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Sample records for acid sequence analyses

  1. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  2. Analyses of mitochondrial amino acid sequence datasets support the proposal that specimens of Hypodontus macropi from three species of macropodid hosts represent distinct species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypodontus macropi is a common intestinal nematode of a range of kangaroos and wallabies (macropodid marsupials). Based on previous multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence data sets, H. macropi has been proposed to be complex of species. To test this proposal using independent molecular data, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial (mt) genomes of individuals of H. macropi from three different species of hosts (Macropus robustus robustus, Thylogale billardierii and Macropus [Wallabia] bicolor) as well as that of Macropicola ocydromi (a related nematode), and undertook a comparative analysis of the amino acid sequence datasets derived from these genomes. Results The mt genomes sequenced by next-generation (454) technology from H. macropi from the three host species varied from 13,634 bp to 13,699 bp in size. Pairwise comparisons of the amino acid sequences predicted from these three mt genomes revealed differences of 5.8% to 18%. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence data sets using Bayesian Inference (BI) showed that H. macropi from the three different host species formed distinct, well-supported clades. In addition, sliding window analysis of the mt genomes defined variable regions for future population genetic studies of H. macropi in different macropodid hosts and geographical regions around Australia. Conclusions The present analyses of inferred mt protein sequence datasets clearly supported the hypothesis that H. macropi from M. robustus robustus, M. bicolor and T. billardierii represent distinct species. PMID:24261823

  3. Assignment of fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria to Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov. on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, H.; Yang, D.; Woese, C. R.; Bryant, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    After enrichment from Chinese rural anaerobic digestor sludge, anaerobic, sporing and nonsporing, saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria were isolated as cocultures with H2- and formate-utilizing Methanospirillum hungatei or Desulfovibrio sp. strain G-11. The syntrophs degraded C4 to C8 saturated fatty acids, including isobutyrate and 2-methylbutyrate. They were adapted to grow on crotonate and were isolated as pure cultures. The crotonate-grown pure cultures alone did not grow on butyrate in either the presence or the absence of some common electron acceptors. However, when they were reconstituted with M. hungatei, growth on butyrate again occurred. In contrast, crotonate-grown Clostridium kluyveri and Clostridium sticklandii, as well as Clostridium sporogenes, failed to grow on butyrate when these organisms were cocultured with M. hungatei. The crotonate-grown pure subcultures of the syntrophs described above were subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Several previously documented fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophs grown in pure cultures with crotonate were also subjected to comparative sequence analyses. The sequence analyses revealed that the new sporing and nonsporing isolates and other syntrophs that we sequenced, which had either gram-negative or gram-positive cell wall ultrastructure, all belonged to the phylogenetically gram-positive phylum. They were not closely related to any of the previously known subdivisions in the gram-positive phylum with which they were compared, but were closely related to each other, forming a new subdivision in the phylum. We recommend that this group be designated Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov.; a description is given.

  4. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. Comparative studies on tree pollen allergens. X. Further purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses of the major allergen of birch pollen (Betula verrucosa).

    PubMed

    Vik, H; Elsayed, S

    1986-01-01

    The previously isolated major allergen of birch pollen (fraction BV45), Int. Archs Allergy appl. Immun. 68: 70-78 (1982), was further purified by recycling chromatography. The purified preparation was run on a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) TSK-G-2000 gel filtration chromatography column and, finally, on paper high-volt electrophoresis. The protein recovered met the homogeneity criteria required for performing the N-terminal sequence analysis. The allergenic and antigenic reactivities of the HPLC-purified protein, designated BV45B, was examined. A single homogeneous precipitation line in crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was shown. Specific IgE-inhibition tests and immuno-autoradiographic prints indicated that this allergen could bind reaginic IgE specificially and with good affinity. The homogeneity of BV45B was examined by isoelectric focusing (IEF). Several minor bands of pI differences of less than 0.1 units were visible, demonstrating the existence of some molecular variants of this protein. The N-terminal sequence analysis of the molecule was performed, and the following four amino acids were tentatively shown by sequential cleavage: NH2-Ala-Gly-Ile-Val-. The demonstration of one dominant N-terminal 1-dimethyl-amino-5-naphthalene sulphonyl (DNS)-amino acid by polyamide thin-layer chromatography at each sequence step confirmed that the N-terminal residue of the protein was not blocked; the heterogeneity shown by the IEF system was merely due to the presence of several homologous polymorphic proteins with identical N-terminal amino acid, the adequacy of the purification repertoire used. PMID:3957444

  6. Comparative sequence analyses of sixteen reptilian paramyxoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Batts, W.N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Viral genomic RNA of Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), a paramyxovirus highly pathogenic for reptiles, was reverse transcribed and cloned. Plasmids with significant sequence similarities to the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and polymerase (L) genes of mammalian paramyxoviruses were identified by BLAST search. Partial sequences of the FDLV genes were used to design primers for amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of 518-bp L gene and 352-bp HN gene fragments from a collection of 15 previously uncharacterized reptilian paramyxoviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial L and HN sequences produced similar trees in which there were two distinct subgroups of isolates that were supported with maximum bootstrap values, and several intermediate isolates. Within each subgroup the nucleotide divergence values were less than 2.5%, while the divergence between the two subgroups was 20-22%. This indicated that the two subgroups represent distinct virus species containing multiple virus strains. The five intermediate isolates had nucleotide divergence values of 11-20% and may represent additional distinct species. In addition to establishing diversity among reptilian paramyxoviruses, the phylogenetic groupings showed some correlation with geographic location, and clearly demonstrated a low level of host species-specificity within these viruses. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Analyses of Intestinal Microbiota: Culture versus Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hiergeist, Andreas; Gläsner, Joachim; Reischl, Udo; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing human as well as animal microbiota composition has gained growing interest because structural components and metabolites of microorganisms fundamentally influence all aspects of host physiology. Originally dominated by culture-dependent methods for exploring these ecosystems, the development of molecular techniques such as high throughput sequencing has dramatically increased our knowledge. Because many studies of the microbiota are based on the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene targets, they can, at least in principle, be compared to determine the role of the microbiome composition for developmental processes, host metabolism, and physiology as well as different diseases. In our review, we will summarize differences and pitfalls in current experimental protocols, including all steps from nucleic acid extraction to bioinformatical analysis which may produce variation that outweighs subtle biological differences. Future developments, such as integration of metabolomic, transcriptomic, and metagenomic data sets and standardization of the procedures, will be discussed. PMID:26323632

  8. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  9. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  10. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  11. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  12. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  13. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses.

    PubMed

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3'-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486-5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  15. Pegasys: software for executing and integrating analyses of biological sequences

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sohrab P; He, David YM; Sawkins, Jessica N; Druce, Jeffrey C; Quon, Gerald; Lett, Drew; Zheng, Grace XY; Xu, Tao; Ouellette, BF Francis

    2004-01-01

    Background We present Pegasys – a flexible, modular and customizable software system that facilitates the execution and data integration from heterogeneous biological sequence analysis tools. Results The Pegasys system includes numerous tools for pair-wise and multiple sequence alignment, ab initio gene prediction, RNA gene detection, masking repetitive sequences in genomic DNA as well as filters for database formatting and processing raw output from various analysis tools. We introduce a novel data structure for creating workflows of sequence analyses and a unified data model to store its results. The software allows users to dynamically create analysis workflows at run-time by manipulating a graphical user interface. All non-serial dependent analyses are executed in parallel on a compute cluster for efficiency of data generation. The uniform data model and backend relational database management system of Pegasys allow for results of heterogeneous programs included in the workflow to be integrated and exported into General Feature Format for further analyses in GFF-dependent tools, or GAME XML for import into the Apollo genome editor. The modularity of the design allows for new tools to be added to the system with little programmer overhead. The database application programming interface allows programmatic access to the data stored in the backend through SQL queries. Conclusions The Pegasys system enables biologists and bioinformaticians to create and manage sequence analysis workflows. The software is released under the Open Source GNU General Public License. All source code and documentation is available for download at . PMID:15096276

  16. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  17. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  18. Sequence and structural analyses of interleukin-8-like chemokine superfamily.

    PubMed

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-8 and related chemokines are small proteins that bind to receptors belonging to the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. They can cause migration of cells like neutrophils and eosinophils and some of them are implicated in angiogenic diseases. More than 40 subfamilies of these ligands are known that share poor sequence similarity and display receptor specificity. There is very little structural information about the mode of binding between ligands and the receptors. We have employed multi-fold sensitive sequence search methods to provide a repertoire of 252 putative interleukin-8 proteins and homologues, which are shared across humans, aves and fish. The sequences can be organized into five major known clusters. The propensity of occurrence of certain amino acid alphabets is found to be specific in different locations of the polypeptide fold. The sequence dispersion is also observed to be cluster-specific when examined by Evolutionary Trace procedure. Amino acid alphabet analysis and Evolutionary Trace procedure reveal cluster-specific amino acid distribution that provide clues about how the small fold of the ligand could display remarkable receptor specificity. We notice regions, like the beta1-beta2 loop of the fold, that are potentially involved in receptor recognition and specificity that could be potential sites for residue mutations. Systematic studies of the distribution patterns enable better understanding of the evolution and molecular recognition of this important and diverse protein superfamily. PMID:19032164

  19. Sequence and Structural Analyses for Functional Non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Sato, Kengo

    Analysis and detection of functional RNAs are currently important topics in both molecular biology and bioinformatics research. Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been developed for modeling and analysing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNAs and are used for structural alignments of RNA sequences. Such stochastic models, however, are not sufficient to discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from non-members, and hence to detect non-coding RNA regions from genome sequences. Recently, the support vector machine (SVM) and kernel function techniques have been actively studied and proposed as a solution to various problems in bioinformatics. SVMs are trained from positive and negative samples and have strong, accurate discrimination abilities, and hence are more appropriate for the discrimination tasks. A few kernel functions that extend the string kernel to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures have been proposed. In this article, we give an overview of recent progress in SCFG-based methods for RNA sequence analysis and novel kernel functions tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences and developed for use with support vector machines (SVM) in discriminating members of an RNA family from non-members.

  20. Sequencing and comparative analyses of the genomes of zoysiagrasses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Nakayama, Shinobu; Ono, Akiko; Watanabe, Akiko; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Gondo, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Genki; Muguerza, Melody; Shimizu, Katsuya; Sawamura, Noriko; Inoue, Takayasu; Shigeki, Yuichi; Ohno, Naoki; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Sato, Shusei

    2016-04-01

    Zoysiais a warm-season turfgrass, which comprises 11 allotetraploid species (2n= 4x= 40), each possessing different morphological and physiological traits. To characterize the genetic systems of Zoysia plants and to analyse their structural and functional differences in individual species and accessions, we sequenced the genomes of Zoysia species using HiSeq and MiSeq platforms. As a reference sequence of Zoysia species, we generated a high-quality draft sequence of the genome of Z. japonica accession 'Nagirizaki' (334 Mb) in which 59,271 protein-coding genes were predicted. In parallel, draft genome sequences of Z. matrella 'Wakaba' and Z. pacifica 'Zanpa' were also generated for comparative analyses. To investigate the genetic diversity among the Zoysia species, genome sequence reads of three additional accessions, Z. japonica'Kyoto', Z. japonica'Miyagi' and Z. matrella'Chiba Fair Green', were accumulated, and aligned against the reference genome of 'Nagirizaki' along with those from 'Wakaba' and 'Zanpa'. As a result, we detected 7,424,163 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 852,488 short indels among these species. The information obtained in this study will be valuable for basic studies on zoysiagrass evolution and genetics as well as for the breeding of zoysiagrasses, and is made available in the 'Zoysia Genome Database' at http://zoysia.kazusa.or.jp. PMID:26975196

  1. Sequencing and comparative analyses of the genomes of zoysiagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Nakayama, Shinobu; Ono, Akiko; Watanabe, Akiko; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Gondo, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Genki; Muguerza, Melody; Shimizu, Katsuya; Sawamura, Noriko; Inoue, Takayasu; Shigeki, Yuichi; Ohno, Naoki; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Sato, Shusei

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia is a warm-season turfgrass, which comprises 11 allotetraploid species (2n = 4x = 40), each possessing different morphological and physiological traits. To characterize the genetic systems of Zoysia plants and to analyse their structural and functional differences in individual species and accessions, we sequenced the genomes of Zoysia species using HiSeq and MiSeq platforms. As a reference sequence of Zoysia species, we generated a high-quality draft sequence of the genome of Z. japonica accession ‘Nagirizaki’ (334 Mb) in which 59,271 protein-coding genes were predicted. In parallel, draft genome sequences of Z. matrella ‘Wakaba’ and Z. pacifica ‘Zanpa’ were also generated for comparative analyses. To investigate the genetic diversity among the Zoysia species, genome sequence reads of three additional accessions, Z. japonica ‘Kyoto’, Z. japonica ‘Miyagi’ and Z. matrella ‘Chiba Fair Green’, were accumulated, and aligned against the reference genome of ‘Nagirizaki’ along with those from ‘Wakaba’ and ‘Zanpa’. As a result, we detected 7,424,163 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 852,488 short indels among these species. The information obtained in this study will be valuable for basic studies on zoysiagrass evolution and genetics as well as for the breeding of zoysiagrasses, and is made available in the ‘Zoysia Genome Database’ at http://zoysia.kazusa.or.jp. PMID:26975196

  2. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  3. Amino-Acid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J.; Sepulveda, P.; Marciniszyn, J.; Chen, K. C. S.; Huang, W-Y.; Tao, N.; Liu, D.; Lanier, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of a 37-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment was already known, it was not studied. The alignment of these fragments was determined from the sequence of methionyl-peptides we had previously reported. We also discovered the locations of activesite aspartyl residues, as well as the pairing of the three disulfide bridges. A minor component of commercial crystalline pepsin was found to contain two extra amino-acid residues, Ala-Leu-, at the amino-terminus of the molecule. This minor component was apparently derived from a different site of cleavage during the activation of porcine pepsinogen. PMID:4587252

  4. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  5. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  6. Whale song analyses using bioinformatics sequence analysis approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yian A.; Almeida, Jonas S.; Chou, Lien-Siang

    2005-04-01

    Animal songs are frequently analyzed using discrete hierarchical units, such as units, themes and songs. Because animal songs and bio-sequences may be understood as analogous, bioinformatics analysis tools DNA/protein sequence alignment and alignment-free methods are proposed to quantify the theme similarities of the songs of false killer whales recorded off northeast Taiwan. The eighteen themes with discrete units that were identified in an earlier study [Y. A. Chen, masters thesis, University of Charleston, 2001] were compared quantitatively using several distance metrics. These metrics included the scores calculated using the Smith-Waterman algorithm with the repeated procedure; the standardized Euclidian distance and the angle metrics based on word frequencies. The theme classifications based on different metrics were summarized and compared in dendrograms using cluster analyses. The results agree with earlier classifications derived by human observation qualitatively. These methods further quantify the similarities among themes. These methods could be applied to the analyses of other animal songs on a larger scale. For instance, these techniques could be used to investigate song evolution and cultural transmission quantifying the dissimilarities of humpback whale songs across different seasons, years, populations, and geographic regions. [Work supported by SC Sea Grant, and Ilan County Government, Taiwan.

  7. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  8. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  10. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Solanum bulbocastanum, Solanum lycopersicum and comparative analyses with other Solanaceae genomes.

    PubMed

    Daniell, Henry; Lee, Seung-Bum; Grevich, Justin; Saski, Christopher; Quesada-Vargas, Tania; Guda, Chittibabu; Tomkins, Jeffrey; Jansen, Robert K

    2006-05-01

    Despite the agricultural importance of both potato and tomato, very little is known about their chloroplast genomes. Analysis of the complete sequences of tomato, potato, tobacco, and Atropa chloroplast genomes reveals significant insertions and deletions within certain coding regions or regulatory sequences (e.g., deletion of repeated sequences within 16S rRNA, ycf2 or ribosomal binding sites in ycf2). RNA, photosynthesis, and atp synthase genes are the least divergent and the most divergent genes are clpP, cemA, ccsA, and matK. Repeat analyses identified 33-45 direct and inverted repeats >or=30 bp with a sequence identity of at least 90%; all but five of the repeats shared by all four Solanaceae genomes are located in the same genes or intergenic regions, suggesting a functional role. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of all coding sequences and intergenic spacer regions was done for the first time in chloroplast genomes. Only four spacer regions are fully conserved (100% sequence identity) among all genomes; deletions or insertions within some intergenic spacer regions result in less than 25% sequence identity, underscoring the importance of choosing appropriate intergenic spacers for plastid transformation and providing valuable new information for phylogenetic utility of the chloroplast intergenic spacer regions. Comparison of coding sequences with expressed sequence tags showed considerable amount of variation, resulting in amino acid changes; none of the C-to-U conversions observed in potato and tomato were conserved in tobacco and Atropa. It is possible that there has been a loss of conserved editing sites in potato and tomato. PMID:16575560

  11. Sequence and structural analyses of nuclear export signals in the NESdb database

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Darui; Farmer, Alicia; Collett, Garen; Grishin, Nick V.; Chook, Yuh Min

    2012-01-01

    We compiled >200 nuclear export signal (NES)–containing CRM1 cargoes in a database named NESdb. We analyzed the sequences and three-dimensional structures of natural, experimentally identified NESs and of false-positive NESs that were generated from the database in order to identify properties that might distinguish the two groups of sequences. Analyses of amino acid frequencies, sequence logos, and agreement with existing NES consensus sequences revealed strong preferences for the Φ1-X3-Φ2-X2-Φ3-X-Φ4 pattern and for negatively charged amino acids in the nonhydrophobic positions of experimentally identified NESs but not of false positives. Strong preferences against certain hydrophobic amino acids in the hydrophobic positions were also revealed. These findings led to a new and more precise NES consensus. More important, three-dimensional structures are now available for 68 NESs within 56 different cargo proteins. Analyses of these structures showed that experimentally identified NESs are more likely than the false positives to adopt α-helical conformations that transition to loops at their C-termini and more likely to be surface accessible within their protein domains or be present in disordered or unobserved parts of the structures. Such distinguishing features for real NESs might be useful in future NES prediction efforts. Finally, we also tested CRM1-binding of 40 NESs that were found in the 56 structures. We found that 16 of the NES peptides did not bind CRM1, hence illustrating how NESs are easily misidentified. PMID:22833565

  12. Genomic sequencing and analyses of Lymantria xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of the casuarina moth, Lymantria xylina Swinehoe (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), which is a very important forest pest in Taiwan, have occurred every five to 10 years. This moth has expanded its range of host plants to include more than 65 species of broadleaf trees. LyxyMNPV (L. xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus) is highly virulent to the casuarina moth and has been investigated as a possible biopesticide for controlling this moth. LdMNPV-like virus has also been isolated from Lymantria xylina larvae but LyxyMNPV was more virulent than LdMNPV-like virus both in NTU-LY and IPLB-LD-652Y cell lines. To better understand LyxyMNPV, the nucleotide sequence of the LyxyMNPV DNA genome was determined and analysed. Results The genome of LyxyMNPV consists of 156,344 bases, has a G+C content of 53.4% and contains 157 putative open reading frames (ORFs). The gene content and gene order of LyxyMNPV were similar to those of LdMNPV, with 151 ORFs identified as homologous to those reported in the LdMNPV genome. Two genes (Lyxy49 and Lyxy123) were homologous to other baculoviruses, and four unique LyxyMNPV ORFs (Lyxy11, Lyxy19, Lyxy130 and Lyxy131) were identified in the LyxyMNPV genome, including a gag-like gene that was not reported in baculoviruses. LdMNPV contains 23 ORFs that are absent in LyxyMNPV. Readily identifiable homologues of the gene host range factor-1 (hrf-1), which appears to be involved in the susceptibility of L. dispar to NPV infection, were not present in LyxyMNPV. Additionally, two putative odv-e27 homologues were identified in LyxyMNPV. The LyxyMNPV genome encoded 14 bro genes compared with 16 in LdMNPV, which occupied more than 8% of the LyxyMNPV genome. Thirteen homologous regions (hrs) were identified containing 48 repeated sequences composed of 30-bp imperfect palindromes. However, they differed in the relative positions, number of repeats and orientation in the genome compared to LdMNPV. Conclusion The gene parity plot analysis

  13. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  14. Reclassification of ascomycetous yeasts from gene sequence analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past decade, identification of yeasts and their classification has been based almost exclusively on gene sequence analysis. Primarily as a result of using diagnostic gene sequences, such as D1/D2 LSU and ITS ribosomal RNAs, the number of known species has doubled. With the faster sequen...

  15. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the sequence listing in accordance with the requirements in 37 CFR...

