability of the adhesive compound with dentin after laser preparation compared with conventional preparation using different bonding agents was evaluated. An Er,Cr:YSGG laser and 36% phosphoric acid in combination with various bonding systems were used. A total of 100 caries-free human third molars were used in this study. Immediately after surgical removal teeth were cut using a band saw and 1-mm thick dentin slices were created starting at a distance of 4 mm from the cusp plane to ensure complete removal of the enamel. The discs were polished with silicon carbide paper into rectangular shapes to a size of 6 × 4 mm (±0,2 mm).The discs as well as the remaining teeth stumps were stored in 0.9% NaCl at room temperature. The specimens were divided into three main groups (group I laser group, group II etch group, group III laser and etch group) and each group was subdivided into three subgroups which were allocated to the different bonding systems (subgroup A Excite, subgroup B Scotchbond, subgroup C Syntac). Each disc and the corresponding tooth stump were treated in the same way. After preparation the bonding composite material was applied according to the manufacturers' guidelines in a hollow tube of 2 mm diameter to the disc as well as to the corresponding tooth stump. Shear bond strength testing and environmental scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the morphology and stability of the resin-dentin interface. The self-etching bonding system showed the highest and the most constant shear values in all three main groups, thus enabling etching with phosphoric acid after laser preparation to be avoided. Thus we conclude that laser preparation creates a surface texture that allows prediction of the quality of the restoration without the risk of negative influences during the following treatment steps. This can easily and repeatedly be achieved. PMID:21948398

  11. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Elastomer-modified vinyl ester resins: Impact fracture and fatigue resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, A.R.; Guiley, C.D.; Kinloch, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Vinyl esters are a class of corrosion resistant thermoset resins. Products are available based on epoxide resins that have been addition-esterified with methacrylic acid and diluted with styrene monomer. Elastomer modification improves fracture properties and fatigue properties.

  13. Extraction chromatography of neodymium by an organophosphorous extractant supported on various polymeric resins

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1993-04-01

    Fifteen resins coated with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethyl phosphonate (CMP) were studied for their extraction of neodymium (Nd) in 4.0 and 7.0 M nitric acid. Resin properties, such as chemical composition and physical morphology, which can influence Nd extraction as well as subsequent resin regeneration (Nd stripping), were identified. Hydrophilic or polar resins coated with CMP efficiently extracted the Nd. Resins initially washed free of residual monomer and solvent before CMP coating outperformed their untreated counterparts. The macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene hydrophobic resins that were high in surface area were less effective supports compared with hydrophilic microporous Aurorez, polybenzimidazole (PBI) and macroporous Amberlite polyacrylic resins. Only one resin, Duolite C-467, showed no measurable improvement in Nd extraction with CMP coating. CMP-coated Aurorez PBI, a microporous and hydrophilic polymeric resin with an average surface area, showed the best overall efficiency for Nd removal and resin regeneration.

  14. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.

    1991-01-01

    High temperature structural resins are required for use on advanced aerospace vehicles as adhesives and composite matrices. NASA-Langley developed polyimide resins were evaluated as high temperature structural adhesives for metal to metal bonding and as composite matrices. Adhesive tapes were prepared on glass scrim fabric from solutions of polyamide acids of the semicrystalline polyimide LARC-CPI, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center. Using 6Al-4V titanium adherends, high lap shear bond strengths were obtained at ambient temperature (45.2 MPa, 6550 psi) and acceptable strengths were obtained at elevated temperature (14.0 MPa, 2030 psi) using the Pasa-Jell 107 conversion coating on the titanium and a bonding pressure of 1.38 MPa (200 psi). Average zero degree composite tensile and compressive strengths of 1290 MPa (187 ksi) and 883 MPa (128 ksi) respectively were obtained at ambient temperature with unsized AS-4 carbon fiber reinforcement.

  15. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  16. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  17. Leachability of denture-base acrylic resins in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Koda, T; Tsuchiya, H; Yamauchi, M; Ohtani, S; Takagi, N; Kawano, J

    1990-01-01

    We studied the influence of salivary acidity on leachability of denture-base acrylic resins with etiological interest in denture stomatitis because denture surfaces are frequently exposed to acidic conditions in the oral cavities. Auto-, heat-, and microwave-polymerized resins were immersed in artificial saliva with pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.8 at 37 degrees C, and leachables were pursued quantitatively with time. Methyl methacrylate, methacrylic acid, and benzoic acid leached from all resins. Their concentrations in the saliva were markedly high for auto-polymerized resins, while leachability of heat- and microwave-polymerized resins was so low that quantitative analysis of leachables was impossible. Lower pH showed higher concentrations of methyl methacrylate, although no apparent association was confirmed between salivary acidity and its own leachability. The concentrations of methacrylic acid increased remarkably with an increase in pH, which was probably due to hydrolysis of methyl methacrylate. These results suggest that chemotoxic actions of auto-polymerized resins are potentially ascribable to methyl methacrylate under more acidic conditions and to methacrylic acid under less acidic conditions. PMID:2376289

  18. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  19. Improved well stimulation with resin-coated proppants

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, A.R.; Graham, J.W.; Sinclair, C.P.

    1983-02-01

    Resin-coated proppants improve well stimulation results by preventing flowback, or fracture evacuation, near the wellbore, a phenomenon that effectively ''decouples'' the wellbore and the productive formation. In addition, the deformable coating protects the resin-coated proppants from crushing and helps resist embedment in softer formations. The tough coating is chemically inert in crude oils, brines, and most acids. The resin-coated materials work best under actual downhole conditions since the closure stress and temperature help lock the materials in the fracture for the life of the well. This paper reviews case histories from four wells in which resin-coated proppants were used. In addition, simple lab tests of the resin-coated proppants in an API crush cell confirm their excellent properties and potential. Together, these results show the need for resin-coated proppants in many types of wells. In many ways they act as ''ideal'' proppants that can be economically justified over uncoated proppants.

  20. Conventional and microfilled composite resins. Part II. Chip fractures.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, P; Ameye, C; Vanherle, G

    1982-11-01

    Dentists are accustomed to advantages and disadvantages in the materials at their disposal. This article was concerned with one disadvantage of microfilled composite resins, namely, chip fractures. Probably due to their higher coefficient of thermal expansion, higher water sorption, higher polymerization shrinkage, and lower tensile strengths, cohesive as well as adhesive chip fractures occur three to four times more often with microfilled composite resins than with conventional composite resins. Microfilled composite resins are indicated for esthetic purposes. They are contraindicated for Class IV and stress-bearing restorations. They are indicated for limited use in Class I restorations where esthetics is of primary importance. The technique of use must include acid-etching and intermediate bonding. The microfilled composite resins enjoy a smooth finish and high luster. This offers advantages in areas where smoothness is paramount. They may replace conventional composite resins for resurfacing existing restorations and veneering stained or mottled anterior teeth. They are indicated for treatment of cervical erosion. PMID:6958862

  1. Cleanup of TMI-2 demineralizer resins

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocesium is being removed from Demineralizers A and B (DA and DB by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). The process was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDS feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consists of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin is contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subject the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH/sub 2/BO/sub 3/-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution (total B = 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared to those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2 which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB.

  2. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  3. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  4. Synthesis of improved polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, A. H.; Delano, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen aromatic unsaturated polyester prepolymers prepared by a modified interfacial condensation technique were investigated for their solubility in vinyl monomers and ability to provide high char yield forming unsaturated polyester resins. The best resin system contained a polyester prepolymer of phthalic, fumaric and diphenic acids reacted with 2,7-naphthalene diol and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene. This prepolymer is very soluble in styrene, divinyl benzene, triallyl cyanurate, diallyl isophthalate and methylvinylpyridine. It provided anaerobic char yields as high as 41 percent at 800 C. The combination of good solubility and char yield represents a significant improvement over state-of-the-art unsaturated polyester resins. The majority of the other prepolymers had only low or no solubility in vinyl monomers. Graphite composites from this prepolymer with styrene were investigated. The cause for the observed low shear strengths of the composites was not determined, however 12-week aging of the composites at 82 C showed that essentially no changes in the composites had occurred.

  5. Resin glycosides from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenbing; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wu, Ping; Xu, Liangxiong; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2012-09-01

    Three glycosidic acids, turpethic acids A-C, and two intact resin glycosides, turpethosides A and B, all having a common pentasaccharide moiety and 12-hydroxy fatty acid aglycones of different chain lengths, were obtained from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. The aglycones were characterized as 12-hydroxypentadecanoic acid in two compounds, 12-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid in two other components, and 12-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid in the fifth compound, which were all confirmed by synthesis. The absolute configurations of these aglycones were all established as S by Mosher's method. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides with a monohydroxylated 12-hydroxy fatty acid as an aglycone, and one compound is the first described resin glycoside having a hydroxylated C(17) fatty acid as its aglycone. PMID:22717506

  6. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

  7. Examination of styrene-divinylbenzene ion-exchange resins, used in contact with food, for potential migrants.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, J A; Willoughby, B G

    2006-07-01

    The nature of extractable substances from five types of styrene-divinylbenzene ion-exchange resins used in the preparation of foodstuffs was investigated. Strong acid cation resins, strong and weak base anion resins, and an active carbon replacement resin were examined. These resins are used for a variety of purposes including water softening, decalcification of sugar syrups, demineralization, removal of nitrate ions from water and decolourization. Analysis was carried out using electrospray LC-MS- and GC-MS-based methodologies. Extractable substances from new resins were identified as mainly being by-products of the resin manufacturing process. Levels of extractable substances decreased with washing. PMID:16751150

  8. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1986-01-01

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  9. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  10. Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1991-01-01

    Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

  11. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  12. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  13. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  14. Branched polymeric media: boron-chelating resins from hyperbranched polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Yu, Changjun; Chen, Dennis P; Goddard, William A; Dalleska, Nathan F; Hoffmann, Michael R; Diallo, Mamadou S

    2012-08-21

    Extraction of boron from aqueous solutions using selective resins is important in a variety of applications including desalination, ultrapure water production, and nuclear power generation. Today's commercial boron-selective resins are exclusively prepared by functionalization of styrene-divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads with N-methylglucamine to produce resins with boron-chelating groups. However, such boron-selective resins have a limited binding capacity with a maximum free base content of 0.7 eq/L, which corresponds to a sorption capacity of 1.16 ± 0.03 mMol/g in aqueous solutions with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM. In this article, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new resin that can selectively extract boron from aqueous solutions. We show that branched polyethylenimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension process can be reacted with glucono-1,5-D-lactone to afford a resin consisting of spherical beads with high density of boron-chelating groups. This resin has a sorption capacity of 1.93 ± 0.04 mMol/g in aqueous solution with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM, which is 66% percent larger than that of standard commercial STY-DVB resins. Our new boron-selective resin also shows excellent regeneration efficiency using a standard acid wash with a 1.0 M HCl solution followed by neutralization with a 0.1 M NaOH solution. PMID:22827255

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-02-23

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

  16. Controversies in posterior composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E G; Mandradjieff, M; Brindock, T

    1990-01-01

    The use of posterior composites is riddled with so many controversies that the puzzled practitioner must step warily among them. This modality is a minefield, where one careless movement can bring disaster. All composite restorations are subject to three big destructive forces--moisture, polymerization shrinkage, and clinical wear--forces that can eventually produce both microleakage and deterioration of the silane coupling agent linking filler particles to resin matrix. Despite the extreme technique sensitivity of posterior composite resins, knowledge of resin technology, sound operative dentistry principles and foresight in case selection can be effective in producing durable cosmetic restorations. Posterior composite resin restorations bonded to enamel and dentin reputedly strengthen teeth in both conventional and adhesive types of preparations provided polymerization shrinkage can be controlled. It is imperative that a knowledge of occlusal contacts be used to influence cavity outline, confining the trauma or occlusal forces away from the tooth-resin interface and helping to minimize occlusal wear. With the increased use of posterior resins, the trend in cavity preparations should break away from the traditional Black preparation toward the adhesive type preparation. If the Black Class II preparation is used, it is suggested that bevels be confined to the facial and lingual margins of the proximal box. Prewedging helps to maintain a conservative Class II preparation. Shade selection must be made prior to rubber dam isolation for greater accuracy and to help prevent postinsertion discoloration. The enamel should be pumiced to present a clean substrate for acid etching. The smear layer should be removed. The type of pulp protection applied before acid etching is dependent on the material used. After etching, the enamel should be washed with a 1 per cent potassium chloride solution. It is a more universally chemically stable solution than additive-laden local water supplies. The potassium chloride solution lowers the electrostatic forces on the enamel that would interfere with the flow of enamel bonding agents. Furthermore, tests have shown that the use of potassium chloride washes increase the strength of the enamel body by 40 per cent. Because of the depth of most posterior cavities, an incremental filling technique must be used to ensure a thorough polymerization of the resin and to forestall a massive polymerization shrinkage. When finished and contoured, the margins of the restoration should be re-etched, washed, and dried and then covered with an application of unfilled resin to discourage microleakage. Traditional operative dentistry technique must become flexible enough to meet the new demands of resin technology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2403943

  17. Salivary contamination and post-cured resin/resin lute bond.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A N; Pereira, B P

    1994-01-01

    A previous study has shown that sandblasting and silane priming a post-cured inlay resin gave a secure bond to dual-cure luting resin. To determine the influence of salivary contamination 4 additional groups of 15 post-cured resin discs were mounted in acrylic cylinders, their faces sandblasted with 50 microns alumina and silane primed. Surface treatments with saliva (sa), air/water spray (a/w), phosphoric acid gel (pa), and silane (si) followed in the order listed: A) control, no further treatment; B) sa, a/w; C) sa, a/w, si; D) sa, a/w, pa a/w; E) sa, a/w, pa, a/w, si. A 3.9 mm diameter column of dual-cure resin lute was then bonded to the dry stored in water surfaces. Specimens were stored in water for 2 weeks after which the dual-cure resin columns were sheared off the post-cured resin discs. Shear bond strengths were A) 19.2 +/- 3.7, B) 17.4 +/- 3.9, C) 16.7 +/- 3.1, D) 15.6 +/- 3.5, E) 15.4 +/- 2.3 MPa. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Procedure showed groups D and E to be significantly lower than the uncontaminated control group A (p < 0.05). There were 2 adhesive failures in group B and all others were cohesive within the post-cured resin discs. This implies that air/water alone after salivary contamination is an unreliable cleansing method. The low shear bond values for Groups D and E may have been related to inadequate clearance of the phosphoric acid gel. It was concluded that salivary contamination adversely affected the quality of the bonds studied and decontamination using phosphoric acid gel resulted in significantly reduced shear bond strengths. PMID:9582676

  18. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  19. Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Morio

    Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

  20. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  1. Assessment of Microleakage of Class V Composite Resin Restoration Following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) Laser Conditioning and Acid Etching with Two Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Arbabzadeh Zavareh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Birang, Reza; Eskini, Massoumeh; Bouraima, Stephane Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of laser for cavity preparation or conditioning of dentin and enamelsurfaces as an alternative for dental tissue acid-etch have increased in recent years. Theaim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage at enamel-composite and dentincompositeinterfaces following Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet(Er:YAG) laserconditioning or acid-etching of enamel and dentin, hybridized with different bonding systems. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of 50 recentlyextracted intact human posterior teeth with occlusal margin in the enamel and gingival marginin the dentin. The cavities were randomly assigned to five groups: group1:conditioned withlaser (Energy=120mJ, Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100?s for Enamel and Energy=80mJ,Frequency=10Hz, Pulse duration=100?s for Dentin) + Optibond FL, group2:conditioned withlaser + etching with 35% phosphoric acid + Optibond FL, group3:conditioned with laser+ Clearfil SE Bond, group 4 (control):acid etched with 35% phosphoric acid + OptibondFL, group 5 (control): Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored using Point 4 compositeresin. All samples were stored in distilled water at 37°c for 24 h, then were thermocycled for500 cycles and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 h. The teeth were sectionedbucco-lingually to evaluate the dye penetration. Kruskal-Wallis & Mann-Whitney testswere used for statistical analysis. Results: In occlusal margins, the least microleakage showed in groups 2, 4 and 5. Themaximum microleakage was observed in group 3 (P=0.009). In gingival margins, the leastmicroleakage was recorded in group2, while the most microleakage was found in group5 (P=0.001). Differences between 5 study groups were statistically significant (P<0.05).The microleakage scores were higher at the gingival margins. Conclusion: The use of the Er:YAG laser for conditioning with different dentin adhesivesystems influenced the marginal sealing of composite resin restorations. PMID:25606305

  2. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  3. Color test for selective detection of secondary amines on resin and in solution.

    PubMed

    Boas, Ulrik; Mirsharghi, Sahar

    2014-11-21

    Resins for solid-phase synthesis give orange to red-brown resin beads selectively when secondary amines are present on the resin when treated with a solution of acetaldehyde and an Fmoc-amino acid in NMP. The method shows good specificity and gives colorless beads when exposed to a variety of other functional groups. Furthermore, the acetaldehyde/Fmoc amino acid method can be used as a selective colorimetric test for secondary amines in solution. PMID:25360626

  4. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  5. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  6. Ageing behaviour and analytical characterization of the Jatobá resin collected from Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa; de La Cruz-Cañizares, Juana; Osete-Cortina, Laura; Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; David, Helena

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an analytical study to characterize the trunk resin collected from the Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart. species from the region of Minas Gerais (Brazil), popularly known as Jatobá resin. Hymenaea resins are reported to have been used in artistic applications such as protective varnishes in polychromed sculptures and paintings. Therefore, the identification of the main chemical changes that take place in the resin when it is prepared as a thin film exposed to atmospheric effects have been considered herein. Changes due to the degradation effect of light have been studied on a series of specimens prepared as a thin films and subjected to accelerated UV light ageing. The results based on GC-MS, THM-Py-GC-MS analyses, and on-line trimethylsilylation Py-GC-MS using hexamethyldislylazane as a derivatization reagent, have been compared. The study shows that eperuic acid and its [Delta]7 and [Delta]8 isomers, together with copalic acid, are the major components of the studied resin. Other compounds such as kolavenic acid, iso-ozic acid and epi-pinifolic acid are also present in this resin as minor components. This composition differs from those of resins obtained from other species of the Hymenaea genus growing in this Amazonian region. UV light ageing of the Jatobá resin prepared as a thin film results in the appearance of a new isomer of eperuic acid. Some changes in the relative content of the major components present in the resin have also been observed after ageing.

  7. Carboxymethylated polyethylenimine-polymethylenepolyphenylene isocyanate chelating ion exchange resin preconcentration for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, A.; Barnes, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    A carboxymethylated polyethylenimine-polylmethylenepolyphenylene isocyanate chelating ion exchange resin was prepared, characterized, and used for metals preconcentration for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The uptake of copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc by the resin was quantitative in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and acetate and citrate salts. These metals could be collected from artificial seawater, Dead Sea water, and dissolved bone with a recovery of nearly 100%. The resin also chelates heavy metals and rare earths. Complexed metals can be eluted from the resin column with strong acids. The resin does not change volume with ionic form changes and can be regenerated for repeated use.

  8. Influence of different power outputs of erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser and acid etching on shear bond strengths of a dual-cure resin cement to enamel.

    PubMed

    Ba?aran, Emine Göncü; Ayna, Emrah; Ba?aran, Güvenç; Beydemir, Köksal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the irradiation of enamel with laser of different output powers might be viable alternatives to acid etching for the bonding of resin luting agents. Seventy-seven maxillary central incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used. The enamel was etched with an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser operated at one of six power outputs (0.5 W, 0.75 W, 1 W, 1.5 W, 1.75 W and 2 W) or with 38% phosphoric acid. Seventy teeth were used for the bond strength experiments, and the remaining seven (one specimen for each group) were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the topography and morphology of the treated enamel surface. The acid-etched group yielded the highest mean of shear bond strength (13.5 ± 2.8 MPa). The means of the shear bond strength for the teeth irradiated at 0.5 W, 0.75 W, 1 W, 1.5 W , 1.75 W and 2 W laser were 3.28 ± 2.4 MPa, 5.44 ± 3.4 MPa, 8.8 ± 4.5 MPa, 10.2 ± 4.0 MPa, 11.4 ± 4.8 MPa and 11.9 ± 4.3 MPa, respectively. Laser irradiation at 1.5 W, 1.75 W and 2 W produced a type III acid-etched pattern similar to that produced by acid etching. No significant enamel surface etching was obtained by 0.5 W or 0.75 W laser irradiation. Irradiation at 0.5 W and 0.75 W produced a type V acid-etched pattern. We concluded that the mean shear bond strength and enamel surface etching obtained with Er,Cr:YSGG laser (operated at 1.5 W and 1.75 W for 15 s) is comparable to that obtained with acid etching. PMID:20016923

  9. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  10. Two pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Argyreia acuta.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yan, You-Shao; Chen, Yan-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Two new compounds of acutacosides 1 and 2, pentasaccharide resin glycosides were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. The core of the two compounds was operculinic acid A, and they were esterfied at the same position, just one substituent group was linked at C-2 of Rha. The absolute configuration of the aglycone in the two compounds was established by Mosher's method, which was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods. PMID:25925631

  11. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin. (authors)

  12. VALIDATION FOR THE PERMANGANATE DIGESTION OF REILLEX HPQ ANION RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2009-09-23

    The flowsheet for the digestion of Reillex{trademark} HPQ was validated both under the traditional alkaline conditions and under strongly acidic conditions. Due to difficulty in performing a pH adjustment in the large tank where this flowsheet must be performed, the recommended digestion conditions were changed from pH 8-10 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}. Thus, no pH adjustment of the solution is required prior to performing the permanganate addition and digestion and the need to sample the digestion tank to confirm appropriate pH range for digestion may be avoided. Neutralization of the acidic digestion solution will be performed after completion of the resin digestion cycle. The amount of permanganate required for this type of resin (Reillex{trademark} HPQ) was increased from 1 kg/L resin to 4 kg/L resin to reduce the amount of residual resin solids to a minimal amount (<5%). The length of digestion time at 70 C remains unchanged at 15 hours. These parameters are not optimized but are expected to be adequate for the conditions. The flowsheet generates a significant amount of fine manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) solids (1.71 kg/L resin) and involves the generation of a significant liquid volume due to the low solubility of permanganate. However, since only two batches of resin (40 L each) are expected to be digested, the total waste generated is limited.

  13. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  14. The effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex trademark HPQ, a new macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin, and on four conventional polystyrene anion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    This study compares the effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex{trademark} HPQ, a recently available macroporous copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine/divinylbenzene, and on four conventional strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. The polystyrene resins investigated included one gel type, Dowex{trademark} 1 {times} 4, and three macroporous resins: Dow{trademark} MSA-1, Amberlite{trademark} IRA-900, and Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK. Each resin, in 7 M nitric acid, was subjected to seven different levels of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation ranging from 100 to 1000 megarads. Irradiated resins were measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, chloride and Pu(IV) exchange capacities, and thermal stability. In separate experiments, each resin was subjected to approximately 340 megarads of in situ alpha particles from sorbed plutonium. Resin damage from alpha particles was less than half that caused by gamma rays, which may be a consequence of different production rates of radiolytic nitrite and nitro radicals in the two systems. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin provided the greatest radiation stability, whereas Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK was the least stable of the resins tested. Thermogravimetric analyses of dry, nitrate-form resin revealed that dry Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin offered the best thermal stability for absorbed gamma doses to 370 megarads, but the worst thermal stability after exposures of 550 megarads or more. 25 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Alternate Methods For Eluting Cesium From Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Johnson, Heather Lauren

    2009-01-01

    A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST) an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The standard method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15-20 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO3). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks, and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid generated by the standard elution method exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing conditions in the glass melt. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M nitric acid are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the standard elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. The resin was loaded with 9.5 g Cs/L of resin prior to elution, which is the maximum expected loading for RF resin treating the actual dissolved salt waste at SRS. For the baseline elution method, 465 g of nitrate is used per liter of resin, and >99.9999% of the cesium is removed from the resin. An alternative method that used 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M HNO3 followed by 11 bed volumes of 0.05 M HNO3, used 158 g of nitrate per liter of resin (66% less nitrate than used for the standard elution) and removed >99.998% of the cesium. A staccato flow mode using 0.5 M HNO3 (1 hr on at 1 BV/hr, followed by 3 hrs off) after the resin had been titrated using a continuous flow of acid at 1 BV/hr removed 99.9998% of the cesium while using 12 BV of acid (20% less than the baseline). Formic acid was slightly less efficient than nitric acid for eluting the resin, but 20 BV of 0.5 M HCOOH removed 99.98% of the cesium from the resin.

  16. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  17. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... isophthalic acid, and 38.8±0.5 weight percent bis(4-amino-3-methylcyclohexyl)-methane. (12) Nylon 6I/6T resins... CFR 177.1395 of this chapter 1.09±0.02 270-277 >140 using the method described in § 177.1500(c)(5)(ii... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at...

  18. Plastic resin hardener poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Seek immediate emergency medical help. If the resin is on the skin, wash the area thoroughly for at least 15 minutes. Contact ... further instructions. This is a free and confidential service. All ... need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours ...

  19. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  20. Immunomodulatory triterpenoids from the oleogum resin of Boswellia carterii Birdwood.

    PubMed

    Badria, Farid A; Mikhaeil, Botros R; Maatooq, Galal T; Amer, Mohamed M A

    2003-01-01

    The immunomodulatory bioassay-guided fractionation of the oleogum resin of frankincense (Boswellia carterii Birdwood) resulted in the isolation and identification of 9 compounds; palmitic acid and eight triterpenoids belonging to lupane, ursane, oleanane, and tirucallane skeleta were isolated form the resin. These triterpenoids are lupeol, beta-boswellic acid, 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl beta-boswellic acid, acetyl 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-alpha-boswellic acid, 3-oxo-tirucallic acid, and 3-hydroxy-tirucallic acid. The structures of the isolated compounds were deduced based on spectroscopic evidences. The lymphocyte transformation assay of the isolated compounds proved that the total extract retained more activity than that of any of the purified compounds. PMID:12939036

  1. A NEW EXTRACTION CHROMATOGRAPHY RESIN CONTAINING KLÄUI LIGANDS FOR APPLICATION IN ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Wester, Dennis W.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Latesky, Stanley L.; Martyr, Cuthbert C.; Richards, Kia N.

    2004-11-01

    An extraction chromatography resin containing the anionic ligand (?5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)tris-(diethylphosphito-P)cobalt(III), (L) has been prepared. The resin consists of 1 wt% L on Amberlite® XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am(III) and Pu(IV). The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is more pronounced for Am(III). This allows for convenient separation of Am(III) from Pu(IV) by simple adjustments in the nitric acid concentration. The tripodal geometry of L disfavors the complexation of uranyl ion, so sorption of U(VI) by the L-containing resin is weak.

  2. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  3. Enlightening the past: analytical proof for the use of Pistacia exudates in ancient Egyptian embalming resins.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tim M; Gradl, Manuela; Welte, Beatrix; Metzger, Michael; Pusch, Carsten M; Albert, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Mastic, the resinous exudate of the evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus, is frequently discussed as one of the ingredients used for embalming in ancient Egypt. We show the identification of mastic in ancient Egyptian embalming resins by an unambiguous assignment of the mastic triterpenoid fingerprint consisting of moronic acid, oleanonic acid, isomasticadienonic and masticadienonic acid through the consolidation of NMR and GC/MS analysis. Differences in the observed triterpenoid fingerprints between mummy specimens suggest that more than one plant species served as the triterpenoid resin source. Analysis of the triterpenoid acids of ancient embalming resin samples in the form of their methyl- and trimethylsilyl esters is compared. In addition we show a simple way to differentiate between residues of mastic from its use as incense during embalming or from direct mastic application in the embalming resin. PMID:22083980

  4. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Sheldon T. (Augusta, GA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  5. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  6. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  7. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: a potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste. PMID:25128764

  8. Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

    2003-02-26

    Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

  9. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  10. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  11. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  12. Morphological characterization of furfuraldehyde resins adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Monteiro, S.N.; D`Almeida, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sugar cane is one of the most traditional plantation cultivated crops in large areas in Brazil. The State University of the North of Rio de Janeiro, UENF, is currently engaged in a program aimed to exploit the potentialities of sugar cane industry as a self sustained non-polluting enterprise. One of the projects being carried out at the UENF is the transformation of sugar cane bagasse in precursor materials for the industry of furan derivatives such as the furfuraldehyde resins obtained by acid catalysis. The possibility of employing acid catalyzed furfuraldehyde resins as selective adsorbents has arisen during a comprehensive study of physical-chemical adsorption properties of these materials. The morphology of these resins depend on the synthesis method. Scanning Electron Microscopic studies of these materials which were synthesized, in bulk (FH-M) and solution (FH-D), showed differences in surface density and particle size. Using mercury porosimeter techniques and BET adsorption methods, it was found different pore size distributions and a decrement in surface area when solvent was employed in the synthesis process. By thermogravimetric analysis it was found similar weight losses (6%) of water adsorption and a small differences in thermal stabilities.

  13. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  14. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  15. Environment and Genotype Affect Sweetpotato Storage Root Periderm Resin Glycoside Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resin glycosides are complex compounds composed primarily of fatty acids and sugars that contribute to allelopathic potential and pest resistance in sweetpotato. Total periderm resin glycoside (PRG) contents of 10 sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) clones grown in three different field trials was det...

  16. Use of the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin for microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Androutsou, Maria Eleni; Pantelia, Anna; Friligou, Irene; Crisp, Molly; High, Kirsty; Penkman, Kirsty; Gatos, Dimitrios; Tselios, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    A fast and efficient microwave (MW)-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis protocol using the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin and the Fmoc/tBu methodology, has been developed. The established protocol combines the advantages of MW irradiation and the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin. The effect of temperature during the MW irradiation, the degree of resin substitution during the coupling of the first amino acids and the rate of racemization for each amino acid were evaluated. The suggested solid phase methodology is applicable for orthogonal peptide synthesis and for the synthesis of cyclic peptides. PMID:26270247

  17. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application...

  18. Indirect resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ‘indirect resin composites,’ composite inlays,’ and ‘fiber-reinforced composites.’ PMID:21217945

  19. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Polyethylene *Polyethylene—Ethyl Acrylate Resins *Polyethylene—Polyvinyl Acetate Copolymers Polyethylene Resin (HDPE) Polyethylene Resin (LPDE) Polyethylene Resin, Scrap Polyethylene Resin, Wax (Low M.W.) Polyethylene Resin, Latex Polyethylene Resins *Polyethylene Resins, Compounded *Polyethylene,...

  20. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Polyethylene *Polyethylene—Ethyl Acrylate Resins *Polyethylene—Polyvinyl Acetate Copolymers Polyethylene Resin (HDPE) Polyethylene Resin (LPDE) Polyethylene Resin, Scrap Polyethylene Resin, Wax (Low M.W.) Polyethylene Resin, Latex Polyethylene Resins *Polyethylene Resins, Compounded *Polyethylene,...

  1. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Polyethylene *Polyethylene—Ethyl Acrylate Resins *Polyethylene—Polyvinyl Acetate Copolymers Polyethylene Resin (HDPE) Polyethylene Resin (LPDE) Polyethylene Resin, Scrap Polyethylene Resin, Wax (Low M.W.) Polyethylene Resin, Latex Polyethylene Resins *Polyethylene Resins, Compounded *Polyethylene,...

  2. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Polyethylene *Polyethylene—Ethyl Acrylate Resins *Polyethylene—Polyvinyl Acetate Copolymers Polyethylene Resin (HDPE) Polyethylene Resin (LPDE) Polyethylene Resin, Scrap Polyethylene Resin, Wax (Low M.W.) Polyethylene Resin, Latex Polyethylene Resins *Polyethylene Resins, Compounded *Polyethylene,...

  3. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  4. Uranium removal from contaminated groundwater by synthetic resins.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D H; Gu, B; Watson, D B; Parmele, C S

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic resins are shown to be effective in removing uranium from contaminated groundwater. Batch and field column tests showed that strong-base anion-exchange resins were more effective in removing uranium from both near-neutral-pH (6.5)- and high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing groundwaters, than metal-chelating resins, which removed more uranium from acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Y-12 S-3 Ponds area in Tennessee, USA. Dowex 1-X8 and Purolite A-520E anion-exchange resins removed more uranium from high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing synthetic groundwater in batch tests than metal-chelating resins. The Dowex 21K anion-exchange resin achieved a cumulative loading capacity of 49.8 mg g(-1) before breakthrough in a field column test using near-neutral-pH (6.5)-low-nitrate-containing groundwater. However, in an acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater, metal-chelating resins Diphonix and Chelex-100 removed more uranium than anion-exchange resins. In 15 m L of acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater spiked with 20 mg L(-1) uranium, the uranium concentrations ranged from 0.95 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.08 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Diphonix and 0.17 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.03 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Chelex-100. Chelex-100 removed more uranium in the first 10 min in the 100mL of acidic-(pH 5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater ( approximately 5 mg L(-1) uranium); however, after 10 min, Diphonix equaled or out-performed Chelex-100. This study presents an improved understanding of the selectivity and sorption kenetics of a range of ion-exchange resins that remove uranium from both low- and high-nitrate-containing groundwaters with varying pHs. PMID:17697694

  5. Copper resinate: an XPS study of degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, C.; Ciliberto, E.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of copper resinate, a transparent green glaze that is coloured by copper salts of resin acids. This pigment was used in Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, but it does not seem to be a usual feature of the palette anywhere after the end of the sixteenth century, because its tendency to discolour was already widely known by artists. An essential prerequisite for the restoration of works of art is the understanding of the effects of various climatic parameters on the deterioration process. For this reason, pictorial models of copper resinate in linseed oil, capable of simulating the ancient paintings on mobile supports, were prepared and aged in a climatic chamber, under different conditions such as exposure to UV radiations, humidity and different concentration of chemical pollutants (NO2 and SO2). All the samples were investigated by XPS and the data obtained were evaluated in order to estimate aging effects as well as mechanisms of degradation. On these paint layers damage induced by X-ray irradiation was also verified.

  6. Amalgam vs. composite resin: 1998.

    PubMed

    Christensen, G J

    1998-12-01

    Class II resin restorations have been evolving in American dentistry for 30 years, but the concept has had significant difficulty being accepted because of stigma attached to early generations of composites. Currently available composite resins for posterior tooth restorations have physical characteristics justifying their use. Techniques for Class II resin placement have improved significantly, and mastery of them is within the ability of both dentists and dental students. Although composite resin materials and techniques present clinical challenges, so do amalgam materials and techniques. It is time to accept Class II resin restorations, improve dentist and student education about their use, increase acceptance by third-party organizations and various approving groups, and bring this concept into the mainstream of U.S. dentistry. PMID:9854929

  7. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Traumatic Resin Ducts, Terpenoid Resin Biosynthesis, and Terpenoid Accumulation in Developing Xylem of Norway Spruce Stems1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diane; Tholl, Dorothea; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) produces an oleoresin characterized by a diverse array of terpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpene resin acids that can protect conifers against potential herbivores and pathogens. Oleoresin accumulates constitutively in resin ducts in the cortex and phloem (bark) of Norway spruce stems. De novo formation of traumatic resin ducts (TDs) is observed in the developing secondary xylem (wood) after insect attack, fungal elicitation, and mechanical wounding. Here, we characterize the methyl jasmonate-induced formation of TDs in Norway spruce by microscopy, chemical analyses of resin composition, and assays of terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes. The response involves tissue-specific differentiation of TDs, terpenoid accumulation, and induction of enzyme activities of both prenyltransferases and terpene synthases in the developing xylem, a tissue that constitutively lacks axial resin ducts in spruce. The induction of a complex defense response in Norway spruce by methyl jasmonate application provides new avenues to evaluate the role of resin defenses for protection of conifers against destructive pests such as white pine weevils (Pissodes strobi), bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytidae), and insect-associated tree pathogens. PMID:12114556

  8. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  9. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Taylor, Paul Allen; Collins, Robert T; Hunt, Rodney Dale

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

  10. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  11. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Rosins listed in paragraph (b)(3)(v)(a) of this section, for use only as reactants in oil-based or fatty acid-based alkyd resins. (c) Polyhydric alcohols: Butylene glycol. Diethylene glycol. 2,2-Dimethyl-1,3... chemically treated with one or more of the following substances: Allyl ether of mono-, di-,...

  12. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...)(v)(a) of this section, for use only as reactants in oil-based or fatty acid-based alkyd resins. (c... chemically treated with one or more of the following substances: Allyl ether of mono-, di-, or... more of the following substances: Allyl ether of mono-, di-, or trimethylol phenol....

  13. How to increase the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Imazato, Satoshi

    2011-09-01

    Resin-dentin bonds are not as durable as was previously thought. Microtensile bond strengths often fall 30% to 40% in 6 to 12 months. The cause of this poor durability is a combination of the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by weak acids such as lactic acid released by caries-producing bacteria, and acid-etchants used in adhesive bonding systems. These acids uncover and activate matrix-bound MMPs. The other contributing factor is incomplete resin infiltration. If all exposed collagen fibrils were enveloped by resin, the MMPs would not have free access to water, an obligatory requirement of these enzymes. Recently, several inhibitors of MMPs have been added to adhesive primers. Examples include chlorhexidine (CHX), benzalkonium chloride (BAC), and MDPB, an antibacterial monomer used in a two-step self-etching primer adhesive. The advantage of MDPB over CHX and BAC is that it polymerizes with adhesive resins and cannot leach from the hybrid layer. This is an example of what can be termed a "therapeutic adhesive system" that provides anti-MMP activity along with antibacterial qualities. PMID:21910364

  14. Melamine-formaldehyde-NTA chelating gel resin: Synthesis, characterization and application for copper(II) ion removal from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Ahmad; Hall, P J; Heslop, M J

    2007-02-01

    A new chelating resin was synthesised by anchoring nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to melamine during the melamine-formaldehyde gelling reaction in the presence of water, using acetone and guaiacol as a porogen mixture. This technique gives a porous chelating gel resin capable of removing heavy metals from wastewater. FT-IR, XRD, elemental analysis, surface area and water regain measurements were conducted for characterization of the new chelating gel resin. A comprehensive adsorption study (kinetics isotherm, and thermodynamics) of Cu(II) removal from synthetic acidic aqueous solutions by adsorption on this resin was conducted regarding the effects of time, temperature, initial pH and copper(II) initial concentration. PMID:16887265

  15. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  16. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  17. Resin polymerization problems--are they caused by resin curing lights, resin formulations, or both?