  16. Nucleic acid renaturation and restriction endonuclease cleavage analyses show that the DNAs of a transforming and a nontransforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, B; Summers, W C; Klein, G

    1976-01-01

    Viral DNA molecules were purified from a nontransforming and a transforming strain of Epstein-Barr virus. Each viral DNA was labeled in vitro and renatured in the presence of an excess of either one or the other unlabeled viral DNA. Both viral DNAs were also digested with the Eco R1 restriction endonuclease and subsequently labeled by using avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase to repair either the EcoR1 nuclease-generated single-stranded ends of the DNAs or their single-stranded ends produced by a second digestion with exonuclease III after the first EcoR1 nuclease digestion. The results of these experiments support three general conclusions: (i) the DNAs of these two strains of Epstein-Barr virus share approximately 90% of their nucleotide sequences; (ii) both viral DNA populations are reasonably homogenous; and (iii) both DNAs contain repetitions or inverted repetitions of some of their nucleotide sequences. Images PMID:178907

  17. Analyses of response-stimulus sequences in descriptive observations.

    PubMed

    Samaha, Andrew L; Vollmer, Timothy R; Borrero, Carrie; Sloman, Kimberly; Pipkin, Claire St Peter; Bourret, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Descriptive observations were conducted to record problem behavior displayed by participants and to record antecedents and consequences delivered by caregivers. Next, functional analyses were conducted to identify reinforcers for problem behavior. Then, using data from the descriptive observations, lag-sequential analyses were conducted to examine changes in the probability of environmental events across time in relation to occurrences of problem behavior. The results of the lag-sequential analyses were interpreted in light of the results of functional analyses. Results suggested that events identified as reinforcers in a functional analysis followed behavior in idiosyncratic ways: after a range of delays and frequencies. Thus, it is possible that naturally occurring reinforcement contingencies are arranged in ways different from those typically evaluated in applied research. Further, these complex response-stimulus relations can be represented by lag-sequential analyses. However, limitations to the lag-sequential analysis are evident. PMID:19949537

  18. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  19. Sequence and intramolecular distance scoring analyses of microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Miki; Ide, Shunta; Kamata, Atsushi; Takahasi, Kiyohiro; Okada, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Recent accumulation of sequence and structural data, in conjunction with systematical classification into a set of families, has significantly advanced our understanding of diverse and specific protein functions. Analysis and interpretation of protein family data requires comprehensive sequence and structural alignments. Here, we present a simple scheme for analyzing a set of experimental structures of a given protein or family of proteins, using microbial rhodopsins as an example. For a data set comprised of around a dozen highly similar structures to each other (overall pairwise root-mean-squared deviation < 2.3 Å), intramolecular distance scoring analysis yielded valuable information with respect to structural properties, such as differences in the relative variability of transmembrane helices. Furthermore, a comparison with recent results for G protein-coupled receptors demonstrates how the results of the present analysis can be interpreted and effectively utilized for structural characterization of diverse protein families in general. PMID:26998236

  20. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  1. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  2. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  3. Evidence for Balancing Selection from Nucleotide Sequence Analyses of Human G6PD

    PubMed Central

    Verrelli, Brian C.; McDonald, John H.; Argyropoulos, George; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Froment, Alain; Drousiotou, Anthi; Lefranc, Gerard; Helal, Ahmed N.; Loiselet, Jacques; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations that result in reduced enzyme activity have been implicated in malarial resistance and constitute one of the best examples of selection in the human genome. In the present study, we characterize the nucleotide diversity across a 5.2-kb region of G6PD in a sample of 160 Africans and 56 non-Africans, to determine how selection has shaped patterns of DNA variation at this gene. Our global sample of enzymatically normal B alleles and A, A−, and Med alleles with reduced enzyme activities reveals many previously uncharacterized silent-site polymorphisms. In comparison with the absence of amino acid divergence between human and chimpanzee G6PD sequences, we find that the number of G6PD amino acid polymorphisms in human populations is significantly high. Unlike many other G6PD-activity alleles with reduced activity, we find that the age of the A variant, which is common in Africa, may not be consistent with the recent emergence of severe malaria and therefore may have originally had a historically different adaptive function. Overall, our observations strongly support previous genotype-phenotype association studies that proposed that balancing selection maintains G6PD deficiencies within human populations. The present study demonstrates that nucleotide sequence analyses can reveal signatures of both historical and recent selection in the genome and may elucidate the impact that infectious disease has had during human evolution. PMID:12378426

  4. Sequence analyses of type IV pili from Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Alisha M; Häse, Claudia C

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial surface structures called pili have been studied extensively for their role as possible colonization factors. Most sequenced Vibrio genomes predict a variety of pili genes in these organisms, including several types of type IV pili. In particular, the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) and the PilA pili, also known as the chitin-regulated pilus (ChiRP), are type IVa pili commonly found in Vibrio genomes and have been shown to play a role in the colonization of Vibrio species in the environment and/or host tissue. Here, we report sequence comparisons of two type IVa pilin subunit genes, mshA and pilA, and their corresponding amino acid sequences, for several strains from the three main human pathogenic Vibrio species, V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. We identified specific groupings of these two genes in V. cholerae, whereas V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus strains had no apparent allelic clusters, and these genes were strikingly divergent. These results were compared with other genes from the MSHA and PilA operons as well as another Vibrio pili from the type IVb group, the toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) from V. cholerae. Our data suggest that a selective pressure exists to cause these strains to vary their MSHA and PilA pilin subunits. Interestingly, V. cholerae strains possessing TCP have the same allele for both mshA and pilA. In contrast, V. cholerae isolates without TCP have polymorphisms in their mshA and pilA sequences similar to what was observed for both V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. This data suggests a possible linkage between host interactions and maintaining a highly conserved type IV pili sequence in V. cholerae. Although the mechanism underlying this intriguing diversity has yet to be elucidated, our analyses are an important first step towards gaining insights into the various aspects of Vibrio ecology. PMID:22383120

  5. Comparative ribosomal protein sequence analyses of a phylogenetically defined genus, Pseudomonas, and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Ochi, K

    1995-04-01

    I analyzed various families of ribosomal proteins obtained from selected species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto and allied organisms which were previously classified in the genus Pseudomonas. Partial amino acid sequencing of L30 preparations revealed that the strains which I examined could be divided into three clusters. The first cluster, which was assigned to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto, included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas mendocina, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The second cluster included Burkholderia pickettii and Burkholderia plantarii. The third cluster, which was a deeply branching cluster in the stem of gram-negative bacteria, included Brevundimonas diminuta and Brevundimonas vesicularis. Despite the different levels of conservation of the N-terminal sequences of ribosomal protein families (the highest level of similarity was 74% for L27 proteins and the lowest level of similarity was 42% for L30 proteins), similar phylogenetic trees were constructed by using data obtained from sequence analyses of various ribosomal protein families, including the S20, S21, L27, L29, L31, L32, and L33 protein families. Thus, I demonstrated the efficacy of ribosomal protein analysis in bacterial taxonomy. PMID:7727274

  6. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  7. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    David J. States

    1998-08-01

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  8. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  9. Matrix genes of measles virus and canine distemper virus: cloning, nucleotide sequences, and deduced amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, W J; Englund, G; Richardson, C D; Rozenblatt, S; Lazzarini, R A

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the matrix (M) proteins of measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) were determined from cDNA clones containing these genes in their entirety. In both cases, single open reading frames specifying basic proteins of 335 amino acid residues were predicted from the nucleotide sequences. Both viral messages were composed of approximately 1,450 nucleotides and contained 400 nucleotides of presumptive noncoding sequences at their respective 3' ends. MV and CDV M-protein-coding regions were 67% homologous at the nucleotide level and 76% homologous at the amino acid level. Only chance homology was observed in the 400-nucleotide trailer sequences. Comparisons of the M protein sequences of MV and CDV with the sequence reported for Sendai virus (B. M. Blumberg, K. Rose, M. G. Simona, L. Roux, C. Giorgi, and D. Kolakofsky, J. Virol. 52:656-663; Y. Hidaka, T. Kanda, K. Iwasaki, A. Nomoto, T. Shioda, and H. Shibuta, Nucleic Acids Res. 12:7965-7973) indicated the greatest homology among these M proteins in the carboxyterminal third of the molecule. Secondary-structure analyses of this shared region indicated a structurally conserved, hydrophobic sequence which possibly interacted with the lipid bilayer. Images PMID:3754588

  10. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  11. Effects of fixed versus random condition sequencing during multielement functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Jennifer L; Iwata, Brian A; Rooker, Griffin W; Fritz, Jennifer N; Bloom, Sarah E

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that a fixed condition sequence might facilitate differential responding during multielement functional analyses (FAs) by capitalizing on or limiting sequence effects (Iwata, Pace, et al., 1994); however, the effects of condition sequence have not been examined empirically. We conducted fixed- and random-sequence FAs for 7 individuals with developmental disabilities to determine the relative effects that sequence may have on assessment outcomes. Experimental conditions during the fixed sequence were conducted in the following order: ignore, attention, play, and demand; condition order during the random sequence was determined randomly. Results showed that sequence had no influence on the FA outcomes for 3 subjects, whereas differential responding emerged either faster (1 subject) or only (3 subjects) under the fixed sequence for the remaining subjects. These results suggest that the fixed sequence, a simple modification, should be used when conducting multielement FAs to accommodate the influence of establishing operations across assessment conditions. PMID:24114082

  12. Multimodal phylogeny for taxonomy: integrating information from nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bicego, Manuele; Dellaglio, Franco; Felis, Giovanna E

    2007-10-01

    The crucial role played by the analysis of microbial diversity in biotechnology-based innovations has increased the interest in the microbial taxonomy research area. Phylogenetic sequence analyses have contributed significantly to the advances in this field, also in the view of the large amount of sequence data collected in recent years. Phylogenetic analyses could be realized on the basis of protein-encoding nucleotide sequences or encoded amino acid molecules: these two mechanisms present different peculiarities, still starting from two alternative representations of the same information. This complementarity could be exploited to achieve a multimodal phylogenetic scheme that is able to integrate gene and protein information in order to realize a single final tree. This aspect has been poorly addressed in the literature. In this paper, we propose to integrate the two phylogenetic analyses using basic schemes derived from the multimodality fusion theory (or multiclassifier systems theory), a well-founded and rigorous branch for which its powerfulness has already been demonstrated in other pattern recognition contexts. The proposed approach could be applied to distance matrix-based phylogenetic techniques (like neighbor joining), resulting in a smart and fast method. The proposed methodology has been tested in a real case involving sequences of some species of lactic acid bacteria. With this dataset, both nucleotide sequence- and amino acid sequence-based phylogenetic analyses present some drawbacks, which are overcome with the multimodal analysis. PMID:17933011

  13. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins: sequence motifs in structural and evolutionary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Solidar, Ada; Yoden, Marilyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are a family of monomeric proteins that bind and transfer phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine between membrane compartments. They are required for production of inositol and diacylglycerol second messengers, and are found in most metazoan organisms. While PITPs are known to carry out crucial cell-signaling roles in many organisms, the structure, function and evolution of the majority of family members remains unexplored; primarily because the ubiquity and diversity of the family thwarts traditional methods of global alignment. To surmount this obstacle, we instead took a novel approach, using MEME and a parsimony-based analysis to create a cladogram of conserved sequence motifs in 56 PITP family proteins from 26 species. In keeping with previous functional annotations, three clades were supported within our evolutionary analysis; two classes of soluble proteins and a class of membrane-associated proteins. By, focusing on conserved regions, the analysis allowed for in depth queries regarding possible functional roles of PITP proteins in both intra- and extra- cellular signaling.

  14. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  15. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  16. Analyses of the Sequence and Structural Properties Corresponding to Pentapeptide and Large Palindromes in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Nagamruta, Mallapragada; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2015-01-01

    The analyses of 3967 representative proteins selected from the Protein Data Bank revealed the presence of 2803 pentapeptide and large palindrome sequences with known secondary structure conformation. These represent 2014 unique palindrome sequences. 60% palindromes are not associated with any regular secondary structure and 28% are in helix conformation, 11% in strand conformation and 1% in the coil conformation. The average solvent accessibility values are in the range between 0-155.28 Å2 suggesting that the palindromes in proteins can be either buried, exposed to the solvent or share an intermittent property. The number of residue neighborhood contacts defined by interactions ≤ 3.2 Ǻ is in the range between 0-29 residues. Palindromes of the same length in helix, strand and coil conformation are associated with different amino acid residue preferences at the individual positions. Nearly, 20% palindromes interact with catalytic/active site residues, ligand or metal ions in proteins and may therefore be important for function in the corresponding protein. The average hydrophobicity values for the pentapeptide and large palindromes range between -4.3 to +4.32 and the number of palindromes is almost equally distributed between the negative and positive hydrophobicity values. The palindromes represent 107 different protein families and the hydrolases, transferases, oxidoreductases and lyases contain relatively large number of palindromes. PMID:26465610

  17. Analyses of the Sequence and Structural Properties Corresponding to Pentapeptide and Large Palindromes in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Settu; Nagamruta, Mallapragada; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2015-01-01

    The analyses of 3967 representative proteins selected from the Protein Data Bank revealed the presence of 2803 pentapeptide and large palindrome sequences with known secondary structure conformation. These represent 2014 unique palindrome sequences. 60% palindromes are not associated with any regular secondary structure and 28% are in helix conformation, 11% in strand conformation and 1% in the coil conformation. The average solvent accessibility values are in the range between 0–155.28 Å2 suggesting that the palindromes in proteins can be either buried, exposed to the solvent or share an intermittent property. The number of residue neighborhood contacts defined by interactions ≤ 3.2 Ǻ is in the range between 0–29 residues. Palindromes of the same length in helix, strand and coil conformation are associated with different amino acid residue preferences at the individual positions. Nearly, 20% palindromes interact with catalytic/active site residues, ligand or metal ions in proteins and may therefore be important for function in the corresponding protein. The average hydrophobicity values for the pentapeptide and large palindromes range between -4.3 to +4.32 and the number of palindromes is almost equally distributed between the negative and positive hydrophobicity values. The palindromes represent 107 different protein families and the hydrolases, transferases, oxidoreductases and lyases contain relatively large number of palindromes. PMID:26465610

  18. Detecting frame shifts by amino acid sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Claverie, J M

    1993-12-20

    Various amino acid substitution scoring matrices are used in conjunction with local alignments programs to detect regions of similarity and infer potential common ancestry between proteins. The usual scoring schemes derive from the implicit hypothesis that related proteins evolve from a common ancestor by the accumulation of point mutations and that amino acids tend to be progressively substituted by others with similar properties. However, other frequent single mutation events, like nucleotide insertion or deletion and gene inversion, change the translation reading frame and cause previously encoded amino acid sequences to become unrecognizable at once. Here, I derive five new types of scoring matrix, each capable of detecting a specific frame shift (deletion, insertion and inversion in 3 frames) and use them with a regular local alignments program to detect amino acid sequences that may have derived from alternative reading frames of the same nucleotide sequence. Frame shifts are inferred from the sole comparison of the protein sequences. The five scoring matrices were used with the BLASTP program to compare all the protein sequences in the Swissprot database. Surprisingly, the searches revealed hundreds of highly significant frame shift matches, of which many are likely to represent sequencing errors. Others provide some evidence that frame shift mutations might be used in protein evolution as a way to create new amino acid sequences from pre-existing coding regions. PMID:7903399

  19. Life in hot acid: pathway analyses in extremely thermoacidophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Cooper, Charlotte R; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaea are a particularly intriguing group of microorganisms that must simultaneously cope with biologically extreme pHs (< or = 4) and temperatures (Topt > or = 60 degrees C) in their natural environments. Their expanding biotechnological significance relates to their role in biomining of base and precious metals and their unique mechanisms of survival in hot acid, at both the cellular and biomolecular levels. Recent developments, such as advances in understanding of heavy metal tolerance mechanisms, implementation of a genetic system, and discovery of a new carbon fixation pathway, have been facilitated by the availability of genome sequence data and molecular genetic systems. As a result, new insights into the metabolic pathways and physiological features that define extreme thermoacidophily have been obtained, in some cases suggesting prospects for biotechnological opportunities. PMID:18760359

  20. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  1. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  2. Use of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons for yeast systematics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection, identification, and classification of yeasts has undergone a major transformation in the past decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined gene sequences from domains 1 and 2 of large sub...

  3. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection, identification, and classification of yeasts has undergone a major transformation in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of th...

  4. Characterization of bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein: sequence, structural, phylogenetic and subcellular localization analyses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kollath-Leiß, Krisztina; Kempken, Frank

    2013-08-30

    The bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein from Neurospora crassa belongs to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Recently, we have reported that the BEM46 protein is localized in the perinuclear ER and also forms spots close by the plasma membrane. The protein appears to be required for cell type-specific polarity formation in N. crassa. Furthermore, initial studies suggested that the BEM46 amino acid sequence is conserved in eukaryotes and is considered to be one of the widespread conserved "known unknown" eukaryotic genes. This warrants for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily to unravel origin and molecular evolution of these genes in different eukaryotes. Herein, we observe that all eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. Upon scanning of these proteins in various genomes, we find that there are expansions leading into several paralogs in vertebrates. Usingcomparative genomic analyses, we identified insertion/deletions (indels) in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein, which allow to differentiate fungal classes such as ascomycetes from basidiomycetes. We also find that exonic indels are able to differentiate BEM46 homologs of different eukaryotic lineage. Furthermore, we unravel that BEM46 protein from N. crassa possess a novel endoplasmic-retention signal (PEKK) using GFP-fusion tagging experiments. We propose that three residues namely a serine 188S, a histidine 292H and an aspartic acid 262D are most critical residues, forming a catalytic triad in BEM46 protein from N. crassa. We carried out a comprehensive study on bem46 genes from a molecular evolution perspective with combination of functional analyses. The evolutionary history of BEM46 proteins is characterized by exonic indels in lineage specific manner. PMID:23916612

  5. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, B; Ozanne, B

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses to examine the arrangement of homologous sequences in BALB/c deoxyribonucleic acid (endogenous Abelson sequences). The endogenous Abelson sequences within the mouse genome were interrupted by noncoding regions, suggesting that a rearrangement of the cell sequences was required to produce the sequence found in the virus. Endogenous Abelson sequences were arranged similarly in mice that were susceptible to A-MuLV tumors and in mice that were resistant to A-MuLV tumors. An examination of three BALB/c plasmacytomas and a BALB/c early B-cell tumor likewise revealed no alteration in the arrangement of the endogenous Abelson sequences. Homology to pSA-17 was also observed in deoxyribonucleic acids prepared from rat, hamster, chicken, and human cells. An isolate of A-MuLV which encoded a 160,000-dalton transforming protein (P160) contained 700 more base pairs of mouse sequences than the standard A-MuLV isolate, which encoded a 120,000-dalton transforming protein (P120). Images PMID:9279386

  6. Quantitative Estimates of Sequence Divergence for Comparative Analyses of Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Gregory M.; Brudno, Michael; Program, NISC Comparative Sequencing; Green, Eric D.; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

    2003-01-01

    Comparative sequence analyses on a collection of carefully chosen mammalian genomes could facilitate identification of functional elements within the human genome and allow quantification of evolutionary constraint at the single nucleotide level. High-resolution quantification would be informative for determining the distribution of important positions within functional elements and for evaluating the relative importance of nucleotide sites that carry single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Because the level of resolution in comparative sequence analyses is a direct function of sequence diversity, we propose that the information content of a candidate mammalian genome be defined as the sequence divergence it would add relative to already-sequenced genomes. We show that reliable estimates of genomic sequence divergence can be obtained from small genomic regions. On the basis of a multiple sequence alignment of ∼1.4 megabases each from eight mammals, we generate such estimates for five unsequenced mammals. Estimates of the neutral divergence in these data suggest that a small number of diverse mammalian genomes in addition to human, mouse, and rat would allow single nucleotide resolution in comparative sequence analyses. [The multiple sequence alignment of the CFTR region and a spreadsheet with the calculations performed, will be available as supplementary information online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12727901

  7. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  8. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  9. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  10. Characterization of bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein: Sequence, structural, phylogenetic and subcellular localization analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kollath-Leiß, Krisztina; Kempken, Frank

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •All eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. •The catalytic triad of BEM46 is illustrated using sequence and structural analysis. •We identified indels in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein. •Localization studies of BEM46 protein were carried out using GFP-fusion tagging. -- Abstract: The bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein from Neurospora crassa belongs to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Recently, we have reported that the BEM46 protein is localized in the perinuclear ER and also forms spots close by the plasma membrane. The protein appears to be required for cell type-specific polarity formation in N. crassa. Furthermore, initial studies suggested that the BEM46 amino acid sequence is conserved in eukaryotes and is considered to be one of the widespread conserved “known unknown” eukaryotic genes. This warrants for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily to unravel origin and molecular evolution of these genes in different eukaryotes. Herein, we observe that all eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. Upon scanning of these proteins in various genomes, we find that there are expansions leading into several paralogs in vertebrates. Usingcomparative genomic analyses, we identified insertion/deletions (indels) in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein, which allow to differentiate fungal classes such as ascomycetes from basidiomycetes. We also find that exonic indels are able to differentiate BEM46 homologs of different eukaryotic lineage. Furthermore, we unravel that BEM46 protein from N. crassa possess a novel endoplasmic-retention signal (PEKK) using GFP-fusion tagging experiments. We propose that three residues namely a serine 188S, a histidine 292H and an aspartic acid 262D are most critical residues, forming a catalytic triad in BEM46 protein from N. crassa. We carried out a comprehensive study on bem46 genes from a molecular evolution perspective with combination of functional

  11. A method to find palindromes in nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Anjana, Ramnath; Shankar, Mani; Vaishnavi, Marthandan Kirti; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Various types of sequences in the human genome are known to play important roles in different aspects of genomic functioning. Among these sequences, palindromic nucleic acid sequences are one such type that have been studied in detail and found to influence a wide variety of genomic characteristics. For a nucleotide sequence to be considered as a palindrome, its complementary strand must read the same in the opposite direction. For example, both the strands i.e the strand going from 5' to 3' and its complementary strand from 3' to 5' must be complementary. A typical nucleotide palindromic sequence would be TATA (5' to 3') and its complimentary sequence from 3' to 5' would be ATAT. Thus, a new method has been developed using dynamic programming to fetch the palindromic nucleic acid sequences. The new method uses less memory and thereby it increases the overall speed and efficiency. The proposed method has been tested using the bacterial (3891 KB bases) and human chromosomal sequences (Chr-18: 74366 kb and Chr-Y: 25554 kb) and the computation time for finding the palindromic sequences is in milli seconds. PMID:23515654

  12. Metagenomic analyses reveal phylogenetic diversity of carboxypeptidase gene sequences in activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hao; Li, Bailin; Peng, Xu; Chen, Lanming