    PubMed

    Christensen, R P; Palmer, T M; Ploeger, B J; Yost, M P

    1999-01-01

    Negative effects of rapid, high-intensity resin curing have been predicted for both argon lasers and plasma-arc curing lights. To address these questions, six different resin restorative materials were cured with 14 different resin curing lights representing differences in intensities ranging from 400 mW/cm2 to 1,900 mW/cm2; delivery modes using constant, ramped, and stepped methods; cure times ranging from 1 second to 40 seconds; and spot sizes of 6.7 mm to 10.9 mm. Two lasers, five plasma-arc lights, and seven halogen lights were used. Shrinkage, modulus, heat generation, strain, and physical changes on the teeth and resins during strain testing were documented. Results showed effects associated with lights were not statistically significant, but resin formulation was highly significant. Microfill resins had the least shrinkage and the lowest modulus. An autocure resin had shrinkage and modulus as high as or higher than the light-cured hybrid resins. Lasers and plasma-arc lights produced the highest heat increases on the surface (up to 21 degrees C) and within the resin restorations (up to 14 degrees C), and the halogen lights produced the most heat within the pulp chamber (up to 2 degrees C). Strain within the tooth was least with Heliomolar and greatest with Z100 Restorative and BISFIL II autocure resin. Clinical effects of strain relief were evident as white lines at the tooth-resin interface and cracks in enamel adjacent to the margins. This work implicates resin formulation, rather than light type or curing mode, as the important factor in polymerization problems. Lower light intensity and use of ramped and stepped curing modes did not provide significant lowering of shrinkage, modulus, or strain, and did not prevent enamel cracking adjacent to margins and formation of "white line" defects at the margins. Until materials with lower shrinkage and modulus are available, use of low-viscosity surface sealants as a final step in resin placement is suggested to seal defects. PMID:11908396

  18. Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy) benzene (1,3-APB), and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA). PERA-1 was made from 3,5-diamino- 4.-phenylethynylbenzophenon and equimolar amounts of phthalic anhydride and PEPA. To make PERA-1 in the imide form, the aforementioned ingredients were processed by refluxing in glacial acetic acid. To make the amide form of PERA-1, the ingredients were reacted in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) under nitrogen at a temperature of 23 C (see figure). On the basis of the processability and other properties, a blend comprising 20 weight percent of PERA-1 and 80 weight percent PETI-5 was selected for further evaluation. Relative to neat PETI-5, the blend exhibited an increase in Tg; improved processability; and comparable values of shear strength in adhesion to titanium panels, open-hole compressive properties, compression properties after impact, and resistance to microcracking.

  19. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  20. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  1. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  2. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  3. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  4. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  5. Urea-formaldehyde resins and free formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Vargha, V

    1998-01-01

    Specifications of wood adhesives must be in correlation with the requirements for the corresponding wood products, for which they will be used. Formaldehyde emission of wood products bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin based adhesives is strictly regulated by standards and there is a compromise is between formaldehyde emission and performance, such as strength, or water resistance. Since values of formaldehyde emission depend on the test method used, in Europe urea-formaldehyde resins for adhesives may generally be classified according to HCHO emission in the particleboard rating of Emission 0 to Emission I class (E-0 to E-1). According to DIN EN 120, particleboard quality E1 emits <6.5 mg/100 g dry article determined with the perforator method. Although a great number of factors effect the formaldehyde emission of the cured products, such as the hardener system, the type of wood etc., the emission of formaldehyde is in strict correlation with the free formaldehyde content of the resin before the curing process. E1 emission class can be achieved, if the free formaldehyde content of the resin is lower than 0.2% by mass. Urea-formaldehyde resins containing. higher than 0.5% free formaldehyde by mass exceed emission class E2, and are not accepted. Since the free formaldehyde content of the urea-formaldehyde resin effects the emission of formaldehyde in the cured product, low formaldehyde content must be ensured during resin synthesis. This can be achieved by properly selecting synthesis conditions as well as raw materials. The quality of raw materials is an essential and determining factor for the synthesis of urea formaldehyde resins. The principal changes which may take place in the formaldehyde solution on storage are the polymerization and precipitation of the polymer, Cannizzaro reaction, methylal formation, oxydation to formic acid, condensation to hydroxyaldehydes and sugars. Any of these reactions are detrimental to product quality. The state of formaldehyde is also an essential factor, since the reaction of poly(methylene glycol)s with urea leads to methylene ether linkages resulting in emission of formaldehyde during storage and later on during the process of curing. Hydrolysis, isomerisation and decomposition of urea may take place simultaneously during improper storage conditions, such as high humidity, high temperatures, industrial atmosphere. The side products formed affect the reaction with formaldehyde during the synthesis resulting in high free formaldehyde content of urea-formaldehyde resins. The relation between synthesis conditions, free formaldehyde content and performance of urea-formaldehyde resins are discussed in detail. PMID:10526993

  6. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  7. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  8. Separation of capsaicin from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changxia; Liu, Ruican; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yiming; Xu, Tao; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Chunqiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of present study is to develop an efficient and low-cost method for capsaicin production isolated from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography. HZ816 resin has shown the best adsorption and desorption capacities for capsaicin among other resins. To optimize the operating parameters for separation, initial concentration, diameter-to-height ratio, mobile phase ratio, and crystallization method were investigated. When capsaicinoids solution (5 g/L) was loaded onto the column (diameter-to-height ratio = 1:12) with ethanol/1% w/w NaOH (4:6, v/v) as the mobile phase, capsaicin was purified most effectively. By using acid neutralization as the crystallization method, the purity of capsaicin improved from 90.3 to 99.5% with 82.3% yield. In conclusion, this study provides a simple and low-cost method for the industrial-scale production of high-purity capsaicin. PMID:26456215

  9. Separation and concentration of some platinum metal ions with a new chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazide as functional group.

    PubMed

    Siddhanta, S; Das, H R

    1985-06-01

    A new chelating ion-exchange resin containing thiosemicarbazide as functional group and based on macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene (8%) has been prepared. Its sorption characteristics for palladium(II), platinum(IV), rhodium(III), ruthenium(III) and iridium(III) have been studied. These platinum metal ions can be quantitatively separated by sorption on this chelating resin and selective elution. The resin is highly stable in acid and alkaline solution. PMID:18963878

  10. Pulp reactions to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Pameijer, C H; Stanley, H R

    1992-04-01

    Several formulas of a resin-filled cement that successfully passed a series of laboratory tests were evaluated for their pulp reactions in primates. Their performance was compared to three controls: a positive control (silicate cement), a negative control (zinc oxide-eugenol) and a control group with the protection of calcium hydroxide. The chemical cure resin cement scored the lowest reactions for the 5-day evaluation. The intermediate and prolonged periods demonstrated no significant differences while average, acceptable responses were recorded. No resin cement formula scored as low as the negative control for the three time periods. Silicate cement, the positive control, scored the greatest inflammatory reaction of any material in the intermediate period, but this response was resolved after 60 days. When the resin cements were used with calcium hydroxide, the traditional reactions to calcium hydroxide were observed; an initial mild irritation that diminished with time and was completely resolved after 60 days. The resin cements, with or without the calcium hydroxide, compared favorably to the negative control IRM after 60 days. If the resin cements are appropriately applied, they are expected to be well tolerated by the human pulp. The microorganisms associated with microleakage (MLM) were minimal and there appeared to be no correlation between the MLM and pulp inflammation. PMID:1524752

  11. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  12. Cariogenic Bacteria Degrade Dental Resin Composites and Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Bourbia, M.; Ma, D.; Cvitkovitch, D.G.; Santerre, J.P.; Finer, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material’s chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries. PMID:24026951

  13. Copper and boron fixation in wood by pyrolytic resins.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Daniel; Yang, Dian-Qing; Lu, Xiao; Riedl, Bernard; Roy, Christian

    2009-02-01

    A phenol-formaldehyde (PF)-resin designed to penetrate wood and immobilize copper and boron in wood cells for protection against decay was investigated. The phenol portion of the PF-resin was partially substituted with pyrolysis oil derived from softwood bark. The objective was to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production of petroleum-borne phenol, as well as to improve the product economics. Leaching tests were conducted with three different formulas of resins containing 50%, 75% or 85% by weight of pyrolytic oil on a total phenol basis. The leachates were analyzed for the presence of copper by atomic absorption spectroscopy while inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used for boron detection. Copper leaching was reduced up to 18 times when comparing the treatments with and without the resin. Preservative leaching varied between wood species as well as between the resins containing different concentrations of pyrolytic oil. The organic leachates were measured using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. Trace amounts of organics, mostly acetic acid, were found in the leachates. PMID:18835155

  14. WEAK-ACID ION EXCHANGE FOR REMOVING BARIUM, RADIUM, AND HARDNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weak-acid resin in the hydrogen form was found to effectively remove barium, radium, and hardness, without increasing the sodium content of the product water. The maximum capacity of the weak-acid resin was about 2.3 times that of strong-acid resin, and much less spent regenerant...

  15. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torlakoglu, A.; Gueclue, G.

    2009-01-15

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40 mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 deg. C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins.

  16. Irradiation effects in the storage and disposal of radioactive ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.E.; Dayal, R.; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Research is under way to characterize the effects of self-irradiation on radwastes which may be generated when organic ion-exchange media are used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. External factors affecting the relation between laboratory evaluations and field performance are emphasized. Initial experiments do not yet indicate substantial radiation dose-rate effects on radiolytic gas yields or acid product formation, when (fully swollen) sulfonic acid resins are irradiated in a sealed air environment. At the same time, oxygen gas is removed from the environment of irradiated resins. Interaction between mild steel coupons and acidic species produced in the irradiation induced decomposition of sulfonic acid resin results in irradiation enhanced corrosion. Corrosion rates depend on radiation dose rate, moisture content and resin chemical loading. In some cases, corrosion rates decrease with time, suggesting depletion of acidic species within the resin bed, or a synergistic interaction between resin and corrosion coupon. Implications of these and other results on evaluating field behavior of radwaste containing ion-exchange media are discussed. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Identification and quantitative determination of lignans in Cedrus atlantica resins using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Paoli, Mathieu; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-03-01

    Identification and quantitative determination of individual components of resin collected on the trunk of 28 Cedrus atlantica trees, grown in Corsica, has been carried out using 13C NMR spectroscopy. Eight resin acids bearing either the pimarane or abietane skeleton, two monoterpene hydrocarbons and four oxygenated neutral diterpenes have been identified, as well as three lignans, scarcely found in resins. Three groups could be distinguished within the 28 resin samples. The nine samples of Group I had their composition dominated by diterpene acids (33.7-45.8%), with abietic acid (6.2-18.7%) and isopimaric acid (5.1-12.6%) being the major components. The four samples of Group II contained resin acids (main components) and lignans in moderate amounts (up to 10.3%). Conversely, lignans (38.8-63.8%) were by far the major components of the 15 samples of Group III. Depending on the sample, the major component was pinoresinol (18.1-38.9%), lariciresinol (17.2-33.7%) or lariciresinol 9'-acetate (16.9-29.1%). Finally, due to the high biological interest in lignans, a rapid procedure, based on 1H NMR spectroscopy, was developed for quantification of lignans in resins of C. atlantica. PMID:21485279

  18. Moisture insensitive adsorption of ammonia on resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    PubMed

    Seredych, Mykola; Ania, Conchi; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2016-03-15

    Phenolic-formaldehyde resins aged at 85, 90 and 95°C were used as ammonia adsorbents at dynamic conditions in dry and moist air. To avoid pressure drops 10% bentonite was added as a binder. The initial and hybrid materials (before and after ammonia adsorption) were extensively characterized from the point of view of their porosity and surface chemistry. The results showed that the addition of the binder had various effects on materials' properties depending on the chemistry of their surface groups. When the phenolic acidic groups were predominant, the largest increase in surface acidity upon the addition of the binder was found. It was linked to the exfoliation of bentonite by polar moieties of the resins, which made acidic groups from aluminosilicate layers available for ammonia adsorption. On this sample, a relatively high amount of ammonia was strongly adsorbed in dry conditions. Insensitivity to moisture is a significant asset of ammonia adsorbents. PMID:26651066

  19. K Basin sludge/resin bead separation test report

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, D.M.

    1998-08-25

    The K Basin sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt and minor amounts of other organic material. The sludge will be collected and treated for storage and eventual disposal. This process will remove the large solid materials by a 1/4 inch screen. The screened material will be subjected to nitric acid in a chemical treatment process. The organic ion exchange resin beads produce undesirable chemical reactions with the nitric acid. The resin beads must be removed from the bulk material and treated by another process. An effective bead separation method must extract 95% of the resin bead mass without entraining more than 5% of the other sludge component mass. The test plan I-INF-2729, ``Organic Ion Exchange Resin Separation Methods Evaluation,`` proposed the evaluation of air lift, hydro cyclone, agitated slurry and elutriation resin bead separation methods. This follows the testing strategy outlined in section 4.1 of BNF-2574, ``Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process``. Engineering study BNF-3128, ``Separation of Organic Ion Exchange Resins from Sludge,`` Rev. 0, focused the evaluation tests on a method that removed the fine sludge particles by a sieve and then extracted the beads by means of a elutriation column. Ninety-nine percent of the resin beads are larger than 125 microns and 98.5 percent are 300 microns and larger. Particles smaller than 125 microns make up the largest portion of sludge in the K Basins. Eliminating a large part of the sludge`s non-bead component will reduce the quantity that is lifted with the resin beads in the elutriation column. Resin bead particle size distribution measurements are given in Appendix A The Engineering Testing Laboratory conducted measurements of a elutriation column`s ability to extract resin beads from a sieved, non-radioactive sludge simulant. A elutriation column uses a constant velocity upward flow stream to segregate materials. In simplistic terms, the dense particles fall to the column`s bottom while the flow lifts less dense particles to the column`s top. A particle can be streamlined or have a high drag profile; this factor also influences the lift or fall of a particle exposed to the column flow. The sludge components that lift or fall are determined by the fluid velocity. The column flow velocity needed to lift the bulk of the resin beads will also lift other, non-bead, sludge components. Resin bead treatment and disposal are complicated by large quantities of non-bead material. Tests are necessary to determine a column flow velocity that will collect the bulk of the resin beads and the amount of non-bead sludge components that are also collected.

  20. Coemulsion and electrodeposition properties of mixtures of cationic epoxy resin and cationic acrylic resin containing butoxymethylamide groups

    SciTech Connect

    Chinping Yang; Yahnhaur Chen . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    Butyl acrylate, styrene, N,N-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate, and N-(n-butoxy-methyl) acrylamide were copolymerized to prepare a cationic acrylic copolymer (I) containing butoxymethylamide groups. This copolymer can be mixed with an epoxy-amine adduct (II), acetic acid, and deionized water to form a coemulsion containing two cationic resins. The electrophoretic codeposition of the coemulsion and physical and chemical properties of the deposited film were investigated. The resin composition of film deposited from coemulsion was determined by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) quantitative analysis to study the coemulsion and electrophoretic codeposition behavior. The applicability of this two-component coemulsion in primer-surfacer (pricer) electrodeposition paint was also discussed. The results indicate that at any coemulsion resin composition the resin composition of electrodeposited film is almost equal to the coemulsion resin composition. The throwing power of emulsion increases with increasing applied voltage, as expected. However, the throwing power of coemulsion is almost equal to that of the II emulsion but greater than that of the I emulsion. Furthermore, all cured films derived from mixtures of I/II show excellent adhesive strength, good hardness, and high levels of salt spray resistance.

  1. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, Martha A. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  2. TGR5 potentiates GLP-1 secretion in response to anionic exchange resins

    PubMed Central

    Harach, Taoufiq; Pols, Thijs W. H.; Nomura, Mitsunori; Maida, Adriano; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Anionic exchange resins are bona fide cholesterol-lowering agents with glycemia lowering actions in diabetic patients. Potentiation of intestinal GLP-1 secretion has been proposed to contribute to the glycemia lowering effect of these non-systemic drugs. Here, we show that resin exposure enhances GLP-1 secretion and improves glycemic control in diet-induced animal models of “diabesity”, effects which are critically dependent on TGR5, a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by bile acids. We identified the colon as a major source of GLP-1 secretion after resin treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the boost in GLP-1 release by resins is due to both enhanced TGR5-dependent production of the precursor transcript of GLP-1 as well as to the local enrichment of TGR5 agonists in the colon. Thus, TGR5 represents an essential component in the pathway mediating the enhanced GLP-1 release in response to anionic exchange resins. PMID:22666533

  3. TGR5 potentiates GLP-1 secretion in response to anionic exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Harach, Taoufiq; Pols, Thijs W H; Nomura, Mitsunori; Maida, Adriano; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Anionic exchange resins are bona fide cholesterol-lowering agents with glycemia lowering actions in diabetic patients. Potentiation of intestinal GLP-1 secretion has been proposed to contribute to the glycemia lowering effect of these non-systemic drugs. Here, we show that resin exposure enhances GLP-1 secretion and improves glycemic control in diet-induced animal models of "diabesity", effects which are critically dependent on TGR5, a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by bile acids. We identified the colon as a major source of GLP-1 secretion after resin treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the boost in GLP-1 release by resins is due to both enhanced TGR5-dependent production of the precursor transcript of GLP-1 as well as to the local enrichment of TGR5 agonists in the colon. Thus, TGR5 represents an essential component in the pathway mediating the enhanced GLP-1 release in response to anionic exchange resins. PMID:22666533

  4. Natural amber, copal resin and colophony investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, ZhiFan; Dong, Kun; Yang, XiaoYun; Lin, JinChang; Cui, XiaoYing; Zhou, RongFeng; Deng, Qing

    2013-08-01

    Natural amber, copal resin and colophony are have investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum. In order to distinguish the natural amber, copal resin and colophony, we have successfully used the nondestructive examination (NDE) technology. The results show that UV-VIS could not distinguish these compositions. The infrared spectra can distinguish them, but the technology may destroy the specimen. The Raman spectra show three characteristic peaks of vibration near position 932 cm-1 and position 1179 cm-1 of copal resin, which confirm the existence of terpenes compounds in it. In the Raman spectra of colophony, the vibration characteristic peak at position 1589 cm-1, caused by the conjugate double bond of internal unsaturated resin acid, is the basis of the characteristic difference between colophony and natural amber. The advantages of the distinguished technology by Raman spectroscopy are convenient and nondestructive examination for natural amber, copal resin and colophony.

  5. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  6. Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan in Support of BNFL Part B: Studies of Ion Exchange Resin Integrity under Flowsheet Extremes: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-08-23

    This task will address four items related to ion exchange stability: (1) process upset evaluation of resin in contact with 1 molar sodium permanganate at 25 and 40 degrees C, (2) accelerated aging with nitric acid solution used during normal regeneration operations, (3) prolonged contacting of SuperLig 644 resin with 5 molar nitric acid at room temperature, and (4) prolonged contacting of SuperLig 644 resin with deionized water at 60 plus/minus 5 degrees C.

  7. Sorption of trace heavy metals by thiol containing chelating resins

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.; Iglesias, M.; Cumming, I.W.; Streat, M.

    2000-01-01

    The sorption of copper, cadmium, nickel and zinc ions on thiol (-SH) based chelating polymeric resins (thiomethyl resin and Duolite GT-73) has been investigated. The physical and chemical characterization of these polymers in the form of scanning electron micrographs (SEM), BET and Langmuir surface area measurements. Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, atomic composition measurement, sodium capacity determination and zeta potential measurements have been conducted to assess their performance as sorbents for trace toxic metal removal. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to analyze the pore size distribution data. The adsorption of metal ions from aqueous solution on these sorbents has been studied in batch equilibrium experiments. The influence of pH on metal adsorption capacity has also been examined. The kinetic performance of these polymers has been assessed and the results have been analyzed by a pore diffusion model. The resins have been used in mini-columns to study the selectivity towards the desired metal ion. The desorption of metal ions has been studied using hydrochloric acid (1 M and 4 M), sulfuric acid (1 M and 4 M) and acidified thiourea. The present study confirms that these thiol based chelating resins are very effective for selective removal of trace heavy metals from water.