    2014-01-01

    Activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants carries a diverse microflora. However, up to 80-90 % of microorganisms in activated sludge cannot be cultured by current laboratory techniques, leaving an enzyme reservoir largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated carboxypeptidase diversity in activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in Shanghai, China, by a culture-independent metagenomic approach. Three sets of consensus degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers (CODEHOPs) targeting conserved domains of public carboxypeptidases have been designed to amplify carboxypeptidase gene sequences in the metagenomic DNA of activated sludge by PCR. The desired amplicons were evaluated by carboxypeptidase sequence clone libraries and phylogenetic analyses. We uncovered a significant diversity of carboxypeptidases present in the activated sludge. Deduced carboxypeptidase amino acid sequences (127-208 amino acids) were classified into three distinct clusters, α, β, and γ. Sequences belonging to clusters α and β shared 58-97 % identity to known carboxypeptidase sequences from diverse species, whereas sequences in the cluster γ were remarkably less related to public carboxypeptidase homologous in the GenBank database, strongly suggesting that novel carboxypeptidase families or microbial niches exist in the activated sludge. We also observed numerous carboxypeptidase sequences that were much closer to those from representative strains present in industrial and sewage treatment and bioremediation. Thermostable and halotolerant carboxypeptidase sequences were also detected in clusters α and β. Coexistence of various carboxypeptidases is evidence of a diverse microflora in the activated sludge, a feature suggesting a valuable gene resource to be further explored for biotechnology application. PMID:24860282

  13. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    PubMed

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel. PMID:27307442

  14. Amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janet C.; Waley, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the subunits in rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase has been investigated. 2. Amino acid analyses show that there are five cysteine residues and two methionine residues/subunit. 3. The amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues have been determined; these account for about 75 residues. 4. Cleavage at the methionine residues with cyanogen bromide gave three fragments. 5. These results show that the subunits correspond to polypeptide chains, containing about 230 amino acid residues. The chains in triose phosphate isomerase seem to be shorter than those of other glycolytic enzymes. PMID:5165707

  15. Correlation between Serological and Sequencing Analyses of the PorB Outer Membrane Protein in the Neisseria meningitidis Serotyping System

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Claudio T.; Lemos, Ana P. S.; Whitney, Anne M.; Solari, Claude A.; Brandt, Mary E.; Melles, Carmo E. A.; Frasch, Carl E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    1998-01-01

    The current serological typing scheme for Neisseria meningitidis is not comprehensive; a proportion of isolates are not serotypeable. DNA sequence analysis and predicted amino acid sequences were used to characterize the structures of variable-region (VR) epitopes on N. meningitidis PorB proteins (PorB VR typing). Twenty-six porB gene sequences were obtained from GenBank and aligned with 41 new sequences. Primary amino acid structures predicted from those genes were grouped into 30 VR families of related variants that displayed at least 60% similarity. We correlated VR families with monoclonal antibody (MAb) reactivities, establishing a relationship between VR families and epitope locations for 15 serotype-defining MAbs. The current panel of serotype-defining MAbs underestimates by at least 50% the PorB VR variability because reagents for several major VR families are lacking or because a number of VR variants within some families are not recognized by serotype-defining MAbs. These difficulties, also reported for serosubtyping based on the PorA protein, are shown as inconsistent results between serological and sequence analyses, leading to inaccurate strain identification and incomplete epidemiological data. The information from this study enabled the expansion of the panel of MAbs currently available for serotyping, by including MAbs of previously undetermined specificities. Use of the expanded serotype panel enabled us to improve the sensitivity of serotyping by resolving a number of formerly nonserotypeable strains. In most cases, this information can be used to predict the VR family placement of unknown PorB proteins without sequencing the entire porB gene. PorB VR typing complements serotyping, and a combination of both techniques may be used for full characterization of meningococcal strains. The present work represents the most complete and integrated data set of PorB VR sequences and MAb reactivities of serogroup B and C meningococci produced to date. PMID

  16. On Quantum Algorithm for Multiple Alignment of Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriyama, Satoshi; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    The alignment of genome sequences or amino acid sequences is one of fundamental operations for the study of life. Usual computational complexity for the multiple alignment of N sequences with common length L by dynamic programming is O(LN). This alignment is considered as one of the NP problems, so that it is desirable to find a nice algorithm of the multiple alignment. Thus in this paper we propose the quantum algorithm for the multiple alignment based on the works12,1,2 in which the NP complete problem was shown to be the P problem by means of quantum algorithm and chaos information dynamics.

  17. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  18. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  19. Comparative Sequence Analyses of La Crosse Virus Strain Isolated from Patient with Fatal Encephalitis, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Freyman, Kimberly; Ulloa, Armando; Velez, Jason O.; Paulsen, Dave; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized a La Crosse virus (LACV) isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee, USA, during summer 2012. We compared the isolate with LACV sequences from mosquitoes collected near the child’s home just after his postmortem diagnosis. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of these and other sequences derived from LACV strains representing varied temporal, geographic, and ecologic origins. Consistent with historical findings, results of these analyses indicate that a limited range of LACV lineage I genotypes is associated with severe clinical outcomes. PMID:25898269

  20. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  1. Amino acid analyses of R and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; McLain, Hannah; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Davidson, Jemma; Miller, Kelly E.; Andronikov, Alexander V.; Lauretta, Dante; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous delivery of amino acids and other organic molecules to planetary surfaces may have played an important role in the origins of life on Earth and other solar system bodies. Previous studies have revealed the presence of indigenous amino acids in a wide range of carbon-rich meteorites, with the abundances and structural distributions differing significantly depending on parent body mineralogy and alteration conditions. Here we report on the amino acid abundances of seven type 3-6 CK chondrites and two Rumuruti (R) chondrites. Amino acid measurements were made on hot water extracts from these meteorites by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the nine meteorites analyzed, four were depleted in amino acids, and one had experienced significant amino acid contamination by terrestrial biology. The remaining four, comprised of two R and two CK chondrites, contained low levels of amino acids that were predominantly the straight chain, amino-terminal (n-ω-amino) acids β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. This amino acid distribution is similar to what we reported previously for thermally altered ureilites and CV and CO chondrites, and these n-ω-amino acids appear to be indigenous to the meteorites and not the result of terrestrial contamination. The amino acids may have been formed by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, although this hypothesis needs further testing.

  2. Gene sequence analyses and other DNA-based methods for yeast species recognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analyses, as well as other DNA-based methodologies, have transformed the way in which yeasts are identified. The focus of this chapter will be on the resolution of species using various types of DNA comparisons. In other chapters in this book, Rozpedowska, Piškur and Wolfe discuss mul...

  3. Amino acid sequence of Salmonella typhimurium branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Feild, M J; Nguyen, D C; Armstrong, F B

    1989-06-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B, EC 2.6.1.42) of Salmonella typhimurium was determined. An Escherichia coli recombinant containing the ilvGEDAY gene cluster of Salmonella was used as the source of the hexameric enzyme. The peptide fragments used for sequencing were generated by treatment with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme subunit contains 308 residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920. To determine the coenzyme-binding site, the pyridoxal 5-phosphate containing enzyme was treated with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest and monitoring radioactivity incorporation allowed identification of the pyridoxylated peptide, which was then isolated and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is the lysyl residue at position 159. The amino acid sequence of Salmonella transaminase B is 97.4% identical with that of Escherichia coli, differing in only eight amino acid positions. Sequence comparisons of transaminase B to other known aminotransferase sequences revealed limited sequence similarity (24-33%) when conserved amino acid substitutions are allowed and alignments were forced to occur on the coenzyme-binding site. PMID:2669973

  4. GBSA: a comprehensive software for analysing whole genome bisulfite sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Benoukraf, Touati; Wongphayak, Sarawut; Hadi, Luqman Hakim Abdul; Wu, Mengchu; Soong, Richie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is increasingly being used in combination with bisulfite (BS) assays to study DNA methylation at nucleotide resolution. Although several programmes provide genome-wide alignment of BS-treated reads, the resulting information is not readily interpretable and often requires further bioinformatic steps for meaningful analysis. Current post-alignment BS-sequencing programmes are generally focused on the gene-specific level, a restrictive feature when analysis in the non-coding regions, such as enhancers and intergenic microRNAs, is required. Here, we present Genome Bisulfite Sequencing Analyser (GBSA—http://ctrad-csi.nus.edu.sg/gbsa), a free open-source software capable of analysing whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with either a gene-centric or gene-independent focus. Through analysis of the largest published data sets to date, we demonstrate GBSA’s features in providing sequencing quality assessment, methylation scoring, functional data management and visualization of genomic methylation at nucleotide resolution. Additionally, we show that GBSA’s output can be easily integrated with other high-throughput sequencing data, such as RNA-Seq or ChIP-seq, to elucidate the role of methylated intergenic regions in gene regulation. In essence, GBSA allows an investigator to explore not only known loci but also all the genomic regions, for which methylation studies could lead to the discovery of new regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23268441

  5. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24462600

  6. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences. PMID:18397498

  7. Amino acid sequence of bovine heart coupling factor 6.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J K; Jacobs, J W; Kanner, B I; Racker, E; Bradshaw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine heart mitochondrial coupling factor 6 (F6) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and derived peptides. Preparations based on heat precipitation and ethanol extraction showed allotypic variation at three positions while material further purified by HPLC yielded only one sequence that also differed by a Phe-Thr replacement at residue 62. The mature protein contains 76 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 9006 and a pI of approximately equal to 5, in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The charged amino acids are mainly clustered at the termini and in one section in the middle; these three polar segments are separated by two segments relatively rich in nonpolar residues. Chou-Fasman analysis suggests three stretches of alpha-helix coinciding (or within) the high-charge-density sequences with a single beta-turn at the first polar-nonpolar junction. Comparison of the F6 sequence with those of other proteins did not reveal any homologous structures. PMID:6149548

  8. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  9. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  10. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  11. Identification of a Herbal Powder by Deoxyribonucleic Acid Barcoding and Structural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Bhavisha P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Authentic identification of plants is essential for exploiting their medicinal properties as well as to stop the adulteration and malpractices with the trade of the same. Objective: To identify a herbal powder obtained from a herbalist in the local vicinity of Rajkot, Gujarat, using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding and molecular tools. Materials and Methods: The DNA was extracted from a herbal powder and selected Cassia species, followed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the rbcL barcode locus. Thereafter the sequences were subjected to National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis, followed by the protein three-dimension structure determination of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder and Cassia species namely Cassia fistula, Cassia tora and Cassia javanica (sequences obtained in the present study), Cassia Roxburghii, and Cassia abbreviata (sequences retrieved from Genbank). Further, the multiple and pairwise structural alignment were carried out in order to identify the herbal powder. Results: The nucleotide sequences obtained from the selected species of Cassia were submitted to Genbank (Accession No. JX141397, JX141405, JX141420). The NCBI BLAST analysis of the rbcL protein from the herbal powder showed an equal sequence similarity (with reference to different parameters like E value, maximum identity, total score, query coverage) to C. javanica and C. roxburghii. In order to solve the ambiguities of the BLAST result, a protein structural approach was implemented. The protein homology models obtained in the present study were submitted to the protein model database (PM0079748-PM0079753). The pairwise structural alignment of the herbal powder (as template) and C. javanica and C. roxburghii (as targets individually) revealed a close similarity of the herbal powder with C. javanica. Conclusion: A strategy as used here, incorporating the integrated use of DNA

  12. Genome sequencing elucidates Sardinian genetic architecture and augments association analyses for lipid and blood inflammatory markers

    PubMed Central

    Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Mulas, Antonella; Pistis, Giorgio; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Kwong, Alan; Ortega del Vecchyo, Vicente Diego; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Pitzalis, Maristella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Tarrier, Brendan; Brennan, Christine; Uzzau, Sergio; Fuchsberger, Christian; Atzeni, Rossano; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Huang, Jie; Timpson, Nicholas J; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo; Malerba, Giovanni; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Soranzo, Nicole; Jones, Chris; Lyons, Robert; Angius, Andrea; Kang, Hyun M.; Novembre, John; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-01-01

    We report ~17.6M genetic variants from whole-genome sequencing of 2,120 Sardinians; 22% are absent from prior sequencing-based compilations and enriched for predicted functional consequence. Furthermore, ~76K variants common in our sample (frequency >5%) are rare elsewhere (<0.5% in the 1000 Genomes Project). We assessed the impact of these variants on circulating lipid levels and five inflammatory biomarkers. Fourteen signals, including two major new loci, were observed for lipid levels, and 19, including two novel loci, for inflammatory markers. New associations would be missed in analyses based on 1000 Genomes data, underlining the advantages of large-scale sequencing in this founder population. PMID:26366554

  13. Genome sequencing elucidates Sardinian genetic architecture and augments association analyses for lipid and blood inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Sidore, Carlo; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Porcu, Eleonora; Naitza, Silvia; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Mulas, Antonella; Pistis, Giorgio; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Kwong, Alan; Ortega Del Vecchyo, Vicente Diego; Chiang, Charleston W K; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Pitzalis, Maristella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Tarrier, Brendan; Brennan, Christine; Uzzau, Sergio; Fuchsberger, Christian; Atzeni, Rossano; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Huang, Jie; Timpson, Nicholas J; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo; Malerba, Giovanni; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Soranzo, Nicole; Jones, Chris; Lyons, Robert; Angius, Andrea; Kang, Hyun M; Novembre, John; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-11-01

    We report ∼17.6 million genetic variants from whole-genome sequencing of 2,120 Sardinians; 22% are absent from previous sequencing-based compilations and are enriched for predicted functional consequences. Furthermore, ∼76,000 variants common in our sample (frequency >5%) are rare elsewhere (<0.5% in the 1000 Genomes Project). We assessed the impact of these variants on circulating lipid levels and five inflammatory biomarkers. We observe 14 signals, including 2 major new loci, for lipid levels and 19 signals, including 2 new loci, for inflammatory markers. The new associations would have been missed in analyses based on 1000 Genomes Project data, underlining the advantages of large-scale sequencing in this founder population. PMID:26366554

  14. Power Spectrum and Mutual Information Analyses of DNA Base (Nucleotide) Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isohata, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Masaki

    2003-03-01

    On the basis of the power spectrum analyses for the base (nucleotide) sequences of various genes, we have studied long-range correlations in total base sequences which are expressed as 1/fα, behaviour of the exponent α for the accumulated base sequences as well as periodicities at short range. In particular from the analysis of content rate distributions of α we have obtained the average value \\barα=0.40± 0.01 and \\barα=0.20± 0.01 for the human genes and S. cerevisiae genes, respectively. We have also performed the analyses using the mutual information function. We show that there exists a clear difference between the content rate distributions of correlation lengths for the sample human genes and the S. cerevisiae genes. We are led to a conjecture that the elongation of the correlation length in the base sequences of genes from the early eukaryote (S. cerevisiae) to the late eukaryote (human) should be the definite reflection of the evolutionary process.

  15. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  16. Correlation between fibroin amino acid sequence and physical silk properties.

    PubMed

    Fedic, Robert; Zurovec, Michal; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2003-09-12

    The fiber properties of lepidopteran silk depend on the amino acid repeats that interact during H-fibroin polymerization. The aim of our research was to relate repeat composition to insect biology and fiber strength. Representative regions of the H-fibroin genes were sequenced and analyzed in three pyralid species: wax moth (Galleria mellonella), European flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella), and Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella). The amino acid repeats are species-specific, evidently a diversification of an ancestral region of 43 residues, and include three types of regularly dispersed motifs: modifications of GSSAASAA sequence, stretches of tripeptides GXZ where X and Z represent bulky residues, and sequences similar to PVIVIEE. No concatenations of GX dipeptide or alanine, which are typical for Bombyx silkworms and Antheraea silk moths, respectively, were found. Despite different repeat structure, the silks of G. mellonella and E. kuehniella exhibit similar tensile strength as the Bombyx and Antheraea silks. We suggest that in these latter two species, variations in the repeat length obstruct repeat alignment, but sufficiently long stretches of iterated residues get superposed to interact. In the pyralid H-fibroins, interactions of the widely separated and diverse motifs depend on the precision of repeat matching; silk is strong in G. mellonella and E. kuehniella, with 2-3 types of long homogeneous repeats, and nearly 10 times weaker in P. interpunctella, with seven types of shorter erratic repeats. The high proportion of large amino acids in the H-fibroin of pyralids has probably evolved in connection with the spinning habit of caterpillars that live in protective silk tubes and spin continuously, enlarging the tubes on one end and partly devouring the other one. The silk serves as a depot of energetically rich and essential amino acids that may be scarce in the diet. PMID:12816957

  17. A Weighted U Statistic for Genetic Association Analyses of Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Changshuai; Li, Ming; He, Zihuai; Vsevolozhskaya, Olga; Schaid, Daniel J.; Lu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    With advancements in next generation sequencing technology, a massive amount of sequencing data are generated, which offers a great opportunity to comprehensively investigate the role of rare variants in the genetic etiology of complex diseases. Nevertheless, the high-dimensional sequencing data poses a great challenge for statistical analysis. The association analyses based on traditional statistical methods suffer substantial power loss because of the low frequency of genetic variants and the extremely high dimensionality of the data. We developed a weighted U statistic, referred to as WU-SEQ, for the high-dimensional association analysis of sequencing data. Based on a non-parametric U statistic, WU-SEQ makes no assumption of the underlying disease model and phenotype distribution, and can be applied to a variety of phenotypes. Through simulation studies and an empirical study, we showed that WU-SEQ outperformed a commonly used SKAT method when the underlying assumptions were violated (e.g., the phenotype followed a heavy-tailed distribution). Even when the assumptions were satisfied, WU-SEQ still attained comparable performance to SKAT. Finally, we applied WU-SEQ to sequencing data from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), and detected an association between ANGPTL 4 and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25331574

  18. Amino acid sequence of the nonsecretory ribonuclease of human urine.

    PubMed

    Beintema, J J; Hofsteenge, J; Iwama, M; Morita, T; Ohgi, K; Irie, M; Sugiyama, R H; Schieven, G L; Dekker, C A; Glitz, D G

    1988-06-14

    The amino acid sequence of a nonsecretory ribonuclease isolated from human urine was determined except for the identity of the residue at position 7. Sequence information indicates that the ribonucleases of human liver and spleen and an eosinophil-derived neurotoxin are identical or very closely related gene products. The sequence is identical at about 30% of the amino acid positions with those of all of the secreted mammalian ribonucleases for which information is available. Identical residues include active-site residues histidine-12, histidine-119, and lysine-41, other residues known to be important for substrate binding and catalytic activity, and all eight half-cystine residues common to these enzymes. Major differences include a deletion of six residues in the (so-called) S-peptide loop, insertions of two, and nine residues, respectively, in three other external loops of the molecule, and an addition of three residues at the amino terminus. The sequence shows the human nonsecretory ribonuclease to belong to the same ribonuclease superfamily as the mammalian secretory ribonucleases, turtle pancreatic ribonuclease, and human angiogenin. Sequence data suggest that a gene duplication occurred in an ancient vertebrate ancestor; one branch led to the nonsecretory ribonuclease, while the other branch led to a second duplication, with one line leading to the secretory ribonucleases (in mammals) and the second line leading to pancreatic ribonuclease in turtle and an angiogenic factor in mammals (human angiogenin). The nonsecretory ribonuclease has five short carbohydrate chains attached via asparagine residues at the surface of the molecule; these chains may have been shortened by exoglycosidase action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3166997

  19. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  20. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  1. The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Corran, P H; Waley, S G

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase was deduced by characterizing peptides that overlap the tryptic peptides. Thiol groups were modified by oxidation, carboxymethylation or aminoen. About 50 peptides that provided information about overlaps were isolated; the peptides were mostly characterized by their compositions and N-terminal residues. The peptide chains contain 248 amino acid residues, and no evidence for dissimilarity of the two subunits that comprise the native enzyme was found. The sequence of the rabbit muscle enzyme may be compared with that of the coelacanth enzyme (Kolb et al., 1974): 84% of the residues are in identical positions. Similarly, comparison of the sequence with that inferred for the chicken enzyme (Furth et al., 1974) shows that 87% of the residues are in identical positions. Limited though these comparisons are, they suggest that triose phosphate isomerase has one of the lowest rates of evolutionary change. An extended version of the present paper has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50040 (42 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division) (formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1171682

  2. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  3. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-01-01

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  4. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-02-15

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  5. Sequence and expression analyses of the UL37 and UL38 genes of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Braun, A; Kaliman, A; Boldogköi, Z; Aszódi, A; Fodor, I

    2000-01-01

    Previously, we sequenced the HSV-1 Ul39-Ul40 homologue genes of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), also designated as pseudorabies virus (Kaliman et al., 1994a, b). Now we report the nucleotide sequence of the adjacent DNA that encodes Ul38, the 5'-region (750 bp) of Ul37, and the promoter regions between these divergently arranged two genes. The ADV Ul38 gene encodes a protein of 368 amino acids. Amino acid sequence comparison of ADV Ul38 with that of other herpesviruses revealed significant structural homology. In a transcription study using RNase protection assay and Northern blot hybridization, we found that the Ul38 gene had one initiation site, but the Ul37 gene was initiated at two transcription sites with two potential initiator AUGs, one of which was dominant. Comparison of ADV Ul37, Ul38 and ribonucleotide reductase gene expression showed that these genes belong to the same temporal class with early kinetics. Data of structural and transcriptional studies suggest that regulation of the expression of these two ADV genes could differ from that of the HSV-1 virus. PMID:11402671

  6. Phylogenetic Analyses of Novel Squamate Adenovirus Sequences in Wild-Caught Anolis Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Jill M.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Glor, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity. PMID:23593364