  8. Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

  9. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  10. Fatigue of the Resin-Enamel Bonded Interface and the Mechanisms of Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Majd, Hessam; Ryou, Heonjune; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    The durability of adhesive bonds to enamel and dentin and the mechanisms of degradation caused by cyclic loading are important to the survival of composite restorations. In this study a novel method of evaluation was used to determine the strength of resin-enamel bonded interfaces under both static and cyclic loading, and to identify the mechanisms of failure. Specimens with twin interfaces of enamel bonded to commercial resin composite were loaded in monotonic and cyclic 4-point flexure to failure within a hydrated environment. Results for the resin-enamel interface were compared with those for the resin composite (control) and values reported for resin-dentin adhesive bonds. Under both modes of loading the strength of the resin-enamel interface was significantly (p?0.0001) lower than that of the resin composite and the resin-dentin bonded interface. Fatigue failure of the interface occurred predominately by fracture of enamel, adjacent to the interface, and not due to adhesive failures. In the absence of water aging or acid production of biofilms, the durability of adhesive bonds to enamel is lower than that achieved in dentin bonding. PMID:23571321

  11. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  12. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite{trademark} NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900{trademark}, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material.

  13. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of...

  14. Soluble high molecular weight polyimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Lubowitz, H. R.

    1970-01-01

    High molecular weight polyimide resins have greater than 20 percent /by weight/ solubility in polar organic solvents. They permit fabrication into films, fibers, coatings, reinforced composite, and adhesive product forms. Characterization properties for one typical polyimide resin are given.

  15. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-07-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  16. Distribution Coefficients (Kd Values) for Waste Resins Generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this study was to measure 14C, 129I, and 99Tc Kd values of spent resin generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities. The scope of the work was to conduct Kd measurements of resins combined in the ratio that they are disposed, 42:58 cation:anion. Because it was not known how these spent resins would be buried, it was necessary to measure the Kd values in such a manner as to simulate both trench and vault disposal. This was accomplished by using an acid-rain simulant (a standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol) and a cement leachate simulant .

  17. Linkers, resins, and general procedures for solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the basic protocols for solid-phase peptide synthesis using the Fmoc group as the N (?)-protecting group (Fmoc-SPPS). The chapter introduces resins and their handling, choice of linkers, and the most common methods for peptide chain assembly. The proper choice of resins and linkers for solid-phase synthesis is a key parameter for successful peptide synthesis. This chapter provides an overview of the most common and useful resins and linkers for the synthesis of peptides with C-terminal amides, carboxylic acids, and more. The chapter finishes with robust protocols for general solid-phase peptide synthesis, i.e., the standard operations. PMID:23943476

  18. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  19. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  20. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  1. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J. (Naperville, IL); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); St. Martin, Edward (Libertyville, IL); Arora, Michelle (Woodridge, IL); de la Garza, Linda (Woodridge, IL)

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  2. Alternate Methods for Eluting Cesium from Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Johnson, Heather Lauren

    2009-02-01

    A small-column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high-level-waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent, or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The baseline method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid that would be used to elute the RF resin, using the current elution protocol, exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing environment in the glass melt. Installing a denitration evaporator at SRS is technically feasible but would add considerable cost to the project. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 BV of 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the baseline elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. A summary of the elution methods that have been tested are listed.

  3. Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

  4. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  5. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  6. Strengthening of Porcelain Provided by Resin Cements and Flowable Composites.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Guarda, G B; Oliveira-Ogliari, A; Leal, F B; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Moraes, R R

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mechanical properties of resin-based luting agents on the strength of resin-coated porcelain. The luting agents tested were two flowable resin composites (Filtek Z350 Flow and Tetric-N Flow), a light-cured resin cement (Variolink Veneer [VV]), and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) in either light-cured (base paste) or dual-cured (base + catalyst pastes [VD]) mode. Flexural strength (σf) and modulus of elasticity (Ef) of the luting agents were measured in three-point bending mode (n=5). Porcelain discs (Vita VM7) were tested either untreated (control) or acid etched, silanized, and coated with the luting agents. Biaxial flexural strength (σbf) of the porcelain discs was tested using a ball-on-ring setup (n=30). The σbf of the resin-coated specimens was calculated at z-axial positions for multilayer specimens in the ball-on-ring test: position z = 0 (ceramic surface at the bonded interface) and position z = -t2 (luting agent surface above ring). The σf and Ef data were subjected to analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). A Weibull analysis was performed for σbf data. Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ0) were calculated. Linear regression analyses investigated the relationship between mechanical properties of the luting agents and the strengthening of porcelain. VD had higher and VV had lower mechanical strength than the other materials. At z = 0, all resin-coated groups had higher σbf than the control group. No significant differences between the luting agents were observed for σbf and σ0. At z = -t2, VD had the highest σbf and σ0, whereas VV had the poorest results. No significant differences in m were observed across groups. A linear increase in flexural strength of the porcelain was associated with increased σf and Ef of the luting agents at position z = -t2. In conclusion, resin coating and use of luting agents with better physical properties generally improved the mechanical performance of porcelain. PMID:26266657

  7. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the promise of minimizing tooth reduction and may be particularly useful in preserving sound tooth structure. Although not the primary intended use, an excellent application is long-term temporization, such as for patients requiring full mouth rehabilitation. The belleGlass/Connect, Ribbond, and GlasSpan materials rely on nonimpregnated polyethylene fibers which have mechanical properties inferior to Vectris and FibreKor. These fibers may be used to greater success as splinting materials, in provisional restorations, and in repair of complete and partial removable dentures. PMID:11199586

  8. Control of resin production in Araucaria angustifolia, an ancient South American conifer.

    PubMed

    Perotti, J C; da Silva Rodrigues-Corrêa, K C; Fett-Neto, A G

    2015-07-01

    Araucaria angustifolia is an ancient slow-growing conifer that characterises parts of the Southern Atlantic Forest biome, currently listed as a critically endangered species. The species also produces bark resin, although the factors controlling its resinosis are largely unknown. To better understand this defence-related process, we examined the resin exudation response of A. angustifolia upon treatment with well-known chemical stimulators used in fast-growing conifers producing both bark and wood resin, such as Pinus elliottii. The initial hypothesis was that A. angustifolia would display significant differences in the regulation of resinosis. The effect of Ethrel(®) (ET - ethylene precursor), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), sulphuric acid (SuA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP - nitric oxide donor) on resin yield and composition in young plants of A. angustifolia was examined. In at least one of the concentrations tested, and frequently in more than one, an aqueous glycerol solution applied on fresh wound sites of the stem with one or more of the adjuvants examined promoted an increase in resin yield, as well as monoterpene concentration (?-pinene, ?-pinene, camphene and limonene). Higher yields and longer exudation periods were observed with JA and ET, another feature shared with Pinus resinosis. The results suggest that resinosis control is similar in Araucaria and Pinus. In addition, A. angustifolia resin may be a relevant source of valuable terpene chemicals, whose production may be increased by using stimulating pastes containing the identified adjuvants. PMID:25545585

  9. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR THE ISOLATION OR CONCENTRATION OF ORGANIC SUBSTANCES FROM WATER USING XAD-4 QUATERNARY RESIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A synthetic resin (Amberlite XAD-4 Quaternary in the OH- form) was evaluated as an adsorption medium for the concentration/isolation of acids, amines, aldehydes, carbohydrates, chlorobiphenyls, esters, hydrocarbons, ketones, phenols, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and trihalo...

  10. Chemically modified polymeric resins for solid-phase extraction and group separation prior to analysis by liquid or gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, L.W.

    1993-07-01

    Polystyrene divinylbenzene was modified by acetyl, sulfonic acid, and quaternary ammonium groups. A resin functionalized with an acetyl group was impregnated in a PTFE membrane and used to extract and concentrate phenolic compounds from aqueous samples. The acetyl group created a surface easily wetted, making it an efficient adsorbent for polar compounds in water. The membrane stabilized the resin bed. Partially sulfonated high surface area resins are used to extract and group separate an aqueous mixture of neutral and basic organics; the bases are adsorbed electrostatically to the sulfonic acid groups, while the neutraons are adsorbed hydrophobically. A two-step elution is then used to separate the two fractions. A partially functionalized anion exchange resin is used to separate organic acids and phenols from neutrals in a similar way. Carboxylic acids are analyzed by HPLC and phenols by GC.

  11. Gastroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of resin from Protium heptaphyllum in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco A; Vieira-Júnior, Gerardo M; Chaves, Mariana H; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Florêncio, Mariana G; Lima, Roberto C P; Silva, Regilane M; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S N

    2004-02-01

    The natural resin collected from the trunk wood of Protium heptaphyllum is used in folk medicine to treat inflammatory conditions and to hasten wound repair. In the search of new potential anti-inflammatory agents with gastroprotective property, the present study evaluated its effects in experimental models of gastric ulcer and inflammation. In mice, the resin (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the gastric damage induced by ethanol or acidified ethanol (HCl/ethanol), in a manner similar to N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a replenisher of sulfhydryls. Unlike NAC the resin failed to restore the ethanol-induced depletion of non-protein sulfhydryl content, indicating a different mechanism of gastroprotection. However, in 4-h pylorus-ligated rats, the resin significantly reduced the total acidity without much change in gastric secretory volume. In rats, at similar doses the resin did not modify the hind-paw edema induced by carrageenan, but effectively reduced the formation of cotton pellet-induced granuloma, suggesting its inhibitory effect on collagen formation but not on acute edema. Furthermore, the vascular permeability increase induced by acetic acid was significantly reduced in mice that received 400 mg/kg resin. The resin demonstrated no overt toxicity in mice up to an oral dose of 5 g/kg. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alpha- and beta-amyrins as principal triterpenoid constituents of resin, which were previously described to have anti-ulcer property. These findings indicate the potential gastroprotective and anti-inflammatory property of P. heptaphyllum resin and further support its popular use in gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:14643690

  12. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A

    2002-06-28

    In the nuclear industry, ion exchange resins are used for purification of aqueous streams. The major contaminants of the resins are usually the radioactive materials that are removed from the aqueous streams. The use of the ion exchange resins creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resin often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposal alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces.

  13. The many faces of ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    McNutty, J.T.

    1997-06-01

    Ion-exchange resins have been used commercially for over 60 years. Softening and demineralization of water for boiler feed and process use were then, and continue to be, the most familiar and widespread applications of ion-exchange resins throughout the chemical process industries (CPI). Several types of membrane-based technologies, such as electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and, more recently, electrodeionization are recognized as alternative methods for water treatment. Yet, modern versions of ion-exchange resins remain a major player in water treatment. In addition, these versatile materials can be found performing a wide range of tasks in both aqueous and nonaqueous environments. Some of these diverse applications include: acid or base catalysis; manufacture of high-purity solvents and reagent chemicals; separation of by-products of fermentation processes; deacidification of organic solvents; high-purity water production for semiconductor manufacture; recovery of valuable waste from dilute process effluents; controlled release of pharmaceutical products; and chromatography, both on the analytical and the industrial scale. The key to understanding the potential of ion-exchange resins is to look beyond their exchange and adsorptive characteristics, and to see their fundamental nature. In other words, it`s necessary to first consider them as spherical, particulate reactive polymers that perform chemical reactions.

  14. High Temperature VARTM of Phenylethynyl Terminated Imides (PETI) Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Cano, Roberto J.; Britton, Sean M.; Watson, Kent A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication of composite structures using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is generally more affordable than conventional autoclave techniques. Recent efforts have focused on adapting VARTM for the fabrication of high temperature composites. Due to their low melt viscosity and long melt stability, certain phenylethynyl terminated imides (PETI) can be processed into composites using high temperature VARTM (HT-VARTM). However, one of the disadvantages of the current HT-VARTM resin systems has been the high porosity of the resultant composites. For aerospace applications a void fraction of less than 2% is desired. In the current study, two PETI resins, LARCTM PETI-330 and LARCTM PETI-8 have been used to fabricate test specimens using HT-VARTM. The resins were infused into carbon fiber preforms at 260 C and cured between 316 C and 371 C. Modifications to the thermal cycle used in the laminate fabrication have reduced the void content significantly (typically < 3%) for carbon fiber biaxially woven fabric. Photomicrographs of the panels were taken and void contents were determined by acid digestion. For carbon fiber uniaxial fabric, void contents of less than 2% have been obtained using both PETI-8 and PETI-330. Mechanical properties of the panels were determined at both room and elevated temperatures. These include short beam shear and flexure tests. The results of this work are presented herein.

  15. BENCH SCALE EVALUATION OF RESINS AND ACTIVATED CARBONS FOR WATER PURIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption isotherms and bench scale column studies were used to compare the performance of five types of commercially available activated carbon and four types of resin for the removal of humic acids, fulvic acids, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), and chloroform from water. For the ads...

  16. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    As part of an effort on tougher/solvent resistant matrix resins for composites, research was directed towards exploring methods to improve the solvent resistance of linear amorphous thermoplastics. Ethyl reactive groups were placed on the ends of oligomers and pendent along the polymer chain and subsequently thermally reacted to provide crosslinking and thus improvement in solvent resistance. This concept is extended to another thermoplastic, a phenoxy resin. A commercially available phenoxy resin (PKHH) was systematically modified by reaction of the pendent hydroxyl groups on the phenoxy resin with various amounts of 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride. As the pendent ethynyl group content in the phenoxy resin increased, the cured resin exhibited a higher glass transition temperature, better solvent resistance and less flexibility. The solvent resistance was further improved by correcting a low molecular weight diethynyl compound, 2,2-bis(4-ethynylbenzoyloxy-4'-phenyl)propane, with a phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups.

  17. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  18. The use of Diphonix{sup {trademark}} ion exchange resin as a preconcentration step for the lanthanides and actinides in analytical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.N.; Thakkar, A.H.; Fern, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Diphonix ion exchange resin is a chelating ion exchange resin containing sulfonic and gemdiphosphonic acid groups. This resin has a high specificity for the lanthanides and actinides, especially at acidities below pH = 3. Currently, we are investigating new ways to use Diphonix resin as a preconcentration step to separate the lanthanides and actinides from interfering elements present in a variety of environmental matrices. Once the lanthanides and actinides have been separated from the interfering matrix constituents, the elements are removed from the resin and passed through subsequent separation schemes. This presentation will outline the use of Diphonix resin with a variety of problem matrices, and demonstrate its usefulness for analysis of the lanthanides and actinides.

  19. Synthesis and swelling properties of β-cyclodextrin-based superabsorbent resin with network structure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin; Fang, Guizhen; Zhang, Bin

    2013-02-15

    A biodegradable, β-cyclodextrin-based superabsorbent resin was synthesized by the inverse suspension method. The microstructure, chemical structure, and thermal performance of the resin were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The effects of the synthesis conditions (dosage of cross-linking agent, mass ratios of acrylic acid to acrylamide, mass ratios of β-cyclodextrin to total monomer, neutralization degree, initiator dosage, and reaction time) were optimized to achieve a resin with a maximum swelling capacity. The water absorbency of the optimized resin in distilled water was 1544.76 g/g and that in 0.9 wt.% NaCl was 144.52 g/g. The resin, which is thermoplastic as well as pH-sensitive, had good salt resistance and underwent a maximum in swelling with time in CaCl(2) and AlCl(3) solutions. The fracture surface of the dry resin contained many pores. After swelling, the internal hydrogel showed a typical three-dimensional network structure. The biodegradation of the resin reached 71.2% after 18 days treatment at 30 °C with Lentinus edodes. PMID:23399293

  20. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  1. Diphonix{trademark} Resin: A review of its properties and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gula, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The recently developed Diphonix{trademark} resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. It has potential applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. Influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results studies on the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions.

  2. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  3. High-Temperature Polyimide Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanucci, Raymond D.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1990-01-01

    Improved polyimide resin used at continuous temperatures up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees C). PMR-II-50, serves as matrix for fiber-reinforced composites. Material combines thermo-oxidative stability with autoclave processability. Used in such turbine engine components as air-bypass ducts, vanes, bearings, and nozzle flaps. Other potential applications include wing and fuselage skins on high-mach-number aircraft and automotive engine blocks and pistons.

  4. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Flame-resistant reinforced bodies are disclosed which are composed of reinforcing fibers, filaments or fabrics in a cured body of bis- and tris-imide resins derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, or of addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a mono-imide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride.

  5. Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

  6. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as ?-, ?-, and iso-?-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of ?-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods. PMID:26507444

  7. Oxidative decomposition properties of cationic exchange resins producing SO4(2-) in power plants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiping; Dai, Chenlin; Liu, Sen; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    The sulphate content of a system increases when strong-acid cationic exchange resins leak into a system or when sulphonic acid groups on the resin organic chain detach. To solve this problem, a dynamic cycle method was used in dissolution experiments of several resins under H2O2 or residual chlorine conditions. Results show that after performing dynamic cycle experiments for 120 hours under oxidizing environments, the SO4(2-) and total organic carbon (TOC) released by four kinds of resins increased with time, contrary to their release velocity. The quantity of released SO4(2-) increased as the oxidizing ability of oxidants was enhanced. Results showed that the quantity and velocity of released SO4(2-) under residual chlorine condition were larger than those under H2O2 condition. Data analysis of SO4(2-) and TOC released from the four kinds of resins by the dynamic cycle experiment revealed that the strength of oxidation resistance of the four resins were as follows: 650C>1500H>S200>SP112H. PMID:26442489

  8. Analysis of diterpenoic compounds in natural resins applied as binders in museum objects by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Anna; Kolivoska, Viliam; Kaml, Isabella; Baatz, Wolfgang; Kenndler, Ernst

    2007-07-20

    The exudates of conifers consist mainly of diterpenoic acids of the abietane and pimarane type (abietic, neoabietic, dehydroabietic, palustric, pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric and sandaracopimaric acid) and larixol acetate. These natural resins were used as adhesives, coatings, varnishes or plasticizers in artistic and historic works since ancient times. For the purpose of conservation and restoration and for art historic examination of such museum objects the identification of the binding media used is undoubtedly of paramount importance. In the present paper, the characterization of these resins based on the pattern of their diterpenoid constituents is carried out by capillary electrophoresis. For separation a background electrolyte which has been initially introduced for the analysis of chlorinated and natural resin acids in waste water was modified and the experimental conditions were adjusted in terms of resolution and analysis time. Separation was carried out in borate buffer at pH 9.25 (ionic strength 20 mmol L(-1)) with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin as additives to increase selectivity and enhance the solubility of the analytes. With this electrophoretic system the resin acids of interest and larixol acetate--all as anionic cyclodextrin complexes--were separated within 5 min and detected at 200, 250 and 270 nm with a diode array detector. The electrophoretic patterns served for the characterisation of the relevant diterpenoic resins, balsams and copals. Sample pre-treatment was limited to sonication in methanol at 55 degrees C for 30 min. This enables the identification of the resins in mixtures with other binders like plant gums, animal glues or drying oils, even when these media are present in excess. Colophony was identified as resinous constituent of a modelling mass for gilded frames originating from the 19th century. PMID:17521659

  9. Resin infiltration of early carious lesion in early childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; de Oliveira, Gabriela Cristina; Mendonca, Fernanda Lyrio; Moretto, Marcelo Juliano; Ionta, Franciny Querobim; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Rios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of white-spot lesions in infants and young children with early childhood caries is a challenge. The ideal management of the disease and subsequent remineralization of the lesions depend on the family's commitment to dietary behavior modifications to address the causes of the disease. If this proves ineffective or unlikely, resin infiltration has been developed to slow or arrest progression of white-spot lesions. In resin infiltration, the porous lesion body is penetrated by a special low-viscosity resin, blocking the diffusion of cariogenic acids into the lesion. This case report describes the use of a resin infiltrant to treat white-spot lesions in a 24-month-old boy with early childhood caries. PMID:26325642

  10. Phenol-formaldehyde resin substitutes from biomass tars

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelblau, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Approximately 320,000 tonnes of phenol and formaldehyde are currently used annually in North America to make adhesive resins that are used to make exterior-grade structural panels. The demand for phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins is growing faster than the demand for panels, because more adhesive is required to join/coat the surface of wood flakes (for oriented strand board - OSB) than is required to join veneer; OSB is replacing plywood as logs large enough for veneer become scarcer. Also, competitive uses for phenol and methanol (for making formaldehyde) have increased raw materials cost and threatened availability. Production of adhesive resins from biomass to reduce reliance on raw materials derived from commodity petrochemicals and to lower resin cost looks attractive. A simple fluidized-bed reactor system can be used to produce tars that can substitute for a major portion of the phenol and formaldehyde in PF resin adhesives. This can be done in an air-fluidized, single-bed reactor; no inert gas or dual-bed system is required. The key is recognizing that optimum phenolic character in the tar is not produced at the maximum tar yield, but at reactor temperatures around 600{degrees}C and short gas-phase residence times that produce a yield of about 25 to 30 weight percent. A wide range of phenols, aldehydes and other compounds capable of polymerization are produced. Feedstock can be any wood waste larger than sander dust; low cost agricultural wastes such as bagasse are also suitable. Adhesive resin is produced from the entire tar product by shifting the pH from acidic to basic with NaOH, and combining and heating the resulting resole with phenol and formaldehyde, similarly to conventional resins. Approximately half of the phenol and formaldehyde by weight can be replaced with tar. A plant producing 13,865,000 kg (30,566,000 lb) annually from 308 tonnes (340 tons) per day of green wood chips would cost approximately $8,400,000.