  7. Comparative sequence and genetic analyses of asparagus BACs reveal no microsynteny with onion or rice.

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Telgmann, Alexa; Jung, Christian; Khar, Anil; Melgar, Sergio; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Havey, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The Poales (includes the grasses) and Asparagales [includes onion (Allium cepa L.) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)] are the two most economically important monocot orders. The Poales are a member of the commelinoid monocots, a group of orders sister to the Asparagales. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed a high degree of synteny among the grasses; however, it is not known if this synteny extends to other major monocot groups such as the Asparagales. Although we previously reported no evidence for synteny at the recombinational level between onion and rice, microsynteny may exist across shorter genomic regions in the grasses and Asparagales. We sequenced nine asparagus BACs to reveal physically linked genic-like sequences and determined their most similar positions in the onion and rice genomes. Four of the asparagus BACs were selected using molecular markers tightly linked to the sex-determining M locus on chromosome 5 of asparagus. These BACs possessed only two putative coding regions and had long tracts of degenerated retroviral elements and transposons. Five asparagus BACs were selected after hybridization of three onion cDNAs that mapped to three different onion chromosomes. Genic-like sequences that were physically linked on the cDNA-selected BACs or genetically linked on the M-linked BACs showed significant similarities (e < -20) to expressed sequences on different rice chromosomes, revealing no evidence for microsynteny between asparagus and rice across these regions. Genic-like sequences that were linked in asparagus were used to identify highly similar (e < -20) expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of onion. These onion ESTs mapped to different onion chromosomes and no relationship was observed between physical or genetic linkages in asparagus and genetic linkages in onion. These results further indicate that synteny among grass genomes does not extend to a sister order in the monocots and that asparagus may not be an appropriate smaller genome

  8. Amino acid sequence prerequisites for the formation of cn ions.

    PubMed

    Downard, K M; Biemann, K

    1993-11-01

    Ammo acid sequence prerequisites are described for the formation of c, ions observed in high-energy collision-induced decomposition spectra of peptides. It is shown that the formation of cn ions is promoted by the nature of the amino acid C-terminal to the cleavage site. A propensity for cn cleavage preceding threonine, and to a lesser extent tryptophan, lysine, and serine, is demonstrated where fragmentation is directed N-terminally at these residues. In addition, the nature of the residue N-terminal to the cleavage site is shown to have little effect on cn ion formation. A mechanism for cn ion formation is proposed and its applicability to the results observed is discussed. PMID:24227531

  9. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  10. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  11. The amino acid sequence of ribonuclease U2 from Ustilago sphaerogena.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, S; Uchida, T

    1975-01-01

    1. RNAase (ribonuclease) U2, a purine-specific RNAase, was reduced, aminoethylated and hydrolysed with trypsin, chymotrypsin and thermolysin. On the basis of the analyses of the resulting peptides, the complete amino acid sequence of RNAase U2 was determined, 2. When the sequence was compared with the amino acid sequence of RNAase T1 (EC 3.1.4.8), the following regions were found to be similar in the two enzymes; Tyr-Pro-His-Gln-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase U2 and Tyr-Pro-His-Lys-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase T1, Glu-Phe-Pro-Leu-Val (61-65) in RNAase U2 and Glu-Trp-Pro-Ile-Leu (58-62) in RNAase T1, Asp-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr-Gln (83-88) in RNAase U2 and Asp-Arg-Val-Phe-Asn (76-81) in RNAase T1 and Val-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (98-103) in RNAase U2 and Ile-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (90-95) in RNAase T1. All of the amino acid residues, histidine-40, glutamate-58, arginine-77 and histidine-92, which were found to play a crucial role in the biological activity of RNAase T1, were included in the regions cited here. 3. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the sequence of the proteins has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50041 (33 PAGES) AT THE British Library (Lending Division)(formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1975), 145, 5. PMID:1156364

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  13. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses. PMID:26673876

  14. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses. PMID:26673876

  15. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  16. Phylogeny of yeasts and related filamentous fungi within Pucciniomycotina determined from multigene sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.-M.; Groenewald, M.; Takashima, M.; Theelen, B.; Han, P.-J.; Liu, X.-Z.; Boekhout, T.; Bai, F.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to rusts, the subphylum Pucciniomycotina (Basidiomycota) includes a large number of unicellular or dimorphic fungi which are usually studied as yeasts. Ribosomal DNA sequence analyses have shown that the current taxonomic system of the pucciniomycetous yeasts which is based on phenotypic criteria is not concordant with the molecular phylogeny and many genera are polyphyletic. Here we inferred the molecular phylogeny of 184 pucciniomycetous yeast species and related filamentous fungi using maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analyses based on the sequences of seven genes, including the small subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the large subunit rDNA D1/D2 domains, the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 2) of rDNA including the 5.8S rDNA gene; the nuclear protein-coding genes of the two subunits of DNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2) and the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1); and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (CYTB). A total of 33 monophyletic clades and 18 single species lineages were recognised among the pucciniomycetous yeasts employed, which belonged to four major lineages corresponding to Agaricostilbomycetes, Cystobasidiomycetes, Microbotryomycetes and Mixiomycetes. These lineages remained independent from the classes Atractiellomycetes, Classiculomycetes, Pucciniomycetes and Tritirachiomycetes formed by filamentous taxa in Pucciniomycotina. An updated taxonomic system of pucciniomycetous yeasts implementing the ‘One fungus = One name’ principle will be proposed based on the phylogenetic framework presented here. PMID:26955197

  17. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences of eyelid geckos (Squamata: Eublepharidae).

    PubMed

    Jonniaux, Pierre; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2008-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of approximately 2.3 kbp including the complete NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene and its flanking genes, as well as parts of 12S and 16S rRNA genes were determined from major species of the eyelid gecko family Eublepharidae sensu [Kluge, A.G. 1987. Cladistic relationships in the Gekkonoidea (Squamata, Sauria). Misc. Publ. Mus. Zool. Univ. Michigan 173, 1-54.]. In contrast to previous morphological studies, phylogenetic analyses based on these sequences supported that Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae form a sister group with Pygopodidae, raising the possibility of homoplasious character change in some key features of geckos, such as reduction of movable eyelids and innovation of climbing toe pads. The phylogenetic analyses also provided a well-resolved tree for relationships between the eublepharid species. The Bayesian estimation of divergence times without assuming the molecular clock suggested the Jurassic divergence of Eublepharidae from Gekkonidae and radiations of most eublepharid genera around the Cretaceous. These dating results appeared to be robust against some conditional changes for time estimation, such as gene regions used, taxon representation, and data partitioning. Taken together with geological evidence, these results support the vicariant divergence of Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae by the breakup of Pangea into Laurasia and Gondwanaland, and recent dispersal of two African eublepharid genera from Eurasia to Africa after these landmasses were connected in the Early Miocene. PMID:18029117

  18. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. PMID:26051959

  19. cDNA sequence and protein bioinformatics analyses of MSTN in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Kanjanaworakul, Poonmanee; Sawatdichaikul, Orathai; Poompuang, Supawadee

    2016-04-01

    Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor 8, has been identified as a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. The purpose of this study was to characterize and predict function of the myostatin gene of the African catfish (Cg-MSTN). Expression of Cg-MSTN was determined at three growth stages to establish the relationship between the levels of MSTN transcript and skeletal muscle growth. The partial cDNA sequence of Cg-MSTN was cloned by using published information from its congener walking catfish (Cm-MSTN). The Cg-MSTN was 1194 bp in length encoding a protein of 397 amino acids. The deduced MSTN sequence exhibited key functional sites similar to those of other members of the TGF-β superfamily, especially, the proteolytic processing site (RXXR motif) and nine conserved cysteines at the C-terminal. Expression of MSTN appeared to be correlated with muscle development and growth of African catfish. Protein bioinformatics revealed that the primary sequence of Cg-MSTN shared 98 % sequence identity with that of walking catfish Cm-MSTN with only two different residues, [Formula: see text]. and [Formula: see text]. The proposed model of Cg-MSTN revealed the key point mutation [Formula: see text] causing a 7.35 Å shorter distance between the N- and C-lobes and an approximately 11° narrow angle than those of Cm-MSTN. The substitution of a proline residue near the proteolytic processing site which altered the structure of myostatin may play a critical role in reducing proteolytic activity of this protein in African catfish. PMID:26912268

  20. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above. PMID:23092848

  1. Fatty acid analyses may provide insight into the progression of starvation among squamate reptiles.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D

    2008-10-01

    Fasting-induced changes in fatty acid composition have been reported to occur within the body lipids of several types of animals; however, little is known about the changes in fatty acid profiles exhibited by reptiles subjected to prolonged fasting. This study characterizes the fatty acid profiles of six reptile species subjected to sublethal periods of fasting lasting 0, 56, 112, and 168 days. Analyses of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) conducted on the total body lipids of rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox), ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta), pythons (Python regius), boas (Boa constrictor), true vipers (Bitis gabonica), and monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus) revealed that all of the species exhibited similar characteristic changes in their fatty acid profiles during starvation stress. According to ANOVAs, the four most effective indicators of the onset of starvation were significant increases in the [1] fatty acid unsaturation index as well as ratios of [2] linoleic to palmitoleic acid, [3] oleic to palmitic, and [4] arachidonic to total fatty acid concentrations. The results of this study suggest that FAME analyses might be useful for identifying nutritional stress and/or starvation among squamate reptiles; however, forthcoming studies will be required to validate the generality of these responses. I also review the potential limitations of this approach, and suggest experiments that will be important for future applications of FAME analyses. Ultimately, it is hoped that FAME analyses can be used in conjunction with current practices as an additional tool to characterize the prevalence of starvation experienced by free-living reptiles. PMID:18657629

  2. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  3. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  4. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  5. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  6. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  7. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed. PMID:8177172

  8. Merging Fargesia dracocephala into Fargesia decurvata (Bambusoideae, Poaceae): Implications from Morphological and ITS Sequence Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A-Li; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Aims Fargesia decurvata is closely allied with F. dracocephala and differs in 5 major characters (i.e. the culm sheath blade base shape, the width of the culm sheath blade base, the auricle shape, and the lower surface of leaf blade) in Fargesia. It is difficult to distinguish these two species because of existing of transitional statements of characters. The aims of this paper are to (i) investigate whether the variation of the characters is continuous or not; (ii) reveal whether the publishment of F. dracocephala was the result of discontinuous sampling of F. decurvata or not. Methods Ten populations of F. decurvata and F. dracocephala were investigated in their entire distribution (including type localities). The statements of 5 major characters were measured from 693 annual and 693 perennial culms of 231 individuals in 10 populations, and analyzed at population, individual and culm levels. UPGMA cluster analysis was carried out based on 29 characters from 10 populations of F. decurvata and F. dracocephala and 2 populations of F. qinlingensis as outgroup. The ITS sequences were also sequenced and analyzed. Important Findings Five major characters exhibited great variation not only at population level, but at individual level within a population, even the culm level within an individual and in different parts of the same culm. Cluster analyses showed that 10 populations of F. decurvata and F. dracocephala were not divided into two species, but they were well separated with outgroup. There was no difference in floral organ between F. decurvata and F. dracocephala. MP and NJ trees based on ITS sequences showed the same results with the cluster analysis on morphological characters. All the facts indicated that the publishment of F. dracocephala was the result of discontinuous sampling of F. decurvata, and F. dracocephala should be treated as the synonym of F. decurvata. PMID:24988081

  9. Insight in Genome-Wide Association of Metabolite Quantitative Traits by Exome Sequence Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Aswin; Dharuri, Harish; Amin, Najaf; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Karssen, Lennart C.; de Vries, Boukje; Meissner, Axel; Göraler, Sibel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Deelder, André M.; C ’t Hoen, Peter A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite quantitative traits carry great promise for epidemiological studies, and their genetic background has been addressed using Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Thus far, the role of less common variants has not been exhaustively studied. Here, we set out a GWAS for metabolite quantitative traits in serum, followed by exome sequence analysis to zoom in on putative causal variants in the associated genes. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy experiments yielded successful quantification of 42 unique metabolites in 2,482 individuals from The Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF) study. Heritability of metabolites were estimated by SOLAR. GWAS was performed by linear mixed models, using HapMap imputations. Based on physical vicinity and pathway analyses, candidate genes were screened for coding region variation using exome sequence data. Heritability estimates for metabolites ranged between 10% and 52%. GWAS replicated three known loci in the metabolome wide significance: CPS1 with glycine (P-value  = 1.27×10−32), PRODH with proline (P-value  = 1.11×10−19), SLC16A9 with carnitine level (P-value  = 4.81×10−14) and uncovered a novel association between DMGDH and dimethyl-glycine (P-value  = 1.65×10−19) level. In addition, we found three novel, suggestively significant loci: TNP1 with pyruvate (P-value  = 1.26×10−8), KCNJ16 with 3-hydroxybutyrate (P-value  = 1.65×10−8) and 2p12 locus with valine (P-value  = 3.49×10−8). Exome sequence analysis identified potentially causal coding and regulatory variants located in the genes CPS1, KCNJ2 and PRODH, and revealed allelic heterogeneity for CPS1 and PRODH. Combined GWAS and exome analyses of metabolites detected by high-resolution 1H-NMR is a robust approach to uncover metabolite quantitative trait loci (mQTL), and the likely causative variants in these loci. It is anticipated that insight in the genetics of intermediate phenotypes will provide additional

  10. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, J; Yamamoto, S; Morihara, K; Atsumi, Y; Takeuchi, H; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The DNA encoding the elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited high levels of both elastase activity and elastase antigens. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature elastase consisted of 301 amino acids with a relative molecular mass of 32,926 daltons. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was quite similar to the chemically determined composition of purified elastase reported previously. We also observed nucleotide sequence encoding a signal peptide and "pro" sequence consisting of 197 amino acids upstream from the mature elastase protein gene. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that both the N-terminal sequence of the purified elastase and the N-terminal side sequences of the C-terminal tryptic peptide as well as the internal lysyl peptide fragment were completely identical to the deduced amino acid sequences. The pattern of identity of amino acid sequences was quite evident in the regions that include structurally and functionally important residues of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin. PMID:2493453

  11. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  12. The Mitochondrial Genomes of Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus (Aves, Accipitriformes): Sequence, Structure and Phylogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Ping; Ren, Qiongqiong; Yuan, Jian; Qian, Chaoju; Hua, Xinghong; Guo, Zhichun; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jianke; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Hengwu; Bi, De; Zhang, Zongmeng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Dongsheng; Kan, Xianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The family Accipitridae is one of the largest groups of non-passerine birds, including 68 genera and 243 species globally distributed. In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial sequences of two species of accipitrid, namely Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus, and conducted a comparative mitogenome analysis across the family. The mitogenome length of A. fasciata and B. lagopus are 18,513 and 18,559 bp with an A + T content of 54.2% and 55.0%, respectively. For both the two accipitrid birds mtDNAs, obvious positive AT-skew and negative GC-skew biases were detected for all 12 PCGs encoded by the H strand, whereas the reverse was found in MT-ND6 encoded by the L strand. One extra nucleotide‘C’is present at the position 174 of MT-ND3 gene of A. fasciata, which is not observed at that of B. lagopus. Six conserved sequence boxes in the Domain II, named boxes F, E, D, C, CSBa, and CSBb, respectively, were recognized in the CRs of A. fasciata and B. lagopus. Rates and patterns of mitochondrial gene evolution within Accipitridae were also estimated. The highest dN/dS was detected for the MT-ATP8 gene (0.32493) among Accipitridae, while the lowest for the MT-CO1 gene (0.01415). Mitophylogenetic analysis supported the robust monophyly of Accipitriformes, and Cathartidae was basal to the balance of the order. Moreover, we performed phylogenetic analyses using two other data sets (two mitochondrial loci, and combined nuclear and mitochondrial loci). Our results indicate that the subfamily Aquilinae and all currently polytypic genera of this subfamily are monophyletic. These two novel mtDNA data will be useful in refining the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary processes of Accipitriformes. PMID:26295156

  13. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  14. Specific catalysis of asparaginyl deamidation by carboxylic acids: kinetic, thermodynamic, and quantitative structure-property relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian D; Tran, Benjamin; Moore, Jamie M R; Sharma, Vikas K; Kosky, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Asparaginyl (Asn) deamidation could lead to altered potency, safety, and/or pharmacokinetics of therapeutic protein drugs. In this study, we investigated the effects of several different carboxylic acids on Asn deamidation rates using an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb1*) and a model hexapeptide (peptide1) with the sequence YGKNGG. Thermodynamic analyses of the kinetics data revealed that higher deamidation rates are associated with predominantly more negative ΔS and, to a lesser extent, more positive ΔH. The observed differences in deamidation rates were attributed to the unique ability of each type of carboxylic acid to stabilize the energetically unfavorable transition-state conformations required for imide formation. Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) analysis using kinetic data demonstrated that molecular descriptors encoding for the geometric spatial distribution of atomic properties on various carboxylic acids are effective determinants for the deamidation reaction. Specifically, the number of O-O and O-H atom pairs on carboxyl and hydroxyl groups with interatomic distances of 4-5 Å on a carboxylic acid buffer appears to determine the rate of deamidation. Collectively, the results from structural and thermodynamic analyses indicate that carboxylic acids presumably form multiple hydrogen bonds and charge-charge interactions with the relevant deamidation site and provide alignment between the reactive atoms on the side chain and backbone. We propose that carboxylic acids catalyze deamidation by stabilizing a specific, energetically unfavorable transition-state conformation of l-asparaginyl intermediate II that readily facilitates bond formation between the γ-carbonyl carbon and the deprotonated backbone nitrogen for cyclic imide formation. PMID:24620787

  15. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Phylogenetic Analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Ocean▿

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nurul Huda; Ahsan, Mahbuba; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Hosoya, Shoichi; Yokota, Akira; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Recent isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from the open ocean and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses indicate that these strains have a unique genotype (N. H. Khan, Y. Ishii, N. Kimata-Kino, H. Esaki, T. Nishino, M. Nishimura, and K. Kogure, Microb. Ecol. 53:173-186, 2007). We hypothesized that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have a unique phylogenetic position relative to other strains. The objective of this study was to clarify the intraspecies phylogenetic relationship between marine strains and other strains from various geographical locations. Considering the advantages of using databases, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was chosen for the typing and discrimination of ocean P. aeruginosa strains. Seven housekeeping genes (acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA, and trpE) were analyzed, and the results were compared with data on the MLST website. These genes were also used for phylogenetic analysis of P. aeruginosa. Rooted and unrooted phylogenetic trees were generated for each gene locus and the concatenated gene fragments. MLST data showed that all the ocean strains were new. Trees constructed for individual and concatenated genes revealed that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have clusters distinct from those of other P. aeruginosa strains. These clusters roughly reflected the geographical locations of the isolates. These data support our previous findings that P. aeruginosa strains are present in the ocean. It can be concluded that the ocean P. aeruginosa strains have diverged from other isolates and form a distinct cluster based on MLST and phylogenetic analyses of seven housekeeping genes. PMID:18757570

  16. Phylogeny of tremellomycetous yeasts and related dimorphic and filamentous basidiomycetes reconstructed from multiple gene sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.-Z.; Wang, Q.-M.; Theelen, B.; Groenewald, M.; Bai, F.-Y.; Boekhout, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Tremellomycetes (Basidiomycota) contains a large number of unicellular and dimorphic fungi with stable free-living unicellular states in their life cycles. These fungi have been conventionally classified as basidiomycetous yeasts based on physiological and biochemical characteristics. Many currently recognised genera of these yeasts are mainly defined based on phenotypical characters and are highly polyphyletic. Here we reconstructed the phylogeny of the majority of described anamorphic and teleomorphic tremellomycetous yeasts using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and neighbour-joining analyses based on the sequences of seven genes, including three rRNA genes, namely the small subunit of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rDNA, and the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS 1 and 2) of rDNA including 5.8S rDNA; and four protein-coding genes, namely the two subunits of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2), the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (CYTB). With the consideration of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characters and the congruence of phylogenies inferred from analyses using different algorithms based on different data sets consisting of the combined seven genes, the three rRNA genes, and the individual protein-coding genes, five major lineages corresponding to the orders Cystofilobasidiales, Filobasidiales, Holtermanniales, Tremellales, and Trichosporonales were resolved. A total of 45 strongly supported monophyletic clades with multiple species and 23 single species clades were recognised. This phylogenetic framework will be the basis for the proposal of an updated taxonomic system of tremellomycetous yeasts that will be compatible with the current taxonomic system of filamentous basidiomycetes accommodating the ‘one fungus, one name’ principle. PMID:26955196

  17. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  18. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  19. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions. PMID:25854931

  20. Sequence and Expression Analyses of Ethylene Response Factors Highly Expressed in Latex Cells from Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Piyatrakul, Piyanuch; Yang, Meng; Putranto, Riza-Arief; Pirrello, Julien; Dessailly, Florence; Hu, Songnian; Summo, Marilyne; Theeravatanasuk, Kannikar; Leclercq, Julie; Kuswanhadi; Montoro, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily encodes transcription factors that play a key role in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. In Hevea brasiliensis, ERF genes have been identified by RNA sequencing. This study set out to validate the number of HbERF genes, and identify ERF genes involved in the regulation of latex cell metabolism. A comprehensive Hevea transcriptome was improved using additional RNA reads from reproductive tissues. Newly assembled contigs were annotated in the Gene Ontology database and were assigned to 3 main categories. The AP2/ERF superfamily is the third most represented compared with other transcription factor families. A comparison with genomic scaffolds led to an estimation of 114 AP2/ERF genes and 1 soloist in Hevea brasiliensis. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, functions were predicted for 26 HbERF genes. A relative transcript abundance analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR in various tissues. Transcripts of ERFs from group I and VIII were very abundant in all tissues while those of group VII were highly accumulated in latex cells. Seven of the thirty-five ERF expression marker genes were highly expressed in latex. Subcellular localization and transactivation analyses suggested that HbERF-VII candidate genes encoded functional transcription factors. PMID:24971876

  1. The GeneCards Suite: From Gene Data Mining to Disease Genome Sequence Analyses.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Gil; Rosen, Naomi; Plaschkes, Inbar; Zimmerman, Shahar; Twik, Michal; Fishilevich, Simon; Stein, Tsippi Iny; Nudel, Ron; Lieder, Iris; Mazor, Yaron; Kaplan, Sergey; Dahary, Dvir; Warshawsky, David; Guan-Golan, Yaron; Kohn, Asher; Rappaport, Noa; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards, the human gene compendium, enables researchers to effectively navigate and inter-relate the wide universe of human genes, diseases, variants, proteins, cells, and biological pathways. Our recently launched Version 4 has a revamped infrastructure facilitating faster data updates, better-targeted data queries, and friendlier user experience. It also provides a stronger foundation for the GeneCards suite of companion databases and analysis tools. Improved data unification includes gene-disease links via MalaCards and merged biological pathways via PathCards, as well as drug information and proteome expression. VarElect, another suite member, is a phenotype prioritizer for next-generation sequencing, leveraging the GeneCards and MalaCards knowledgebase. It automatically infers direct and indirect scored associations between hundreds or even thousands of variant-containing genes and disease phenotype terms. VarElect's capabilities, either independently or within TGex, our comprehensive variant analysis pipeline, help prepare for the challenge of clinical projects that involve thousands of exome/genome NGS analyses. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322403

  2. Genome sequence and origin analyses of the recombinant novel IBV virulent isolate SAIBK2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuan; Yang, Xin; Xu, Pengwei; Zhou, Long; Zhang, Zhikun; Wang, Hongning

    2016-08-01

    Recombination between infectious bronchitis viruses (IBVs), together with point mutations, insertions, and deletions, is thought to be responsible for the emergence of new IBV variants. SAIBK2 is a nephropathogenic strain isolated from layer flocks vaccinated with live attenuated H120 vaccine in Sichuan province, China in 2011. SAIBK2 causes severe kidney lesions and results in 50 % mortality in 30-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens (with a dose of 10(5) EID50/0.1 mL SAIBK2 per chicken). The complete genome of SAIBK2 consists of 27669 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tail at the 3' end. SAIBK2 has the highest identity to YX10 in terms of complete genome. Phylogenetic analysis of complete sequence showed that SAIBK2 belongs to the most dominant genotype in China. Comparison and recombination analyses with other IBV strains revealed that SAIBK2 may originate from recombination events among a YX10-, a YN-, and a Mass-like strain. Furthermore, whole gene 5 and parts of nsp 3, nsp 4, nsp 16, and N genes are involved in the recombination events, and the uptake of these regions from YN and Mass strains by SAIBK2 may increase its replication efficiency and be responsible for its increased virulence in specific-pathogen-free chickens. PMID:27108998

  3. Whole-Genome Analyses of Korean Native and Holstein Cattle Breeds by Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stothard, Paul; Chung, Won-Hyong; Jeon, Heoyn-Jeong; Miller, Stephen P.; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Jeong-Koo; Yang, Bokyoung; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Han, Kwang-Jin; Kim, Hyeong-Cheol; Jeong, Dongkee; Oh, Jae-Don; Kim, Namshin; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    A main goal of cattle genomics is to identify DNA differences that account for variations in economically important traits. In this study, we performed whole-genome analyses of three important cattle breeds in Korea—Hanwoo, Jeju Heugu, and Korean Holstein—using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform. We achieved 25.5-, 29.6-, and 29.5-fold coverage of the Hanwoo, Jeju Heugu, and Korean Holstein genomes, respectively, and identified a total of 10.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 54.12% were found to be novel. We also detected 1,063,267 insertions–deletions (InDels) across the genomes (78.92% novel). Annotations of the datasets identified a total of 31,503 nonsynonymous SNPs and 859 frameshift InDels that could affect phenotypic variations in traits of interest. Furthermore, genome-wide copy number variation regions (CNVRs) were detected by comparing the Hanwoo, Jeju Heugu, and previously published Chikso genomes against that of Korean Holstein. A total of 992, 284, and 1881 CNVRs, respectively, were detected throughout the genome. Moreover, 53, 65, 45, and 82 putative regions of homozygosity (ROH) were identified in Hanwoo, Jeju Heugu, Chikso, and Korean Holstein respectively. The results of this study provide a valuable foundation for further investigations to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying variation in economically important traits in cattle and to develop genetic markers for use in cattle breeding. PMID:24992012

  4. Genomic Resources for Water Yam (Dioscorea alata L.): Analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo Sequencing and GBS Libraries.

    PubMed

    Saski, Christopher A; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Scheffler, Brian E; Asiedu, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a major food and cash crop in many countries but research efforts have been limited to understand the genetics and generate genomic information for the crop. The availability of a large number of genomic resources including genome-wide molecular markers will accelerate the breeding efforts and application of genomic selection in yams. In the present study, several methods including expressed sequence tags (EST)-sequencing, de novo sequencing, and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) profiles on two yam (Dioscorea alata L.) genotypes (TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310) was performed to generate genomic resources for use in its improvement programs. This includes a comprehensive set of EST-SSRs, genomic SSRs, whole genome SNPs, and reduced representation SNPs. A total of 1,152 EST-SSRs were developed from >40,000 EST-sequences generated from the two genotypes. A set of 388 EST-SSRs were validated as polymorphic showing a polymorphism rate of 34% when tested on two diverse parents targeted for anthracnose disease. In addition, approximately 40X de novo whole genome sequence coverage was generated for each of the two genotypes, and a total of 18,584 and 15,952 genomic SSRs were identified for TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310, respectively. A custom made pipeline resulted in the selection of 573 genomic SSRs common across the two genotypes, of which only eight failed, 478 being polymorphic and 62 monomorphic indicating a polymorphic rate of 83.5%. Additionally, 288,505 high quality SNPs were also identified between these two genotypes. Genotyping by sequencing reads on these two genotypes also revealed 36,790 overlapping SNP positions that are distributed throughout the genome. Our efforts in using different approaches

  5. Genomic Resources for Water Yam (Dioscorea alata L.): Analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo Sequencing and GBS Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Saski, Christopher A.; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Scheffler, Brian E.; Asiedu, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a major food and cash crop in many countries but research efforts have been limited to understand the genetics and generate genomic information for the crop. The availability of a large number of genomic resources including genome-wide molecular markers will accelerate the breeding efforts and application of genomic selection in yams. In the present study, several methods including expressed sequence tags (EST)-sequencing, de novo sequencing, and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) profiles on two yam (Dioscorea alata L.) genotypes (TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310) was performed to generate genomic resources for use in its improvement programs. This includes a comprehensive set of EST-SSRs, genomic SSRs, whole genome SNPs, and reduced representation SNPs. A total of 1,152 EST-SSRs were developed from >40,000 EST-sequences generated from the two genotypes. A set of 388 EST-SSRs were validated as polymorphic showing a polymorphism rate of 34% when tested on two diverse parents targeted for anthracnose disease. In addition, approximately 40X de novo whole genome sequence coverage was generated for each of the two genotypes, and a total of 18,584 and 15,952 genomic SSRs were identified for TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310, respectively. A custom made pipeline resulted in the selection of 573 genomic SSRs common across the two genotypes, of which only eight failed, 478 being polymorphic and 62 monomorphic indicating a polymorphic rate of 83.5%. Additionally, 288,505 high quality SNPs were also identified between these two genotypes. Genotyping by sequencing reads on these two genotypes also revealed 36,790 overlapping SNP positions that are distributed throughout the genome. Our efforts in using different approaches

  6. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  7. Genomic resources for water yam (Dioscorea alata L.): analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo sequencing and GBS libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources such as SSRs, SNPs and InDels in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) i...

  8. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  9. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  10. DNA Sequence Analyses Reveal Abundant Diversity, Endemism and Evidence for Asian Origin of the Porcini Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Li, Yan-Chun; Tolgor, Bau; Kost, Gerhard W.; Yang, Zhu L.

    2012-01-01

    The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species) and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions. PMID:22629418

  11. Comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses of microbial communities in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-xing; Hu, Min; Huang, Li-nan; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Kuang, Jia-liang; Li, Sheng-jin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2015-07-01

    The microbial communities in acid mine drainage have been extensively studied to reveal their roles in acid generation and adaption to this environment. Lacking, however, are integrated community- and organism-wide comparative gene transcriptional analyses that could reveal the response and adaptation mechanisms of these extraordinary microorganisms to different environmental conditions. In this study, comparative metagenomics and metatranscriptomics were performed on microbial assemblages collected from four geochemically distinct acid mine drainage (AMD) sites. Taxonomic analysis uncovered unexpectedly high microbial biodiversity of these extremely acidophilic communities, and the abundant taxa of Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum and Acidiphilium exhibited high transcriptional activities. Community-wide comparative analyses clearly showed that the AMD microorganisms adapted to the different environmental conditions via regulating the expression of genes involved in multiple in situ functional activities, including low-pH adaptation, carbon, nitrogen and phosphate assimilation, energy generation, environmental stress resistance, and other functions. Organism-wide comparative analyses of the active taxa revealed environment-dependent gene transcriptional profiles, especially the distinct strategies used by Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum in nutrients assimilation and energy generation for survival under different conditions. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the gene transcriptional profiles of AMD microorganisms are closely related to the site physiochemical characteristics, providing clues into the microbial response and adaptation mechanisms in the oligotrophic, extremely acidic environments. PMID:25535937

  12. Comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses of microbial communities in acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin-xing; Hu, Min; Huang, Li-nan; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Kuang, Jia-liang; Li, Sheng-jin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    The microbial communities in acid mine drainage have been extensively studied to reveal their roles in acid generation and adaption to this environment. Lacking, however, are integrated community- and organism-wide comparative gene transcriptional analyses that could reveal the response and adaptation mechanisms of these extraordinary microorganisms to different environmental conditions. In this study, comparative metagenomics and metatranscriptomics were performed on microbial assemblages collected from four geochemically distinct acid mine drainage (AMD) sites. Taxonomic analysis uncovered unexpectedly high microbial biodiversity of these extremely acidophilic communities, and the abundant taxa of Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum and Acidiphilium exhibited high transcriptional activities. Community-wide comparative analyses clearly showed that the AMD microorganisms adapted to the different environmental conditions via regulating the expression of genes involved in multiple in situ functional activities, including low-pH adaptation, carbon, nitrogen and phosphate assimilation, energy generation, environmental stress resistance, and other functions. Organism-wide comparative analyses of the active taxa revealed environment-dependent gene transcriptional profiles, especially the distinct strategies used by Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum in nutrients assimilation and energy generation for survival under different conditions. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the gene transcriptional profiles of AMD microorganisms are closely related to the site physiochemical characteristics, providing clues into the microbial response and adaptation mechanisms in the oligotrophic, extremely acidic environments. PMID:25535937

  13. Partial amino acid sequence of human factor D:homology with serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Volanakis, J E; Bhown, A; Bennett, J C; Mole, J E

    1980-01-01

    Human factor D purified to homogeneity by a modified procedure was subjected to NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by using a modified automated Beckman sequencer. We identified 48 of the first 57 NH2-terminal amino acids in a single sequencer run, using microgram quantities of factor D. The deduced amino acid sequence represents approximately 25% of the primary structure of factor D. This extended NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of factor D was compared to that of other trypsin-related serine proteases. By visual inspection, strong homologies (33--50% identity) were observed with all the serine proteases included in the comparison. Interestingly, factor D showed a higher degree of homology to serine proteases of pancreatic origin than to those of serum origin. Images PMID:6987665

  14. Amino acid sequence of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Goodson, John; Beckstead, Robert B; Payne, Jason; Singh, Rakesh K; Mohan, Anand

    2015-08-15

    Myoglobin has an important physiological role in vertebrates, and as the primary sarcoplasmic pigment in meat, influences quality perception and consumer acceptability. In this study, the amino acid sequences of Japanese quail and northern bobwhite myoglobin were deduced by cDNA cloning of the coding sequence from mRNA. Japanese quail myoglobin was isolated from quail cardiac muscles, purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel-filtration, and subjected to multiple enzymatic digestions. Mass spectrometry corroborated the deduced protein amino acid sequence at the protein level. Sequence analysis revealed both species' myoglobin structures consist of 153 amino acids, differing at only three positions. When compared with chicken myoglobin, Japanese quail showed 98% sequence identity, and northern bobwhite 97% sequence identity. The myoglobin in both quail species contained eight histidine residues instead of the nine present in chicken and turkey. PMID:25794748

  15. Technical note: improved methodology for analyses of acid detergent fiber and acid detergent lignin.

    PubMed

    Raffrenato, E; Van Amburgh, M E

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the methodology of the acid detergent lignin (ADL) assay in an effort to evaluate particle loss, improve repeatability, and decrease variation within and among samples. The original ADL method relied on asbestos as a filtering aid, but that was removed in 1989 with the mandate from the Environmental Protection Agency to eliminate asbestos in the environment. Furthermore, recent work on fiber methodology indicated that pore size in the Gooch sintered glass crucible (40-60 μm) was too large to trap all of the small particles associated with neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF). Thus, any loss of ADF could potentially result in a loss of ADL. Sixty forages including conventional and brown midrib corn silages, alfalfa silages and hays, mature grasses, early vegetative grasses, and 9 feces samples, were analyzed sequentially for ADF and ADL as outlined in the 1973 procedure of Van Soest except for the use of the asbestos fiber. A glass microfiber filter with a 1.5-μm pore size was chosen as a filtering aid because it met the criteria required by the assay: glass, heat resistant, acid resistant, chemically inert, and hydrophobic. To compare with the current ADF and ADL assays, the assays were conducted with either no filter or the glass filter inserted into crucibles, rinsed with acetone, and then according to the 1973 procedure of Van Soest. The samples analyzed covered a range from 18.11 to 55.79% ADF and from 0.96 to 9.94% ADL on a dry matter (DM) basis. With the use of the filter, the mean ADF values increased 4.2% and mean ADL values increased 18.9%. Overall, both ADF and ADL values were greater with the use of the glass microfiber filter than without, indicating that as the type of sample analyzed changed, use of the Gooch crucible without the filtering aid results in particle loss. The adoption of the use of a small pore size (1.5 μm) glass microfiber filter to improve filtration and recovery

  16. FIGG: Simulating populations of whole genome sequences for heterogeneous data analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput sequencing has become one of the primary tools for investigation of the molecular basis of disease. The increasing use of sequencing in investigations that aim to understand both individuals and populations is challenging our ability to develop analysis tools that scale with the data. This issue is of particular concern in studies that exhibit a wide degree of heterogeneity or deviation from the standard reference genome. The advent of population scale sequencing studies requires analysis tools that are developed and tested against matching quantities of heterogeneous data. Results We developed a large-scale whole genome simulation tool, FIGG, which generates large numbers of whole genomes with known sequence characteristics based on direct sampling of experimentally known or theorized variations. For normal variations we used publicly available data to determine the frequency of different mutation classes across the genome. FIGG then uses this information as a background to generate new sequences from a parent sequence with matching frequencies, but different actual mutations. The background can be normal variations, known disease variations, or a theoretical frequency distribution of variations. Conclusion In order to enable the creation of large numbers of genomes, FIGG generates simulated sequences from known genomic variation and iteratively mutates each genome separately. The result is multiple whole genome sequences with unique variations that can primarily be used to provide different reference genomes, model heterogeneous populations, and can offer a standard test environment for new analysis algorithms or bioinformatics tools. PMID:24885193

  17. Chances and pitfalls of leaf wax biomarker analyses applied to fluvial sediment sequences - the example of a Holocene fluvial sediment-paleosol sequence from the upper Alazani River, eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Bliedtner, Marcel; Zielhofer, Christoph; Faust, Dominik; Zech, Roland

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades, fluvial sediment sequences in many regions have intensively been studied to reconstruct Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental and palaeohydrological conditions. However, up to now analyses of leaf wax biomarkers that are increasingly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental and -climate conditions e.g. from lake sediments or loess-paleosol sequences were not systematically applied to Late Quaternary fluvial sediments. Given the ubiquitous distribution of fluvial sediment sequences on the earth's surface such investigations could potentially strongly enhance the knowledge about former environmental conditions in many regions. For this conceptual study we exemplarily analysed leaf wax biomarker (long-chain n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) in a fluvial sediment palaeosol sequence from the upper Alazani River in eastern Georgia to discuss general possibilities and pitfalls: Generally, biomarker records from fluvial archives can be divided into i) a catchment signal recorded in the fluvial sediment layers and ii) a local in-situ signal recorded in the intercalated paleosols. This offers the great chance to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions in both the whole catchment and at the sampling site. However, potential pitfalls are, for example, that inherited catchment signals can bias the in-situ signal from paleosols, while intermediate sediment storage in the catchment prior to sediment deposition and postsedimentary processes may alter the original catchment signal in the fluvial sediment layers. Thus, when applying leaf wax biomarker analyses to fluvial sediment sequences one has to be careful: The interpretation of the biomarker record strongly depends on the specific geomorphological and sedimentological conditions of the investigated site and of the catchment area.

  18. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  19. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  20. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  1. Automation of Molecular-Based Analyses: A Primer on Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lan; Burnett, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics have been enabled by new genetic sequencing techniques called massively parallel sequencing (MPS) or next-generation sequencing. Through the ability to sequence in parallel hundreds of thousands to millions of DNA fragments, the cost and time required for sequencing has dramatically decreased. There are a number of different MPS platforms currently available and being used in Australia. Although they differ in the underlying technology involved, their overall processes are very similar: DNA fragmentation, adaptor ligation, immobilisation, amplification, sequencing reaction and data analysis. MPS is being used in research, translational and increasingly now also in clinical settings. Common applications include sequencing of whole genomes, whole exomes or targeted genes for disease-causing gene discovery, genetic diagnosis and targeted cancer therapy. Even though the revolution that is occurring with MPS is exciting due to its increasing use, improving and emerging technologies and new applications, significant challenges still exist. Particularly challenging issues are the bioinformatics required for data analysis, interpretation of results and the ethical dilemma of ‘incidental findings’. PMID:25336762

  2. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities. PMID:4029488

  3. Differentiation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pili based on sequence and B-cell epitope analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Castric, P A; Deal, C D

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of three previously undescribed Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin structural genes are presented. Comparisons of deduced pilin primary structure and flanking DNA sequence allowed placement of these and six previously published sequences into one of two groups. Epitope mapping, using overlapping immobilized peptides representing the pilin primary structure, with antipilin monoclonal antibodies revealed several B-cell determinants grouped near the carboxyl terminus of P. aeruginosa 1244 pilin. One determinant was found to reside near the pilin constant region. These determinants were found associated with the pili of 31 of 95 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:7507890

  4. Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra; Yuen, George U.

    1992-01-01

    The monocarboxylic acids and hydrocarbons of the Murchison meteorite (CM2) were isolated for isotropic analysis. The nonvolatile hydrocarbons were analyzed as crude methanol and benzene-methanol extracts and also after separation by silica gel chromatography into predominantly aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbon fractions. The volatile hydrocarbons were obtained after progressive decomposition of the meteorite matrix by freeze-thaw, hot water, and acid treatment. Molecular analyses of the aromatic hydrocarbons showed them to comprise a complex suite of compounds in which pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene were the most abundant components, a result similar to earlier analyses. The polar hydrocarbons also comprise a very complex mixture in which aromatic ketones, nitrogen, and sulfur heterocycles were identified. The monocarboxylic acids, aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbons, and the indigenous volatile hydrocarbons were found to be D-rich. The deuterium enrichment observed in these compounds is suggestive. In two separate analyses, the delta-D values of the nonvolatile hydrocarbons were observed to increase in the following order: aliphatic-aromatic-polar. This finding is consistent with an early solar system or parent body conversion of aromatic to aliphatic compounds as well as the suggestion of pyrolytic formation of aromatic from aliphatic compounds.

  5. Factorial Moments Analyses Show a Characteristic Length Scale in DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, A. K.; Narayana Rao, A. V. S. S.

    2000-02-01

    A unique feature of most of the DNA sequences, found through the factorial moments analysis, is the existence of a characteristic length scale around which the density distribution is nearly Poissonian. Above this point, the DNA sequences, irrespective of their intron contents, show long range correlations with a significant deviation from the Gaussian statistics, while, below this point, the DNA statistics are essentially Gaussian. The famous DNA walk representation is also shown to be a special case of the present analysis.

  6. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  7. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Basal Asterid Ardisia polysticta Miq. and Comparative Analyses of Asterid Plastid Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chuan; Hu, Jer-Ming; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Ardisia is a basal asterid genus well known for its medicinal values and has the potential for development of novel phytopharmaceuticals. In this genus of nearly 500 species, many ornamental species are commonly grown worldwide and some have become invasive species that caused ecological problems. As there is no completed plastid genome (plastome) sequence in related taxa, we sequenced and characterized the plastome of Ardisia polysticta to find plastid markers of potential utility for phylogenetic analyses at low taxonomic levels. The complete A. polysticta plastome is 156,506 bp in length and has gene content and organization typical of most asterids and other angiosperms. We identified seven intergenic regions as potentially informative markers with resolution for interspecific relationships. Additionally, we characterized the diversity of asterid plastomes with respect to GC content, plastome organization, gene content, and repetitive sequences through comparative analyses. The results demonstrated that the genome organizations near the boundaries between inverted repeats (IRs) and single-copy regions (SCs) are polymorphic. The boundary organization found in Ardisia appears to be the most common type among asterids, while six other types are also found in various asterid lineages. In general, the repetitive sequences in genic regions tend to be more conserved, whereas those in noncoding regions are usually lineage-specific. Finally, we inferred the whole-plastome phylogeny with the available asterid sequences. With the improvement in taxon sampling of asterid orders and families, our result highlights the uncertainty of the position of Gentianales within euasterids I. PMID:23638113

  8. MannDB – A microbial database of automated protein sequence analyses and evidence integration for protein characterization

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Carol L Ecale; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Zemla, Adam T; Dyer, Matthew D; Kuczmarski, Thomas A; Vitalis, Elizabeth A; Slezak, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Background MannDB was created to meet a need for rapid, comprehensive automated protein sequence analyses to support selection of proteins suitable as targets for driving the development of reagents for pathogen or protein toxin detection. Because a large number of open-source tools were needed, it was necessary to produce a software system to scale the computations for whole-proteome analysis. Thus, we built a fully automated system for executing software tools and for storage, integration, and display of automated protein sequence analysis and annotation data. Description MannDB is a relational database that organizes data resulting from fully automated, high-throughput protein-sequence analyses using open-source tools. Types of analyses provided include predictions of cleavage, chemical properties, classification, features, functional assignment, post-translational modifications, motifs, antigenicity, and secondary structure. Proteomes (lists of hypothetical and known proteins) are downloaded and parsed from Genbank and then inserted into MannDB, and annotations from SwissProt are downloaded when identifiers are found in the Genbank entry or when identical sequences are identified. Currently 36 open-source tools are run against MannDB protein sequences either on local systems or by means of batch submission to external servers. In addition, BLAST against protein entries in MvirDB, our database of microbial virulence factors, is performed. A web client browser enables viewing of computational results and downloaded annotations, and a query tool enables structured and free-text search capabilities. When available, links to external databases, including MvirDB, are provided. MannDB contains whole-proteome analyses for at least one representative organism from each category of biological threat organism listed by APHIS, CDC, HHS, NIAID, USDA, USFDA, and WHO. Conclusion MannDB comprises a large number of genomes and comprehensive protein sequence analyses

  9. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  10. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Five Epimedium Species: Lights into Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjun; Du, Liuwen; Liu, Ao; Chen, Jianjun; Wu, Li; Hu, Weiming; Zhang, Wei; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Yang, Tae-Jin; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium L. is a phylogenetically and economically important genus in the family Berberidaceae. We here sequenced the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes of four Epimedium species using Illumina sequencing technology via a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, which was also the first comprehensive cp genome analysis on Epimedium combining the cp genome sequence of E. koreanum previously reported. The five Epimedium cp genomes exhibited typical quadripartite and circular structure that was rather conserved in genomic structure and the synteny of gene order. However, these cp genomes presented obvious variations at the boundaries of the four regions because of the expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR) region and the single-copy (SC) boundary regions. The trnQ-UUG duplication occurred in the five Epimedium cp genomes, which was not found in the other basal eudicotyledons. The rapidly evolving cp genome regions were detected among the five cp genomes, as well as the difference of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and repeat sequence were identified. Phylogenetic relationships among the five Epimedium species based on their cp genomes showed accordance with the updated system of the genus on the whole, but reminded that the evolutionary relationships and the divisions of the genus need further investigation applying more evidences. The availability of these cp genomes provided valuable genetic information for accurately identifying species, taxonomy and phylogenetic resolution and evolution of Epimedium, and assist in exploration and utilization of Epimedium plants. PMID:27014326

  11. Choice of Reference Sequence and Assembler for Alignment of Listeria monocytogenes Short-Read Sequence Data Greatly Influences Rates of Error in SNP Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pightling, Arthur W.; Petronella, Nicholas; Pagotto, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and an abundance of open-source software have made detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bacterial genomes an increasingly accessible and effective tool for comparative analyses. Thus, ensuring that real nucleotide differences between genomes (i.e., true SNPs) are detected at high rates and that the influences of errors (such as false positive SNPs, ambiguously called sites, and gaps) are mitigated is of utmost importance. The choices researchers make regarding the generation and analysis of WGS data can greatly influence the accuracy of short-read sequence alignments and, therefore, the efficacy of such experiments. We studied the effects of some of these choices, including: i) depth of sequencing coverage, ii) choice of reference-guided short-read sequence assembler, iii) choice of reference genome, and iv) whether to perform read-quality filtering and trimming, on our ability to detect true SNPs and on the frequencies of errors. We performed benchmarking experiments, during which we assembled simulated and real Listeria monocytogenes strain 08-5578 short-read sequence datasets of varying quality with four commonly used assemblers (BWA, MOSAIK, Novoalign, and SMALT), using reference genomes of varying genetic distances, and with or without read pre-processing (i.e., quality filtering and trimming). We found that assemblies of at least 50-fold coverage provided the most accurate results. In addition, MOSAIK yielded the fewest errors when reads were aligned to a nearly identical reference genome, while using SMALT to align reads against a reference sequence that is ∼0.82% distant from 08-5578 at the nucleotide level resulted in the detection of the greatest numbers of true SNPs and the fewest errors. Finally, we show that whether read pre-processing improves SNP detection depends upon the choice of reference sequence and assembler. In total, this study demonstrates that researchers should

  12. Choice of reference sequence and assembler for alignment of Listeria monocytogenes short-read sequence data greatly influences rates of error in SNP analyses.

    PubMed

    Pightling, Arthur W; Petronella, Nicholas; Pagotto, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and an abundance of open-source software have made detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bacterial genomes an increasingly accessible and effective tool for comparative analyses. Thus, ensuring that real nucleotide differences between genomes (i.e., true SNPs) are detected at high rates and that the influences of errors (such as false positive SNPs, ambiguously called sites, and gaps) are mitigated is of utmost importance. The choices researchers make regarding the generation and analysis of WGS data can greatly influence the accuracy of short-read sequence alignments and, therefore, the efficacy of such experiments. We studied the effects of some of these choices, including: i) depth of sequencing coverage, ii) choice of reference-guided short-read sequence assembler, iii) choice of reference genome, and iv) whether to perform read-quality filtering and trimming, on our ability to detect true SNPs and on the frequencies of errors. We performed benchmarking experiments, during which we assembled simulated and real Listeria monocytogenes strain 08-5578 short-read sequence datasets of varying quality with four commonly used assemblers (BWA, MOSAIK, Novoalign, and SMALT), using reference genomes of varying genetic distances, and with or without read pre-processing (i.e., quality filtering and trimming). We found that assemblies of at least 50-fold coverage provided the most accurate results. In addition, MOSAIK yielded the fewest errors when reads were aligned to a nearly identical reference genome, while using SMALT to align reads against a reference sequence that is ∼0.82% distant from 08-5578 at the nucleotide level resulted in the detection of the greatest numbers of true SNPs and the fewest errors. Finally, we show that whether read pre-processing improves SNP detection depends upon the choice of reference sequence and assembler. In total, this study demonstrates that researchers should

  13. Accuracy of sequence alignment and fold assessment using reduced amino acid alphabets.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Reduced or simplified amino acid alphabets group the 20 naturally occurring amino acids into a smaller number of representative protein residues. To date, several reduced amino acid alphabets have been proposed, which have been derived and optimized by a variety of methods. The resulting reduced amino acid alphabets have been applied to pattern recognition, generation of consensus sequences from multiple alignments, protein folding, and protein structure prediction. In this work, amino acid substitution matrices and statistical potentials were derived based on several reduced amino acid alphabets and their performance assessed in a large benchmark for the tasks of sequence alignment and fold assessment of protein structure models, using as a reference frame the standard alphabet of 20 amino acids. The results showed that a large reduction in the total number of residue types does not necessarily translate into a significant loss of discriminative power for sequence alignment and fold assessment. Therefore, some definitions of a few residue types are able to encode most of the relevant sequence/structure information that is present in the 20 standard amino acids. Based on these results, we suggest that the use of reduced amino acid alphabets may allow to increasing the accuracy of current substitution matrices and statistical potentials for the prediction of protein structure of remote homologs. PMID:16506243

  14. Analyses of DNA Base Sequences for Eukaryotes in Terms of Power Spectrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isohata, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Masaki

    2005-02-01

    By adopting a power spectrum method we have analyzed long-range correlations in the gene base sequences, exons and introns for five or six eukaryote species. As a measure of the long-range correlations, we have used an exponent α in 1/fα, which is an approximation of a power spectrum in a low-frequency region. We have analyzed frequency distributions of α and the dependence of its average values <α> on the sequence length for the five or six species, paying particular attention to the species dependence. We have shown that long-range correlations have been formed mainly due to the intron's elongation as well as by the sequence structures of introns acquired over the course of evolution.

  15. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  16. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  17. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  18. Molecular Characterization and Variation of the Broad bean wilt virus 2 Isolates Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Ye-Ji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2013-12-01

    The full-genome sequences of fourteen isolates of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2), collected from broad bean, pea, spinach, bell pepper and paprika plants in Korea during the years 2006-2012, were determined and analyzed comparatively along with fifteen previously reported BBWV2 genome sequences. Sequence analyses showed that RNA-1 and RNA-2 sequences of BBWV2 Korean isolates consisted of 5950-5956 and 3568-3604 nucleotides, respectively. Full-length genome sequence-based phylogenetic analyses revealed that the BBWV2 Korean isolates could be divided into three major groups comprising GS-I (isolates BB2 and RP7) along with isolate IP, GS-II (isolates BB5, P2, P3 and RP3) along with isolate B935, and GS-III including 16 BBWV2 Korean isolates. Interestingly, GS-III appears to be newly emerged and predominant in Korea. Recombination analyses identified two recombination events in the analyzed BBWV2 population: one in the RNA-1 of isolate K and another one in the RNA-2 of isolate XJ14-3. However, no recombination events were detected in the other 21 Korean isolates. On the other hand, out of 29 BBWV2 isolates, 16 isolates were found to be reassortants, of which each RNA segment (i.e. RNA1 and RNA2) was originated from different parental isolates. Our findings suggested that reassortment rather than recombination is a major evolutionary force in the genetic diversification of BBWV population in Korea. PMID:25288968

  19. Molecular Characterization and Variation of the Broad bean wilt virus 2 Isolates Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Ye-Ji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The full-genome sequences of fourteen isolates of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2), collected from broad bean, pea, spinach, bell pepper and paprika plants in Korea during the years 2006–2012, were determined and analyzed comparatively along with fifteen previously reported BBWV2 genome sequences. Sequence analyses showed that RNA-1 and RNA-2 sequences of BBWV2 Korean isolates consisted of 5950–5956 and 3568–3604 nucleotides, respectively. Full-length genome sequence-based phylogenetic analyses revealed that the BBWV2 Korean isolates could be divided into three major groups comprising GS-I (isolates BB2 and RP7) along with isolate IP, GS-II (isolates BB5, P2, P3 and RP3) along with isolate B935, and GS-III including 16 BBWV2 Korean isolates. Interestingly, GS-III appears to be newly emerged and predominant in Korea. Recombination analyses identified two recombination events in the analyzed BBWV2 population: one in the RNA-1 of isolate K and another one in the RNA-2 of isolate XJ14-3. However, no recombination events were detected in the other 21 Korean isolates. On the other hand, out of 29 BBWV2 isolates, 16 isolates were found to be reassortants, of which each RNA segment (i.e. RNA1 and RNA2) was originated from different parental isolates. Our findings suggested that reassortment rather than recombination is a major evolutionary force in the genetic diversification of BBWV population in Korea. PMID:25288968

  20. Sequence analyses and evolutionary relationships among the energy-coupling proteins Enzyme I and HPr of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Hoischen, C.; Reizer, A.; Pham, T. N.; Saier, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported the overexpression, purification, and biochemical properties of the Bacillus subtilis Enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) (Reizer, J., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 9158-9169). We now report the sequencing of the ptsI gene of B. subtilis encoding Enzyme I (570 amino acids and 63,076 Da). Putative transcriptional regulatory signals are identified, and the pts operon is shown to be subject to carbon source-dependent regulation. Multiple alignments of the B. subtilis Enzyme I with (1) six other sequenced Enzymes I of the PTS from various bacterial species, (2) phosphoenolpyruvate synthase of Escherichia coli, and (3) bacterial and plant pyruvate: phosphate dikinases (PPDKs) revealed regions of sequence similarity as well as divergence. Statistical analyses revealed that these three types of proteins comprise a homologous family, and the phylogenetic tree of the 11 sequenced protein members of this family was constructed. This tree was compared with that of the 12 sequence HPr proteins or protein domains. Antibodies raised against the B. subtilis and E. coli Enzymes I exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with each other as well as with PPDK of Bacteroides symbiosus, providing support for the evolutionary relationships of these proteins suggested from the sequence comparisons. Putative flexible linkers tethering the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of protein members of the Enzyme I family were identified, and their potential significance with regard to Enzyme I function is discussed. The codon choice pattern of the B. subtilis and E. coli ptsI and ptsH genes was found to exhibit a bias toward optimal codons in these organisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7686067

  1. DNA Sequence and Expression Variation of Hop (Humulus lupulus) Valerophenone Synthase (VPS), a Key Gene in Bitter Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Consuelo B.; Whittock, Lucy D.; Whittock, Simon P.; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Methods Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Results Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, ‘Symphony’ and ‘Ember’, which typically have high bitter acid levels. Conclusions In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development. PMID:18519445

  2. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only...

  3. spads 1.0: a toolbox to perform spatial analyses on DNA sequence data sets.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    SPADS 1.0 (for 'Spatial and Population Analysis of DNA Sequences') is a population genetic toolbox for characterizing genetic variability within and among populations from DNA sequences. In view of the drastic increase in genetic information available through sequencing methods, spads was specifically designed to deal with multilocus data sets of DNA sequences. It computes several summary statistics from populations or groups of populations, performs input file conversions for other population genetic programs and implements locus-by-locus and multilocus versions of two clustering algorithms to study the genetic structure of populations. The toolbox also includes two MATLAB and r functions, GDISPAL and GDIVPAL, to display differentiation and diversity patterns across landscapes. These functions aim to generate interpolating surfaces based on multilocus distance and diversity indices. In the case of multiple loci, such surfaces can represent a useful alternative to multiple pie charts maps traditionally used in phylogeography to represent the spatial distribution of genetic diversity. These coloured surfaces can also be used to compare different data sets or different diversity and/or distance measures estimated on the same data set. PMID:24215429

  4. ChIPseq in Yeast Species: From Chromatin Immunoprecipitation to High-Throughput Sequencing and Bioinformatics Data Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lelandais, Gaëlle; Blugeon, Corinne; Merhej, Jawad

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIPseq) is a powerful technique for the genome-wide location of protein DNA-binding sites. The ChIP experiment consists in treating living cells with a cross-linking agent to bind proteins to their DNA substrates. After fragmentation of DNA, specific fractions associated with a particular protein of interest are purified by immunoaffinity. They are next sequenced and identified on the reference genome using dedicated bioinformatics programs. Several technical aspects are important to obtain high-quality ChIPseq results. This includes the quality of antibodies, the sequencing protocols, the use of accurate controls and the careful choice of bioinformatics tools. We present here a general protocol to perform ChIPseq analyses in yeast species. This protocol has been optimized to identify target genes of specific transcription factors but can be used for any other DNA binding proteins. PMID:26483023

  5. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  6. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  7. Phylogeny of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group inferred from morphological comparisons, genomic fingerprinting, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1996-01-01

    Phase-contrast light microscopy revealed that only one of eight cultivated strains belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of sheathed bacteria actually produced a sheath in standard growth media. Two Sphaerotilus natans strains produced branched cells, but other morphological characteristics that were used to identify these bacteria were consistent with previously published descriptions. Genomic fingerprints, which were obtained by performing PCR amplification with primers corresponding to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, were useful for distinguishing between the genera Sphaerotilus and Leptothrix, as well as among individual strains. The complete 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of two strains of "Leptothrix discophora" (strains SP-6 and SS-1) were determined. In addition, partial sequences (approximately 300 nucleotides) of one strain of Leptothrix cholodnii (strain LMG 7171), an unidentified Leptothrix strain (strain NC-1), and four strains of Sphaerotilus natans (strains ATCC 13338T [T = type strain], ATCC 15291, ATCC 29329, and ATCC 29330) were determined. We found that two of the S. natans strains (ATCC 15291 and ATCC 13338T), which differed in morphology and in their genomic fingerprints, had identical sequences in the 300-nucleotide region sequenced. Both parsimony and distance matrix methods were used to infer the evolutionary relationships of the eight strains in a comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences of these organisms with 16S rDNA sequences obtained from ribosomal sequence databases. All of the strains clustered in the Rubrivivax subdivision of the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which confirmed previously published conclusions concerning selected individual strains. Additional analyses revealed that all of the S. natans strains clustered in one closely related group, while the Leptothrix strains clustered in two separate lineages that were approximately equidistant from the S. natans cluster. This finding

  8. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome reveal novel transcripts and variants in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Sinha, Ishani; Kelkar, Ashwin; Habib, Farhat; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Sukumar, Raman; Galande, Sanjeev

    2015-12-01

    The Asian elephant Elephas maximus and the African elephant Loxodonta africana that diverged 5-7 million years ago exhibit differences in their physiology, behaviour and morphology. A comparative genomics approach would be useful and necessary for evolutionary and functional genetic studies of elephants. We performed sequencing of E. maximus and map to L. africana at ~15X coverage. Through comparative sequence analyses, we have identified Asian elephant specific homozygous, non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that map to 1514 protein coding genes, many of which are involved in olfaction. We also present the first report of a high-coverage transcriptome sequence in E. maximus from peripheral blood lymphocytes. We have identified 103 novel protein coding transcripts and 66-long non-coding (lnc)RNAs. We also report the presence of 181 protein domains unique to elephants when compared to other Afrotheria species. Each of these findings can be further investigated to gain a better understanding of functional differences unique to elephant species, as well as those unique to elephantids in comparison with other mammals. This work therefore provides a valuable resource to explore the immense research potential of comparative analyses of transcriptome and genome sequences in the Asian elephant. PMID:26648035

  9. [Whole-sequence Analyses for 12 HBV C/D Recombinants from a Population in Tibet (China)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiezhu; Shen, Liping; Yin, Wenjiao; Wang, Feng; Wang, Fuzhen; Zhang, Guomin; Zheng, Hui; Dunzhu, Duoji; Bi, Shengli; Cui, Fuqiang

    2016-03-01

    We wished to undertake molecular genetic typing and evaluate recombinants of the hepatitis-B virus (HBV) in Tibet (China). Multistage random sampling was used to collect HBsAg-positive samples. Nested polymerase chain reactions were used to amplify the whole sequence of the HBV. DNAstar, MEGA6 and SimPlot were used to assemble sequences, create phylogenetic trees, and undertake recombination analyses. Twelve whole sequences of the HBV of a Tibetan population were collected using these methods. Results showed that all 12 strains were C/D recombinants. Nine of the recombinations were at nt750, and the other three at nt1526. Therefore, the 12 strains could be divided into two types of recombinants: C/Da and C/Db. Analyses of the sequence of the whole genome revealed that the 12 strains belonged to genotype C, and that the nucleotide distance was > 4% between the 12 strains and sub-genotypes C1 to C15 in Genbank. The most likely sub-genotype was C1. Individuals with C/Da were from central and northern Tibet (e.g., Lasa, Linzhi, Ali) and those with C/Db recombinants were from Shannan in southern Tibet. These data suggest that the two types of recombinants had a good distribution in Tibet. Also, they can provide important information for studies on HBV recombination, gene features, virus evolution, as well as the control and prevention of HBV infection in Tibet. PMID:27396158

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome DNA sequence for two ophiuroids and a holothuroid: the utility of protein gene sequence and gene maps in the analyses of deep deuterostome phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Scouras, Andrea; Beckenbach, Karen; Arndt, Allan; Smith, Michael J

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been determined for the holothuroid Cucumaria miniata and two ophiuroid species Ophiopholis aculeata and Ophiura lütkeni. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes for the asteroid Pisaster ochraceus has been completed. Maximum-likelihood and LogDet distance analyses of concatenated protein-coding sequences produced a series of trees that did not conclusively support generally accepted models of echinoderm phylogeny. The ophiuroid data consistently demonstrated accelerated nucleotide divergence rates and lack of stationarity. This confounds the phylogenetic analyses. Molecular investigations using individual protein-coding gene alignments demonstrated that the cytochrome b gene exhibits the least deviation in rate and stationarity and generated some trees consistent with proposed echinoderm phylogenies. Phylogenies based on echinoderm mitochondrial gene rearrangements also proved problematic because of extensive variation in gene order between and within classes. A comparison of the two distinctive ophiuroid mitochondrial gene orders supports the hypothesis that O. lütkeni has a more derived mitochondrial gene order versus O. aculeata. The variation in the echinoderm mitochondrial gene maps reinforces the limitations of the application of mitochondrial gene rearrangements as a global phylogenetic tool. PMID:15019608

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ameet J; Sharp, Jonathan O; Yoder, Michael J; Almstrand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  13. A computer program for the estimation of protein and nucleic acid sequence diversity in random point mutagenesis libraries

    PubMed Central

    Volles, Michael J.; Lansbury, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program for the generation and analysis of in silico random point mutagenesis libraries is described. The program operates by mutagenizing an input nucleic acid sequence according to mutation parameters specified by the user for each sequence position and type of point mutation. The program can mimic almost any type of random mutagenesis library, including those produced via error-prone PCR (ep-PCR), mutator Escherichia coli strains, chemical mutagenesis, and doped or random oligonucleotide synthesis. The program analyzes the generated nucleic acid sequences and/or the associated protein library to produce several estimates of library diversity (number of unique sequences, point mutations, and single point mutants) and the rate of saturation of these diversities during experimental screening or selection of clones. This information allows one to select the optimal screen size for a given mutagenesis library, necessary to efficiently obtain a certain coverage of the sequence-space. The program also reports the abundance of each specific protein mutation at each sequence position, which is useful as a measure of the level and type of mutation bias in the library. Alternatively, one can use the program to evaluate the relative merits of preexisting libraries, or to examine various hypothetical mutation schemes to determine the optimal method for creating a library that serves the screen/selection of interest. Simulated libraries of at least 109 sequences are accessible by the numerical algorithm with currently available personal computers; an analytical algorithm is also available which can rapidly calculate a subset of the numerical statistics in libraries of arbitrarily large size. A multi-type double-strand stochastic model of ep-PCR is developed in an appendix to demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm to amplifying mutagenesis procedures. Estimators of DNA polymerase mutation-type-specific error rates are derived using the model. Analyses of an

  14. Two distinct ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus: complete amino acid sequences and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Suetsugu, Y; Yao, Y; Horio, T; Marrs, B L; Matsubara, H

    1990-09-01

    Two distinct ferredoxins were purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Their complete amino acid sequences were determined by a combination of protease digestion, BrCN cleavage and Edman degradation. Ferredoxins I and II were composed of 64 and 111 amino acids, respectively, with molecular weights of 6,728 and 12,549 excluding iron and sulfur atoms. Both contained two Cys clusters in their amino acid sequences. The first cluster of ferredoxin I and the second cluster of ferredoxin II had a sequence, CxxCxxCxxxCP, in common with the ferredoxins found in Clostridia. The second cluster of ferredoxin I had a sequence, CxxCxxxxxxxxCxxxCM, with extra amino acids between the second and third Cys, which has been reported for other photosynthetic bacterial ferredoxins and putative ferredoxins (nif-gene products) from nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and with a unique occurrence of Met. The first cluster of ferredoxin II had a CxxCxxxxCxxxCP sequence, with two additional amino acids between the second and third Cys, a characteristics feature of Azotobacter-[3Fe-4S] [4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin. Ferredoxin II was also similar to Azotobacter-type ferredoxins with an extended carboxyl (C-) terminal sequence compared to the common Clostridium-type. The evolutionary relationship of the two together with a putative one recently found to be encoded in nifENXQ region in this bacterium [Moreno-Vivian et al. (1989) J. Bacteriol. 171, 2591-2598] is discussed. PMID:2277040

  15. Complete nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence amplification and molecular analyses of Bangia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiajie; Jiang, Bo; Chai, Sanming; He, Yuan; Zhu, Jianyi; Shen, Zonggen; Shen, Songdong

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous Bangia, which are distributed extensively throughout the world, have simple and similar morphological characteristics. Scientists can classify these organisms using molecular markers in combination with morphology. We successfully sequenced the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA, approximately 13 kb in length, from a marine Bangia population. We further analyzed the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene (nrSSU) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence regions along with nine other marine, and two freshwater Bangia samples from China. Pairwise distances of the nrSSU and 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene sequences show the marine samples grouping together with low divergences (00.003; 0-0.006, respectively) from each other, but high divergences (0.123-0.126; 0.198, respectively) from freshwater samples. An exception is the marine sample collected from Weihai, which shows high divergence from both other marine samples (0.063-0.065; 0.129, respectively) and the freshwater samples (0.097; 0.120, respectively). A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree based on a combined SSU-ITS dataset with maximum likelihood method shows the samples divided into three clades, with the two marine sample clades containing Bangia spp. from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and one freshwater clade, containing Bangia atropurpurea from North America and China.

  16. Rtools: a web server for various secondary structural analyses on single RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Michiaki; Ono, Yukiteru; Kiryu, Hisanori; Sato, Kengo; Kato, Yuki; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Mori, Ryota; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The secondary structures, as well as the nucleotide sequences, are the important features of RNA molecules to characterize their functions. According to the thermodynamic model, however, the probability of any secondary structure is very small. As a consequence, any tool to predict the secondary structures of RNAs has limited accuracy. On the other hand, there are a few tools to compensate the imperfect predictions by calculating and visualizing the secondary structural information from RNA sequences. It is desirable to obtain the rich information from those tools through a friendly interface. We implemented a web server of the tools to predict secondary structures and to calculate various structural features based on the energy models of secondary structures. By just giving an RNA sequence to the web server, the user can get the different types of solutions of the secondary structures, the marginal probabilities such as base-paring probabilities, loop probabilities and accessibilities of the local bases, the energy changes by arbitrary base mutations as well as the measures for validations of the predicted secondary structures. The web server is available at http://rtools.cbrc.jp, which integrates software tools, CentroidFold, CentroidHomfold, IPKnot, CapR, Raccess, Rchange and RintD. PMID:27131356

  17. Complete nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence amplification and molecular analyses of Bangia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiajie; Jiang, Bo; Chai, Sanming; He, Yuan; Zhu, Jianyi; Shen, Zonggen; Shen, Songdong

    2016-09-01

    Filamentous Bangia, which are distributed extensively throughout the world, have simple and similar morphological characteristics. Scientists can classify these organisms using molecular markers in combination with morphology. We successfully sequenced the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA, approximately 13 kb in length, from a marine Bangia population. We further analyzed the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene (nrSSU) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence regions along with nine other marine, and two freshwater Bangia samples from China. Pairwise distances of the nrSSU and 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene sequences show the marine samples grouping together with low divergences (00.003; 0-0.006, respectively) from each other, but high divergences (0.123-0.126; 0.198, respectively) from freshwater samples. An exception is the marine sample collected from Weihai, which shows high divergence from both other marine samples (0.063-0.065; 0.129, respectively) and the freshwater samples (0.097; 0.120, respectively). A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree based on a combined SSU-ITS dataset with maximum likelihood method shows the samples divided into three clades, with the two marine sample clades containing Bangia spp. from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and one freshwater clade, containing Bangia atropurpurea from North America and China.

  18. Amino Acid Sequence of Anionic Peroxidase from the Windmill Palm Tree Trachycarpus fortunei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications. PMID:25383699

  19. Transcriptome analyses of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infecting chickpea and lentil using RNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes white mold of many important crops. To elucidate its pathogenic mechanisms, transcriptome analyses were used to study its interactions with chickpea and lentil. Five mRNA libraries were constructed from S. sclertiorum (strain WM-A1), healthy chickpea (cv. Spansih Whit...

  20. Isotopic analyses of nitrogenous compounds from the Murchison meteorite: ammonia, amines, amino acids, and polar hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, S.; Feng, X.; Epstein, S.; Cronin, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The combined volatile bases (ammonia, aliphatic amines, and possibly other bases), ammonia, amino acids, and polar hydrocarbons were prepared from the Murchison meteorite for isotopic analyses. The volatile bases were obtained by cryogenic transfer after acid-hydrolysis of a hot-water extract and analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of pentafluoropropionyl derivatives. The aliphatic amines present in this preparation comprise a mixture that includes both primary and secondary isomers through C5 at a total concentration of > or = 100 nmoles g-1. As commonly observed for meteoritic organic compounds, almost all isomers through C5 are present, and the concentrations within homologous series decrease with increasing chain length. Ammonia was chromatographically separated from the other volatile bases and found at a concentration of 1.1-1.3 micromoles g-1 meteorite. The ammonia analyzed includes contributions from ammonium salts and the hydrolysis of extractable organic compounds, e.g., carboxamides. Stable isotope analyses showed the volatile bases to be substantially enriched in the heavier isotopes, relative to comparable terrestrial compounds delta D < or = +1221%; delta 13C = +22%; delta 15N = +93%). Ammonia, per se, was found to have a somewhat lower delta 15N value (+69%) than the total volatile bases; consequently, a higher delta 15N (>93%) can be inferred for the other bases, which include the amines. Solvent-extractable polar hydrocarbons obtained separately were found to be enriched in 15N (delta 15N = +104%). Total amino acids, prepared from a hydrolyzed hot-water extract by cation exchange chromatography, gave a delta 15N of +94%, a value in good agreement with that obtained previously. Nitrogen isotopic data are also given for amino acid fractions separated chromatographically. The delta 15N values of the Murchison soluble organic compounds analyzed to date fall within a rather narrow range (delta 15N = +94 +/- 8%), an observation

  1. Protein chemotaxonomy. XIII. Amino acid sequence of ferredoxin from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Mino, Yoshiki

    2006-08-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the entire S-carboxymethylcysteinyl protein and of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion. This ferredoxin has a unique amino acid sequence, which includes an insertion of Tyr at the 3rd position from the amino-terminus and a deletion of two amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus. This ferredoxin had 18 differences in its amino acid sequence compared to that of Petroselinum sativum (Umbelliferae). In contrast, 23-33 differences were observed compared to other dicotyledonous plants. This suggests that Panax ginseng is related taxonomically to umbelliferous plants. PMID:16880642

  2. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  3. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  4. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing for Analyses of Clonality of Candida albicans Strains in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Odds, Frank C.; Wang, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Chi-Yang; Li, Shu-Ying

    2006-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the genetic profiles of 51 Candida albicans isolates collected from 12 hospitals in Taiwan. Among the 51 isolates, 16 were epidemiologically unrelated, 28 were isolates from 11 critically ill, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients, and 7 were long-term serial isolates from 3 HIV-positive patients. Internal regions of seven housekeeping genes were sequenced. A total of 83 polymorphic nucleotide sites were identified. Ten to 20 different genotypes were observed at the different loci, resulting, when combined, in 45 unique genotype combinations or diploid sequence types (DSTs). Thirty (36.1%) of the 83 individual changes were synonymous and 53 (63.9%) were nonsynonymous. Due to the diploid nature of C. albicans, MLST was more discriminatory than the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-BssHII-restricted fragment method in discriminating epidemiologically related strains. MLST is able to trace the microevolution over time of C. albicans isolates in the same patient. All but one of the DSTs of our Taiwanese strain collections were novel to the internet C. albicans DST database (http://test1.mlst.net/). The DSTs of C. albicans in Taiwan were analyzed together with those of the reference strains and of the strains from the United Kingdom and United States by unweighted-pair group method using average linkages and minimum spanning tree. Our result showed that the DNA type of each isolate was patient specific and associated with ABC type and decade of isolation but not associated with mating type, anatomical source of isolation, hospital origin, or fluconazole resistance patterns. PMID:16757617

  6. Analyses of MYMIV-induced transcriptome in Vigna mungo as revealed by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ganguli, Sayak; Dey, Avishek; Banik, Rahul; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus (MYMIV) is the viral pathogen that causes yellow mosaic disease to a number of legumes including Vigna mungo. VM84 is a recombinant inbred line resistant to MYMIV, developed in our laboratory through introgression of resistance trait from V. mungo line VM-1. Here we present the quality control passed transcriptome data of mock inoculated (control) and MYMIV-infected VM84, those have already been submitted in Sequence Read Archive (SRX1032950, SRX1082731) of NCBI. QC reports of FASTQ files generated by ‘SeqQC V2.2’ bioinformatics tool. PMID:26981413

  7. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses in Bornean sucker fishes (Balitoridae: Teleostei: Gastromyzontinae).

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Zohrah Haji; Hui, Tan Heok; Lim, Kelvin K P; Ng, Peter K L

    2006-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Bornean sucker fishes (Teleostei: Balitoridae: Gastromyzontinae) were investigated by comparing cytochrome b gene sequences from eight species. The results were in general agreement with previous morphology-based studies. It was found that the genera Gastromyzon and Neogastromyzon are both monophyletic and that the Chinese homalopterid Crossostoma lacustre (Homalopterinae) is not related to the Bornean species. This molecular-level study of cytochrome b gene variation in Bornean gastromyzontins will undoubtedly help to shed light on the molecular systematics of this unique freshwater fish. PMID:21395984

  8. Drug-Resistant Genotypes and Multi-Clonality in Plasmodium falciparum Analysed by Direct Genome Sequencing from Peripheral Blood of Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Auburn, Sarah; Assefa, Samuel A.; Polley, Spencer D.; Manske, Magnus; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Rockett, Kirk A.; Maslen, Gareth L.; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael A.; Chiodini, Peter L.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Clark, Taane G.; Sutherland, Colin J.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally acquired blood-stage infections of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum typically harbour multiple haploid clones. The apparent number of clones observed in any single infection depends on the diversity of the polymorphic markers used for the analysis, and the relative abundance of rare clones, which frequently fail to be detected among PCR products derived from numerically dominant clones. However, minority clones are of clinical interest as they may harbour genes conferring drug resistance, leading to enhanced survival after treatment and the possibility of subsequent therapeutic failure. We deployed new generation sequencing to derive genome data for five non-propagated parasite isolates taken directly from 4 different patients treated for clinical malaria in a UK hospital. Analysis of depth of coverage and length of sequence intervals between paired reads identified both previously described and novel gene deletions and amplifications. Full-length sequence data was extracted for 6 loci considered to be under selection by antimalarial drugs, and both known and previously unknown amino acid substitutions were identified. Full mitochondrial genomes were extracted from the sequencing data for each isolate, and these are compared against a panel of polymorphic sites derived from published or unpublished but publicly available data. Finally, genome-wide analysis of clone multiplicity was performed, and the number of infecting parasite clones estimated for each isolate. Each patient harboured at least 3 clones of P. falciparum by this analysis, consistent with results obtained with conventional PCR analysis of polymorphic merozoite antigen loci. We conclude that genome sequencing of peripheral blood P. falciparum taken directly from malaria patients provides high quality data useful for drug resistance studies, genomic structural analyses and population genetics, and also robustly represents clonal multiplicity. PMID:21853089

  9. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae).

    PubMed

    Hovde, Blake T; Deodato, Chloe R; Hunsperger, Heather M; Ryken, Scott A; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J; Barlow, Steven B; Starkenburg, Shawn R; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼ 40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two "red" RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes. PMID:26397803

  10. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ryken, Scott A.; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K.; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J.; Barlow, Steven B.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes. PMID:26397803

  11. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ryken, Scott A.; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K.; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J.; Barlow, Steven B.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Richardson, Paul M.

    2015-09-23

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. In conclusion, the Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.

  12. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hovde, Blake T.; Deodato, Chloe R.; Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ryken, Scott A.; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K.; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J.; Barlow, Steven B.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; et al

    2015-09-23

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. Themore » nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two “red” RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. In conclusion, the Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.« less

  13. Discrimination of prey species of juvenile swordfish Xiphias gladius (Linnaeus, 1758) using signature fatty acid analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jock W.; Guest, Michaela A.; Lansdell, Matt; Phleger, Charles F.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2010-07-01

    Signature lipid and fatty acid analysis were used to discriminate the diet of swordfish ( Xiphias gladius, orbital fork length: 60-203 cm) from waters off eastern Australia. The fatty acid (FA) composition of a range of known prey (squid, myctophids, and other fishes) of swordfish, taken from stomach samples and from net tows, was compared with that of the white muscle tissue (WMT) of swordfish from the same region. Swordfish muscle was lipid rich (average 24-42% dry weight), as was the skeleton (28-41%). The robustness of the approach was also tested by comparison against a key squid prey species that was collected and stored using different protocols: (i) fresh frozen, (ii) fresh frozen, then thawed, and (iii) stomach content collection. The FA profiles were generally similar, with the ratio of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and palmitic acid (16:0) in particular showing no significant difference. Major fatty acids in swordfish WMT were 18:1ω9c, 16:0, 22:6ω3, and 18:0. Multidimensional scaling showed that the swordfish WMT grouped closely with small fish prey including myctophids, and not with squid. Squid contained markedly higher 22:6ω3 than swordfish. Individual prey species of the myctophidae could also be separated by the same technique. These results were supported by traditional stomach content analyses (SCA) that showed fish were the dominant prey for small swordfish sampled from southern waters whereas squid were the main prey in more northern waters, matching the FA patterns we found for the two regions. We propose that where general diet patterns are established, signature FA analysis has good potential to compliment or in some cases, replace temporal and spatial monitoring of trophic pathways for swordfish and other marine species.

  14. Fad7 gene identification and fatty acids phenotypic variation in an olive collection by EcoTILLING and sequencing approaches.

    PubMed

    Sabetta, Wilma; Blanco, Antonio; Zelasco, Samanta; Lombardo, Luca; Perri, Enzo; Mangini, Giacomo; Montemurro, Cinzia

    2013-08-01

    The ω-3 fatty acid desaturases (FADs) are enzymes responsible for catalyzing the conversion of linoleic acid to α-linolenic acid localized in the plastid or in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this research we report the genotypic and phenotypic variation of Italian Olea europaea L. germoplasm for the fatty acid composition. The phenotypic oil characterization was followed by the molecular analysis of the plastidial-type ω-3 FAD gene (fad7) (EC 1.14.19), whose full-length sequence has been here identified in cultivar Leccino. The gene consisted of 2635 bp with 8 exons and 5'- and 3'-UTRs of 336 and 282 bp respectively, and showed a high level of heterozygousity (1/110 bp). The natural allelic variation was investigated both by a LiCOR EcoTILLING assay and the PCR product direct sequencing. Only three haplotypes were identified among the 96 analysed cultivars, highlighting the strong degree of conservation of this gene. PMID:23685785

  15. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijie; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Silva, Ana Marta; Coombs, Graham H.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts. PMID:26368322

  16. Does more sequence data improve estimates of galliform phylogeny? Analyses of a rapid radiation using a complete data matrix

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    The resolution of rapid evolutionary radiations or “bushes” in the tree of life has been one of the most difficult and interesting problems in phylogenetics. The avian order Galliformes appears to have undergone several rapid radiations that have limited the resolution of prior studies and obscured the position of taxa important both agriculturally and as model systems (chicken, turkey, Japanese quail). Here we present analyses of a multi-locus data matrix comprising over 15,000 sites, primarily from nuclear introns but also including three mitochondrial regions, from 46 galliform taxa with all gene regions sampled for all taxa. The increased sampling of unlinked nuclear genes provided strong bootstrap support for all but a small number of relationships. Coalescent-based methods to combine individual gene trees and analyses of datasets that are independent of published data indicated that this well-supported topology is likely to reflect the galliform species tree. The inclusion or exclusion of mitochondrial data had a limited impact upon analyses upon analyses using either concatenated data or multispecies coalescent methods. Some of the key phylogenetic findings include support for a second major clade within the core phasianids that includes the chicken and Japanese quail and clarification of the phylogenetic relationships of turkey. Jackknifed datasets suggested that there is an advantage to sampling many independent regions across the genome rather than obtaining long sequences for a small number of loci, possibly reflecting the differences among gene trees that differ due to incomplete lineage sorting. Despite the novel insights we obtained using this increased sampling of gene regions, some nodes remain unresolved, likely due to periods of rapid diversification. Resolving these remaining groups will likely require sequencing a very large number of gene regions, but our analyses now appear to support a robust backbone for this order. PMID:24795852

  17. Reprint of "Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of novel totivirus-like double-stranded RNAs from field-collected powdery mildew fungi".

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Hisano, Sakae; Chiba, Sotaro; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Fujimori, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The identification of mycoviruses contributes greatly to understanding of the diversity and evolutionary aspects of viruses. Powdery mildew fungi are important and widely studied obligate phytopathogenic agents, but there has been no report on mycoviruses infecting these fungi. In this study, we used a deep sequencing approach to analyze the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments isolated from field-collected samples of powdery mildew fungus-infected red clover plants in Japan. Database searches identified the presence of at least ten totivirus (genus Totivirus)-like sequences, termed red clover powdery mildew-associated totiviruses (RPaTVs). The majority of these sequences shared moderate amino acid sequence identity with each other (<44%) and with other known totiviruses (<59%). Nine of these identified sequences (RPaTV1a, 1b and 2-8) resembled the genome of the prototype totivirus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae virus-L-A (ScV-L-A) in that they contained two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) encoding a putative coat protein (CP) and an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), while one sequence (RPaTV9) showed similarity to another totivirus, Ustilago maydis virus H1 (UmV-H1) that encodes a single polyprotein (CP-RdRp fusion). Similar to yeast totiviruses, each ScV-L-A-like RPaTV contains a -1 ribosomal frameshift site downstream of a predicted pseudoknot structure in the overlapping region of these ORFs, suggesting that the RdRp is translated as a CP-RdRp fusion. Moreover, several ScV-L-A-like sequences were also found by searches of the transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) libraries from rust fungi, plants and insects. Phylogenetic analyses show that nine ScV-L-A-like RPaTVs along with ScV-L-A-like sequences derived from TSA libraries are clustered with most established members of the genus Totivirus, while one RPaTV forms a new distinct clade with UmV-H1, possibly establishing an additional genus in the family. Taken together, our results indicate the presence of

  18. GIbPSs: a toolkit for fast and accurate analyses of genotyping-by-sequencing data without a reference genome.

    PubMed

    Hapke, A; Thiele, D

    2016-07-01

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) and related methods are increasingly used for studies of non-model organisms from population genetic to phylogenetic scales. We present GIbPSs, a new genotyping toolkit for the analysis of data from various protocols such as RAD, double-digest RAD, GBS, and two-enzyme GBS without a reference genome. GIbPSs can handle paired-end GBS data and is able to assign reads from both strands of a restriction fragment to the same locus. GIbPSs is most suitable for population genetic and phylogeographic analyses. It avoids genotyping errors due to indel variation by identifying and discarding affected loci. GIbPSs creates a genotype database that offers rich functionality for data filtering and export in numerous formats. We performed comparative analyses of simulated and real GBS data with GIbPSs and another program, pyRAD. This program accounts for indel variation by aligning homologous sequences. GIbPSs performed better than pyRAD in several aspects. It required much less computation time and displayed higher genotyping accuracy. GIbPSs retained smaller numbers of loci overall in analyses of real GBS data. It nevertheless delivered more complete genotype matrices with greater locus overlap between individuals and greater numbers of loci sampled in all individuals. PMID:26858004

  19. Genomic sequencing and analyses of HearMNPV—a new Multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus isolated from Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HearMNPV, a nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV), which infects the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, comprises multiple rod-shaped nucleocapsids in virion(as detected by electron microscopy). HearMNPV shows a different host range compared with H. armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearSNPV). To better understand HearMNPV, the HearMNPV genome was sequenced and analyzed. Methods The morphology of HearMNPV was observed by electron microscope. The qPCR was used to determine the replication kinetics of HearMNPV infectious for H. armigera in vivo. A random genomic library of HearMNPV was constructed according to the “partial filling-in” method, the sequence and organization of the HearMNPV genome was analyzed and compared with sequence data from other baculoviruses. Results Real time qPCR showed that HearMNPV DNA replication included a decreasing phase, latent phase, exponential phase, and a stationary phase during infection of H. armigera. The HearMNPV genome consists of 154,196 base pairs, with a G + C content of 40.07%. 162 putative ORFs were detected in the HearMNPV genome, which represented 90.16% of the genome. The remaining 9.84% constitute four homologous regions and other non-coding regions. The gene content and gene arrangement in HearMNPV were most similar to those of Mamestra configurata NPV-B (MacoNPV-B), but was different to HearSNPV. Comparison of the genome of HearMNPV and MacoNPV-B suggested that HearMNPV has a deletion of a 5.4-kb fragment containing five ORFs. In addition, HearMNPV orf66, bro genes, and hrs are different to the corresponding parts of the MacoNPV-B genome. Conclusions HearMNPV can replicate in vivo in H. armigera and in vitro, and is a new NPV isolate distinguished from HearSNPV. HearMNPV is most closely related to MacoNPV-B, but has a distinct genomic structure, content, and organization. PMID:22913743

  20. Novel evolutionary lineages in Labeobarbus (Cypriniformes; Cyprinidae) based on phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Beshera, Kebede A; Harris, Phillip M; Mayden, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within Labeobarbus, the large-sized hexaploid cyprinids, were examined using cytochrome b gene sequences from a broad range of geographic localities and multiple taxa. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed novel lineages from previously unsampled drainages in central (Congo River), eastern (Genale River) and southeastern (Revue and Mussapa Grande rivers) Africa. Relationships of some species of Varicorhinus in Africa (excluding 'V.' maroccanus) render Labeobarbus as paraphyletic. 'Varicorhinus' beso, 'V.' jubae, 'V.' mariae, 'V.' nelspruitensis, and 'V.' steindachneri are transferred to Labeobarbus. Bayesian estimation of time to most recent common ancestor suggested that Labeobarbus originated in the Late Miocene while lineage diversification began during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene and continued to the late Pleistocene. The relationships presented herein provide phylogenetic resolution within Labeobarbus and advances our knowledge of genetic diversity within the lineage as well as provides some interesting insight into the hydrographic and geologic history of Africa. PMID:27394501

  1. Cytogenetic and Sequence Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA Insertions in Nuclear Chromosomes of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Ashley N.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Hussain, Abid; Roark, Leah M.; Langewisch, Tiffany L.; Backes, Teresa; Kremling, Karl A. G.; Jiang, Jiming; Birchler, James A.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into nuclear genomes is a regularly occurring process that has been observed in many species. Few studies, however, have focused on the variation of nuclear-mtDNA sequences (NUMTs) within a species. This study examined mtDNA insertions within chromosomes of a diverse set of Zea mays ssp. mays (maize) inbred lines by the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization. A relatively large NUMT on the long arm of chromosome 9 (9L) was identified at approximately the same position in four inbred lines (B73, M825, HP301, and Oh7B). Further examination of the similarly positioned 9L NUMT in two lines, B73 and M825, indicated that the large size of these sites is due to the presence of a majority of the mitochondrial genome; however, only portions of this NUMT (∼252 kb total) were found in the publically available B73 nuclear sequence for chromosome 9. Fiber-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis estimated the size of the B73 9L NUMT to be ∼1.8 Mb and revealed that the NUMT is methylated. Two regions of mtDNA (2.4 kb and 3.3 kb) within the 9L NUMT are not present in the B73 mitochondrial NB genome; however, these 2.4-kb and 3.3-kb segments are present in other Zea mitochondrial genomes, including that of Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, a progenitor of domesticated maize. PMID:26333837

  2. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  3. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  4. Genome-Wide Linkage, Exome Sequencing and Functional Analyses Identify ABCB6 as the Pathogenic Gene of Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Xuechao; Sheng, Donglai; Fu, Xi’an; See, Kelvin; Foo, Jia Nee; Low, Huiqi; Liany, Herty; Irwan, Ishak Darryl; Liu, Jian; Yang, Baoqi; Chen, Mingfei; Yu, Yongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Niu, Guiye; You, Jiabao; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Shanshan; Wang, Ting; Yan, Xiaoxiao; Goh, Boon Kee; Common, John E. A.; Lane, Birgitte E.; Sun, Yonghu; Zhou, Guizhi; Lu, Xianmei; Wang, Zhenhua; Tian, Hongqing; Cao, Yuanhua; Chen, Shumin; Liu, Qiji; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Background As a genetic disorder of abnormal pigmentation, the molecular basis of dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) had remained unclear until recently when ABCB6 was reported as a causative gene of DUH. Methodology We performed genome-wide linkage scan using Illumina Human 660W-Quad BeadChip and exome sequencing analyses using Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon Kits in a multiplex Chinese DUH family to identify the pathogenic mutations and verified the candidate mutations using Sanger sequencing. Quantitative RT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry was performed to verify the expression of the pathogenic gene, Zebrafish was also used to confirm the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation. Results Genome-wide linkage (assuming autosomal dominant inheritance mode) and exome sequencing analyses identified ABCB6 as the disease candidate gene by discovering a coding mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val) that co-segregates with the disease phenotype. Further mutation analysis of ABCB6 in four other DUH families and two sporadic cases by Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val) and discovered a second, co-segregating coding mutation (c.964A>C; p.Ser322Lys) in one of the four families. Both mutations were heterozygous in DUH patients and not present in the 1000 Genome Project and dbSNP database as well as 1,516 unrelated Chinese healthy controls. Expression analysis in human skin and mutagenesis interrogation in zebrafish confirmed the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation. Given the involvement of ABCB6 mutations in coloboma, we performed ophthalmological examination of the DUH carriers of ABCB6 mutations and found ocular abnormalities in them. Conclusion Our study has advanced our understanding of DUH pathogenesis and revealed the shared pathological mechanism between pigmentary DUH and ocular coloboma. PMID:24498303

  5. [Sequencing Analyses of the Hypervariable Region within the VP2 Gene of a Strain of the Aleutian Mink Disease Virus].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Hu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Hailing; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenjun; Ma, Fanshu; Yan, Xijun; Wu, Wei; Xu, Shujuan

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the molecular mechanisms of cross-host transmission of the Aleutian mink disease vi rus (ADV), the hypervariable region fragment of the VP2 gene of the ADV in Jilin Province (China) was amplified. Sequencing analyses showed diversity at residue 174 by comparison with other VP2 genes in GenBank. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the ADV-JL strain had a close relationship with the highly pathogenic strain from Denmark: ADV-K. Results implied that residue 174 may be associated with ADV infectivity. PMID:26470526

  6. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  7. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  8. RAPD and Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analyses Reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a Section Luxuriantes Species Close to Zea luxurians

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Lu, Yanli; Zheng, Mingmin; Rong, Tingzhao; Tang, Qilin

    2011-01-01

    Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species. PMID:21525982

  9. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  10. Comprehensive analyses of prostate gene expression: convergence of expressed sequence tag databases, transcript profiling and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nelson, P S; Han, D; Rochon, Y; Corthals, G L; Lin, B; Monson, A; Nguyen, V; Franza, B R; Plymate, S R; Aebersold, R; Hood, L

    2000-05-01

    Several methods have been developed for the comprehensive analysis of gene expression in complex biological systems. Generally these procedures assess either a portion of the cellular transcriptome or a portion of the cellular proteome. Each approach has distinct conceptual and methodological advantages and disadvantages. We have investigated the application of both methods to characterize the gene expression pathway mediated by androgens and the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells. This pathway is of critical importance for the development and progression of prostate cancer. Of clinical importance, modulation of androgens remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced disease. To facilitate global gene expression studies we have first sought to define the prostate transcriptome by assembling and annotating prostate-derived expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 55000 prostate ESTs were assembled into a set of 15953 clusters putatively representing 15953 distinct transcripts. These clusters were used to construct cDNA microarrays suitable for examining the androgen-response pathway at the level of transcription. The expression of 20 genes was found to be induced by androgens. This cohort included known androgen-regulated genes such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and several novel complementary DNAs (cDNAs). Protein expression profiles of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer cells were generated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometric analysis of androgen-regulated proteins in these cells identified the metastasis-suppressor gene NDKA/nm23, a finding that may explain a marked reduction in metastatic potential when these cells express a functional androgen receptor pathway. PMID:10870968

  11. Evolution and biogeography of Centaurea section Acrocentron inferred from nuclear and plastid DNA sequence analyses

    PubMed Central

    Font, Mònica; Garcia-Jacas, Núria; Vilatersana, Roser; Roquet, Cristina; Susanna, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Section Acrocentron of the genus Centaurea is one of the largest sections of Centaurea with approx. 100 species. The geographic distribution, centred in the Mediterranean, makes it an excellent example for studies of the biogeographic history of this biodiversity-rich region. Methods Plastid (trnH-psbA) and nuclear (ITS and ETS) DNA sequence analysis was used for phylogenetic reconstruction. Ancestral biogeographic patterns were inferred by dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA). Key Results The resulting phylogeny has implications for the sectional classification of Acrocentron and confirms merging sect. Chamaecyanus into Acrocentron as a subsection. Previous suggestions of an eastern Mediterranean origin of the group are confirmed. The main centres of diversification established in previous studies are now strongly supported. Expansion of the group in two different radiations that followed patently diverse paths is inferred. Conclusions Radiation followed two waves, widely separated in time scale. The oldest one, from Turkey to Greece and the northern Balkans and then to North Africa and Iberia, should be dated at the end of the Miocene in the Messinian period. It reached the Iberian Peninsula from the south, following a route that is landmarked by several relictic taxa in Sicily and North Africa. A later radiation during the Holocene interglacial periods followed, involving species from the north of the Balkan Peninsula, along a Eurasian pathway running from Central Iberia to the steppes of Kazakhstan. A generalized pattern of reticulation is also evident from the results, indicating past contacts between presently separated species. Molecular data also confirmed the extent of hybridization within Acrocentron and were successful in reconstructing the paleogeography of the section. PMID:19228702

  12. Ab initio detection of fuzzy amino acid tandem repeats in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repetitions within protein amino acid sequences often correspond to regular secondary structures and form multi-repeat 3D assemblies of varied size and function. Developing internal repetitions is one of the evolutionary mechanisms that proteins employ to adapt their structure and function under evolutionary pressure. While there is keen interest in understanding such phenomena, detection of repeating structures based only on sequence analysis is considered an arduous task, since structure and function is often preserved even under considerable sequence divergence (fuzzy tandem repeats). Results In this paper we present PTRStalker, a new algorithm for ab-initio detection of fuzzy tandem repeats in protein amino acid sequences. In the reported results we show that by feeding PTRStalker with amino acid sequences from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database we detect novel tandemly repeated structures not captured by other state-of-the-art tools. Experiments with membrane proteins indicate that PTRStalker can detect global symmetries in the primary structure which are then reflected in the tertiary structure. Conclusions PTRStalker is able to detect fuzzy tandem repeating structures in protein sequences, with performance beyond the current state-of-the art. Such a tool may be a valuable support to investigating protein structural properties when tertiary X-ray data is not available. PMID:22536906

  13. Phylogeography and evolution in matsutake and close allies inferred by analyses of ITS sequences and AFLPs.

    PubMed

    Chapela, Ignacio H; Garbelotto, Matteo

    2004-01-01

    Matsutake are commercially important ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes in the genus Tricholoma. Despite their importance, the systematics of this species complex have remained elusive and little is known about their origin and biogeography. Using DNA analyses on a worldwide sample of matsutake, we present here the first comprehensive definition of natural groupings in this species complex. We infer patterns of migration and propose Eocene origins for the group in western North America by a transfer from an angiosperm-associated ancestor to an increasingly specialized conifer symbiont. From these origins, matsutake appear to have followed migratory routes parallel to those of coniferous hosts. Patterns of vicariance between eastern North America and eastern Asia are resolved and their origins are suggested to stem from migration through Beringia. Using an analysis of genetic dissimilarity and geographical distance, we reject both the possibility that migration into Europe and Asia occurred through Atlantic bridges and the connection between matsutake populations in the Mahgrebi Mountains and those from Europe. Instead, African and European matsutake appear to be the most recent ends of a westward expansion of the domain of these fungi from North America. PMID:21148894

  14. The amino-acid sequence of leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean).

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, P; Ellfolk, N

    1975-06-01

    1. Leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was digested with trypsin; 15 tryptic peptides and free lysine were purified and the amino acid sequences of the peptides determined. 2. The internal order of the tryptic peptides was determined by the bridge peptides obtained from the thermolytic digest and the dilute acid hydrolyzate of kidney bean leghemoglobin a; 12 thermolytic peptides and two acid hydrolysis peptides were purified and the sequences were partially or completely determined. 3. The complete amino acid sequence of kidney bean leghemoglobin a is compared to that of leghemoglobin a from soybean (Glycine max) and to some animal globins. As regards sequence, the kidney bean globin has 79% identity with the soybean globin and 21% identity with human hemoglobin gamma-chain. Seven of the 14 amino acid residues common to most globins are found in the kidney bean globin. Trp-15 and Tyr-145 are evolutionarily conserved in this globin, which confirms the concept of a common origin of animal and plant globins. PMID:809270

  15. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 2 Amino Acid Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Cao, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Berger, E. L.; Messenger, S.; Clemett, S. J.; Aponte, J. C.; Elsila, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble, unstructured kerogen-like components, as well as structured nano-globules of macromolecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Due to the differences in extractability of soluble and insoluble organic materials, the analysis methods for each differ and are often performed independently. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses, when performed concurrently, can provide a wider understanding of spatial distribution, and elemental, structural and isotopic composition of organic material in primitive meteorites. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques in combination with in situ microscale observation, we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in the primitive CR2 chondrite Miller Range (MIL) 090657. In accompanying abstracts (Cao et al. and Messenger et al.) we discuss insoluble organic material in the samples. By performing the consortium studies, we aim to improve our understanding of the relationship between the meteorite minerals and the soluble and insoluble organic phases and to delineate which species formed within the meteorite and those that formed in nebular or presolar environments. In this abstract, we present the results of amino acid analyses of MIL 090657 by ultra performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acids are of interest because they are essential to life on Earth, and because they are present in sufficient structural, enantiomeric and isotopic diversity to allow insights into early solar system chemical processes. Furthermore, these are among the most isotopically anomalous species, yet at least some fraction are thought to have formed by aqueously-mediated processes during parent body alteration.

  16. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  17. NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing and Pharmacological CellMiner Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D.; Davis, Sean R.; Reinhold, Spencer W.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, “Genetic variant versus drug visualization”, provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, “Genetic variant summation” allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based Cell

  18. New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Bairoch, A

    1993-01-01

    301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes corresponding to 39 EC entries of the I.U.B. classification system have been classified into 35 families on the basis of amino-acid-sequence similarities [Henrissat (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 309-316]. Approximately half of the families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number), whereas the other half were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). A > 60% increase in sequence data for glycosyl hydrolases (181 additional enzymes or enzyme domains sequences have since become available) allowed us to update the classification not only by the addition of more members to already identified families, but also by the finding of ten new families. On the basis of a comparison of 482 sequences corresponding to 52 EC entries, 45 families, out of which 22 are polyspecific, can now be defined. This classification has been implemented in the SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank. PMID:8352747

  19. A classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of 301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes have been compared. A total of 291 sequences corresponding to 39 EC entries could be classified into 35 families. Only ten sequences (less than 5% of the sample) could not be assigned to any family. With the sequences available for this analysis, 18 families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number) and 17 were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). Implications on the folding characteristics and mechanism of action of these enzymes and on the evolution of carbohydrate metabolism are discussed. With the steady increase in sequence and structural data, it is suggested that the enzyme classification system should perhaps be revised. PMID:1747104

  20. Sequence-specific purification of nucleic acids by PNA-controlled hybrid selection.

    PubMed

    Orum, H; Nielsen, P E; Jørgensen, M; Larsson, C; Stanley, C; Koch, T

    1995-09-01

    Using an oligohistidine peptide nucleic acids (oligohistidine-PNA) chimera, we have developed a rapid hybrid selection method that allows efficient, sequence-specific purification of a target nucleic acid. The method exploits two fundamental features of PNA. First, that PNA binds with high affinity and specificity to its complementary nucleic acid. Second, that amino acids are easily attached to the PNA oligomer during synthesis. We show that a (His)6-PNA chimera exhibits strong binding to chelated Ni2+ ions without compromising its native PNA hybridization properties. We further show that these characteristics allow the (His)6-PNA/DNA complex to be purified by the well-established method of metal ion affinity chromatography using a Ni(2+)-NTA (nitrilotriactic acid) resin. Specificity and efficiency are the touchstones of any nucleic acid purification scheme. We show that the specificity of the (His)6-PNA selection approach is such that oligonucleotides differing by only a single nucleotide can be selectively purified. We also show that large RNAs (2224 nucleotides) can be captured with high efficiency by using multiple (His)6-PNA probes. PNA can hybridize to nucleic acids in low-salt concentrations that destabilize native nucleic acid structures. We demonstrate that this property of PNA can be utilized to purify an oligonucleotide in which the target sequence forms part of an intramolecular stem/loop structure. PMID:7495562

  1. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  3. Stable Isotope and Signature Fatty Acid Analyses Suggest Reef Manta Rays Feed on Demersal Zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Lydie I. E.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Jaine, Fabrice R. A.; Bennett, Michael B.; Townsend, Kathy A.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa). Stable isotope δ15N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ13C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs. PMID:24167562

  4. Comparative molecular cytogenetic analyses of a major tandemly repeated DNA family and retrotransposon sequences in cultivated jute Corchorus species (Malvaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rabeya; Zakrzewski, Falk; Menzel, Gerhard; Weber, Beatrice; Alam, Sheikh Shamimul; Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The cultivated jute species Corchorus olitorius and Corchorus capsularis are important fibre crops. The analysis of repetitive DNA sequences, comprising a major part of plant genomes, has not been carried out in jute but is useful to investigate the long-range organization of chromosomes. The aim of this study was the identification of repetitive DNA sequences to facilitate comparative molecular and cytogenetic studies of two jute cultivars and to develop a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) karyotype for chromosome identification. Methods A plasmid library was generated from C. olitorius and C. capsularis with genomic restriction fragments of 100–500 bp, which was complemented by targeted cloning of satellite DNA by PCR. The diversity of the repetitive DNA families was analysed comparatively. The genomic abundance and chromosomal localization of different repeat classes were investigated by Southern analysis and FISH, respectively. The cytosine methylation of satellite arrays was studied by immunolabelling. Key Results Major satellite repeats and retrotransposons have been identified from C. olitorius and C. capsularis. The satellite family CoSat I forms two undermethylated species-specific subfamilies, while the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons CoRetro I and CoRetro II show similarity to the Metaviridea of plant retroelements. FISH karyotypes were developed by multicolour FISH using these repetitive DNA sequences in combination with 5S and 18S–5·8S–25S rRNA genes which enable the unequivocal chromosome discrimination in both jute species. Conclusions The analysis of the structure and diversity of the repeated DNA is crucial for genome sequence annotation. The reference karyotypes will be useful for breeding of jute and provide the basis for karyotyping homeologous chromosomes of wild jute species to reveal the genetic and evolutionary relationship between cultivated and wild Corchorus species. PMID:23666888

  5. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J; Rothfels, Carl J; Johnson, Matthew G; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data were generated for nine taxa in Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta). Analyses of frequency plots for synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks ) between paralogous gene pairs and reconciliation of 578 gene trees were conducted to assess evidence of large-scale or genome-wide duplication events in each transcriptome. Both Ks frequency plots and gene tree-based analyses indicate multiple duplication events in the history of the Sphagnopsida. The most recent WGD event predates divergence of Sphagnum from the two other genera of Sphagnopsida. Duplicate retention is highly variable across species, which might be best explained by local adaptation. Our analyses indicate that the last WGD could have been an important factor underlying the diversification of peatmosses and facilitated their rise to ecological dominance in peatlands. The timing of the duplication events and their significance in the evolutionary history of peat mosses are discussed. PMID:26900928

  6. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of the Mu heavy chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Putnam, F W; Florent, G; Paul, C; Shinoda, T; Shimizu, A

    1973-10-19

    The amino acid sequence of the micro, chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin, including the location of all disulfide bridges and oligosaccharides, has been determined. The homology of the constant regions of immunoglobulin micro, gamma, alpha, and epsilon heavy chains reveals evolutionary relationships and suggests that two genes code for each heavy chain. PMID:4742735

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  10. The sequence diversity and expression among genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway in industrial Saccharomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Goncerzewicz, Anna; Misiewicz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Folic acid is an important vitamin in human nutrition and its deficiency in pregnant women's diets results in neural tube defects and other neurological damage to the fetus. Additionally, DNA synthesis, cell division and intestinal absorption are inhibited in case of adults. Since this discovery, governments and health organizations worldwide have made recommendations concerning folic acid supplementation of food for women planning to become pregnant. In many countries this has led to the introduction of fortifications, where synthetic folic acid is added to flour. It is known that Saccharomyces strains (brewing and bakers' yeast) are one of the main producers of folic acid and they can be used as a natural source of this vitamin. Proper selection of the most efficient strains may enhance the folate content in bread, fermented vegetables, dairy products and beer by 100% and may be used in the food industry. The objective of this study was to select the optimal producing yeast strain by determining the differences in nucleotide sequences in the FOL2, FOL3 and DFR1 genes of folic acid biosynthesis pathway. The Multitemperature Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (MSSCP) method and further nucleotide sequencing for selected strains were applied to indicate SNPs in selected gene fragments. The RT qPCR technique was also applied to examine relative expression of the FOL3 gene. Furthermore, this is the first time ever that industrial yeast strains were analysed regarding genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway. It was observed that a correlation exists between the folic acid amount produced by industrial yeast strains and changes in the nucleotide sequence of adequate genes. The most significant changes occur in the DFR1 gene, mostly in the first part, which causes major protein structure modifications in KKP 232, KKP 222 and KKP 277 strains. Our study shows that the large amount of SNP contributes to impairment of the selected enzymes and S. cerevisiae and S