  11. Marginal adaptation to enamel of a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, J W; Hörstedt, P

    1997-12-01

    Recently, new restoratives, such as resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIC) and polyacid-modified resin composites (PMC) were introduced for class III and class V cavities. Both materials use simplified cavity conditioning methods. The well-established treatment of enamel with phosphoric acid has been replaced with treatment using weaker acids. The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo the quality and durability of the marginal bond to enamel of these restorative system and compare it with a resin composite restorative, Seventeen patients received class III restorations of each of the three restoratives. At baseline and after 1 year replica impressions were made for investigation of the vestibular margins with the scanning electron microscope. Semi-quantitative analysis of the enamel-restorative interfaces was performed at x200 and x1000 magnifications. The three restorative systems showed good marginal adaptation and high percentages of the length of the margins investigated at baseline were gap-free (82%-92%). The resin composite showed significantly better adaptation than the other materials. The marginal quality decreased significantly after 1 year for the resin composite and the polyacid-modified resin composite. The RMGIC showed improved sealing after 1 year in vivo, probably due to continuing water uptake. The percentages of gap-free margins of the total marginal length observed at 1 year were 73%, 90%, and 84%, respectively, for the PMC, the RMGIC and the resin composite. The difference between the PMC and the RMGIC was significant. In conclusion, a good marginal quality was seen for all three restorative systems in class III cavities after a period of 1 year. PMID:9555215

  12. Analysis of the components of hard resin in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and structural elucidation of their transformation products formed during the brewing process.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Yamada, Makiko; Matsukura, Yasuko; Koizumi, Hideki; Furihata, Kazuo; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-11-26

    The resins from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which add the bitter taste to beer, are classified into two main sub-fractions, namely, soft and hard resins. ?- and ?-Acids in soft resin and their transformation during the wort boiling process are well-studied; however, other constituents in resins, especially hard resin, have been unidentified. In this study, we identified humulinones and hulupones as soft-resin components, in addition to 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones and tricyclooxyisohumulones A and B as hard-resin components. These compounds are all oxidation products derived from ?- or ?-acids. We also investigated compositional changes in the hard resin during the wort boiling process, which has a significant effect on the taste of the beer, by using model boiling experiments. The major changes were identified to be isomerization of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones into 4'-hydroxyallo-cis-humulinones, followed by decomposition into cis-oxyhumulinic acids. These findings will be helpful in systematically evaluating and optimizing the effect of the hard resin on beer quality. PMID:25354357

  13. The influence of plutonium concentration and solution flow rate on the effective capacity of macroporous anion exchange resin. [Lewatit MP-500-FK; Pu/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The principal aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. Previous studies with gel-type anion exchange resin have shown an inverse relationship between plutonium concentration in the feed solution and the optimum flow rate for this process. Because gel-type resin has been replaced with macroporous resin at Los Alamos, the relationship between plutonium concentration and solution flow rate was reexamined with the selected Lewatit MP-500-FK resin using solutions of plutonium in nitric acid and in nitric acid with high levels of added nitrate salts. Our results with this resin differ significantly from previous data obtained with gel-type resin. Flow-rate variation from 10 to 80 liters per hour had essentially no effect on the measured quantities of plutonium sorbed by the macroporous resin. However, the effect of plutonium concentration in the feed solutions was pronounced, as feed solutions that contained the highest concentrations of plutonium also produced the highest resin loadings. The most notable effect of high concentrations of dissolved nitrate salts in these solutions was an increased resin capacity for plutonium at low flow rates. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Separation of Lanthanide Ions with Kläui Ligand Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Granger, Trinity D.; Henry, Victoria A.; Latesky, Stanley

    2007-07-01

    Separation and pre-concentration of the desired analyte is often a critical step in many radioanalytical methods. Current procedures for separating and concentrating analytes for detection are complex, and can be both expensive and time consuming. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop an alternative method of separating lanthanide ions through the use of an extraction chromatography resin containing a Klaui ligand salt. This research is a continuation of a concerted effort to develop new methods of detecting small concentrations of radionuclides and lanthanides using Klaui ligands. The Klaui ligands, C5Me5Co(OP(OR)2)3- (R=Me, Et, n-Pr) (LOR-), have unique affinity for lanthanide and actinide ions in the presence of competing metal ions. The use of 1 wt% NaLOR (R=Et or n-Pr) adsorbed onto resin support has been shown to extract lanthanide ions from aqueous nitric acid solutions of different concentrations. In order to further evaluate the utility of these materials in radiochemical separation, the selectivity of the resins for the different lanthanide ions was examined by measuring the distribution coefficients (Kd) for a series of lanthanides over a range of solution conditions. Based on prior research with actinide ions, it was hypothesized that the lanthanide ions would bond strongly with the Klaui ligands. The success of this research is important, because it will assist in expanding and improving current automated radiochemical methods, which will decrease the cost of developing and implementing radiochemical methods. To date, Kd values have been determined for Eu+3, Nd+3 and Pr+3 under varying nitric acid (HNO3) concentration, using a resin consisting of 1.0 wt% NaLOPr on Amberlite XAD-7HP. The dependence of the Kd values for Eu+3 has also been examined as a function of the ligand-to-europium ratio and the nitrate concentration. Decreasing Kd values were obtained upon increasing the nitric acid concentration, indicating protonation of the ligand, which competes with binding of the lanthanide ions. As expected, increasing the Klaui ligand-to-europium ratio results in increasing Kd, but no conclusions could be made from these data regarding stoichiometry of the complex formed on the resin. No dependence of the Kd on the nitrate concentration was observed, supporting the notion that the HNO3 dependence is dominated by the presence of the acidic hydronium ion (as opposed to the nitrate ion). Future work will involve the determination of the Kd values for the remainder of the lanthanide series to further assess the potential of the Klaui ligand for intra-group lanthanide separations.

  15. Removal of cadmium from fish sauce using chelate resin.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Araki, Ryohei; Michihata, Toshihide; Kozawa, Miyuki; Tokuda, Koji; Koyanagi, Takashi; Enomoto, Toshiki

    2015-04-15

    Fish sauce that is prepared from squid organs contains cadmium (Cd), which may be present at hazardous concentrations. Cd molecules are predominantly protein bound in freshly manufactured fish sauce, but are present in a liberated form in air-exposed fish sauce. In the present study, we developed a new method for removing both Cd forms from fish sauce using chelate resin and a previously reported tannin treatment. Sixteen-fold decreases in Cd concentrations were observed (0.78-0.05 mg/100 mL) following the removal of liberated Cd using chelate resin treatment, and the removal of protein-bound Cd using tannin treatment. Major nutritional components of fish sauce were maintained, including free amino acids and peptides, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities. PMID:25466035

  16. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  17. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  18. Etching conditions for resin-modified glass ionomer cement for orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Valente, Rudolfo M; De Rijk, Waldemar G; Drummond, James L; Evans, Carla A

    2002-05-01

    This study reports the tensile bond strength of orthodontic eyelets (RMO, Inc, Denver, Colo) bonded to human extracted teeth with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji Ortho LC, GC America, Alsip, Ill) and various acid etchants (Etch-37 and All-Etch, Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill; Ultra Etch, 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn) for enamel preparation before bonding. The enamel etch conditions were as follows: 37% phosphoric acid with silica; 37% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% polyacrylic acid; and unetched enamel. Bond strength was measured by pulling in tension on the eyelet with a 0.018-in steel wire perpendicular to the enamel surface with a testing machine (Instron model 1125, Canton, Mass) at a speed of 2 mm/min. A light-cured resin cement (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) applied to enamel etched with 37% phosphoric acid containing silica served as a control. Each group included 30 specimens. The Weibull distribution (m) was used for statistical analysis with a 90% CI. The different etchants used with RMGIC did not affect tensile bond strength. The resin cement group had the highest tensile strength. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed when glass ionomer cement was used to bond orthodontic attachments to nonetched teeth. However, unlike resin cement, RMGIC can bond effectively to etched teeth in a moist environment without an additional bonding agent. PMID:12045770

  19. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a 'criteria selection space' which can be used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite 'toughness'. The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  20. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  1. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  2. Accurate determination of ¹²?I concentrations and ¹²?I/¹³?Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-04-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (129)I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO3/HClO4, (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured (129)I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of (129)I/(137)Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. PMID:24525301

  3. Graphite composites with advanced resin matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of processing variables on the flammability and mechanical properties for state-of-the-art and advanced resin matrices for graphite composites were studied. Resin matrices which were evaluated included state-of-the-art epoxy, phenolic-novolac, phenolic-xylok, two types of bismaleimides, benzyl, polyethersulfone, and poly(p-phenylene sulfone). Comparable flammability and thermochemical data on graphite-reinforced laminates prepared with these resin matrices are presented, and the relationship of some of these properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins is described.

  4. Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

  5. Flexible heat resistant neutron shielding resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Anayama, Yoshimasa; Okuno, Koichi; Sakurai, Shinji; Kaminaga, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A flexible heat resistant neutron shielding material has been developed, which consists of polymer resin with 1 wt% boron. The neutron shielding performance of the developed resin, examined by the 252Cf neutron source, is almost the same as that of the polyethylene. The outgas of H 2, H 2O, CO and CO 2 from the resin have been measured at ˜250 °C environment. The resin will be applied around the port of the vacuum vessel as an additional shielding material and reduce the neutron streaming from a superconducting tokamak device such as JT-60SA.

  6. Microbiological Study of Water-Softener Resins

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, John M.; Engelhard, Warren E.; Parsons, James E.

    1969-01-01

    Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb++ exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na+, Fe++, and Al+++ removed 31 to 36% and Ca++ and Cu++ removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe++, Cu++, and Al+++, whereas the Ca++ and Na++ cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca++ and Mg++ cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths. PMID:5373675

  7. Phenol removal from aqueous solution by adsorption and ion exchange mechanisms onto polymeric resins.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Michelle; Valderrama, César; Farran, Adriana; Cortina, José Luis

    2009-10-15

    The removal of phenol from aqueous solution was evaluated by using a nonfunctionalized hyper-cross-linked polymer Macronet MN200 and two ion exchange resins, Dowex XZ (strong anion exchange resin) and AuRIX 100 (weak anion exchange). Equilibrium experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms at different pHs. The Langmuir model describes successfully the phenol removal onto the three resins. The extent of the phenol adsorption was affected by the pH of the solution; thus, the nonfunctionalized resin reported the maximum loading adsorption under acidic conditions, where the molecular phenol form predominates. In contrast both ion exchange resins reported the maximum removal under alkaline conditions where the phenolate may be removed by a combined effect of both adsorption and ion exchange mechanisms. A theoretical model proposed in the literature was used to fit the experimental data and a double contribution was observed from the parameters obtained by the model. Kinetic experiments under different initial phenol concentrations and under the best pH conditions observed in the equilibrium experiments were performed. Two different models were used to define the controlling mechanism of the overall adsorption process: the homogeneous particle diffusion model and the shell progressive model fit the kinetic experimental data and determined the resin phase mechanism as the rate-limiting diffusion for the phenol removal. Resins charged after the kinetic experiments were further eluted by different methods. Desorption of nonfunctionalized resin was achieved by using the solution (50% v/v) of methanol/water with a recovery close to 90%. In the case of the ion exchange resins the desorption process was performed at different pHs and considering the effect of the competitive ion Cl-. The desorption processes were controlled by the ion exchange mechanism for Dowex XZ and AuRIX 100 resins; thus, no significant effect for the addition of Cl- under acidic conditions was observed, while under alkaline conditions the total recovery increased, specially for Dowex XZ resin. PMID:19679317

  8. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyXâ„¢ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  9. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear strength), and about 78% (shear strain to failure) relative to the control composite.

  10. Thermoplastic resins for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, K.

    1997-05-01

    Today`s high-performance thermoplastics could potentially shave up to 16 kg (35 lb) from the drivetrains, fuel systems, and chassis of future cars by replacing metal. In applications already commercial, weight savings average 20 to 25%, and it is not uncommon for installed cost of components to be 20 to 25% lower than machined castings, forgings, and stampings. Moreover, plastics have inherent processing and economic advantages in volume production, and will have for the foreseeable future. This article focuses on engineering resins that can satisfy challenging automotive design requirements, discusses selection criteria, and provides examples of metal-replacement applications.

  11. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as additional government-funded testing proved that RP-46 is even more exceptional than originally thought.

  12. Getting tough with epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, J.L.; Puckett, P.M. )

    1994-03-01

    A growth market for polymer-matrix composites (PMCs) is the replacement of metals in aerospace applications to reduced weight and consolidate parts. However, to substitute for metal primary structures, composites must combine improved strength and toughness with moisture resistance and the ability to withstand high temperatures. Even though higher performance composites are in demand, huge cuts in defense spending have caused a dramatic slowdown in R and D on new polymers. Instead, composites manufacturers are seeking ways to extend the limits of existing materials, such as epoxy, the workhorse'' PMC matrix resin. Suppliers have responded by expanding conventional epoxy technology.

  13. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polymers of bis and tris-imides derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, and addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a monoimide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride prior to curing are disclosed and claimed. Such polymers are flame resistant. Also disclosed are an improved method of producing tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides from the nitro analogues by reduction with hydrazine hydrate using palladized charcoal or Raney nickel as the catalyst and fiber reinforced cured resin composites.

  14. Evaluating ion exchange resin efficiency and oxidative capacity for the separation of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously described methods to separate dissolved U(IV) from dissolved U(VI) under acidic anoxic conditions prior to laboratory analysis were ineffective with materials currently available commercially. Three strong anion exchange resins were examined for their efficiency in separating, recovering, and preserving both redox states during separation. Results Under oxic conditions, recovery of U(VI) from three exchange resins (Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 Poly-Prep® prefilled columns, Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 powder, and Dowex® 1x8 powder) ranged from 72% to 100% depending on the dosed mass, eluent volume, and resin selected. Dowex® 1x8 resin was the only resin found to provide 100% recovery of U(VI) with fewer than 5 bed volumes of eluent. Under anoxic conditions, all three resins oxidized U(IV) in aqueous solutions with relatively low U(IV) concentrations (<3x10-6 M). Resin-induced oxidation was observed visually using a leuco dye, safranin-o. Oxidants associated with the resin were irreversibly reduced by the addition of Ti(III). After anoxic resin pre-treatment, a series of U(IV)/U(VI) mixtures at micro-molar levels were prepared and separated using the Dowex® 1x8 resin with 100% recovery of both U(IV) and U(VI) with no resin-induced changes in oxidation state. Conclusions Currently available anion exchange resins with apparently identical physical properties were found to have significantly different recoveries for hexavalent uranium at micro-molar concentrations. A novel qualitative technique was developed to visually assess oxidative capacities of anion exchange resins under acidic anoxic conditions. A protocol was developed for pre-treatment and use of currently available anion exchange resins to achieve quantitative separation of U(IV) and U(VI) in aqueous solutions with low U(IV) concentrations. This method can be applied to future work to quantitatively assess dissolved U(IV) and U(VI) concentrations in both laboratory and field samples. PMID:23363052

  15. Preventive effect of fluoridated orthodontic resins subjected to high cariogenic challenges.

    PubMed

    Passalini, Paula; Fidalgo, Tatiana Kelly da Silva; Caldeira, Erika Machado; Gleiser, Rogerio; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro caries preventive effect of fluoridated orthodontic resins under pH cycling with two types of acid demineralizing saliva. Brackets were bonded to 60 bovine incisors, using either Transbond Plus Color Change (n=30) or Orthodontic Fill Magic (n=30) orthodontic resins. Each group of resin was divided into 3 subgroups (n=10): immersion in remineralizing artificial saliva for 14 days, pH cycling with high cariogenic challenge in acid saliva with pH 5.5, and acid saliva with pH 4.5. After 14 days of pH cycling, the caries preventive effect on the development of white spot lesion was evaluated considering the presence of inhibition zones to white spot lesions using two scores: 0= absence and 1= presence. Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (a=0.05) were used. Formation of white spot lesions was observed only under pH cycling using acid saliva with pH 4.5; with Transbond Plus Color Change being significantly more effective (p<0.05) in preventing the appearance of white spot lesions effect than Orthodontic Fill Magic. The acidity of the demineralizing solution influenced the formation of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets under highly cariogenic conditions. Transbond Plus Color Change resin presented higher caries preventive effect than Orthodontic Fill Magic. PMID:21203702

  16. Effect of resin rheology on macro- and micro-flows in resin transfer molding

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Hsin Shih; Lee, L.J.; Koelling, K.

    1996-12-31

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a relatively new and high potential process for near net shape composite manufacturing because of its short cycle time, low labor requirements and low equipment cost. The major material variables in the RTM process are the resin rheology and the fiber reinforcement structure. The presence of low profile additives or fillers tends to change the resin mixture from a Newtonian fluid to a Non-Newtonian fluid. Different fiber architectures may result in different flow patterns that will influence the mold filling and curing processes. This paper will discuss how the resin rheology and fiber structure effect the resin transfer molding process.

  17. Sulfate ion (SO4(2-)) release from old and new cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Tang, Xue-Ying; Yin, Zhao-Hui; Yu, Wei-Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a dynamic cycle test, a static immersion method and a pyrolysis experiment were combined to examine the characteristics of SO4(2-) released from several new and old cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants. The results show that the quantity and velocity of SO4(2-) released from new and old resins tend to balance in a short time during the dynamic cycle experiment. SO4(2-) is released by 1500H (monosphere super gel type cation exchange resins) and 001 × 7 (gel type cation exchange resins) new and old cation exchange resins, the quantity of which increases according to immersion time. In the pyrolysis experiment, the quantity of SO4(2-) released from resins increases and the pH of the pyrolysis solution transforms from alkaline to acidic with an increase in temperature. PMID:25325543

  18. Development of solvent-free offset ink using vegetable oil esters and high molecular-weight resin.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Young Han; Kim, Sung Bin

    2013-01-01

    In the development of solvent-free offset ink, the roles of resin molecular weight and used solvent on the ink performance were evaluated by examining the relationship between the various properties of resin and solvent and print quality. To find the best performing resin, the soy-oil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was applied to the five modified-phenolic resins having different molecular weights. It is found from the experimental results that the ink made of higher molecular weight and better solubility resin gives better printability and print quality. It is because larger molecular weight resin with better solubility gives higher rate of ink transfer. From the ink application of different esters to high molecular weight resin, the best printing performance was yielded from the soy-oil fatty acid butyl ester (FABE). It is due to its high kinematic viscosity resulting in the smallest change of ink transfer weight upon multiple number of printing, which improves the stability of ink quality. PMID:23728325

  19. Rosin resin with crystal violet® tint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Moreno, D.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Osorio-Alarcón, F.

    1998-11-01

    In the present work, the behaviour of rosin resin with crystal violet® tint is shown. This mixture shows good photosensitivity to red light (He-Ne line), and has a high enough resolution for holographic applications. This resin is an excellent basis for this tint, and presents good handling and seems to be a worthy material to make holographic elements

  20. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  1. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-4?-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of bisphenol-A with... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate resins... of polymer units derived from diphenylterephthalate. (2) Polyarylate resins shall have a...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-4?-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of bisphenol-A with... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate resins... of polymer units derived from diphenylterephthalate. (2) Polyarylate resins shall have a...

  3. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  4. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

    1993-07-27

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  5. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Six silicone modified resins were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 6-63%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 1,220 MPa and a modulus of 105 GPa. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 72 MPa.

  6. Effect of Resin Viscosity in Fiber Reinforcement Compaction in Resin Injection Pultrusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, N.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    In resin injection pultrusion, the liquid resin is injected through the injection slots into the fiber reinforcement; the liquid resin penetrates through the fibers as well as pushes the fibers towards the centerplane causing fiber compaction. The compacted fibers are more difficult to penetrate, thus higher resin injection pressure becomes necessary to achieve complete reinforcement wetout. Lower injection pressures below a certain range (depending upon the fiber volume fraction and resin viscosity) cannot effectively penetrate through the fiber bed and thus cannot achieve complete wetout. Also, if the degree of compaction is very high the fibers might become essentially impenetrable. The more viscous the resin is, the harder it is to penetrate through the fibers and vice versa. The effect of resin viscosity on complete wetout achievement with reference to fiber-reinforcement compaction is presented in this study.

  7. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements. During the reporting period, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, UTSI has completed the batch mode experiments to evaluate the performance enhancement effect caused by organic acids on the resin's exhaustion efficiency. At present, batch mode experiments are being conducted to locate the position of the CO[sub 3]= and SO[sub 4]= ions in the affinity chart, and also reviewing/assessing the ASPEN Code's capabilities for use in the development of the Best Process Schematic and related economics.

  8. Separation and recovery of lead from a mixture of some heavy metals using Amberlite IRC 718 chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Archana; Sahu, K K

    2006-05-20

    A weakly acidic ion exchanger resin containing the iminodiacetate group has been used to separate and recover metal ion from their mixtures. Batch and column methods were applied for the separation studies. Previous study on the kinetics and thermodynamics shows that the selectivity of this resin for transition metals was quite high as compared to that of alkaline earth metals. The efficiency of this resin in different experimental conditions was established and because of the large difference in the distribution coefficient values separation of the metal ions from their mixture was performed. PMID:16621270

  9. Diphonix{reg_sign} resin: A review of its properties and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gula, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The recently developed Diphonix{reg_sign} resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. Therefore the resin has potential for applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post-transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. In view of the above applications the influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results obtained in the studies on the properties of the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power and fuel processing plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions.

  10. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  11. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  12. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  13. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    PubMed

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for ?TBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of the bonded inlays. PMID:22360367

  14. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Copolymers *Polyvinyl Acetate Resins Polyvinyl Alcohol Resin Polyvinyl Chloride Polyvinyl Chloride... 66 Resin *Nylons *Petroleum Hydrocarbon Resins *Polyvinyl Pyrrolidone—Copolymers *Poly(Alpha)Olefins... Polyethylene *Polyethylene—Ethyl Acrylate Resins *Polyethylene—Polyvinyl Acetate Copolymers Polyethylene...

  15. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  16. The effect of additional etching and curing mechanism of composite resin on the dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Su; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional acid etching and curing mechanism (light-curing or self-curing) of a composite resin on the dentin bond strength and compatibility of one-step self-etching adhesives. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen human permanent molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to the adhesives used (All-Bond Universal: ABU, Clearfil S3 Bond: CS3), additional acid etching (additional acid etching performed: EO, no additional acid etching performed: EX), and composite resins (Filtek Z-250: Z250, Clearfil FII New Bond: CFNB). Group 1: ABU-EO-Z250, Group 2: ABU-EO-CFNB, Group 3: ABU-EX-Z250, Group 4: ABU-EX-CFNB, Group 5: CS3-EO-Z250, Group 6: CS3-EO-CFNB, Group 7: CS3-EX-Z250, Group 8: CS3-EX-CFNB. After bonding procedures, composite resins were built up on dentin surfaces. After 24-hour water storage, the teeth were sectioned to make 10 specimens for each group. The microtensile bond strength test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined by means of an optical microscope at ×20 magnification. The data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post-hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Additional etching groups showed significantly higher values than the no additional etching group when using All-Bond Universal. The light-cured composite resin groups showed significantly higher values than the self-cured composite resin groups in the Clearfil S3 Bond. CONCLUSION The additional acid etching is beneficial for the dentin bond strength when using low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives, and low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives are compatible with self-cured composite resin. The acidity of the one-step self-etch adhesives is an influencing factor in terms of the dentin bonding strength and incompatibility with a self-cured composite resin. PMID:24353889

  17. Zoledronate and Ion-releasing Resins Impair Dentin Collagen Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Feitosa, V.P.; Tay, F.R.; Watson, T.F.; Pashley, D.H.; Sauro, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  18. Zoledronate and ion-releasing resins impair dentin collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R; Feitosa, V P; Tay, F R; Watson, T F; Pashley, D H; Sauro, S

    2014-10-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  19. Chemical affinities between the solvent extractable and the bulk organic matter of fossil resin associated with an extinct podocarpaceae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimalt, J.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses by GC-MS and GC-IR of resin associated to Dacridiumites mawsonii deposits, an extinct species of Podocarpaceae occurring on the South Island of New Zealand during the Bortonian (Middle Eocene), have revealed that dehydroabietic acid is the predominant component of the solvent soluble fraction. Accordingly, this diterpenoid has been selected as the principal component material for spectroscopic comparison with the bulk resin using IR and CP/MAS 13C NMR. ?? 1989.

  20. Therapeutic effects of novel resin bonding systems containing bioactive glasses on mineral-depleted areas within the bonded-dentine interface.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Osorio, Raquel; Watson, Timothy F; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed in evaluating the effects of two experimental resin bonding systems containing conventional Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) or Zinc-polycarboxylated bioactive glass (BAG-Zn) micro-fillers on the resin-bonded dentine interface after storage in a simulated body fluid solution (SBFS). Three resin bonding systems were formulated: Resin-A: (BAG containing); Resin-B; (BAG-Zn containing); Resin-C (no filler). The ability of the experimental resins to evoke apatite formation was evaluated using confocal Raman spectroscopy. Acid-etched dentine specimens were bonded, and prepared for AFM/nano-indentation analysis in a fully-hydrated status to evaluate the modulus of elasticity (Ei) and hardness (Hi) across the interface at different SBFS storage periods. Further resin-dentine specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength after 24 h or 3 months of SBFS storage. SEM examination was performed after de-bonding and confocal laser microscopy was used to evaluate the ultramorphology of the interfaces and micropermeability. The resin A and B showed a consistent presence of apatite (967 cm(-1)), reduced micropermeability within the resin-dentine interface and a significant increase of the Ei and Hi along the bonded-dentine interface after prolonged SBFS storage. Bond strength values were affected by the resin system (P < 0.0001) and by storage time (P < 0.0001) both after 24 h and 3 months of SBFS storage. In conclusion, resin bonding systems containing bioactive fillers may a have therapeutic effect on the nano-mechanical properties and sealing ability of mineral-depleted resin-dentine interface. PMID:22466816

  1. Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Setting Reaction Competition

    PubMed Central

    Berzins, D.W.; Abey, S.; Costache, M.C.; Wilkie, C.A.; Roberts, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGI) set by at least 2 mechanisms dependent upon reactant diffusion prior to gelation. Each reaction’s kinetics and setting mechanism may rely on and/or compete with the other. In this study, we investigated RMGI setting reaction interactions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) by varying light-cure initiation times. A RMGI was analyzed with isothermal and dynamic temperature scan DSC with light-curing occurring immediately, or at 5 or 10 minutes after mixing as well as without light-activation. Results show that as time allowed for the acid-base reaction increased, the light-activation polymerization exotherm decreased. Conversely, analysis of DSC data suggests that earlier light-activation may limit the acid-base reaction and result in a different structured material. During early RMGI development, acid-base and light-polymerization reactions compete with and inhibit one another. PMID:19966038

  2. Synthesis and characterization of amphoteric resins and its use for treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, T.; El-Naggar, I.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Amphoteric resins such as poly (acrylamide-acrylic acid-diallylamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AH-AA-DAA){sup +}Cl{close_quotes} and poly (acrylamide-acrylic acid-dially-ethylamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AM-AA-DAEA){sup +} Cl{close_quotes} were prepared by gamma radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic acid {open_quotes}AA{close_quotes} in the presence of poly(amidoamines) such as poly(acryl-amide-diallyamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AM- DAAH){sup +}Cl{close_quotes} and poly(acrylamide-dially-ethylamine-hydrochloride){close_quotes}P(AM-DAEAH){sup +} Cl{sup -}{close_quotes} it as template polymers using a template polymerization technique. Spectroscopic studies showed that resins contain both amide- and carboxylic groups, and the peak of {r_angle}NH of amine salts at (3000-2700 cm{sup {minus}1}) and (2700-2500 cm{sup {minus}1}) is disappeared. This indicates that the addition of acrylic acid monomer on ammonium groups. These ammonium groups in template polymers are converted into acrylic acid chain ends in the obtained resins accordingly, the probability of the polymer degradation of decreases may be attributed to the high radiation stability of these chain ends of acrylic acid units. The capacities of the obtained resins increase by increasing the absorbed doses of about {approximately}20 kGy, but at high doses the capacities decrease. On increasing the amines ratio in template polymers the capacities of resins for cation decreased but increased for anions. The capacities of the product materials to some heavy metal ions decrease with increasing the hydrogen ion concentrations and the selectivity is decreased in the order Cu{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+} > Cs{sup +}.

  3. LAB STUDY ON REGENERATION OF SPENT DOWEX 21K 16-20 MESH ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-01-24

    Currently the effort to remove chromate from groundwater in the 100K and 100H Areas uses DOWEX 21K 16-20. This report addresses the procedure and results of a laboratory study for regeneration of the spent resin by sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, or sodium sulfate to determine if onsite regeneration by the Effluent Treatment Facility is a feasible option.

  4. POLYAMIDE-EPICHLOROHYDRIN RESINS FOR UNION DYEING WOOL/COTTON BLENDED FABRICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cationic amine polyamide-epichlorohydrin (PAE) resins were applied as pretreatments to all-wool, all-cotton, and blends of wool/cotton for subsequent one-step union dyeing with acid dyes following the conventional wool dyeing process. Compared to cationic biguanide and dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneur...

  5. Mechanical properties of one and two-step fluoridated orthodontic resins submitted to different pH cycling regimes.

    PubMed

    Passalini, Paula; Fidalgo, Tatiana Kelly da Silva; Caldeira, Erika Machado; Gleiser, Rogério; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the in vitro shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of one and two-step fluoridated orthodontic resins under conditions that simulate high cariogenic challenge. Edgewise brackets for maxillary central incisors were randomly bonded to 80 bovine incisors, using either Transbond Plus Color Change orthodontic resin and a self-etching primer adhesive (G1; n = 40) or Orthodontic Fill Magic with a conventional acid-etch technique (G2; n = 40). Each group of resin (n = 10) was divided into: immediate shear (A- pre-cycling control), immersion in artificial remineralizing saliva (neutral saliva) for 14 days (B- post-cycling control) and pH cycling with high cariogenic challenge (C- acid saliva with pH 5.5 and D- acid saliva with pH 4.5). After 14 days of pH cycling, the shear bond strength and ARI were evaluated. Considering the shear bond strength, Transbond Plus Color Change resin was stronger than Orthodontic Fill Magic when it was submitted to high cariogenic challenge (p < 0.05). Also Transbond Plus Color Change resin showed better adhesion to enamel than Orthodontic Fill Magic, in all situations evaluated (p < 0.05). It could be concluded that Transbond Plus Color Change resin presented better shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index when submitted to high cariogenic challenge, in comparison with Orthodontic Fill Magic. PMID:20658039

  6. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  7. Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdasarov, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumänite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

  8. Characterizing Delamination Resistance of Toughened Resin Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The delamination resistance of toughened resin composites was studied. Both the edge delamination test (EDT) and the double-cantilever-beam (DCB) test provided a useful ranking of improvements in delamination resistance between brittle and tough resin composites. Several layups were designed for the edge delamination test to cover a wide range of mixed-mode conditions. The DCB and the various layups of the EDT were then used to characterize the interlaminar fracture behavior of brittle and toughened resin composites subjected to both static and cyclic loading.

  9. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  10. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.

  11. Method for selective plugging using resin emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.

    1982-10-05

    Methods and compositions are provided for selectively plugging the water-rich strata of subterranean formations, including injection into the formation of a water-insoluble, oil-soluble resin emulsion. A series of chemical reactions is initiated insitu such that the emulsion demulsifies, resulting in the coalescence of resin droplets. The coalesced water-insoluble, oil-soluble resin droplets are effective to selectively plug the water-rich strata over a relatively long distance and over a relatively long period of time.

  12. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen reduces the cesium distribution coefficient of the resin beads, as does irradiation. Higher temperatures during irradiation or during contact with the simulant solution further reduce the cesium distribution coefficient.

  13. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite. PMID:26685471

  14. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use.

  15. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2?MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5?MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  16. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  17. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Polyester resin kits consisting of a base material component (Class 3, Packing..., according to the criteria for Class 3, applied to the base material. Additionally, polyester resin kits...

  18. Versatile on-resin synthesis of high mannose glycosylated asparagine with functional handles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Pawlicki, Mark A; Tolbert, Thomas J

    2014-01-13

    Here we present a synthetic route for solid phase synthesis of N-linked glycoconjugates containing high mannose oligosaccharides which allows the incorporation of useful functional handles on the N-terminus of asparagine. In this strategy, the C-terminus of an Fmoc protected aspartic acid residue is first attached to a solid phase support. The side chain of aspartic acid is protected by a 2-phenylisopropyl protecting group, which allows selective deprotection for the introduction of glycosylation. By using a convergent on-resin glycosylamine coupling strategy, an N-glycosidic linkage is successfully formed on the free side chain of the resin bound aspartic acid with a large high mannose oligosaccharide, Man8GlcNAc2, to yield N-linked high mannose glycosylated asparagine. The use of on-resin glycosylamine coupling provides excellent glycosylation yield, can be applied to couple other types of oligosaccharides, and also makes it possible to recover excess oligosaccharides conveniently after the on-resin coupling reaction. Useful functional handles including an alkene (p-vinylbenzoic acid), an alkyne (4-pentynoic acid), biotin, and 5-carboxyfluorescein are then conjugated onto the N-terminal amine of asparagine on-resin after the removal of the Fmoc protecting group. In this way, useful functional handles are introduced onto the glycosylated asparagine while maintaining the structural integrity of the reducing end of the oligosaccharide. The asparagine side chain also serves as a linker between the glycan and the functional group and preserves the native presentation of N-linked glycan which may aid in biochemical and structural studies. As an example of a biochemical study using functionalized high mannose glycosylated asparagine, a fluorescence polarization assay has been utilized to study the binding of the lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) using 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled high mannose glycosylated asparagine. PMID:24326091

  19. Microleakage at the resin-alloy interface of chemically retained composite resins for cast restorations.

    PubMed

    Strygler, H; Nicholls, J I; Townsend, J D

    1991-06-01

    New retentive mechanisms between veneering resins and casting alloys are claimed to have a chemical bond that results in a high bond strength combined with low microleakage between the veneering resin and cast restoration. This study compared the microleakage of four chemical bonding mechanisms when three veneering resins were bonded to two dental casting alloys. Resin-veneered alloy disks were immersed in red India ink and kept at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. The disks were then bench dried for 24 hours. The resin veneer was sectioned into eight sectors in an engineering milling machine and these resin sectors were removed to display the microleakage pattern. It was concluded that (1) no microleakage was found in two combinations, and (2) the highest microleakage was with Sr-Isosit-N/Panavia EX/Firmilay combinations. PMID:1712849

  20. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  1. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups and cured resins obtained therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking with the cure temperature being lowered by using a catalyst if desired but not required. The cured phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups have improved solvent resistance and higher use temperature than linear uncrosslinked phenoxy resins and are applicable for use as coatings, films, adhesives, composited matrices and molding compounds.

  2. In Vitro Effects of Resin Infiltration on Enamel Erosion Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G C; Boteon, A P; Ionta, F Q; Moretto, M J; Honório, H M; Wang, L; Rios, D

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based materials that show promising effects for preventing the progression of erosion have been studied. This in vitro study evaluated the effects of applying resin-based materials, including resin infiltration, on previously eroded enamel subjected to erosive challenges. The influence of enamel surface etching prior to application of the material was also studied. Bovine enamel blocks were immersed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), 0.01 M (pH 2.3), for 30 seconds in order to form a softened erosion lesion. The blocks were then randomly divided into nine groups (n=12) and treated as follows: C = control without treatment; Hel = pit & fissure resin sealant (Helioseal Clear); Adh = two-step self-etching adhesive system (AdheSe); Tet = two-step conventional adhesive system (Tetric N-bond); and Inf = infiltrant (Icon). The Helno, Adhno, Tetno, and Infno groups received the same materials without (or with no) surface conditioning. The depth of the material's penetration into softened erosion lesions was qualitatively analyzed using reflection and fluorescence confocal microscopy. After application of the materials, the blocks were immersed in HCl for two minutes; this step was followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 120 minutes four times a day for five days (erosive cycling). Both the enamel alteration and material thickness were analyzed using profilometry, and the results were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p>0.05). Images from the confocal microscopy showed minimal penetration of Adh/Adhno and deep penetration of Inf/Infno into the erosive lesions. The groups Hel, Adh, Inf, Tetno, and Infno resulted in the formation of a layer of material over the enamel, which was effective in inhibiting the progression of erosion. In conclusion, the infiltrant, with or without etching, was able to penetrate and protect the enamel against dental erosion. The other resin-based materials, except for the two-step conventional adhesive, were able to penetrate and inhibit the progression of erosive lesions only when they were applied after enamel etching. PMID:25587972

  3. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  4. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  5. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  6. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  7. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  8. Self-indicating amine scavenger resins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Ku; White, Peter D; Klute, Wolfgang; Dean, Tony W; Bradley, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Self-indicating methylisocyanate resin, which functions as both a scavenger and an indicator for amines, was used for in-situ reaction monitoring and purification of a urea based library. PMID:14973578

  9. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components of polyolefin film intended for use...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  12. A medicated polycarboxylate cement to prevent complications in composite resin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Y.; Shintani, H.; Yamaki, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Preparative treatment is the preferred method to protect the dentin and pulp from complications in composite resin therapy. This study investigated the in vivo effects of the polycarboxylate cement containing zinc fluoride and tannic acid in composite resin restorations. Scanning electron micrographs established that the composite resin failed to contact the axial wall. The gaps varied from 10 to 60 microns. However, this polycarboxylate cement was shown to provide excellent adaptation to dentin when used as a base and its chemical adhesion allowed it to make close contact with the unetched dentin. The newly developed electron probe x-ray microanalyzer revealed that the in vivo penetration of fluoride and zinc occurred through the dentinal tubules. When this polycarboxylate cement was used, the orifices of dentinal tubules were partially occluded, possibly with the smear layer fixed by tannic acid. In addition, by releasing the components, this polycarboxylate cement adds acid resistance to dentin and increases the resistance of dentin collagen to proteolytic enzymes. As such this polycarboxylate cement offers advantages as a base to composite resin therapy.

  13. Nano composite from coal modified novolac resin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K.

    2007-07-01

    Coal-modified novolac/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using clay as reinforcing materials. It was found that coal-modified novolac resin based silica nano-composites showed improved tensile strength compared to that of neat novolac resin. The structure of the nanocomposites was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies have also been undertaken to see the morphology of the nanocomposites prepared. The results obtained are being reported.

  14. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  15. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  16. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials

    PubMed Central

    El-Deeb, Heba A.; Ghalab, Radwa M.; Elsayed Akah, Mai M.; Mobarak, Enas H.

    2015-01-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm2) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64–86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  17. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  18. Triterpenes from Protium hebetatum resin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Delcio Dias; Graebner, Ilmar Bernardo; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Machado, Luciana Lucas; Assunção, Jõao Carlos Costa; Monte, Francisco José Queiroz

    2010-08-01

    Three olean (beta-amyrenone, beta-amyrin and maniladiol), three ursane (alpha-amyrinone, alpha-amyrin and breine) and four tirucallane (3-oxotirucalla-8,24-dien-21-6ic acid, 3alpha-hydroxytirucalla-8,24-dien-21-oic acid, 3alpha-acetoxytirucalla-8,24-dien-21-oic acid and 3alpha-hydroxytirucalla-7,24-dien-21-oic acid) triterpenes were isolated from the oleoresin of Protium hebetatum Daly. The structures were established mainly by 13C, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. The isolation of 3alpha-hydroxytirucalla-8,24-dien-21-oic acid permitted correction of the chemical shift assignments of some of its carbon atoms. PMID:20839613

  19. Chemical derivatization of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde resin leading to enhanced chemical/oxidative stability of the resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Our previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce, para-bisquinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. Our studies have also shown that Phenol-Formaldehyde (P-F) resin has a substantially lower capacity compared to R-F resin, based on predicted values, because over half the ion-exchange sites of the P-F resin undergo etherification during the standard synthetic procedures used for preparation of these resins. In this report, we present our studies into rational synthetic solutions to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of R-F resin.

  20. Proton-conducting membrane based on epoxy resin-poly(vinyl alcohol)-sulfosuccinic acid blend and its nanocomposite with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes for fuel-cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, Nitul; Das, Gautam; Yoon, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    A blend of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGB) in the presence of sulfosuccinic acid (SSA) was investigated as hydrolytically-stable proton-conducting membrane. The PVA modification was carried out by varying the DGB:SSA ratio (20:20, 10:20, and 5:20). A nanocomposite of the blend (20:20) was prepared with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes (viz., 1, 3 and 5 wt%). The water uptake behavior and the proton conductivity of the prepared membranes were evaluated. The ionic conductivity of the membranes and the water uptake behavior depended on the s-MWCNT and the DGB contents. The ionic conductivity showed an enhancement for the blend and for the nanocomposite membrane as compared to the pristine polymer.

  1. Ring opening of a resin-bound chiral aziridine with phenol nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Lars K; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Franzyk, Henrik

    2010-08-01

    An efficient and versatile solid-phase route for the preparation of aryl-alkyl ethers is described. Regioselective ring opening of a resin-bound chiral aziridine with phenolic nucleophiles constitutes the key feature of the present protocol that allows incorporation of fluorescent moieties and subsequent on-resin protecting group interconversion. Initial experiments demonstrated that a competing oligomerization may occur by concomitant attacks of transient nosylamide anions on neighboring aziridines, resulting in formation of dimeric and trimeric byproduct. Expectedly, the significance of this alternative reaction pathway was strongly dependent on resin loading, and a low loading (<0.4 mmol g(-1)) was required for obtaining high yields of the desired aryl-alkyl ethers. The developed methodology allowed preparation of novel N-Fmoc-protected coumaryl amino acid building blocks, which were incorporated into peptides by solid-phase peptide synthesis. PMID:20617832

  2. Improved recovery and purification of plutonium at Los Alamos using macroporous anion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Mann, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    For almost 30 years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has used anion exchange in nitric acid as the major aqueous process or the recovery and purification of plutonium. One of the few disadvantages of this system is the particularly slow rate at which the anionic nitrato complex of Pu(IV) equilibrates with the resin. The Nuclear Materials Process Technology Group at Los Alamos recently completed an ion exchange development program that focused on improving the slow sorption kinetics that limits this process. A comprehensive investigation of modern anion exchange resins identified porosity and bead size as the properties that most influence plutonium sorption kinetics. Our study found that small beads of macroporous resin produced a dramatic increase in plutonium process efficiency. The Rocky Flats Plant has already adopted this improved ion exchange technology, and it currently is being evaluated for use in other DOE plutonium-processing facilities.

  3. Hierarchical superparamagnetic magnetite nanowafers from a resin-bound [Fe(bpy)3]2+ matrix.

    PubMed

    Basu, Mrinmoyee; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Sarkar, Sougata; Pradhan, Mukul; Yusuf, S M; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2010-04-20

    The brilliant red [Fe(bpy)(3)](2+) complex upon immobilization on a strongly acidic cation exchanger or in situ formation of the same cationic complex onto a resin matrix and subsequent modified hydrothermolysis (MHT) at approximately 110 degrees C produces unusually stable hierarchical magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanowafers. The slow hydrothermolysis, oxidation, and subsequent dehydration of the complex on the solid-liquid interface produce stable hierarchical nanostructures. The isolation of neat Fe(3)O(4) (uncapped) particles from the resin matrix as hierarchical nanowafers was achieved by magnetically stirring a CH(3)CN suspension of nanocomposites. The solid resin support not only aids nanowafer formation on its surface but also provides unique stability to the magnetite particles, where nanowafer oxidation is largely retarded. The utility of the as-prepared porous nanocomposite and characterization of the nanoparticles are promising for nanotechnological and soft ferromagnetic applications. PMID:19894750

  4. Controlled methyl-esterification of pectin catalyzed by cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaoxia; Yang, Guang; Fan, Xingchen; Bai, Yeming; Ren, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yifa

    2016-02-10

    This study developed a new method to methyl-esterify pectin using a cation exchange resin. Homogalacturonan (HG)-type pectin (WGPA-3-HG) and rhamnogalacturonan (RG)-I-type pectin (AHP-RG) obtained from the roots of Panax ginseng and sunflower heads, respectively, were used as models. Compared to commonly used methyl-esterification methods that use either methyl iodide or acidified methanol, the developed method can methyl-esterify both HG- and RG-I-type pectins without degrading their structures via β-elimination or acid hydrolysis. In addition, by modifying reaction conditions, including the mass ratio of resin to pectin, reaction time, and temperature, the degree of esterification can be controlled. Moreover, the resin and methanol can be recycled to conserve resources, lower costs, and reduce environmental pollution. This new methodology will be highly useful for industrial esterification of pectin. PMID:26686175

  5. Effects of Boswellia serrata gum resin in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, I; Parihar, A; Malhotra, P; Singh, G B; Lüdtke, R; Safayhi, H; Ammon, H P

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon where leukotrienes are suggested to play an important role for keeping inflammation active. Boswellic acids, the biologically active ingredients of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata (Sallai guggal), have been shown to be specific, nonredox and noncompetitive inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase, the key enzyme of leukotriene biosynthesis. In patients suffering from ulcerative colitis grade II and III the effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin preparation (350 mg thrice daily for 6 weeks) on stool properties, histolopathology and scan microscopy of rectal biopsies, blood parameters including Hb, serum iron, calcium, phosphorus, proteins, total leukocytes and eosinophils was studied. Patients receiving sulfasalazine (1 g thrice daily) served as controls. All parameters tested improved after treatment with Boswellia serrata gum resin, the results being similar compared to controls: 82% out of treated patients went into remission; in case of sulfasalazine remission rate was 75%. PMID:9049593

  6. Factors influencing the rate of gas evolution from epoxide resins during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.; Reed, R.P.

    1997-06-01

    This work examined the influence of resin and hardener structure, together with the associated processing variables, on the rate of radiation induced gas evolution. Glycidyl ether and glycidyl amine resins are considered, together with aromatic amine and acid anhydride hardeners and such processing variables as cure schedule, accelerator content and amount of anhydride hardener. The effect of specimen geometry on the total gas evolved for unit radiation dose is also examined. A range of {open_quote}radical scavengers{close_quote} has been investigated, in relation to the structure of the resin and hardener components, to investigate the possibility of reducing the total radiolytic gas evolution. A nuclear reactor was used for the irradiation studies - and a system of dosimetry based on the well characterized gas evolution from polyethylene provided comprehensive information relating to dose distribution within the reactor.

  7. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-03-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  8. The Bond Strength of Resin Bonded Bridge Retainers to Abutments of Differing Proportions of Enamel and Composite.

    PubMed

    Durey, Kathryn; Nattress, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Four groups of specimens were constructed using bovine enamel and composite resin. After a period of ageing, the specimens were roughened and acid etched before they were cemented to air abraded base metal alloy beams with a universal resin cement. After further ageing, tensile peel testing was carried out using a Universal Testing Machine. The force required to produce failure increased as the amount of composite resin on the bonding surface of the abutment increased. This difference reached statistical significance (p < 0.5) when the abutments contained > 50% composite. The mode of failure was mixed on the majority of retainers. Within the limitations of the study, findings suggest that RBB retainers can be cemented to abutments restored with composite resin without a reduction in bond strength. PMID:26415336

  9. Sorption of beryllium from fluorine-containing solutions by amino-phosphonate amphoteric ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Rychkov, V.N.

    1981-10-20

    Sorption of beryllium ions by a series of amino-phosphonate amphoteric ion-exchange resins from BeF/sub 2/ solutions containing HF, NH/sub 4/F.HF, and NH/sub 4/F has been studied. The influence of the salt form of the resin, concentration of fluoride ions, and beryllium content in the original solutions was demonstrated. The mechanism of ion exchange on amphoteric ion-exchangers was postulated on the basis of chemical analysis and sorption and IR-spectroscopic data. Conclusions are drawn regarding the participation of phosphorus-containing groups of the resins in exchange. Data are presented on desorption of complex fluoride ions and beryllium from amphoteric ion-exchange resins by solutions of hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, and sulfuric acids, ammonium fluoride, and ammonium hydrogenfluoride.

  10. Preparation and properties of a new chelating resin containing 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as the functional group.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, J P; Das, H R

    1981-04-01

    A macroreticular polystyrene-based chelating ion-exchanger containing 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as the functional group has been synthesized. The exchange-capacity of the resin for a number of metal ions such as copper(II), iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II), palladium(II) and uranium(VI) as a function of pH has been determined. The sorption and elution characteristics for palladium(II) and uranium(VI) have been thoroughly examined with a view to utilizing the resin for separation and concentration of uranium and palladium. Uranium(VI) has been separated from a mixture of ten other metal ions by sorption on the chelating resin and selective elution with 0.5M sodium carbonate. Palladium(II) has been separated from various metal ions by selective sorption on the resin in 1M hydrochloric acid medium. PMID:18962916

  11. Influence of microhybrid resin and etching times on bleached enamel for the bonding of ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Brandão, Juliana Viana Pereira; Fialho, Melissa Proença Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of polycrystalline ceramic brackets (PCB) bonded after bleaching treatment using different composite resins and enamel etching times. A total of 144 bovine incisors were randomly divided into two study groups (n = 72, each) as follows: G1, enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide, and G2 (control group), enamel unbleached. After the bleaching treatment, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. These groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 36, each) as follows: GA, brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M) and GB, brackets bonded with Filtek Z250 (3M). For each resin used, three different etching times with 37% phosphoric acid (15, 30 and 60 seconds) were tested. SBS tests were performed using a universal testing machine (EMIC), and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was verified. Significant differences among the three experimental conditions and interactions between the groups were observed. The type of composite resin accounted for 24% of the influence on the bond strength, whereas the etching time and bleaching treatment accounted for 14.5% and 10% of the influence on bond strength, respectively. The ARI revealed that the most common area of adhesion failure was at the composite resin-bracket interface. The type of composite resin, etching time and external bleaching significantly influenced the SBS of PCB on enamel, even after 14 days of saliva storage. PMID:23538425

  12. [Studies on dental self-curing resins (20) - adhesion mechanism of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to dentine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, N; Takeyama, M; Kojima, K; Masuhara, E

    1982-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopic studies on dentine surface cleaned with a mixture of citric acid and ferric chloride, fractured surfaces parallel to the tubules of dentine and dentine with the cured adhesive and the partially demineralized fractured surfaces, tensile fractured surface of the joint on the dentine and cured adhesive resin tags impregnated in tubules were carried out to clarify the adhesion mechanism. Infiltration of monomers into dentine is more important to get good adhesion with dentine than the interlocking at dentinal tubules due to impregnated resin. Monomers with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups like 4-META promote the monomer infiltration. The infiltrated and cured adhesive layer in dentine is observed at the subsurface dentine zone. This zone has excellent resistance against acid demineralization. PMID:7042865

  13. Effects of Porous Polystyrene Resin Parameters on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Distribution, and Polyester Synthesis Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,B.; Miller, M.; Gross, R.

    2007-01-01

    Polystyrene resins with varied particle sizes (35 to 350-600 {mu}m) and pore diameters (300-1000 {angstrom}) were employed to study the effects of immobilization resin particle size and pore diameter on Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) loading, distribution within resins, fraction of active sites, and catalytic properties for polyester synthesis. CALB adsorbed rapidly (saturation time {<=}4 min) for particle sizes 120 {mu}m (pore size = 300 {angstrom}). Infrared microspectroscopy showed that CALB forms protein loading fronts regardless of resin particle size at similar enzyme loadings ({approx}8%). From the IR images, the fractions of total surface area available to the enzyme are 21, 33, 35, 37, and 88% for particle sizes 350-600, 120, 75, 35 {mu}m (pore size 300 {angstrom}), and 35 {mu}m (pore size 1000 {angstrom}), respectively. Titration with methyl p-nitrophenyl n-hexylphosphate (MNPHP) showed that the fraction of active CALB molecules adsorbed onto resins was {approx}60%. The fraction of active CALB molecules was invariable as a function of resin particle and pore size. At {approx}8% (w/w) CALB loading, by increasing the immobilization support pore diameter from 300 to 1000 {angstrom}, the turnover frequency (TOF) of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone ({var_epsilon}-CL) to polyester increased from 12.4 to 28.2 s{sup -1}. However, the {var_epsilon}-CL conversion rate was not influenced by changes in resin particle size. Similar trends were observed for condensation polymerizations between 1,8-octanediol and adipic acid. The results herein are compared to those obtained with a similar series of methyl methacrylate resins, where variations in particle size largely affected CALB distribution within resins and catalyst activity for polyester synthesis.

  14. Use of ion exchange resins in the analysis of rocks and minerals: Separation of sodium and potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1958-01-01

    This procedure was developed primarily for analyses in which limited amounts of sample are available. Sodium and potassium can be separated from the other constituents of silicate rocks by cation exchange resin (Amberlite IR-120). The sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids and passed through the resin bed after expulsion of the fluorine. The column is eluted with 0.12N hydrochloric acid at a fast flow rate of 4 ml. per sq. cm. per minute and the sodium and potassium are recovered together within a reasonable time. Other constituents of the sample, except silica, can be determined on the same portion of sample.

  15. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  16. Structure-function investigations of modified phenol-formaldehyde and resorcinol-formaldehyde ion-exchange resins that are selective for cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Hallen, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange material for removal of radioactive cesium from alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. The chemical stability of the R-F resin is a primary issue under the typical process conditions encountered for cesium removal, especially during the acid elution step. Part of our examination into this issue has been directed toward preparation of resins that contain fluorine to examine the effect on chemical stability of resorcinol and phenol based resins and to explore the effect of structural modification of the polymer on its cesium selectivity. Polymer modifiers included 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenol as well as 2,5-, 3,4-, and 3,5-difluorophenol. The resins were characterized using spectroscopic techniques (IR, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR) and by determination of cesium-specific distribution coefficients (K{sub d}`s).

  17. Plastination of decalcified bone by a new resin technique

    PubMed Central

    Rabiei, Abbas Ali; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Hajian, Morteza; Shamosi, Atefe; Mardani, Mohammad; Rashidi, Bahman; Setayeshmehr, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The scope of this study was to preserve whole detailed structure of dissected and decalcified bones, taken from used cadavers, by a new plastination technique. Materials and Methods: Specimens we used in this study were sheep femurs and human bones including pelvis, femur, tibia, and fibula. Bones, at first, fixed with 5% formalin and were decalcified with 5% nitric acid, and then were fixed again and washed under the tap water. The resulted flexible bones were dehydrated in −25°C acetone and degreased them in +25°C acetone. Then, the experimental and control specimen were placed in the vacuum chamber for forced impregnation with our new flexible unsaturated polyester resin (UP89 method) and silicon resin (S10 method), respectively. Finally, the strength and flexibility of plastinated decalcified specimens were investigated by tensometer, and the weight diversity was measured by digital balance. Results: Plastinated bones prepared by this technique were found to be dried, non-fragile, durable, odorless, non-greasy, and demonstrating all detailed structures of the bones. Tensile and weight tests results indicated that plastinated decalcified femurs have owned higher flexibility and strength but lesser weight than plastinated undecalcified femurs. The characteristics of both experimental and control groups of plastinated decalcified specimens were found to have no significant difference. Conclusions: Our synthesized resin found to be much more economical than conventional plastination method. In more details, properties of these new products were the same as, S10 method, from points of strength, flexibility and weight, but, since the money cost for producing them was about one fifth that of S10 method. PMID:24592368

  18. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. PMID:25047352

  19. Qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin for use in SRS processes

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-05-18

    The Phase 2 portion of the HB-Line facility was built in the early 1980's to process plutonium and neptunium from nitric acid solutions into oxide suitable for storage in a vault. Although the other portions of HB-Line were started up in the mid 1980's and have operated since that time, the anion exchange and precipitation processes in Phase 2 were never started up. As part of the material stabilization efforts, Phase 2 is currently being started up. A new anion exchange resin is needed because the resins that were proposed for use 10 years ago are limited by performance characteristics, disposal requirements, or are no longer commercially available. SRTC is responsible for qualifying all resins prior to their use in Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage (NMSS) processes. Qualification consists of both process suitability and thermal stability with nitric acid. This report describes the thermal stability qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ, the new resin proposed for processing plutonium and neptunium in the HB Line facility.

  20. Glycine feeding improves pristinamycin production during fermentation including resin for in situ separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Jing; Jin, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Jin, Qin-Chao; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2012-05-01

    Seven amino acids were tested as precursors to affect pristinamycin production by a mutant strain derived from Streptomyces pristinaespiralis ATCC25486. Of those, glycine was selected as the best precursor to facilitate both cell growth and pristinamycin production at the feeding time of 36-h incubation and the feeding rate of 0.75 g L(-1) flask culture. The optimized time and concentration of glycine feeding were applied to enlarged 3-L bioreactor fermentation with a resin added at the time of 20-h fermentation for in situ separation. As a result, a combination of the glycine feeding and the added resin resulted in the maximal pristinamycin yield of 616 mg L(-1) culture 12 h after glycine feeding. The yield from the combined treatment was 1.71-, 2.77- and 4.32-fold of those from the mere glycine and resin treatments and the control, respectively. Other parameters, including intracellular nucleic acid content, animo nitrogen content and pH level, during 72-h fermentation were also given in association with the pristinamycin yields in the different treatments. The results indicate that glycine feeding is an effective approach to enhance pristinamycin production in the culture of S. pristinaespiralis F213 with supplemented resin for in situ separation. PMID:21947672

  1. Influence of contamination on resin bond strength to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Kocjan, Andraz; Lehmann, Frank; Kosmac, Tomaz; Kern, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of contamination and subsequent cleaning on the bond strength and durability of an adhesive resin to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic. Zirconia ceramic disks were coated with nano-structured alumina, utilizing the hydrolysis of aluminum nitride powder. After immersion in saliva or the use of a silicone disclosing agent, specimens were cleaned with phosphoric acid etching or with tap water rinsing only. Uncontaminated specimens served as controls. Plexiglas tubes filled with composite resin were bonded with a phosphate monomer [10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogenphosphate (MDP)]-containing resin (Panavia 21). Subgroups of eight specimens each were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 3 d without thermal cycling (TC) or for 150 d with 37,500 thermal cycles from 5 to 55 degrees C. The tensile bond strength (TBS) was determined using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm min(-1). The topography of the debonded surface was scrutinized for fractographic features, utilizing both optical and scanning electron microscopy. The TBS to uncontaminated nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic was durable, while contamination significantly reduced the TBS. Phosphoric acid cleaning was effective in removal of saliva contamination from the coated bonding surface but was not effective in removal of the silicone disclosing agent. Nano-structured alumina coating improves resin bonding to zirconia ceramic and eliminates the need for air-abrasion before bonding. PMID:20662914

  2. Diffusion of residual monomer in polymer resins.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1976-01-01

    A simplified mathematical model which made use of Fick's laws of diffusion written in spherical coordinates was developed to describe the rate of diffusion of residual monomers from polymer resins. The properties of the monomer-polymer system which influenced the amount of monomer remaining in the polymer as a function of time were the diffusivity and solubility of the monomer in the polymer, and the particle size of the polymer resin. This model was used to analyze literature data on the diffusion of residual vinyl chloride monomer in polyvinyl chloride resins made by the suspension process. It was concluded that particle size of the resin was a significant parameter which should be taken advantage of in process equipment designed to remove residual monomer from PVC resins. The diffusivity of the monomer in the polymer was a function of the solubility of the monomer in the polymer. Monomer solubility can be determined from Henry's law. It was suggested that this model could be adapted to describe diffusion of monomers from any monomer-polymer system, and would be a useful approach to modeling the transport of nonreactive chemical additives from plastics. PMID:1026410

  3. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  4. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow unsuccessfully attacked or wounded trees to resist future bark beetle attacks. Forest management that encourages healthy, vigorously growing trees will also favor larger resin ducts, thereby conferring increased constitutive resistance to bark beetle attacks. PMID:26433021

  5. PETIs as High-Temperature Resin-Transfer-Molding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John N.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Compositions of, and processes for fabricating, high-temperature composite materials from phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) oligomers by resin-transfer molding (RTM) and resin infusion have been developed. Composites having a combination of excellent mechanical properties and long-term high-temperature stability have been readily fabricated. These materials are particularly useful for the fabrication of high-temperature structures for jet-engine components, structural components on highspeed aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers that are precursors of PETI oligomers are easily made through the reaction of a mixture of aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides at high stoichiometric offsets and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) as an end-capper in a polar solvent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP). These oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated -- for example, by heating the solution in the presence of toluene to remove the water by azeotropic distillation to form low-molecular-weight imide oligomers. More precisely, what is obtained is a mixture of PETI oligomeric species, spanning a range of molecular weights, that exhibits a stable melt viscosity of less than approximately 60 poise (and generally less than 10 poise) at a temperature below 300 deg C. After curing of the oligomers at a temperature of 371 deg C, the resulting polymer can have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) as high as 375 C, the exact value depending on the compositions.

  6. Determining efficacy of monitoring devices on ceramic bond to resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Estrella; Aguilera, Fátima S.; Osorio, Raquel; García-Godoy, Franklin; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel A.; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This paper aims to assess the effectiveness of 3D nanoroughness and 2D microroughness evaluations, by their correlation with contact angle measurements and shear bond strength test, in order to evaluate the effect of two different acids conditioning on the bonding efficacy of a leucite-based glass-ceramic to a composite resin. Study Design: Ceramic (IPS Empress) blocks were treated as follows: 1) no treatment, 2) 37% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), 15 s, 3) 9% hydrofluoric acid (HF), 5 min. Micro- and nano-roughness were assessed with a profilometer and by means of an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Water contact angle (CA) measurements were determined to assess wettability of the ceramic surfaces with the asixymetric drop shape analysis contact diameter technique. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested to a resin composite (Z100) with three different adhesive systems (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Clearfil New Bond, ProBOND). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were performed. Results: Nanoroughness values assessed in 50x50 ?m areas were higher for the HF group, these differences were not detected by profilometric analysis. HF treatment created the nano- roughest surfaces and the smallest CA (p<0.05), producing the highest SBS to the composite resin with all tested adhesive systems (p<0.05). No differences existed between the SBS produced by the adhesive systems evaluated with any of the surface treatments tested. Conclusions: Nano-roughness obtained in a 50x50 µm scan size areas was the most reliable data to evaluate the topographical changes produced by the different acid treatments on ceramic surfaces. Key words:Dental ceramic, acid etching, bonding efficacy, resin composite, adhesive systems, contact angle, roughness. PMID:22549693

  7. The Creep of Laminated Synthetic Resin Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkuhn, H

    1941-01-01

    The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

  8. Occupational epoxy resin allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, M

    2000-11-01

    Sixteen cases of occupational contact dermatitis to epoxy resins were seen over a 5-year period. All were men. Six cases worked in the construction industry, two worked as painters, two as engineers, two as car windscreen repairers, and one each worked in a timber yard, a car yard, on a farm and as a cane-furniture salesman. Most presented with rashes on their faces (56%), hands (50%) or arms (37%). Two patients were allergic to the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether, and one was allergic to the epoxy hardener isophorone diamine. The rest were allergic to the epoxy resin itself. Outcome in this series was poor because most continued to be exposed to epoxy resins in their workplace environment. PMID:11105365

  9. Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

  10. [Allergic contact eczema from epoxy resin].

    PubMed

    Calzado, Leticia; Ortiz-de Frutos, Francisco J; del Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Galera, Carmen María; Valverde, Ricardo; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2005-11-01

    Epoxy resins are plastics that are widely used as electrical insulation, in coatings, and as adhesives and paints. They have strong sensitizing power and are one of the main causes of allergic contact eczema, both in the workplace and elsewhere. We present the case of a worker at a plastics/chemical plant, who handled aeronautical components in the process of manufacturing fuselage parts. He consulted his physician because of eczematous lesions on his fingers, hands and forearms which had developed over a two-year period and were clearly related to his work. The standard battery of skin tests was performed, along with the plastics and adhesives series and tests using the products from his workplace. Positivity was shown to epoxy resins (standard battery) and to the products from his workplace, which included different fiberglass and carbon fiber sheets impregnated with epoxy resins and epoxy adhesives. PMID:16476309

  11. Studies on cesium uptake by phenolic resins

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, S.K.; Ramaswamy, M.; Misra, B.M. )

    1992-02-01

    The selective removal of cesium by phenolic ion-exchange resins from highly salted alkaline radioactive solutions was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and resorcinol-catechol mixture with formaldehyde and characterized for their moisture regain, ion-exchange (H{sup +} {yields} Na{sup +}) capacity, and distribution coefficient (K{sub D}) for cesium. The effects of open and sealed curing of the polymers on their properties were studied. The effect of Na{sup +}, NaOH, and Cs{sup +} concentration on the uptake of cesium by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin was investigated, in particular. The chemical, thermal, and radiation stabilities of the polymers were also studied.

  12. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (?70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of ?-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (?42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ?50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility, comparable to commercialized composites. The results indicate that this novel LC nanocomposite is worthy of development and has potential for further applications in clinical dentistry. PMID:22842038

  13. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    PubMed Central

    TANOUE, Naomi; MATSUDA, Yasuhiro; YANAGIDA, Hiroaki; MATSUMURA, Hideo; SAWASE, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. Material and Methods Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm) were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON); 2) 1) + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA); 3) 1) + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP); 4) treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. Results The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05) greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. Conclusion Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used. PMID:24037070

  14. Sorption mechanism and predictive models for removal of cationic organic contaminants by cation exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Zhang, Huichun

    2014-12-16

    Understanding the sorption mechanism of organic contaminants on cation exchange resins (CXRs) will enable application of these resins for the removal of cationic organic compounds from contaminated water. In this study, sorption of a diverse set of 12 organic cations and 8 neutral aromatic solutes on two polystyrene CXRs, MN500 and Amberlite 200, was examined. MN500 showed higher sorbed concentrations due to its microporous structure. The sorbed concentrations followed the same trend of aromatic cations > aliphatic cations > neutral solutes for both resins. Generally, solute-solvent interactions, nonpolar moiety of the solutes, and resin matrix can affect selectivity of the cations. Sorbed concentrations of the neutral compounds were significantly less than those of the cations, indicating a combined effect of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions. By conducting multiple linear regression between Gibbs free energy of sorption and Abraham descriptors for all 20 compounds, polarity/polarizability (S), H-bond acidity (A), induced dipole (E), and electrostatic (J(+)) interactions were found to be involved in the sorption of the cations by the resins. After converting the aqueous sorption isotherms to sorption from the ideal gas-phase by water-wet resins, a more significant effect of J(+) was observed. Predictive models were then developed based on the linear regressions and validated by accurately estimating the sorption of different test set compounds with a root-mean-square error range of 0.91-1.1 and 0.76-0.85 for MN500 and Amberlite 200, respectively. The models also accurately predicted sorption behavior of aniline and imidazole between pH 3 and 10. PMID:25409479

  15. The Class IV resin composite restoration: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Potoky, J R; Rothfuss, L G

    1993-01-01

    Various aspects and principles of the Class IV acid-etched direct resin composite restoration are reviewed through an examination of the literature and a national survey. The purpose of the survey was to determine what is being taught and relate it to literature on the subject. The general conclusion is that responding dental schools in the United States teach the most currently accepted concepts of material selection, tooth preparation, and clinical technique associated with this treatment service. Among respondents: (1) 73 percent report that they teach use of a liner before placement of the resin composite; (2) two include instruction for a total-etch technique; (3) 15 percent regularly teach use of DBAs; (4) 21 percent teach placement of a microfilled resin composite veneer, while 69 percent teach placement of a single resin composite restoration; (5) all use visible light-cured resin composite systems exclusively; (6) all indicate that some type of preparation is required, and circumferental preparation was preferred most (95 percent); types of margins taught most frequently are the long bevel (33 percent), chamfer (26 percent), and either the long bevel or chamfer (14 percent); one school prefers porcelain laminate veneers as the restoration for larger Class IV lesions; and. 74 percent prefer incremental addition of resin composite layers as their placement technique. In most cases, the literature and survey findings agree, but there are a number of areas (liners, DBAs, and occlusion) for which further research is indicated to determine an optimal direction for dental school instruction. This article will be useful if it improves clinical performance or spurs answers to those items for which consensus is lacking. PMID:23087953

  16. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test. The posts received surface treatments in three categories: 1) roughening by sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid etching; 2) application of primer by coating with Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II and Silane and 3) a combination treatment in the form of roughening (sandblasting or etching) supplemented by the application of a primer or in the form of the Cojet system. After surface treatment, the post was embedded in a cylinder of resin cement (diameter = 4.0 mm, height = 4.0 mm). The surface-treated post was centered in the resin cement-filled mold with the aid of fixation apparatus. Fifteen minutes from the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding of resin cement to titanium alloy posts was increased by several surface treatments of the post. However, coating with primers as sole treatment had no effect on bonding. With the DTS method applied, none of the surface treatments had an effect on the bonding to glass fiber posts. The bonding of both resin cements to zirconia posts was improved by Cojet treatment, while sandblasting, followed by silane application, improved bonding of Panavia F. PMID:14753334

  17. Utilization of Methacrylates and Polymer Matrices for the Synthesis of Ion Specific Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Kenneth

    2013-10-29

    Disposal, storage, and/or transmutation of actinides such as americium (Am) will require the development of specific separation schemes. Existing efforts focus on solvent extraction systems for achieving suitable separation of actinide from lanthanides. However, previous work has shown the feasibility of ion-imprinting polymer-based resins for use in ion-exchange-type separations with metal ion recognition. Phenolic-based resins have been shown to function well for Am-Eu separations, but these resins exhibited slow kinetics and difficulties in the imprinting process. This project addresses the need for new and innovative methods for the selective separation of actinides through novel ion-imprinted resins. The project team will explore incorporation of metals into extended frameworks, including the possibility of 3D polymerized matrices that can serve as a solid-state template for specific resin preparation. For example, an anhydrous trivalent f-element chain can be formed directly from a metal carbonate, and methacrylic acid from water. From these simple coordination complexes, molecules of discrete size or shape can be formed via the utilization of coordinating ligands or by use of an anionic multi-ligand system incorporating methacrylate. Additionally, alkyl methyl methacrylates have been used successfully to create template nanospaces, which underscores their potential utility as 3D polymerized matrices. This evidence provides a unique route for the preparation of a specific metal ion template for the basis of ion-exchange separations. Such separations may prove to be excellent discriminators of metal ions, even between f-elements. Resins were prepared and evaluated for sorption behavior, column properties, and proton exchange capacity.

  18. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  19. REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO THE HEATED CORE BOX THAT SETS THE RESIN CREATING THE HARDENED CORE SHOWN HERE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Additive effects on the toughening of unsaturated polyester resins

    SciTech Connect

    Suspene, L.; Yang, Y.S.; Pascault, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    An elastomer additive, carboxy-terminated acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer, was used for toughening in the free radical cross-linking copolymerization of unsaturated polyester (UP) resins. For molded parts, Charpy impact behavior was generally enhanced and the number of catastrophic failures was reduced. The miscibility and interfacial properties of additive and resin blends play important roles in the toughening process. Phase-diagram studies showed that the elastomer additive is immiscible with the UP resin and is phase-separated from the resin matrix during curing. This phase-separation phenomenon is similar to that in the low-profile mechanism of UP resins. Additive-resin system miscibility greatly influences curing morphology. Microvoids occurred in the additive phase of cured resin because of shrinkage stress. The intrinsic inhomogeneity of the polyester network and the existence of microvoids in the final product limit the toughening effect of additives on unsaturated polyester resins. 49 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Standard tests for toughened resin composites, revised edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Several toughened resin systems are evaluated to achieve commonality for certain kinds of tests used to characterize toughened resin composites. Specifications for five tests were standardized; these test standards are described.

  2. Characterization of the resin transfer moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K. N.; Rudd, C. D.; Owen, M. J.; Middleton, V.

    1992-12-01

    Complete process characterization is required to enable high volume manufacture of composite components by resin transfer moulding (RTM). A review of processing literature indicates adequate understanding of the thermal cycle but limited understanding of the pressure cycle. Experimental results are presented to characterize both the thermal and pressure cycles during RTM, verifying published findings in instances and developing them in others. A phase of post-impregnation cavity pressure is identified which is considered to be caused by thermal expansion of liquid resin adjacent to the gate. Results are presented to demonstrate that this pressure phase can be more significant than impregnation pressure when considering mould design.

  3. Technical assessment for quality control of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

  4. Occupational dermatitis to epoxydic and phenolic resins.

    PubMed

    Geraut, Christian; Tripodi, Dominique; Brunet-Courtois, Béatrice; Leray, Fabrice; Geraut, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Contact dermatitis to epoxydic and phenolic resins are the most frequent contact dermatoses due to plastics, in particular in the form of airborne dermatitis. The chemical formulas of the various components of these resins and their additives are complex and the patch tests available in the trade are insufficient and often arrive at a late stage in the progress of industry, in particular in advanced technologies like aeronautical engineering, shipbuilding or the new floor and wall coverings in buildings. This article is a review of the actions to be taken with these allergies, as well as with regards to their diagnosis, prevention and medico-legal compensation. PMID:19349256

  5. Thermal analysis of bismaleimide matrix resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, D.A.

    1990-07-01

    Commercial bismaleimide (BMI) resins for composite applications have mechanical properties with values between those of high temperature epoxies and fully aromatic polyimides. The former have the disadvantage of poor hot-wet strength and the latter have the disadvantages of being difficult to process and costly. Current commercial BMI formulations offer good properties retention under hot/wet conditions, comparative ease of processing, and moderate cost. We have used thermal analysis extensively to study commercial BMI materials. This paper will survey the results to TGA, TMA, and DMA analyses which were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of cured BMI resins. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  7. New phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Hsu, M.-T.; Parker, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus-based flame retardants have been effectively used in a wide variety of polymeric materials. Such additives, however, may either influence the decomposition reaction in polymers or lack durability due to a tendency to be leached out by solvents. Attention is given to the synthesis, characterization, thermal stability and degradation mechanisms of bisimide resins, and an evaluation is conducted of the flammability and mechanical properties of graphite cloth-reinforced laminates fabricated from one of the six phosphorus-containing bisimide resins considered.

  8. Resin pins: a novel composite resin concept for treatment of posterior teeth--technical presentation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Bernardo Cesar Sanmartin; de Almeida, Rui Sanmartin

    2008-09-01

    With the evolution of bonding systems, various techniques have been proposed to reduce polymerization shrinkage and postoperative sensitivity in posterior direct resin restorations. It has been noted that the result could be improved using various layers, due to the contractions that occur proportionally to the quantity of material and the intensity of the curing light during polymerization. This article reviews the use of small, prepolymerized composite resin pearls or inserts compressed against the surface of the tooth wall to reduce the volume to be polymerized. The use of resin pins enables superior bonding to the dental structure, incrementing the marginal adaptation and reducing postoperative sensitivity. PMID:18990903

  9. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  15. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base... will not interact dangerously in the event of leakage. (b) For transportation by aircraft,...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  3. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A 60 kg batch of Resin M751 was produced in pilot plant scale. The resin was delivered to the prepreg company as an NMP solution. 100 kg of glass-fabric prepregs were fabricated. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication were provided. A new batch of Resin M756 (Code M756 - 2) was synthesized.

  4. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of articles intended for use in contact...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray...