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Sample records for acid signaling pathways

  1. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  2. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment. PMID:27060495

  3. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. PMID:26594836

  4. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  5. Phospholipase D Signaling Pathways and Phosphatidic Acid as Therapeutic Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruntz, Ronald C.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein–coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions. PMID:25244928

  6. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26378497

  7. Bile acid promotes liver regeneration via farnesoid X receptor signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long; Yang, Yu; Qu, Yikun; Yang, Ting; Wang, Kaifeng; Liu, Weixin; Xia, Weibin

    2015-06-01

    Bile acids, which are synthesized from cholesterol in the hepatocytes of the liver, are amphipathic molecules with a steroid backbone. Studies have shown that bile acid exhibits important effects on liver regeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bile acid and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) on hepatic regeneration and lipid metabolism. Rats were fed with 0.2% bile acid or glucose for 7 days and then subjected to a 50 or 70% hepatectomy. Hepatic regeneration rate, serum and liver levels of bile acid, and expression of FXR and Caveolin‑1, were detected at 24, 48 or 72 h following hepatectomy. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the liver was measured using immunohistochemistry at the end of the study. Hepatocytes isolated from rats were treated with bile acid, glucose, FXR agonist and FXR antagonist, separately or in combination. Lipid metabolism, the expression of members of the FXR signaling pathway and energy metabolism‑related factors were measured using ELISA kits or western blotting. Bile acid significantly increased the hepatic regeneration rate and the expression of FXR, Caveolin‑1 and PCNA. Levels of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein were increased in bile acid‑ or FXR agonist‑treated hepatocytes in vitro. Levels of triglyceride, low density lipoprotein and free fatty acid were decreased. In addition, bile acid and FXR agonists increased the expression of bile salt export pump and small heterodimer partner, and downregulated the expression of apical sodium‑dependent bile acid transporter, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and cholesterol 7α‑hydroxylase. These results suggested that physiological concentrations of bile acid may promote liver regeneration via FXR signaling pathways, and may be associated with energy metabolism. PMID:25634785

  8. Drosophila Fatty Acid Taste Signals through the PLC Pathway in Sugar-Sensing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs) signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids. PMID:24068941

  9. Once and again: retinoic acid signaling in the developing and regenerating olfactory pathway.

    PubMed

    Rawson, N E; LaMantia, A-S

    2006-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a member of the steroid/thyroid superfamily of signaling molecules, is an essential regulator of morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration in the mammalian olfactory pathway. RA-mediated teratogenesis dramatically alters olfactory pathway development, presumably by disrupting retinoid-mediated inductive signaling that influences initial olfactory epithelium (OE) and bulb (OB) morphogenesis. Subsequently, RA modulates the genesis, growth, or stability of subsets of OE cells and OB interneurons. RA receptors, cofactors, and synthetic enzymes are expressed in the OE, OB, and anterior subventricular zone (SVZ), the site of neural precursors that generate new OB interneurons throughout adulthood. Their expression apparently accommodates RA signaling in OE cells, OB interneurons, and slowly dividing SVZ neural precursors. Deficiency of vitamin A, the dietary metabolic RA precursor, leads to cytological changes in the OE, as well as olfactory sensory deficits. Vitamin A therapy in animals with olfactory system damage can accelerate functional recovery. RA-related pathology as well as its potential therapeutic activity may reflect endogenous retinoid regulation of neuronal differentiation, stability, or regeneration in the olfactory pathway from embryogenesis through adulthood. These influences may be in register with retinoid effects on immune responses, metabolism, and modulation of food intake. PMID:16688760

  10. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  11. From carrot to clinic: an overview of the retinoic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Theodosiou, Maria; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin A is essential for the formation and maintenance of many body tissues. It is also important for embryonic growth and development and can act as a teratogen at critical periods of development. Retinoic acid (RA) is the biologically active form of vitamin A and its signaling is mediated by the RA and retinoid X receptors. In addition to its role as an important molecule during development, RA has also been implicated in clinical applications, both as a potential anti-tumor agent as well as for the treatment of skin diseases. This review presents an overview of how dietary retinoids are converted to RA, hence presenting the major players in RA metabolism and signaling, and highlights examples of treatment applications of retinoids. Moreover, we discuss the origin and diversification of the retinoid pathway, which are important factors for understanding the evolution of ligand-specificity among retinoid receptors. PMID:20140749

  12. Retinoic Acid-Dependent Signaling Pathways and Lineage Events in the Developing Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rebecca Lee Yean; Finnell, Richard H.; Dollé, Pascal; Niederreither, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Studies in avian models have demonstrated an involvement of retinoid signaling in early neural tube patterning. The roles of this signaling pathway at later stages of spinal cord development are only partly characterized. Here we use Raldh2-null mouse mutants rescued from early embryonic lethality to study the consequences of lack of endogenous retinoic acid (RA) in the differentiating spinal cord. Mid-gestation RA deficiency produces prominent structural and molecular deficiencies in dorsal regions of the spinal cord. While targets of Wnt signaling in the dorsal neuronal lineage are unaltered, reductions in Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) and Notch signaling are clearly observed. We further provide evidence that endogenous RA is capable of driving stem cell differentiation. Raldh2 deficiency results in a decreased number of spinal cord derived neurospheres, which exhibit a reduced differentiation potential. Raldh2-null neurospheres have a decreased number of cells expressing the neuronal marker β-III-tubulin, while the nestin-positive cell population is increased. Hence, in vivo retinoid deficiency impaired neural stem cell growth. We propose that RA has separable functions in the developing spinal cord to (i) maintain high levels of FGF and Notch signaling and (ii) drive stem cell differentiation, thus restricting both the numbers and the pluripotent character of neural stem cells. PMID:22396766

  13. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented. PMID:24767113

  14. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato hijacks the Arabidopsis abscisic acid signalling pathway to cause disease

    PubMed Central

    de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Bennett, Mark H; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Mansfield, John W; Rodriguez Egea, Pedro; Bögre, Laszlo; Grant, Murray

    2007-01-01

    We have found that a major target for effectors secreted by Pseudomonas syringae is the abscisic acid (ABA) signalling pathway. Microarray data identified a prominent group of effector-induced genes that were associated with ABA biosynthesis and also responses to this plant hormone. Genes upregulated by effector delivery share a 42% overlap with ABA-responsive genes and are also components of networks induced by osmotic stress and drought. Strongly induced were NCED3, encoding a key enzyme of ABA biosynthesis, and the abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABI1) clade of genes encoding protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs) involved in the regulation of ABA signalling. Modification of PP2C expression resulting in ABA insensitivity or hypersensitivity led to restriction or enhanced multiplication of bacteria, respectively. Levels of ABA increased rapidly during bacterial colonisation. Exogenous ABA application enhanced susceptibility, whereas colonisation was reduced in an ABA biosynthetic mutant. Expression of the bacterial effector AvrPtoB in planta modified host ABA signalling. Our data suggest that a major virulence strategy is effector-mediated manipulation of plant hormone homeostasis, which leads to the suppression of defence responses. PMID:17304219

  15. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep

    2010-04-15

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-gamma and attenuated the level of TNF-alpha in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IkappaBalpha and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  16. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27278104

  17. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27278104

  18. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  19. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  20. Differential Modulation of Nods Signaling Pathways by Fatty Acids in Human Colonic Epithelial HCT116 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing proteins (Nods) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognizing conserved moieties of bacterial peptidoglycan through their leucine-rich repeats (LRR) domain. The agonists for Nods activate proinflammtory signaling pathways incl...

  1. Wnt signaling pathway participates in valproic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan; Li, Sen; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells that have the capacity for differentiation into the major cell types of the nervous system, i.e. neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely prescribed drug for seizures and bipolar disorder in clinic. Previously, a number of researches have been shown that VPA has differential effects on growth, proliferation and differentiation in many types of cells. However, whether VPA can induce NSCs from embryonic cerebral cortex differentiate into neurons and its possible molecular mechanism is also not clear. Wnt signaling is implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation during CNS development in animal model, but its action at the cellular level has been poorly understood. In this experiment, we examined neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by VPA culture media using vitro immunochemistry assay. The neuronal differentiation of NSCs was examined after treated with 0.75 mM VPA for three, seven and ten days. RT-PCR assay was employed to examine the level of Wnt-3α and β-catenin. The results indicated that there were more β-tublin III positive cells in NSCs treated with VPA medium compared to the control group. The expression of Wnt-3α and β-catenin in NSCs treated with VPA medium was significantly greater compared to that of control media. In conclusion, these findings indicated that VPA could induce neuronal differentiation of NSCs by activating Wnt signal pathway. PMID:25755748

  2. Antitumor activity of gambogic acid on NCI-H1993 xenografts via MET signaling pathway downregulation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DONGLEI; YANG, HUIWEI; LI, RUNPU; WANG, YANLI; WANG, WEIJUN; LI, DONGJIE; MA, SHAOLIN; ZHANG, XUYU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor mechanisms of gambogic acid (GA) on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo. Non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H1993 cells, which harbor a MET gene amplification, were subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. The mice were randomly assigned to treatment with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg GA for 3 weeks. At the end of the efficacy study, all the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were subjected to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. GA inhibited NCI-H1993 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated (p)-MET and its downstream signaling molecules p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were significantly inhibited by GA. IHC analysis of Ki-67 expression demonstrated that GA treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. GA exerted antitumor effects on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo by direct regulation of the MET signaling pathway. Theses antitumor effects were primarily a result of its anti-proliferation function. PMID:26722245

  3. Chitosan oligosaccharide induces resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis via the salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingshan; Zeng, Haihong; Wang, Wenxia; Yin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most abundant carbohydrate biopolymers in the world, and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), which is prepared from chitosan, is a plant immunity regulator. The present study aimed to validate the effect of COS on inducing resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Arabidopsis and to investigate the potential defence-related signalling pathways involved. Optimal conditions for the induction of TMV resistance in Arabidopsis were COS pretreatment at 50 mg/L for 1 day prior to inoculation with TMV. Multilevel indices, including phenotype data, and TMV coat protein expression, revealed that COS induced TMV resistance in wild-type and jasmonic acid pathway- deficient (jar1) Arabidopsis plants, but not in salicylic acid pathway deficient (NahG) Arabidopsis plants. Quantitative-PCR and analysis of phytohormone levels confirmed that COS pretreatment enhanced the expression of the defence-related gene PR1, which is a marker of salicylic acid signalling pathway, and increased the amount of salicylic acid in WT and jar1, but not in NahG plants. Taken together, these results confirm that COS induces TMV resistance in Arabidopsis via activation of the salicylic acid signalling pathway. PMID:27189192

  4. Chitosan oligosaccharide induces resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis via the salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingshan; Zeng, Haihong; Wang, Wenxia; Yin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most abundant carbohydrate biopolymers in the world, and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), which is prepared from chitosan, is a plant immunity regulator. The present study aimed to validate the effect of COS on inducing resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Arabidopsis and to investigate the potential defence-related signalling pathways involved. Optimal conditions for the induction of TMV resistance in Arabidopsis were COS pretreatment at 50 mg/L for 1 day prior to inoculation with TMV. Multilevel indices, including phenotype data, and TMV coat protein expression, revealed that COS induced TMV resistance in wild-type and jasmonic acid pathway- deficient (jar1) Arabidopsis plants, but not in salicylic acid pathway deficient (NahG) Arabidopsis plants. Quantitative-PCR and analysis of phytohormone levels confirmed that COS pretreatment enhanced the expression of the defence-related gene PR1, which is a marker of salicylic acid signalling pathway, and increased the amount of salicylic acid in WT and jar1, but not in NahG plants. Taken together, these results confirm that COS induces TMV resistance in Arabidopsis via activation of the salicylic acid signalling pathway. PMID:27189192

  5. Tributyltin and triphenyltin inhibit osteoclast differentiation through a retinoic acid receptor-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Ahn, Jae-Yong; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae; E-mail: jwoo@isc.chubu.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), have been widely used in agriculture and industry. Although these compounds are known to have many toxic effects, including endocrine-disrupting effects, their effects on bone resorption are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of organotin compounds, such as monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), TBT, and TPT, on osteoclast differentiation using mouse monocytic RAW264.7 cells. MBT and DBT had no effects, whereas TBT and TPT dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast differentiation at concentrations of 3-30 nM. Treatment with a retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-specific antagonist, Ro41-5253, restored the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by TBT and TPT. TBT and TPT reduced receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) induced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 expression, and the reduction in NFATc1 expression was recovered by Ro41-5253. Our results suggest that TBT and TPT suppress osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression via an RAR-dependent signaling pathway.

  6. Asiatic Acid Protects against Cardiac Hypertrophy through Activating AMPKα Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen-Guo; Dai, Jia; Wei, Wen-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Si-Chi; Liao, Hai-Han; Yang, Zheng; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background: AMPactivated protein kinase α (AMPKα) is closely involved in the process of cardiac hypertrophy. Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene, was found to activate AMPKα in our preliminary experiment. However, its effects on the development of cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. The present study was to determine whether AA could protect against cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Mice subjected to aortic banding were orally given AA (10 or 30mg/kg) for 7 weeks. In the inhibitory experiment, Compound C was intraperitoneally injected for 3 weeks after surgery. Results: Our results showed that AA markedly inhibited hypertrophic responses induced by pressure overload or angiotensin II. AA also suppressed cardiac fibrosis in vivo and accumulation of collagen in vitro. The protective effects of AA were mediated by activation of AMPKα and inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in vivo and in vitro. However, AA lost the protective effects after AMPKα inhibition or gene deficiency. Conclusions: AA protects against cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα, and has the potential to be used for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:27313499

  7. 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic “inactivation” of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators. PMID:25450232

  8. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Late Diabetes through Adiponectin Receptor Signaling Pathways in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shasha; Chang, Cuiqing; Zhang, Lantao; Liu, Yang; Huang, Xianren; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON) groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage for 12 weeks, whereas the mice in both CON groups were given equal volumes of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by lavage. At the end of the intervention, we assessed body fat and the parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in the plasma, liver and skeletal muscle tissues as well as the levels of aldose reductase (AR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the kidneys and measured adiponectin receptors and the protein expression of their signaling molecules in liver and muscle tissues. After 12 weeks of intervention, compared with the db/db-CON group, the percentage of body fat, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the db/db-CGA group were all significantly decreased; TGF-β1 protein expression and AR activity in the kidney were both decreased; and the adiponectin level in visceral adipose was increased. The protein expression of adiponectin receptors (ADPNRs), the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the liver and muscle, and the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) in the liver were all significantly greater. CGA could lower the levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c during late diabetes and improve kidney fibrosis to some extent through the modulation of adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice. PMID:25849026

  9. Ulvan, a sulfated polysaccharide from green algae, activates plant immunity through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  10. Ulvan, a Sulfated Polysaccharide from Green Algae, Activates Plant Immunity through the Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  11. Jasmonic acid is involved in the signaling pathway for fungal endophyte-induced volatile oil accumulation of Atractylodes lancea plantlets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in plant defense responses. However, its relationships with other signal molecules in secondary metabolite production induced by endophytic fungus are largely unknown. Atractylodes lancea (Asteraceae) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant that produces antimicrobial volatiles oils. We incubated plantlets of A. lancea with the fungus Gilmaniella sp. AL12. to research how JA interacted with other signal molecules in volatile oil production. Results Fungal inoculation increased JA generation and volatile oil accumulation. To investigate whether JA is required for volatile oil production, plantlets were treated with JA inhibitors ibuprofen (IBU) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The inhibitors suppressed both JA and volatile oil production, but fungal inoculation could still induce volatile oils. Plantlets were further treated with the nitric oxide (NO)-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), the H2O2 inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and catalase (CAT), and the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis inhibitors paclobutrazol and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid. With fungal inoculation, IBU did not inhibit NO production, and JA generation was significantly suppressed by cPTIO, showing that JA may act as a downstream signal of the NO pathway. Exogenous H2O2 could reverse the inhibitory effects of cPTIO on JA generation, indicating that NO mediates JA induction by the fungus through H2O2-dependent pathways. With fungal inoculation, the H2O2 scavenger DPI/CAT could inhibit JA generation, but IBU could not inhibit H2O2 production, implying that H2O2 directly mediated JA generation. Finally, JA generation was enhanced when SA production was suppressed, and vice versa. Conclusions Jasmonic acid acts as a downstream signaling molecule in NO- and H2O2-mediated volatile oil accumulation induced by endophytic fungus and has a complementary

  12. The Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acid Pathway Enhances Hepatic Insulin Signaling and is Repressed in Insulin-Resistant Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Alexander; Neschen, Susanne; Kahle, Melanie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Gaisbauer, Tobias; Imhof, Axel; Adamski, Jerzy; Hauck, Stefanie M; Ueffing, Marius

    2015-10-01

    Although it is widely accepted that ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well characterized.Here we employed time resolved quantitative proteomic profiling of mice fed a high fat diet to determine which pathways were affected during the transition of the liver to an insulin-resistant state. We identified several metabolic pathways underlying altered protein expression. In order to test the functional impact of a critical subset of these alterations, we focused on the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) eicosanoid pathway, whose deregulation coincided with the onset of hepatic insulin resistance. These results suggested that EETs may be positive modulators of hepatic insulin signaling. Analyzing EET activity in primary hepatocytes, we found that EETs enhance insulin signaling on the level of Akt. In contrast, EETs did not influence insulin receptor or insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation. This effect was mediated through the eicosanoids, as overexpression of the deregulated enzymes in absence of arachidonic acid had no impact on insulin signaling. The stimulation of insulin signaling by EETs and depression of the pathway in insulin resistant liver suggest a likely role in hepatic insulin resistance. Our findings support therapeutic potential for inhibiting EET degradation. PMID:26070664

  13. Activation of the salicylic acid signaling pathway enhances Clover yellow vein virus virulence in susceptible pea cultivars.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Go; Kagaya, Uiko; Kitazawa, Hiroaki; Nakahara, Kenji Suto; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2009-02-01

    The wild-type strain (Cl-WT) of Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) systemically induces cell death in pea cv. Plant introduction (PI) 118501 but not in PI 226564. A single incompletely dominant gene, Cyn1, controls systemic cell death in PI 118501. Here, we show that activation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway enhances ClYVV virulence in susceptible pea cultivars. The kinetics of virus accumulation was not significantly different between PI 118501 (Cyn1) and PI 226564 (cyn1); however, the SA-responsive chitinase gene (SA-CHI) and the hypersensitive response (HR)-related gene homologous to tobacco HSR203J were induced only in PI 118501 (Cyn1). Two mutant viruses with mutations in P1/HCPro, which is an RNA-silencing suppressor, reduced the ability to induce cell death and SA-CHI expression. The application of SA and of its analog benzo (1,2,3) thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH) partially complemented the reduced virulence of mutant viruses. These results suggest that high activation of the SA signaling pathway is required for ClYVV virulence. Interestingly, BTH could enhance Cl-WT symptoms in PI 226564 (cyn1). However, it could not enhance symptoms induced by White clover mosaic virus and Bean yellow mosaic virus. Our report suggests that the SA signaling pathway has opposing functions in compatible interactions, depending on the virus-host combination. PMID:19132869

  14. Defining and Modeling Known Adverse Outcome Pathways: Domoic Acid and Neuronal Signaling as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Basu, Nil; Carvan, Michael J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; King, Kerensa A.; Sunol, Cristina; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2011-01-01

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a sequence of key events from a molecular-level initiating event and an ensuing cascade of steps to an adverse outcome with population level significance. To implement a predictive strategy for ecotoxicology, the multiscale nature of an AOP requires computational models to link salient processes (e.g., in chemical uptake, toxicokinetics, toxicodynamics, and population dynamics). A case study with domoic acid was used to demonstrate strategies and enable generic recommendations for developing computational models in an effort to move toward a toxicity testing paradigm focused on toxicity pathway perturbations applicable to ecological risk assessment. Domoic acid, an algal toxin with adverse effects on both wildlife and humans, is a potent agonist for kainate receptors (ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the influx of Na+ and Ca2+). Increased Ca2+ concentrations result in neuronal excitotoxicity and cell death primarily in the hippocampus, which produces seizures, impairs learning and memory, and alters behavior in some species. Altered neuronal Ca2+ is a key process in domoic acid toxicity which can be evaluated in vitro. Further, results of these assays would be amenable to mechanistic modeling for identifying domoic acid concentrations and Ca2+ perturbations that are normal, adaptive, or clearly toxic. In vitro assays with outputs amenable to measurement in exposed populations can link in vitro to in vivo conditions, and toxicokinetic information will aid in linking in vitro results to the individual organism. Development of an AOP required an iterative process with three important outcomes: (1) a critically reviewed, stressor-specific AOP; (2) identification of key processes suitable for evaluation with in vitro assays; and (3) strategies for model development.

  15. The MYB96-HHP module integrates cold and abscisic acid signaling to activate the CBF-COR pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Gil; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-06-01

    Various environmental stresses limit plant growth, development, and reproductive success. Plants have therefore evolved sophisticated adaptive responses to deal with environmental challenges. The responses of plants to environmental stresses are mainly mediated by abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent signaling pathways. While these two pathways have been implicated to play discrete roles in abiotic stress responses, accumulating evidence suggests that they are also intertwined. Here, we report that an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, MYB96, integrates the ABA and cold signaling pathways. In addition to its role in ABA-mediated drought responses, MYB96 is also induced by cold stress in an ABA-independent manner and subsequently activates freezing tolerance. Notably, MYB96 regulates HEPTAHELICAL PROTEIN (HHP) genes by binding to their promoters. The HHP proteins, in turn, interact with C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR (CBF) upstream regulators, such as INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION 1 (ICE1), ICE2, and CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR 3 (CAMTA3). The specific interactive networks of HHPs with the CBF upstream regulators are necessary to facilitate transcriptional activation of the CBF regulon under stressful conditions. Together, the MYB96-HHP module integrates ABA-dependent and ABA-independent signals and activates the CBF pathway, ensuring plant adaptation to a wide range of adverse environmental fluctuations. PMID:25912720

  16. The inhibitory effects of carnosic acid on cervical cancer cells growth by promoting apoptosis via ROS-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Ke; Wang, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Ying; Cai, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer has been the fourth most common cancer killing many women across the world. Carnosic acid (CA), as a phenolic diterpene, has been suggested to against cancer, exerting protective effects associated with inflammatory cytokines. It is aimed to demonstrate the therapeutic role of carnosic acid against cervical cancer and indicate its underlying molecular mechanisms. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was performed to assess the possible anti-proliferative effects of carnosic acid. And also, colony formation was used to further estimate carnosic acid's ability in suppressing cervical cancer cells proliferation. Flow cytometry assays were performed here to indicate the alterations of cervical cancer cells cycle and the development of apoptosis. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were also applied to clarify the apoptosis-associated signaling pathways affected by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. And immunofluorescence was used to detect ROS-positive cells. In vivo experiments, CaSki xenograft model samples of nude mice were involved to further elucidate the effects of carnosic acid. In our results, we found that carnosic acid exerted anti-tumor ability in vitro supported by up-regulation of apoptosis and ROS production in cervical cancer cells. Also, acceleration of ROS led to the phospharylation of (c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its-related signals, as well as activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress, promoting the progression of apoptosis via stimulating Caspase3 expression. The development and growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice were found to be inhibited by the administration of carnosic acid for five weeks. And the suppressed role of carnosic acid in proliferation of cervical cancer cells and apoptosis of nude mice with tumor tissues were observed in our study. Taken together, our data indicated that carnosic acid resulted in apoptosis both in vitro and vivo experiments via promoting ROS and

  17. Distinctive effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in regulating neural stem cell fate are mediated via endocannabinoid signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dyall, S C; Mandhair, H K; Fincham, R E A; Kerr, D M; Roche, M; Molina-Holgado, F

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a complex interplay between the endocannabinoid system, omega-3 fatty acids and the immune system in the promotion of brain self-repair. However, it is unknown if all omega-3 fatty acids elicit similar effects on adult neurogenesis and if such effects are mediated or regulated by interactions with the endocannabinoid system. This study investigated the effects of DHA and EPA on neural stem cell (NSC) fate and the role of the endocannabinoid signalling pathways in these effects. EPA, but not DHA, significantly increased proliferation of NSCs compared to controls, an effect associated with enhanced levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and p-p38 MAPK, effects attenuated by pre-treatment with CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, in NSCs derived from IL-1β deficient mice, EPA significantly decreased proliferation and p-p38 MAPK levels compared to controls, suggesting a key role for IL-1β signalling in the effects observed. Although DHA similarly increased 2-AG levels in wild-type NSCs, there was no concomitant increase in proliferation or p-p38 MAPK activity. In addition, in NSCs from IL-1β deficient mice, DHA significantly increased proliferation without effects on p-P38 MAPK, suggesting effects of DHA are mediated via alternative signalling pathways. These results provide crucial new insights into the divergent effects of EPA and DHA in regulating NSC proliferation and the pathways involved, and highlight the therapeutic potential of their interplay with endocannabinoid signalling in brain repair. PMID:27044662

  18. Chemosensory signalling pathways involved in sensing of amino acids by the ghrelin cell.

    PubMed

    Vancleef, L; Van Den Broeck, T; Thijs, T; Steensels, S; Briand, L; Tack, J; Depoortere, I

    2015-01-01

    Taste receptors on enteroendocrine cells sense nutrients and transmit signals that control gut hormone release. This study aimed to investigate the amino acid (AA) sensing mechanisms of the ghrelin cell in a gastric ghrelinoma cell line, tissue segments and mice. Peptone and specific classes of amino acids stimulate ghrelin secretion in the ghrelinoma cell line. Sensing of L-Phe occurs via the CaSR, monosodium glutamate via the TAS1R1-TAS1R3 while L-Ala and peptone act via 2 different amino acid taste receptors: CaSR &TAS1R1-TAS1R3 and CaSR &GPRC6A, respectively. The stimulatory effect of peptone on ghrelin release was mimicked ex vivo in gastric but not in jejunal tissue segments, where peptone inhibited ghrelin release. The latter effect could not be blocked by receptor antagonists for CCK, GLP-1 or somatostatin. In vivo, plasma ghrelin levels were reduced both upon intragastric (peptone or L-Phe) or intravenous (L-Phe) administration, indicating that AA- sensing is not polarized and is due to inhibition of ghrelin release from the stomach or duodenum respectively. In conclusion, functional AA taste receptors regulate AA-induced ghrelin release in vitro. The effects differ between stomach and jejunum but these local nutrient sensing mechanisms are overruled in vivo by indirect mechanisms inhibiting ghrelin release. PMID:26510380

  19. Chemosensory signalling pathways involved in sensing of amino acids by the ghrelin cell

    PubMed Central

    Vancleef, L.; Van Den Broeck, T.; Thijs, T.; Steensels, S.; Briand, L.; Tack, J.; Depoortere, I.

    2015-01-01

    Taste receptors on enteroendocrine cells sense nutrients and transmit signals that control gut hormone release. This study aimed to investigate the amino acid (AA) sensing mechanisms of the ghrelin cell in a gastric ghrelinoma cell line, tissue segments and mice. Peptone and specific classes of amino acids stimulate ghrelin secretion in the ghrelinoma cell line. Sensing of L-Phe occurs via the CaSR, monosodium glutamate via the TAS1R1-TAS1R3 while L-Ala and peptone act via 2 different amino acid taste receptors: CaSR & TAS1R1-TAS1R3 and CaSR & GPRC6A, respectively. The stimulatory effect of peptone on ghrelin release was mimicked ex vivo in gastric but not in jejunal tissue segments, where peptone inhibited ghrelin release. The latter effect could not be blocked by receptor antagonists for CCK, GLP-1 or somatostatin. In vivo, plasma ghrelin levels were reduced both upon intragastric (peptone or L-Phe) or intravenous (L-Phe) administration, indicating that AA- sensing is not polarized and is due to inhibition of ghrelin release from the stomach or duodenum respectively. In conclusion, functional AA taste receptors regulate AA-induced ghrelin release in vitro. The effects differ between stomach and jejunum but these local nutrient sensing mechanisms are overruled in vivo by indirect mechanisms inhibiting ghrelin release. PMID:26510380

  20. Gambogic acid inhibits multiple myeloma mediated osteoclastogenesis through suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj K; Kale, Vijay P; Song, Chunhua; Sung, Shen-shu; Sharma, Arun K; Talamo, Giampaolo; Dovat, Sinisa; Amin, Shantu G

    2014-10-01

    Bone disease, characterized by the presence of lytic lesions and osteoporosis is the hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM). Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), has been implicated as a regulator of bone resorption, suggesting that agents that can suppress SDF1α/CXCR4 signaling might inhibit osteoclastogenesis, a process closely linked to bone resorption. We, therefore, investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone, could inhibit CXCR4 signaling and suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by MM cells. Through docking studies we predicted that GA directly interacts with CXCR4. This xanthone down-regulates the expression of CXCR4 on MM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The down-regulation of CXCR4 was not due to proteolytic degradation, but rather GA suppresses CXCR4 mRNA expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) DNA binding. This was further confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, as GA inhibits p65 binding at the CXCR4 promoter. GA suppressed SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis of MM cells and downstream signaling of CXCR4 by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt, p38, and Erk1/2 in MM cells. GA abrogated the RANKL-induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, we found that MM cells induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts, and that GA suppressed this process. Importantly, suppression of osteoclastogenesis by GA was mediated through IL-6 inhibition. Overall, our results show that GA is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression and has a strong potential to suppress osteoclastogenesis mediated by MM cells. PMID:25034231

  1. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Geun C.; Choi, Hye K.; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen. PMID:26500665

  2. The effects of centrally injected arachidonic acid on respiratory system: Involvement of cyclooxygenase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Leman Gizem; Guvenc, Gokcen; Altinbas, Burcin; Niaz, Nasir; Yalcin, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids of the cell membranes of the body and is abundant in the brain. Exogenously administered AA has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular and neuroendocrine actions. However, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected AA on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cyclooxygenase (COX) to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) signaling pathway on AA-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of AA induced dose- and time-dependent increase in tidal volume, respiratory rates and respiratory minute ventilation and also caused an increase in partial oxygen pressure (pO2) and decrease in partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. I.c.v. pretreatment with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX inhibitor, completely blocked the hyperventilation and blood gases changes induced by AA. In addition, central pretreatment with different doses of furegrelate, a TXA2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially prevented AA-evoked hyperventilation and blood gases effects. These data explicitly show that centrally administered AA induces hyperventilation with increasing pO2 and decreasing pCO2 levels which are mediated by the activation of central COX to TXA2 signaling pathway. PMID:26767978

  3. Aluminium-induced phospholipid signal transduction pathway in Coffea arabica suspension cells and its amelioration by silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Quintal-Tun, Fausto; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Ramos-Díaz, Ana; Escamilla-Bencomo, Armando; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel; Exley, Christopher; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2007-02-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is of economic importance worldwide. Its growth in organic-rich acidic soils is influenced by aluminium such that coffee yield may be impaired. Herein we have used the Al-sensitive C. arabica suspension cell line L2 to analyse the effect of two different Al species on the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway. Our results have shown that the association of Al with coffee cells was affected by the pH and the form of Al in media. More Al was associated with cells at pH 4.3 than 5.8, whereas when Al was present as hydroxyaluminosilicates (HAS) the association was halved at pH 4.3 and unchanged at pH 5.8. Two signal transduction elements were also evaluated; phospholipase C (PLC) activity and phosphatidic acid (PA) formation. PLC was inhibited ( approximately 50%) when cells were incubated for 2 h in the presence of either AlCl(3) or Al in the form of HAS. PA formation was tested as a short-term response to Al. By way of contrast to what was found for PLC, incubation of cells for 15 min in the presence of AlCl(3) decreased the formation of PA whereas the same concentration of Al as HAS produced no effect upon its formation. These results suggest that Al is capable to exert its effects upon signal transduction as Al((aq))(3+) acting upon a mechanism linked to the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway. PMID:17161461

  4. Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species play a vital role in the salicylic acid signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shengjun; Yue, Haiyun; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria constitute a major source of ROS and are proposed to act as signaling organelles in the orchestration of defense response. At present, the signals generated and then integrated by mitochondria are still limited. Here, fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the events of mitochondria in vivo, as well as the induction of mitochondrial signaling by a natural defensive signal chemical salicylic acid (SA). An inhibition of respiration was observed in isolated mitochondria subjected to SA. The cytochrome reductase activity analysis in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that SA might act directly on the complex III in the respiration chain by inhibiting the activity. With this alteration, a quick burst of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) was stimulated. SA-induced mtROS caused mitochondrial morphology transition in leaf tissue or protoplasts expressing mitochondria-GFP (43C5) and depolarization of membrane potential. However, the application of AsA, an H2O2 scavenger, significantly prevented both events, indicating that both of them are attributable to ROS accumulation. In parallel, SA-induced mtROS up-regulated AOX1a transcript abundance and this induction was correlated with the disease resistance, whereas AsA-pretreatment interdicted this effect. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of SA-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the SA-mediated biological processes, including plant defense response. PMID:25811367

  5. Mitochondrial-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Vital Role in the Salicylic Acid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shengjun; Yue, Haiyun; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria constitute a major source of ROS and are proposed to act as signaling organelles in the orchestration of defense response. At present, the signals generated and then integrated by mitochondria are still limited. Here, fluorescence techniques were used to monitor the events of mitochondria in vivo, as well as the induction of mitochondrial signaling by a natural defensive signal chemical salicylic acid (SA). An inhibition of respiration was observed in isolated mitochondria subjected to SA. The cytochrome reductase activity analysis in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that SA might act directly on the complex III in the respiration chain by inhibiting the activity. With this alteration, a quick burst of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) was stimulated. SA-induced mtROS caused mitochondrial morphology transition in leaf tissue or protoplasts expressing mitochondria-GFP (43C5) and depolarization of membrane potential. However, the application of AsA, an H2O2 scavenger, significantly prevented both events, indicating that both of them are attributable to ROS accumulation. In parallel, SA-induced mtROS up-regulated AOX1a transcript abundance and this induction was correlated with the disease resistance, whereas AsA-pretreatment interdicted this effect. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of SA-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the SA-mediated biological processes, including plant defense response. PMID:25811367

  6. Alkamides Activate Jasmonic Acid Biosynthesis and Signaling Pathways and Confer Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Calderón-Vázquez, Carlos; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Raya-González, Javier; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Guevara-García, Angel A.; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Alkamides are fatty acid amides of wide distribution in plants, structurally related to N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) from Gram-negative bacteria and to N- acylethanolamines (NAEs) from plants and mammals. Global analysis of gene expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to N-isobutyl decanamide, the most highly active alkamide identified to date, revealed an overrepresentation of defense-responsive transcriptional networks. In particular, genes encoding enzymes for jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis increased their expression, which occurred in parallel with JA, nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 accumulation. The activity of the alkamide to confer resistance against the necrotizing fungus Botrytis cinerea was tested by inoculating Arabidopsis detached leaves with conidiospores and evaluating disease symptoms and fungal proliferation. N-isobutyl decanamide application significantly reduced necrosis caused by the pathogen and inhibited fungal proliferation. Arabidopsis mutants jar1 and coi1 altered in JA signaling and a MAP kinase mutant (mpk6), unlike salicylic acid- (SA) related mutant eds16/sid2-1, were unable to defend from fungal attack even when N-isobutyl decanamide was supplied, indicating that alkamides could modulate some necrotrophic-associated defense responses through JA-dependent and MPK6-regulated signaling pathways. Our results suggest a role of alkamides in plant immunity induction. PMID:22076141

  7. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight. PMID:26421979

  8. Fatty Acid-binding Protein 4, a Point of Convergence for Angiogenic and Metabolic Signaling Pathways in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Harjes, Ulrike; Bridges, Esther; McIntyre, Alan; Fielding, Barbara A.; Harris, Adrian L.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) is an adipogenic protein and is implicated in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, and cancer. In endothelial cells, FABP4 is induced by VEGFA, and inhibition of FABP4 blocks most of the VEGFA effects. We investigated the DLL4-NOTCH-dependent regulation of FABP4 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by gene/protein expression and interaction analyses following inhibitor treatment and RNA interference. We found that FABP4 is directly induced by NOTCH. Stimulation of NOTCH signaling with human recombinant DLL4 led to FABP4 induction, independently of VEGFA. FABP4 induction by VEGFA was reduced by blockade of DLL4 binding to NOTCH or inhibition of NOTCH signal transduction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of the NOTCH intracellular domain showed increased binding to two specific regions in the FABP4 promoter. The induction of FABP4 gene expression was dependent on the transcription factor FOXO1, which was essential for basal expression of FABP4, and FABP4 up-regulation following stimulation of the VEGFA and/or the NOTCH pathway. Thus, we show that the DLL4-NOTCH pathway mediates endothelial FABP4 expression. This indicates that induction of the angiogenesis-restricting DLL4-NOTCH can have pro-angiogenic effects via this pathway. It also provides a link between DLL4-NOTCH and FOXO1-mediated regulation of endothelial gene transcription, and it shows that DLL4-NOTCH is a nodal point in the integration of pro-angiogenic and metabolic signaling in endothelial cells. This may be crucial for angiogenesis in the tumor environment. PMID:24939870

  9. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    AMONYINGCHAROEN, SUMET; SURIYO, TAWIT; THIANTANAWAT, APINYA; WATCHARASIT, PIYAJIT; SATAYAVIVAD, JUTAMAAD

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1–40 μM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth. PMID:25815516

  10. Crosstalk between cystine and glutathione is critical for the regulation of amino acid signaling pathways and ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau

    2016-01-01

    Although essential amino acids regulate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the integrated stress response (ISR), the role of cysteine is unknown. We found that in hepatoma HepG2 cells, cystine (oxidized form of cysteine) activated mTORC1 and suppressed the ISR. Cystine deprivation induced GSH efflux and extracellular degradation, which aimed to restore cellular cysteine. Inhibition of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) impaired the ability of GSH or cell-permeable GSH to restore mTORC1 signaling and the ISR, suggesting that the capacity of GSH to release cysteine, but not GSH per se, regulated the signaling networks. Inhibition of protein translation restored both mTORC1 signaling and the ISR during cystine starvation, suggesting the bulk of cellular cysteine was committed to the biosynthetic process. Cellular cysteine and GSH displayed overlapping protective roles in the suppression of ferroptosis, further supporting their cooperation in the regulation of cell signaling. Thus, cellular cysteine and its derivative GSH cooperate to regulate mTORC1 pathway, the ISR and ferroptosis. PMID:27425006

  11. Nitric oxide regulates K+ and Cl- channels in guard cells through a subset of abscisic acid-evoked signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Gay, Robert; Sokolovski, Sergei; Hills, Adrian; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Blatt, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) triggers a complex sequence of signaling events that lead to concerted modulation of ion channels at the plasma membrane of guard cells and solute efflux to drive stomatal closure in plant leaves. Recent work has indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and its synthesis are a prerequisite for ABA signal transduction in Arabidopsis and Vicia guard cells. Its mechanism(s) of action is not well defined in guard cells and, generally, in higher plants. Here we show directly that NO selectively regulates Ca2+-sensitive ion channels of Vicia guard cells by promoting Ca2+ release from intracellular stores to raise cytosolic-free [Ca2+]. NO-sensitive Ca2+ release was blocked by antagonists of guanylate cyclase and cyclic ADP ribose-dependent endomembrane Ca2+ channels, implying an action mediated via a cGMP-dependent cascade. NO did not recapitulate ABA-evoked control of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-insensitive K+ channels, and NO scavengers failed to block the activation of these K+ channels evoked by ABA. These results place NO action firmly within one branch of the Ca2+-signaling pathways engaged by ABA and define the boundaries of parallel signaling events in the control of guard cell movements. PMID:12949257

  12. Crosstalk between cystine and glutathione is critical for the regulation of amino acid signaling pathways and ferroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau

    2016-01-01

    Although essential amino acids regulate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the integrated stress response (ISR), the role of cysteine is unknown. We found that in hepatoma HepG2 cells, cystine (oxidized form of cysteine) activated mTORC1 and suppressed the ISR. Cystine deprivation induced GSH efflux and extracellular degradation, which aimed to restore cellular cysteine. Inhibition of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) impaired the ability of GSH or cell-permeable GSH to restore mTORC1 signaling and the ISR, suggesting that the capacity of GSH to release cysteine, but not GSH per se, regulated the signaling networks. Inhibition of protein translation restored both mTORC1 signaling and the ISR during cystine starvation, suggesting the bulk of cellular cysteine was committed to the biosynthetic process. Cellular cysteine and GSH displayed overlapping protective roles in the suppression of ferroptosis, further supporting their cooperation in the regulation of cell signaling. Thus, cellular cysteine and its derivative GSH cooperate to regulate mTORC1 pathway, the ISR and ferroptosis. PMID:27425006

  13. Glycyrrhizic Acid Attenuates Sepsis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yu; Li, Fengchun; Zhang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is a major active ingredient in licorice. In our study, the effects of GA on acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. The sepsis model was produced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in rats. The molecular and histological experiments were performed in the kidney tissues and serum samples of rats. According to the results obtained, GA alleviated sepsis-induced AKI by improving the pathological changes, decreasing the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cre), and increasing the survival rate of rats with AKI significantly. The production of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, was markedly inhibited by GA. Moreover, treatment with GA inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and expression levels of induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in kidney tissues. Furtherly, the apoptosis in kidney tissue induced by AKI was suppressed by GA. Finally, GA could inhibit the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway. Our study suggests that GA alleviates sepsis-induced AKI by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway, which provides a strong evidence for a new approach for treating sepsis-induced AKI. PMID:26904148

  14. A Direct Link between Abscisic Acid Sensing and the Chromatin-Remodeling ATPase BRAHMA via Core ABA Signaling Pathway Components.

    PubMed

    Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Han, Soon-Ki; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Jeong, Cheol Woong; Rodriguez, Lesia; Belda-Palazon, Borja; Wagner, Doris; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Optimal response to drought is critical for plant survival and will affect biodiversity and crop performance during climate change. Mitotically heritable epigenetic or dynamic chromatin state changes have been implicated in the plant response to the drought stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling ATPase BRAHMA (BRM) modulates response to ABA by preventing premature activation of stress response pathways during germination. We show that core ABA signaling pathway components physically interact with BRM and post-translationally modify BRM by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Genetic evidence suggests that BRM acts downstream of SnRK2.2/2.3 kinases, and biochemical studies identified phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of BRM at SnRK2 target sites that are evolutionarily conserved. Finally, the phosphomimetic BRM(S1760D S1762D) mutant displays ABA hypersensitivity. Prior studies showed that BRM resides at target loci in the ABA pathway in the presence and absence of the stimulus, but is only active in the absence of ABA. Our data suggest that SnRK2-dependent phosphorylation of BRM leads to its inhibition, and PP2CA-mediated dephosphorylation of BRM restores the ability of BRM to repress ABA response. These findings point to the presence of a rapid phosphorylation-based switch to control BRM activity; this property could be potentially harnessed to improve drought tolerance in plants. PMID:26499068

  15. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity. PMID:26879142

  16. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report (ATVB 11:1944, 2009) suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for conjugating f...

  17. α-Lipoic acid inhibits sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis through PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Wang, Xiang; Peng, Peipei; Xiong, Jingwei; Dong, Hongquan; Wang, Lixia; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a widely used anaesthetic agent, including in anaesthesia of children and infants. Recent studies indicated that the general anaesthesia might cause the cell apoptosis in the brain. This issue raises the concerns about the neuronal toxicity induced by the application of anaesthetic agents, especially in the infants and young children. In this study, we used Morris water maze, western blotting and immunohistochemistry to elucidate the role of α-lipoic acid in the inhibition of neuronal apoptosis. We found that sevoflurane led to the long-term cognitive impairment in the young rats. This adverse effect may be caused by the neuronal death in the hippocampal region, mediated through PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. We also showed that α-lipoic acid offset the effect of sevoflurane on the neuronal apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction. This study elucidated the potential clinical role of α-lipoic acid, providing a promising way in the prevention and treatment of long-term cognitive impairment induced by sevoflurane general anesthesia. PMID:26781804

  18. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Stacey A N; Finlay, Graeme J; Baguley, Bruce C; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  19. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D’Mello, Stacey A. N.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E.

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  20. Gallic Acid Induces Necroptosis via TNF–α Signaling Pathway in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya Ju; Hsu, Shih Lan; Liu, Yi Ting; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lin, Ming Hui; Huang, Shu Jung; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Wu, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), a natural phenolic acid widely found in gallnuts, tea leaves and various fruits, possesses several bioactivities against inflammation, oxidation, and carcinogenicity. The beneficial effect of GA on the reduction of animal hepatofibrosis has been indicated due to its antioxidative property. However, the cytotoxicity of GA autoxidation causing cell death has also been reported. Herein, we postulated that GA might target activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs), the cell type responsible for hepatofibrosis, to mitigate the process of fibrosis. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms that GA exerted on aHSCs were then analyzed. The results indicated that GA elicited aHSC programmed cell death through TNF–α–mediated necroptosis. GA induced significant oxidative stress through the suppression of catalase activity and the depletion of glutathione (GSH). Elevated oxidative stress triggered the production of TNF–α facilitating the undergoing of necroptosis through the up-regulation of key necroptotic regulatory proteins TRADD and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the inactivation of caspase–8. Calmodulin and calpain–1 activation were engaged, which promoted subsequent lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). The TNF–α antagonist (SPD–304) and the RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin–1, Nec–1) confirmed GA-induced TNFR1–mediated necroptosis. The inhibition of RIP1 by Nec–1 diverted the cell death from necroptosis to apoptosis, as the activation of caspase 3 and the increase of cytochrome c. Collectively, this is the first report indicating that GA induces TNF signaling–triggered necroptosis in aHSCs, which may offer an alternative strategy for the amelioration of liver fibrosis. PMID:25816210

  1. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibiting TLR4/MyD88 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Chen, Guang; Yu, Xiangdong; Li, Yunchao; Zhang, Li; He, Zongze; Zhang, Nannan; Yang, Xiuping; Zhao, Yansheng; Li, Na; Qiu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic stroke can activate multiple transcription factors and cause inflammatory reactions, which involve pattern recognition receptors with immunostimulatory effects. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the receptors related to innate immunity and several inflammatory reactions. The promising anti- inflammatory activity of salvianolic acid B (SAB) had been previously reported, but its effect on ischemic stroke remains unknown. An oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in vitro and a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in vivo were used in this paper, and the results showned that SAB remarkably increased the viabilities of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons after OGD/R injury and notably prevented cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. SAB also significantly ameliorated NeuN release from primary cortical neurons. Further research indicated that the neuroprotection of SAB was completed through inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6 signaling pathway. The blocking of TLR4 by SAB also restrained NF-kB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These findings supply a new insight that will aid in clarifying the effect of SAB against cerebral I/R injury and provide the development of SAB as a potential candidate for treating ischemic stroke. PMID:27255374

  2. Folic acid promotes the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 murine myoblasts through the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kang, Yong Jung; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yujin; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin in the B-complex group, and an exogenous intake is required for health, growth and development. As a precursor to co-factors, folic acid is required for one-carbon donors in the synthesis of DNA bases and other essential biomolecules. A lack of dietary folic acid can lead to folic acid deficiency and can therefore result in several health problems, including macrocytic anemia, elevated plasma homocysteine levels, cardiovascular disease, birth defects, carcinogenesis, muscle weakness and difficulty in walking. Previous studies have indicated that folic acid exerts a positive effect on skeletal muscle functions. However, the precise role of folic acid in skeletal muscle cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of folic acid on neo-myotube maturation and differentiation using C2C12 murine myoblasts. We found that folic acid promoted the formation of multinucleated myotubes, and increased the fusion index and creatine kinase (CK) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of the muscle-specific marker, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as those of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), MyoD and myogenin, were increased in the folic acid-treated myotubes during myogenic differentiation. Folic acid also promoted the activation of the Akt pathway, and this effect was inhibited by treatment of the C2C12 cells with LY294002 (Akt inhibitor). Blocking of the Akt pathway with a specific inhibitor revealed that it was necessary for mediating the stimulatory effects of folic acid on muscle cell differentiation and fusion. Taken together, our data suggest that folic acid promotes the differentiation of C2C12 cells through the activation of the Akt pathway. PMID:26310574

  3. Nitro-linoleic acid inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via the Keap1/Nrf2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Luis; Zhang, Jifeng; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Chen, Xi-lin; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Yuqing E.; Cui, Taixing

    2007-01-01

    Nitroalkenes, the nitration products of unsaturated fatty acids formed via NO-dependent oxidative reactions, have been demonstrated to exert strong biological actions in endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages; however, little is known about their effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The present study examined the role of nitro-linoleic acid (LNO2) in the regulation of VSMC proliferation. We observed that LNO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LNO2 induced growth arrest of VSMCs in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle with an upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1. Furthermore, LNO2 triggered nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and activation of the antioxidant-responsive element-driven transcriptional activity via impairing Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1 (Keap1)-mediated negative control of Nrf2 activity in VSMCs. LNO2 upregulated the expression of Nrf2 protein levels, but not mRNA levels, in VSMCs. A forced activation of Nrf2 led to an upregulation of p27kip1 and growth inhibition of VSMCs. In contrast, knock down of Nrf2 using an Nrf2 siRNA approach reversed the LNO2-induced upregulation of p27kip1 and inhibition of cellular proliferation in VSMCs. These studies provide the first evidence that nitroalkene LNO2 inhibits VSMC proliferation through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 signaling pathway, suggesting an important role of nitroalkenes in vascular biology. PMID:17468336

  4. c9, t11- conjugated linoleic acid induces HCC cell apoptosis and correlation with PPAR-γ signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guozhong; Zhang, Guoqing; Zheng, Xing; Zeng, Yan; Xu, Ziqi; Zeng, Weichi; Wang, Kebing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11-CLA.) is one of the most important isomers of conjugated linoleic acid, which have a strong anti-tumor effects. Based on previous studies, we further explored the molecular mechanism of inducing cells apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and Hep3B. Methods: Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) assay was used to investigate the effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell viability and cell proliferation ability; The effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell apoptosis was analyzed by DNA ladder assay, immuno-fluorescence and flow cytometry, respectively. Apoptotic related gene (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bax, Bak, Bad, Bid and Bim), PPAR family member (PPAR-α, PPAR-β and PPAR-γ), and Cox2 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting. ELISA assay was used to detect the content of Caspase-3. Results: Our data were confirmed that c9, t11-CLA could inhibit the HCC cells proliferation ability and decrease the cells viability. RT-PCR and western blotting assay verified that c9, t11-CLA obviously increased the transcription and protein expression levels of PPAR-γ. The synchronism and correlation between PPAR-γ and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were found with a dose- and time-dependent manner. PPAR-γ inhibitor GW9662 and activator Rosilitazone were further verified that there was cooperative relation between them. Conclusion: In our study, we first report that c9, t11-CLA induces apoptosis in HCC cells by activation of PPARγ-Bcl-2-Caspase-3 signal pathway. These results indicated that c9, t11-CLA will be useful for clinic therapy of anti-tumor and as a new regulator of PPAR-γ in the future. PMID:26885272

  5. Tannic acid modulates NFκB signaling pathway and skin inflammation in NC/Nga mice through PPARγ expression.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Masahiko; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Polyphenolic compound tannic acid, which is mainly found in grapes and green tea, is a potent antioxidant with anticarcinogenic activities. In this present study, we hypothesized that tannic acid could inhibit nuclear factor (NF)κB signaling and inflammation in atopic dermatitis (AD) NC/Nga mice. We have analyzed the effects of tannic acid on dermatitis severity, histopathology and expression of inflammatory signaling proteins in house dust mite extract induced AD mouse skin. In addition, serum levels of T helper (Th) cytokines (interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-4) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with tannic acid ameliorated the development of AD-like clinical symptoms and effectively inhibited hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, acanthosis, mast cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the AD mouse skin. Serum levels of IFNγ and IL-4 were significantly down-regulated by tannic acid. Furthermore, tannic acid treatment inhibited DfE induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, NFκB, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, IL-1β and increased the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, DfE induced skin inflammation might be mediated through NFκB signaling and tannic acid may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD, which may possibly act via induction of PPARγ protein. PMID:26049169

  6. All-trans retinoic acid mitigates methotrexate-induced liver injury in rats; relevance of retinoic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ewees, Mohamed G; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Abdel-Aziz, Abdel-Aziz H; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S

    2015-09-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a widely used drug for treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases as well as different types of cancer. One of the major side effects of MTX is hepatotoxicity. Retinoid receptors, including retinoid X receptor (RXR), and retinoic acid receptor (RAR) are vitamin A receptors that are highly expressed in the liver and regulate important physiological processes through regulation of different genes. In this study, we investigated the effect of MTX on RXR-α and RAR-α expression in the liver and the potential protective effects of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: The rates were treated with saline, DMSO, MTX (20 mg/kg/IP; single dose), ATRA (7.5 mg/kg/day, I.P), or MTX and ATRA. Rats were killed 24 h after the last ATRA injection. The liver tissues were dissected out, weighed, and subjected to histological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical examinations. Our results demonstrated that treatment with MTX resulted in significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, with concomitant increase in ALT, AST, and MDA levels. In addition, MTX markedly downregulated the expression of both RXR-α and RAR-α, and changed the appearance of RXR-α to be very small speckled droplets. Treatment with ATRA significantly ameliorated MTX-induced effects on GSH, ALT, and MDA. Moreover, ATRA administration increased the expression and nuclear translocation of RXR-α in rat hepatocytes. In conclusion, our study revealed, for the first time, that retinoid receptors may play an important role in the MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25971792

  7. All-trans retinoic acid potentiates cisplatin-induced kidney injury in rats: impact of retinoic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Abdelrahman M; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Akool, El-Sayed; Abdel-Aziz, Abdel-Aziz H; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S

    2016-03-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diammine dichloroplatinum (II), CDDP) is a widely used drug for treatment of various types of cancers. However, CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity remains the main dose-limiting side effect. Retinoids are a group of vitamin A-related compounds that exert their effects through retinoid receptors activation. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDDP treatment on retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) and retinoid X receptor-α (RXR-α) expression. In addition, we investigated the possible modulatory effects of RAR agonist, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), on CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. Rats were treated with saline, DMSO, CDDP, ATRA, or CDDP/ATRA. Twenty-four hours after the last ATRA injection, rats were killed; blood samples were collected; kidneys were dissected; and biochemical, immunohistochemical, and histological examinations were performed. Our results revealed that CDDP treatment significantly increased serum levels of creatinine and urea, with concomitant decrease in serum albumin. Moreover, reduced glutathione (GSH) content as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were significantly reduced with concurrent increase in kidney malondialdehyde (MDA) content following CDDP treatment. Furthermore, CDDP markedly upregulated tubular RAR-α, RXR-α, fibrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Although administration of ATRA to control rats did not produce marked alterations in kidney function parameters, administration of ATRA to CDDP-treated rats significantly exacerbated CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. In addition, CDDP/ATRA co-treatment significantly increased RAR-α, RXR-α, fibrin, and iNOS protein expression compared to CDDP alone. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, the crucial role of retinoid receptors in CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. Moreover, our findings indicate that co-administration of ATRA with CDDP, although beneficial on the therapeutic effects, their deleterious effects on

  8. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  9. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways. PMID:11389765

  10. Analysis of key genes of jasmonic acid mediated signal pathway for defense against insect damages by comparative transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengshan; Zhang, Yuliang; Huang, Qixing; Yin, Guohua; Pennerman, Kayla K; Yu, Jiujiang; Liu, Zhixin; Li, Dafei; Guo, Anping

    2015-01-01

    Corn defense systems against insect herbivory involve activation of genes that lead to metabolic reconfigurations to produce toxic compounds, proteinase inhibitors, oxidative enzymes, and behavior-modifying volatiles. Similar responses occur when the plant is exposed to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). To compare the defense responses between stalk borer feeding and exogenous MeJA on a transcriptional level, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods following Ostrinia furnacalis leaf feeding and MeJA leaf treatment. 39,636 genes were found to be differentially expressed with O. furnacalis feeding, MeJA application, and O. furnacalis feeding and MeJA application. Following Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the up- or down- regulated genes, many were implicated in metabolic processes, stimuli-responsive catalytic activity, and transfer activity. Fifteen genes that indicated significant changes in the O. furnacalis feeding group: LOX1, ASN1, eIF3, DXS, AOS, TIM, LOX5, BBTI2, BBTI11, BBTI12, BBTI13, Cl-1B, TPS10, DOX, and A20/AN1 were found to almost all be involved in jasmonate defense signaling pathways. All of the data demonstrate that the jasmonate defense signal pathway is a major defense signaling pathways of Asian corn borer's defense against insect herbivory. The transcriptome data are publically available at NCBI SRA: SRS965087. PMID:26560755

  11. Analysis of key genes of jasmonic acid mediated signal pathway for defense against insect damages by comparative transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengshan; Zhang, Yuliang; Huang, Qixing; Yin, Guohua; Pennerman, Kayla K.; Yu, Jiujiang; Liu, Zhixin; Li, Dafei; Guo, Anping

    2015-01-01

    Corn defense systems against insect herbivory involve activation of genes that lead to metabolic reconfigurations to produce toxic compounds, proteinase inhibitors, oxidative enzymes, and behavior-modifying volatiles. Similar responses occur when the plant is exposed to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). To compare the defense responses between stalk borer feeding and exogenous MeJA on a transcriptional level, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods following Ostrinia furnacalis leaf feeding and MeJA leaf treatment. 39,636 genes were found to be differentially expressed with O. furnacalis feeding, MeJA application, and O. furnacalis feeding and MeJA application. Following Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the up- or down- regulated genes, many were implicated in metabolic processes, stimuli-responsive catalytic activity, and transfer activity. Fifteen genes that indicated significant changes in the O. furnacalis feeding group: LOX1, ASN1, eIF3, DXS, AOS, TIM, LOX5, BBTI2, BBTI11, BBTI12, BBTI13, Cl-1B, TPS10, DOX, and A20/AN1 were found to almost all be involved in jasmonate defense signaling pathways. All of the data demonstrate that the jasmonate defense signal pathway is a major defense signaling pathways of Asian corn borer’s defense against insect herbivory. The transcriptome data are publically available at NCBI SRA: SRS965087. PMID:26560755

  12. Signaling Pathways in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells of hematopoietic origin that are responsible for the degradation of old bone matrix. Osteoclast differentiation and activity are controlled by two essential cytokines, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). M-CSF and RANKL bind to their respective receptors c-Fms and RANK to stimulate osteoclast differentiation through regulation of delicate signaling systems. Here, we summarize the critical or essential signaling pathways for osteoclast differentiation including M-CSF-c-Fms signaling, RANKL-RANK signaling, and costimulatory signaling for RANK. PMID:26865996

  13. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  14. The G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor Gpbar1 (TGR5) suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration through antagonizing STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong; Su, Jia; Li, Zhijun; Xiao, Rui; Wen, Jianxun; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Xueting; Yu, Donna; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Gpbar1 (TGR5), a membrane-bound bile acid receptor, is well known for its roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we show that TGR5 is a suppressor of gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration through antagonizing STAT3 signaling pathway. We firstly show that TGR5 activation greatly inhibited proliferation and migration of human gastric cancer cells and strongly induced gastric cancer cell apoptosis. We then found that TGR5 activation antagonized STAT3 signaling pathway through suppressing the phosphorylation of STAT3 and its transcription activity induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or interleukin-6. TGR5 overexpression with ligand treatment inhibited gene expression mediated by STAT3. It suggests that TGR5 antagonizes gastric cancer proliferation and migration at least in part by inhibiting STAT3 signaling. These findings identify TGR5 as a suppressor of gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration that may serve as an attractive therapeutic tool for human gastric cancer. PMID:26417930

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the IGF signaling pathway by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors during myogenesis in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Bower, Neil I; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor signalling pathway is an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth. We examined the mRNA expression of components of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling pathway as well as Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) during maturation of myotubes in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The transcriptional regulation of IGFs and IGFBP expression by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors was also investigated. Proliferation of cells was 15% d(-1) at days 2 and 3 of the culture, increasing to 66% d(-1) at day 6. Three clusters of elevated gene expression were observed during the maturation of the culture associated with mono-nucleic cells (IGFBP5.1 and 5.2, IGFBP-6, IGFBP-rP1, IGFBP-2.2 and IGF-II), the initial proliferation phase (IGF-I, IGFBP-4, FGF2 and IGF-IRb) and terminal differentiation and myotube production (IGF2R, IGF-IRa). In cells starved of amino acids and serum for 72 h, IGF-I mRNA decreased 10-fold which was reversed by amino acid replacement. Addition of IGF-I and amino acids to starved cells resulted in an 18-fold increase in IGF-I mRNA indicating synergistic effects and the activation of additional pathway(s) leading to IGF-I production via a positive feedback mechanism. IGF-II, IGFBP-5.1 and IGFBP-5.2 expression was unchanged in starved cells, but increased with amino acid replacement. Synergistic increases in expression of IGFBP5.2 and IGFBP-4, but not IGFBP5.1 were observed with addition of IGF-I, IGF-II or insulin and amino acids to the medium. IGF-I and IGF-II directly stimulated IGFBP-6 expression, but not when amino acids were present. These findings indicate that amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate myogenesis in myoblasts and that IGF-I production is controlled by both endocrine and paracrine pathways. A model depicting the transcriptional regulation of the IGF pathway in Atlantic salmon muscle following feeding is proposed. PMID:20559434

  16. G-CSF signaling can differentiate promyelocytes expressing a defective retinoic acid receptor: evidence for divergent pathways regulating neutrophil differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maun, Noel A; Gaines, Peter; Khanna-Gupta, Arati; Zibello, Theresa; Enriquez, Louie; Goldberg, Laura; Berliner, Nancy

    2004-03-01

    Several lines of investigation suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) augments all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced neutrophil differentiation in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). We sought to characterize the relationship between G-CSF- and ATRA-mediated neutrophil differentiation. We established a G-CSF receptor-transduced promyelocytic cell line, EPRO-Gr, derived from the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent EPRO cell line harboring a dominant-negative retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha). In EPRO-Gr, neutrophil differentiation occurs either in GM-CSF upon addition of ATRA or upon induction with G-CSF alone. Transient transfection of EPRO-Gr cells with a RARE-containing reporter plasmid demonstrates increased activity in the presence of ATRA, but not G-CSF, while STAT3 phosphorylation occurs only in response to G-CSF. This suggests that ATRA-mediated differentiation of EPRO-Gr cells occurs via a RARE-dependent, STAT3-independent pathway, while G-CSF-mediated differentiation occurs via a RARE-independent, STAT3-dependent pathway. ATRA and G-CSF thus regulate differentiation by divergent pathways. We characterized these pathways in the APL cell line, NB4. ATRA induction of NB4 cells resulted in morphologic differentiation and up-regulation of C/EBPepsilon and G-CSFR, but not in STAT3 phosphorylation. The addition of G-CSF with ATRA during NB4 induction resulted in STAT3 phosphorylation but did not enhance differentiation. These results may elucidate how G-CSF and ATRA affect the differentiation of primary and ATRA-resistant APL cells. PMID:14604978

  17. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  18. Signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kawanami, Daiji; Matoba, Keiichiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, specific treatment for DN has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying DN to develop cause-related therapeutic strategy. To date, various factors such as hemodynamic changes and metabolic pathways have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of DN. Excessive glucose influx activates cellular signaling pathways, including the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), polyol pathway, hexosamine pathway and oxidative stress. These factors interact with one another, thereby facilitating inflammatory processes, leading to the development of glomerulosclerosis under diabetic conditions. In addition to metabolic pathways, Rho-kinase, an effector of small-GTPase binding protein Rho, has been implicated as an important factor in the pathogenesis of DN. A number of studies have demonstrated that Rho-kinase plays key roles in the development of DN by inducing endothelial dysfunction, mesangial excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production, podocyte abnormality, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In this review article, we describe our current understanding of the signaling pathways in DN. PMID:27094540

  19. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1–10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:26759698

  20. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1-10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:26759698

  1. Effect of methacrylic acid beads on the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway and macrophage polarization in a subcutaneous injection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lisovsky, Alexandra; Zhang, David K Y; Sefton, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (MAA) beads promote a vascular regenerative response when used in diabetic wound healing. Previous studies reported that MAA beads modulated the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and inflammation related genes in diabetic wounds. The aim of this work was to follow up on these observations in a subcutaneous injection model to study the host response in the absence of the confounding factors of diabetic wound healing. In this model, MAA beads improved vascularization in healthy mice of both sexes compared to control poly(methyl methacrylate) (MM) beads, with a stronger effect seen in males than females. MAA-induced vessels were perfusable, as evidenced from the CLARITY-processed images. In Shh-Cre-eGFP/Ptch1-LacZ non-diabetic transgenic mice, the increased vessel formation was accompanied by a higher density of cells expressing GFP (Shh) and β-Gal (patched 1, Ptch1) suggesting MAA enhanced the activation of the Shh pathway. Ptch1 is the Shh receptor and a target of the pathway. MAA beads also modulated the inflammatory cell infiltrate in CD1 mice: more neutrophils and more macrophages were noted with MAA relative to MM beads at days 1 and 7, respectively. In addition, MAA beads biased macrophages towards a MHCII-CD206+ ("M2") polarization state. This study suggests that the Shh pathway and an altered inflammatory response are two elements of the complex mechanism whereby MAA-based biomaterials effect vascular regeneration. PMID:27264502

  2. Feeding rainbow trout with a lipid-enriched diet: effects on fatty acid sensing, regulation of food intake and cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Librán-Pérez, Marta; Geurden, Inge; Dias, Karine; Corraze, Genevieve; Panserat, Stephane; Soengas, José L

    2015-08-01

    Using rainbow trout fed with low-fat or high-fat diets, we aimed to determine whether the response of food intake, mRNA abundance of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the metabolic regulation of food intake and fatty acid sensing systems in the hypothalamus and liver are similar to results previously observed when levels of specific fatty acids were raised by injection. Moreover, we also aimed to determine if the phosphorylation state of intracellular energy sensor 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and proteins involved in cellular signaling such as protein kinase B (Akt) and target of rapamycin (mTOR) display changes that could be related to fatty acid sensing and the control of food intake. The increased levels of fatty acids in the hypothalamus and liver of rainbow trout fed with a high-fat diet only partially activated fatty acid sensing systems and did not elicit changes in food intake, suggesting that the fatty acid sensing response in fish is more dependent on the presence of specific fatty acids, such as oleate or octanoate, rather than to the global increase in fatty acids. We also obtained, for the first time in fish, evidence for the presence and function of energy sensors such as AMPK and proteins involved in cellular signaling, like mTOR and Akt, in the hypothalamus. These proteins in the hypothalamus and liver were generally activated in fish fed the high-fat versus low-fat diet, suggesting that cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to the increased availability of fatty acids. PMID:26089527

  3. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Proliferation, Survival, and Migration in A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Activating the ERK Signaling Pathway through a Transcription-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Quintero Barceinas, Reyna Sara; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; González-De la Rosa, Claudia Haydée

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used as an antineoplastic because of its ability to promote proliferation, inhibition, and differentiation, primarily in leukemia; however, in other types of cancer, such as lung cancer, treatment with ATRA is restricted because not all the patients experience the same results. The ERK signaling pathway is dysregulated in cancer cells, including lung cancer, and this dysregulation promotes proliferation and cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with ATRA can activate the ERK signaling pathway by a transcription-independent mechanism through a signaling cascade that involves RARα and PI3K, promoting growth, survival, and migration in lung cancer cells. Until now, this mechanism was unknown in lung cancer cells. The inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway restores the beneficial effects of ATRA, reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and blocks the cell migration process in lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of ATRA with ERK inhibitor in clinical trials for lung cancer is warranted. PMID:26557664

  4. Signaling pathways mediating alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Ron, Dorit; Messing, Robert O

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol's effects on intracellular signaling pathways contribute to acute effects of ethanol as well as to neuroadaptive responses to repeated ethanol exposure. In this chapter we review recent discoveries that demonstrate how ethanol alters signaling pathways involving several receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine and serine-threonine kinases, with consequences for regulation of cell surface receptor function, gene expression, protein translation, neuronal excitability and animal behavior. We also describe recent work that demonstrates a key role for ethanol in regulating the function of scaffolding proteins that organize signaling complexes into functional units. Finally, we review recent exciting studies demonstrating ethanol modulation of DNA and histone modification and the expression of microRNAs, indicating epigenetic mechanisms by which ethanol regulates neuronal gene expression and addictive behaviors. PMID:21877259

  5. Function of retinoid nuclear receptors: lessons from genetic and pharmacological dissections of the retinoic acid signaling pathway during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Chambon, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is involved in vertebrate morphogenesis, growth, cellular differentiation, and tissue homeostasis. The use of in vitro systems initially led to the identification of nuclear receptor RXR/RAR heterodimers as possible transducers of the RA signal. To unveil the physiological functions of RARs and RXRs, genetic and pharmacological studies have been performed in the mouse. Together, their results demonstrate that (a) RXR/RAR heterodimers in which RXR is either transcriptionally active or silent are involved in the transduction of the RA signal during prenatal development, (b) specific RXRalpha/RAR heterodimers are required at many distinct stages during early embryogenesis and organogenesis, (c) the physiological role of RA and its receptors cannot be extrapolated from teratogenesis studies using retinoids in excess. Additional cell type-restricted and temporally controlled somatic mutagenesis is required to determine the functions of RARs and RXRs during postnatal life. PMID:16402912

  6. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alissa R.; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  7. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alissa R; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  8. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Gu, Tieguang; Yamahara, Johji; Li, Yuhao

    2014-06-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  9. Regulation of Monocarboxylic Acid Transporter 1 Trafficking by the Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells Requires Cross-talk with Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zejian; Sneve, Mary; Haroldson, Thomas A; Smith, Jeffrey P; Drewes, Lester R

    2016-04-01

    The transport of monocarboxylate fuels such as lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies across brain endothelial cells is mediated by monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 (MCT1). Although the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for rodent blood-brain barrier development and for the expression of associated nutrient transporters, the role of this pathway in the regulation of brain endothelial MCT1 is unknown. Here we report expression of nine members of the frizzled receptor family by the RBE4 rat brain endothelial cell line. Furthermore, activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RBE4 cells via nuclear β-catenin signaling with LiCl does not alter brain endothelialMct1mRNA but increases the amount of MCT1 transporter protein. Plasma membrane biotinylation studies and confocal microscopic examination of mCherry-tagged MCT1 indicate that increased transporter results from reduced MCT1 trafficking from the plasma membrane via the endosomal/lysosomal pathway and is facilitated by decreased MCT1 ubiquitination following LiCl treatment. Inhibition of the Notch pathway by the γ-secretase inhibitorN-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester negated the up-regulation of MCT1 by LiCl, demonstrating a cross-talk between the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch pathways. Our results are important because they show, for the first time, the regulation of MCT1 in cerebrovascular endothelial cells by the multifunctional canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. PMID:26872974

  10. Proinsulin C-peptide antagonizes the profibrotic effects of TGF-beta1 via up-regulation of retinoic acid and HGF-related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2010-04-01

    Novel signaling roles for C-peptide have recently been discovered with evidence that it can ameliorate complications of type 1 diabetes. Here we sought to identify new pathways regulated by C-peptide of relevance to the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Microarray analysis was performed to identify genes regulated by either C-peptide and/or TGF-beta1 in a human proximal tubular cell line, HK-2. Expression of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII), vimentin, E-cadherin, Snail, and beta-catenin was assessed by immunoblotting. The cellular localization of vimentin and beta-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry. Changes in cell morphology were assessed by phase contrast microscopy. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of 953 and 1458 genes after C-peptide exposure for 18 h or 48 h, respectively. From these, members of the antifibrotic retinoic acid (RA)- and HGF-signaling pathways were selected. Immunoblotting demonstrated that C-peptide increased RARbeta, CRABPII, and HGF. We confirmed a role for RA in reversal of TGF-beta1-induced changes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including expression changes in Snail, E-cadherin, vimetin, and redistribution of beta-catenin. Importantly, these TGF-beta1-induced changes were inhibited by C-peptide. Further, effects of TGF-beta1 on Snail and E-cadherin expression were blocked by HGF, and inhibitory effects of C-peptide were removed by blockade of HGF activity. This study identifies a novel role for HGF as an effector of C-peptide, possibly via an RA-signaling pathway, highlighting C-peptide as a potential therapy for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20197308

  11. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, F; Paul, S S; Wang, X Q; Assmann, S M

    2000-09-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels. PMID:10982437

  12. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, F.; Paul, S. S.; Wang, X. Q.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels.

  13. Distinct Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways for Modulation of Guard Cell versus Mesophyll Cell Potassium Channels Revealed by Expression Studies in Xenopus laevis Oocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Fedora; Paul, Sunil S.; Wang, Xi-Qing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2000-01-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K+ current (IKin) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K+ current (IKout). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, IKout was generated that displayed similar properties to IKout observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. IKout expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K+ channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in IKin that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced IKin that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K+ channels. PMID:10982437

  14. The gain-of-function Arabidopsis acd6 mutant reveals novel regulation and function of the salicylic acid signaling pathway in controlling cell death, defenses, and cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Rate, D N; Cuenca, J V; Bowman, G R; Guttman, D S; Greenberg, J T

    1999-01-01

    We isolated a dominant gain-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, accelerated cell death 6 (acd6), with elevated defenses, patches of dead and enlarged cells, reduced stature, and increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. The acd6-conferred phenotypes are suppressed by removing a key signaling molecule, salicylic acid (SA), by using the nahG transgene, which encodes SA hydroxylase. This suppression includes phenotypes that are not induced by application of SA to wild-type plants, indicating that SA acts with a second signal to cause many acd6-conferred phenotypes. acd6-nahG plants show hyperactivation of all acd6-conferred phenotypes after treatment with a synthetic inducer of the SA pathway, benzo(1,2, 3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid (BTH), suggesting that SA acts with and also modulates the levels and/or activity of the second defense signal. acd6 acts partially through a NONEXPRESSOR OF PR 1 (NPR1) gene-independent pathway that activates defenses and confers resistance to P. syringae. Surprisingly, BTH-treated acd6-nahG plants develop many tumor-like abnormal growths, indicating a possible role for SA in modulating cell growth. PMID:10488236

  15. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis through inactivation of Src/STAT3 signaling pathway in human renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Byoungduck; Chae, In Gyeong; Kim, Do-Hee; Kundu, Juthika; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), the major bioactive compound of Rosmarinus officinalis L., has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of CA remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated that CA significantly reduced the viability of human renal carcinoma Caki cells. CA-induced apoptosis was connected with the cleavage of caspase-9, -7 and -3, and that of PARP. Moreover, CA increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and diminished the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, thereby releasing cytochrome c into the cytosol. Treatment with CA in Caki cells also induced the expression of p53 and its target gene product, p27, through down-regulation of Murine double minute-2 (Mdm2). Furthermore, CA generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) abrogated CA-induced cleavage of PARP and expression of p53. One of the key oncogenic signals is mediated through signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), which promotes abnormal cell proliferation. Incubation of cells with CA markedly diminished the phosphorylation of STAT3 and its upstream, Src, and reduced the expression of STAT3 responsive gene products, such as D-series of cyclins and survivin. Taken together, the present study revealed that CA induced apoptosis in Caki cells by induction of p53 and suppression of STAT3 signaling. PMID:26936454

  16. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  17. JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic rats: effects of salvianolic acid A intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuping; Xu, Tongda; Li, Dongye; Pan, Defeng; Wu, Pei; Luo, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yanfeng; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that diabetes impairs the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway, while insulin resistance syndrome has been associated with alterations of this pathway in diabetic rats after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and activation of C-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved. The present study was designed to investigate whether inhibiting JNK activity would partially restore the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and protect against myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats, and to explore the effect of intervention with salvianolic acid A (Sal A). The inhibitor of JNK (SP600125) and Sal A were used in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats, outcome measures included heart hemodynamic data, myocardial infarct size, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), SERCA2a activity, cardiomyocyte apotosis, expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and the phosphorylation status of Akt and JNK. The p-Akt levels were increased after myocardial I/R in non-diabetic rats, while there was no change in diabetic rats. Pretreatment with the SP600125 and Sal A decreased the p-JNK levels and increased the p-Akt levels in diabetic rats with I/R, and heart hemodynamic data improved, infarct size and LDH release decreased, SERCA2a activity increased, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression levels decreased, and the expression of Bcl-2 and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Our results suggest that the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats and Sal A exerts an anti-apoptotic effect and improves cardiac function following I/R injury through the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in this model. PMID:27398138

  18. JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in diabetic rats: effects of salvianolic acid A intervention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuping; Xu, Tongda; Li, Dongye; Pan, Defeng; Wu, Pei; Luo, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yanfeng; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that diabetes impairs the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway, while insulin resistance syndrome has been associated with alterations of this pathway in diabetic rats after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and activation of C-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved. The present study was designed to investigate whether inhibiting JNK activity would partially restore the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and protect against myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats, and to explore the effect of intervention with salvianolic acid A (Sal A). The inhibitor of JNK (SP600125) and Sal A were used in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats, outcome measures included heart hemodynamic data, myocardial infarct size, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), SERCA2a activity, cardiomyocyte apotosis, expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and the phosphorylation status of Akt and JNK. The p-Akt levels were increased after myocardial I/R in non-diabetic rats, while there was no change in diabetic rats. Pretreatment with the SP600125 and Sal A decreased the p-JNK levels and increased the p-Akt levels in diabetic rats with I/R, and heart hemodynamic data improved, infarct size and LDH release decreased, SERCA2a activity increased, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression levels decreased, and the expression of Bcl-2 and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Our results suggest that the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in myocardial I/R injury in diabetic rats and Sal A exerts an anti-apoptotic effect and improves cardiac function following I/R injury through the JNK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in this model. PMID:27398138

  19. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  20. Cross talk between signaling pathways in pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Barbara N; Brooks, David M

    2002-08-01

    Plant defense in response to microbial attack is regulated through a complex network of signaling pathways that involve three signaling molecules: salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene. The SA and JA signaling pathways are mutually antagonistic. This regulatory cross talk may have evolved to allow plants to fine-tune the induction of their defenses in response to different plant pathogens. PMID:12179966

  1. Sargaquinoic acid promotes neurite outgrowth via protein kinase A and MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathways in PC12D cells.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yuto; Tsang, Chi Kwan

    2003-08-01

    We previously isolated a nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent neurite outgrowth promoting substance MC14 (sargaquinoic acid) from a marine brown alga, Sargassum macrocarpum. In the present study, the NGF-potentiating activity of MC14 to neural differentiation of PC12D cells was investigated in detail. The treatment of cells with 3 microg/ml MC14 in the presence of 1.25-100 ng/ml NGF markedly enhanced the proportion of neurite-bearing cells compared with the NGF-only controls. In addition, MC14 significantly elevated the NGF-induced specific acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in PC12D cells, suggesting that MC14 could morphologically and biochemically promote the differentiation of PC12D cells. The mechanism of action of MC14 was further investigated by pharmacological inhibition of several intracellular signaling molecules. Results indicated that the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14 was almost completely blocked by 10 microM PD98059, suggesting that a TrkA-dependent MAP kinases-mediated signaling pathway may play a crucial role in modulating the effect of MC14. Besides, the MC14-enhanced neurite outgrowth was substantially suppressed by the pretreatment with 10 ng/ml protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, demonstrating that the adenylate cyclase-PKA signaling cascade was also involved in the action of MC14. In contrast, a PKC inhibitor chelerythrine chloride did not inhibit the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of MC14. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MC14 enhances the neurite outgrowth by cooperating at least two separated signaling pathways, a TrkA-MAP kinases pathway and an adenylate cyclase-PKA pathway, in PC12D cells. PMID:12850058

  2. Signalling pathways in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Anna; Pawałowska, Monika; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process, during which the activity of signalling pathways responsible for cell cycle regulation and division is disrupted which leads to inhibition of apoptosis and enhanced proliferation. Improper activation of Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K. Akt pathways play essential role in endometrial cancers (EC), mainly type I. Mutations in APC, axin or CTNBB1 may lead to β-catenin overactivation leading to excessive gene expression. PTEN inactivation, mutations in the PIK3CA or Akt result in increased transmission in the PI3K/Akt pathway, apoptosis inhibition, intensive cell division, mTOR excitation. In non-endometrioid cancers, key mutations include suppressor gene TP53 responsible for repairing damaged DNA or apoptosis initiation. Irregularities in gene P16, encoding a protein forming the p16-cyclinD/CDK-pRb have also been described. Understanding the complex relations between specific proteins taking part in signal transduction of the abovementioned pathways is key to research on drugs used in targeted therapy. PMID:25520571

  3. The G-Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptor Gpbar1 (TGR5) Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Through Antagonizing NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong; Qi, Hui; Yu, Yingjie; Zhang, Qiqi; Su, Jia; Yu, Donna; Huang, Wendong; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Gpbar1 (TGR5), a membrane-bound bile acid receptor, is well-known for its roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here, we show that mice lacking TGR5 were much more susceptible to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute gastric inflammation than wild-type (WT) mice and TGR5 is a negative regulator of gastric inflammation through antagonizing NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that the treatment of TGR5 ligands 23(S)-mCDCA and GPBARA (3-(2-Chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide) suppressed gene and protein expression mediated by NF-κB signaling. TGR5 overexpression with ligand treatment inhibited gene expression of interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), TNF-α, and chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) induced by LPS. Furthermore, we revealed that TGR5 activation antagonized NF-κB signaling pathway through suppressing its transcription activity, the phosphorylation of IκBα and p65 translocation, which suggests that TGR5 antagonizes gastric inflammation at least in part by inhibiting NF-κB signaling. These findings identify TGR5 as a negative mediator of gastric inflammation that may serve as an attractive therapeutic tool for human gastric inflammation and cancer. PMID:26696888

  4. Carnosic acid nanoparticles suppress liver ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibition of ROS, Caspases and NF-κB signaling pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, Jian-Jun; Chen, Guo-Yong; Wang, Wei-Wei; Xie, Zhan-Tao; Tang, Gao-Feng; Wei, Si-Dong

    2016-08-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) requires ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which can lead to early graft injury. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of I/R injury remains unclear. Carnosic acid, as a phenolic diterpene with function of anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, as well as neuroprotective properties, is produced by many species from Lamiaceae family. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been known to better the bioavailability of drugs on intranasal administration compared with only drug solutions. Administration of carnosic acid nanoparticles was thought to be sufficient to lead to considerable inhibition of liver injury progression induced by ischemia/reperfusion. In our study, liver ischemia/reperfusion injury was established successfully with C57BL/6 animal model. 10 and 20mg/kg carnosic acid nanoparticles were injected to mice for five days prior to ischemia. After liver ischemia/reperfusion, the levels of serum AST, ALT and APL were increased, which was attenuated by pre-treatment with carnosic acid nanoparticles. In addition, carnosic acid nanoparticles inhibited ROS production via its related signals regulation. And carnosic acid nanoparticles also suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced up-regulation in the pro-apoptotic protein and mRNA levels of Bax, Cyto-c, Apaf-1 and Caspase-9/3 while increased ischemia/reperfusion-induced decrease of anti-apoptotic factor of Bcl-2. Further, ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation was also inhibited for carnosic acid nanoparticles administration via inactivating NF-κB signaling pathway, leading to down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines releasing. In conclusion, our study suggested that carnosic acid nanoparticles protected against liver ischemia/reperfusion injury via its role of anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity. PMID:27470360

  5. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and

  6. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  7. Non-esterified fatty acids activate the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway to regulate lipid metabolism in bovine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwei; Li, Xiaobing; Chen, Hui; Lei, Liancheng; Liu, Juxiong; Guan, Yuan; Liu, Zhaoxi; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Wentao; Zhao, Chenxu; Fu, Shixin; Li, Peng; Liu, Guowen; Wang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) act as signaling molecules involved in regulating genes expression to modulate lipid metabolism. However, the regulation mechanism of NEFAs on lipid metabolism in dairy cows is unclear. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. In vitro, bovine hepatocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of NEFAs and AMPKα inhibitors (BML-275). NEFAs increased AMPKα phosphorylation through up-regulating the protein levels of liver kinase B1. Activated AMPKα increased the expression and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). NEFAs also directly activate the PPARα independent of AMPKα. Activated PPARα increased the lipolytic genes expression to increase lipid oxidation. Furthermore, activated AMPKα inhibited the expression and transcriptional activity of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein, which reduced the expression of lipogenic genes, thereby decreasing lipid synthesis. Activated AMPKα phosphorylated and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity, which increased lipid oxidation. Consequently, the triglyceride content in the NEFAs-treated hepatocytes was significantly decreased. These results indicate that NEFAs activate the AMPKα signaling pathway to increase lipid oxidation and decrease lipid synthesis in hepatocytes, which in turn, generates more ATP to relieve the negative energy balance in transition dairy cows. PMID:23690240

  8. Acid sphingomyelinase determines melanoma progression and metastatic behaviour via the microphtalmia-associated transcription factor signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bizzozero, L; Cazzato, D; Cervia, D; Assi, E; Simbari, F; Pagni, F; De Palma, C; Monno, A; Verdelli, C; Querini, P R; Russo, V; Clementi, E; Perrotta, C

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a rapidly growing and highly metastatic cancer with high mortality rates, for which a resolutive treatment is lacking. Identification of novel therapeutic strategies and biomarkers of tumour stage is thus of particular relevance. We report here on a novel biomarker and possible candidate therapeutic target, the sphingolipid metabolising enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase). A-SMase expression correlates inversely with tumour stage in human melanoma biopsies. Studies in a mouse model of melanoma and on cell lines derived from mouse and human melanomas demonstrated that A-SMase levels of expression actually determine the malignant phenotype of melanoma cells in terms of pigmentation, tumour progression, invasiveness and metastatic ability. The action of A-SMase is mediated by the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, the subsequent proteasomal degradation of the Microphtalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, Bcl-2 and c-Met, downstream targets of Mitf involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival and metastatisation. PMID:24317198

  9. A splice donor mutation in NAA10 results in the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signaling pathway and causes Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esmailpour, Taraneh; Riazifar, Hamidreza; Liu, Linan; Donkervoort, Sandra; Huang, Vincent H; Madaan, Shreshtha; Shoucri, Bassem M; Busch, Anke; Wu, Jie; Towbin, Alexander; Chadwick, Robert B; Sequeira, Adolfo; Vawter, Marquis P; Sun, Guoli; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G; Kawaguchi, Riki; Sun, Hui; Kimonis, Virginia; Huang, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is a genetically heterogeneous X-linked disorder characterised by microphthalmia/anophthalmia, skeletal abnormalities, genitourinary malformations, and anomalies of the digits, ears, and teeth. Intellectual disability and seizure disorders are seen in about 60% of affected males. To date, no gene has been identified for LMS in the microphthalmia syndrome 1 locus (MCOPS1). In this study, we aim to find the disease-causing gene for this condition. Methods and results Using exome sequencing in a family with three affected brothers, we identified a mutation in the intron 7 splice donor site (c.471+2T→A) of the N-acetyltransferase NAA10 gene. NAA10 has been previously shown to be mutated in patients with Ogden syndrome, which is clinically distinct from LMS. Linkage studies for this family mapped the disease locus to Xq27-Xq28, which was consistent with the locus of NAA10. The mutation co-segregated with the phenotype and cDNA analysis showed aberrant transcripts. Patient fibroblasts lacked expression of full length NAA10 protein and displayed cell proliferation defects. Expression array studies showed significant dysregulation of genes associated with genetic forms of anophthalmia such as BMP4, STRA6, and downstream targets of BCOR and the canonical WNT pathway. In particular, STRA6 is a retinol binding protein receptor that mediates cellular uptake of retinol/vitamin A and plays a major role in regulating the retinoic acid signalling pathway. A retinol uptake assay showed that retinol uptake was decreased in patient cells. Conclusions We conclude that the NAA10 mutation is the cause of LMS in this family, likely through the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signalling pathway. PMID:24431331

  10. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. PMID:26350415

  11. Hyaluronic acid fragments enhance the inflammatory and catabolic response in human intervertebral disc cells through modulation of toll-like receptor 2 signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is characterized by extracellular matrix breakdown and is considered to be a primary cause of discogenic back pain. Although increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels within degenerating discs are associated with discogenic back pain, the mechanisms leading to their overproduction have not yet been elucidated. As fragmentation of matrix components occurs during IVD degeneration, we assessed the potential involvement of hyaluronic acid fragments (fHAs) in the induction of inflammatory and catabolic mediators. Methods Human IVD cells isolated from patient biopsies were stimulated with fHAs (6 to 12 disaccharides) and their effect on cytokine and matrix degrading enzyme production was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The involvement of specific cell surface receptors and signal transduction pathways in mediating the effects of fHAs was tested using small interfering RNA (siRNA) approaches and kinase inhibition assays. Results Treatment of IVD cells with fHAs significantly increased mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -13. The stimulatory effects of fHAs on IL-6 protein production were significantly impaired when added to IVD cells in combination with either Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 siRNA or a TLR2 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, the ability of fHAs to enhance IL-6 and MMP-3 protein production was found to be dependent on the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway. Conclusions These findings suggest that fHAs may have the potential to mediate IVD degeneration and discogenic back pain through activation of the TLR2 signaling pathway in resident IVD cells. PMID:23968377

  12. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 3-Mediated LPA Signal Transduction Pathways: A Possible Relationship with Early Development of Peri-Implantation Porcine Conceptus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooyoung; Seo, Heewon; Sung, Yujin; Ka, Hakhyun; Song, Gwonhwa; Kim, Jinyoung

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid with a variety of fatty acyl groups that mediates diverse biological effects on various types of cells through specific G protein-coupled receptors. LPA appears to play a significant role in many reproductive processes, including luteolysis, implantation, and placentation. Our previous study in pigs demonstrated that LPA and the LPA receptor system are present at the maternal-conceptus interface and that LPA increases uterine endometrial expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) through LPA receptor 3 (LPAR3). However, the role of LPA in conceptuses during early pregnancy has not been determined. Therefore, this study examined the effects of LPA in cell proliferation, migration, and activation of the intracellular signaling pathway in porcine conceptuses by using an established porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cell line isolated from Day 12 conceptuses. All examined LPA species with various fatty acid lengths increased proliferation and migration of pTr cells as the dosage increased. Immunoblot analyses found that LPA activated intracellular signaling molecules, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90 kDa (P90RSK), ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6), and P38 in pTr cells. Furthermore, LPA increased expression of PTGS2 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (PLAU), and the LPA-induced increases in PTGS2 and PLAU expression were inhibited by LPAR3 siRNA. Collectively, these results showed that LPA promotes proliferation, migration, and differentiation of pTr cells by activating the ERK1/2-P90RSK-RPS6 and P38 pathways, indicating that the LPA-LPAR3 system may be involved in the development of trophoblast during early pregnancy in pigs. PMID:27030044

  13. Protective effects of protocatechuic acid on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice via p38MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Chunli; Li, Jun; Xu, Yingzhen; Guan, Shui; Zhao, Mingshan

    2015-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the effects of protocatechuic acid (PCA) separated from Chinese herbs, on acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. The mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS at the dose of 5mg/kg body weight. Three doses of PCA (30, 15, 5 mg/kg) were administered to mice with intraperitoneal injection one hour prior to LPS exposure. Six hours later after LPS administration, the effect of PCA on ALI mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE staining, inflammatory cytokine production by ELISA assay and RT-PCR, p38MAPK and NF-κB activation by Western blot analysis. We found that PCA administration significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, the overproduction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was reduced by PCA. Additionally, PCA at the dose of 30 mg/kg could block the activation of p38MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that PCA possesses a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice via suppression of p38MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways. Therefore, PCA may be useful in the therapy of lung inflammatory diseases, especially for ALI. PMID:25841318

  14. Phospholipase D Activation Is an Early Component of the Salicylic Acid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis Cell Suspensions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Krinke, Ondřej; Flemr, Matyáš; Vergnolle, Chantal; Collin, Sylvie; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Taconnat, Ludivine; Yu, Agnès; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in defense against pathogen attack, as well as in germination, flowering, senescence, and the acquisition of thermotolerance. In this report we investigate the involvement of phospholipase D (PLD) in the SA signaling pathway. In presence of exogenous primary alcohols, the production of phosphatidic acid by PLD is diverted toward the formation of phosphatidylalcohols through a reaction called transphosphatidylation. By in vivo metabolic phospholipid labeling with 33Pi, PLD activity was found to be induced 45 min after addition of SA. We show that incubation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspensions with primary alcohols inhibited the induction of two SA-responsive genes, PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 and WRKY38, in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was more pronounced when the primary alcohols were more hydrophobic. Secondary or tertiary alcohols had no inhibitory effect. These results provide compelling arguments for PLD activity being upstream of the induction of these genes by SA. A subsequent study of n-butanol effects on the SA-responsive transcriptome identified 1,327 genes differentially expressed upon SA treatment. Strikingly, the SA response of 380 of these genes was inhibited by n-butanol but not by tert-butanol. A detailed analysis of the regulation of these genes showed that PLD could act both positively and negatively, either on gene induction or gene repression. The overlap with the previously described phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase pathway is discussed. PMID:19304931

  15. Shared Segment Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Implicates the Retinoic Acid Signaling Pathway in Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return (TAPVR)

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Dustin; Arrington, Cammon B.; Kennedy, Brett J.; Yandell, Mark; Wu, Wilfred; Zhang, Wenying; Ware, Stephanie; Jorde, Lynn B.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yost, H. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Most isolated congenital heart defects are thought to be sporadic and are often ascribed to multifactorial mechanisms with poorly understood genetics. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return (TAPVR) occurs in 1 in 15,000 live-born infants and occurs either in isolation or as part of a syndrome involving aberrant left-right development. Previously, we reported causative links between TAVPR and the PDGFRA gene. TAPVR has also been linked to the ANKRD1/CARP genes. However, these genes only explain a small fraction of the heritability of the condition. By examination of phased single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data from 5 distantly related TAPVR patients we identified a single 25 cM shared, Identical by Descent genomic segment on the short arm of chromosome 12 shared by 3 of the patients and their obligate-carrier parents. Whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis identified a non-synonymous variant within the shared segment in the retinol binding protein 5 (RBP5) gene. The RBP5 variant is predicted to be deleterious and is overrepresented in the TAPVR population. Gene expression and functional analysis of the zebrafish orthologue, rbp7, supports the notion that RBP5 is a TAPVR susceptibility gene. Additional sequence analysis also uncovered deleterious variants in genes associated with retinoic acid signaling, including NODAL and retinol dehydrogenase 10. These data indicate that genetic variation in the retinoic acid signaling pathway confers, in part, susceptibility to TAPVR. PMID:26121141

  16. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pozdzik, Agnieszka A.; Giordano, Laetitia; Li, Gang; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Quellard, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; De Prez, Eric; Husson, Cécile; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Arlt, Volker M.; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Brochériou-Spelle, Isabelle; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Caron, Nathalie; Nortier, Joëlle L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ)+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target. Aims In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) inhibition in a rat model of AAN. Materials and Methods Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11) and its control isotype (13C4) were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc) was injected daily. Results At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema) in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation. PMID:27379382

  17. Carnosic acid inhibits TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Carnosic acid (CA), found in rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis) leaves, is known to exhibit anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory activities. However, whether its anti-inflammatory potency can contribute to the amelioration of obesity has not been elucidated. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of CA on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with CA (0-20 µM) for 1 h, followed by treatment with LPS for 30 min; mRNA expression of adipokines and protein expression of TLR4-related molecules were then measured. RESULTS LPS-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes showed elevated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and CA significantly inhibited the expression of these adipokine genes. LPS-induced up regulation of TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, TNF receptor-associated factor 6, and nuclear factor-κB, as well as phosphorylated extracellular receptor-activated kinase were also suppressed by pre-treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with CA. CONCLUSIONS Results of this study suggest that CA directly inhibits TLR4-MyD88-dependent signaling pathways and decreases the inflammatory response in adipocytes. PMID:25324930

  18. α-Lipoic Acids Promote the Protein Synthesis of C2C12 Myotubes by the TLR2/PI3K Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Cai, Xingcai; Xu, Yaqiong; Zhu, Canjun; Wang, Lina; Wang, Songbo; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Yongliang; Jiang, Qingyan; Shu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle protein turnover is regulated by endocrine hormones, nutrients, and inflammation. α-Lipoic acid (ALA) plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ALA on protein synthesis in skeletal muscles and reveal the underlying mechanism. ALA (25 μM) significantly increased the protein synthesis and phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and S6 in C2C12 myotubes with attenuated phosphorylation of AMPK, Ikkα/β, and eIF2α. Intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg ALA also produced the same results in mouse gastrocnemius. Both the PI3K (LY294002) and mTOR (rapamycin) inhibitors abolished the effects of ALA on protein synthesis in the C2C12 myotubes. However, AICAR (AMPK agonist) failed to block the activation of mTOR and S6 by ALA. ALA increased TLR2 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the C2C12 myotubes. TLR2 knockdown by siRNA almost eliminated the effects of ALA on protein synthesis and the Akt/mTOR pathway in the C2C12 myotubes. Immunoprecipitation data showed that ALA enhanced the p85 subunit of PI3K binding to MyD88. These findings indicate that ALA induces protein synthesis and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by TLR2. PMID:26855124

  19. G-protein-coupled receptor cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, i.e. the problem of axonal guidance. We used the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We showed that both LPA and S1P cause a specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences compared to the mouse but very similar to observations in Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibition of Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and with S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA- and S1P-induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  20. Signalling pathways: jack of all cascades.

    PubMed

    Cahill, M A; Janknecht, R; Nordheim, A

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factors that bind the c-fos promoter element SRE are targeted by multiple, independent signalling cascades; the identities of these signalling pathways and their modes of activation are being elucidated. PMID:8805215

  1. Effect of salicylic acid on the attenuation of aluminum toxicity in Coffea arabica L. suspension cells: A possible protein phosphorylation signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanchez, J Armando; Chan-May, Abril; Cab-Guillén, Yahaira; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    The protective effect of salicylic acid (SA) on aluminum (Al) toxicity was studied in suspension cells of Coffea arabica L. The results showed that SA does not produce any effect on cell growth and that the growth inhibition produced by aluminum is restored during simultaneous treatment of the cells with Al and SA. In addition, the cells exposed to both compounds, Al and SA, showed evident morphological signals of recovery from the toxic state produced in the presence of Al. The cells treated with SA showed a lower accumulation of Al, which was linked to restoration from Al toxicity because the concentration of Al(3+) outside the cells, measured as the Al(3+)-morin complex, was not modified by the presence of SA. Additionally, the inhibition of phospholipase C by Al treatment was restored during the exposure of the cells to SA and Al. The involvement of protein phosphorylation in the protective effect of SA on Al-toxicity was suggested because staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, reverted the stimulatory effect of the combination of Al and SA on protein kinase activity. These results suggest that SA attenuates aluminum toxicity by affecting a signaling pathway linked to protein phosphorylation. PMID:23953991

  2. Nrf2-Mediated HO-1 Induction Coupled with the ERK Signaling Pathway Contributes to Indirect Antioxidant Capacity of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the contributing effect of the nuclear transcription factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated signaling pathway on the indirect antioxidant capacity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. The result of an antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase assay showed that CAPE stimulated ARE promoter activity resulting in increased transcriptional and translational activities of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In addition, CAPE treatment enhanced Nrf2 accumulation in the nucleus and the post-translational phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) among several protein kinases tested. Treatment with ERK inhibitor U126 completely suppressed CAPE-induced ERK phosphorylation and HO-1 expression, but it only partly inhibited CAPE-induced Nrf2 accumulation and ARE promoter. Using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, the cellular antioxidant capacity of CAPE against 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress also was shown to be partially suppressed by the ERK inhibitor. From the overall results it is proposed that the indirect antioxidant activity of CAPE against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells is partially attributed to induction of HO-1, which is regulated by Kelch-like erythroid-cell-derived protein with CNC homology (ECH)-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-independent Nrf2 activation relying on post-translational phosphorylation of ERK. PMID:25007817

  3. The jasmonic acid signaling pathway is linked to auxin homeostasis through the modulation of YUCCA8 and YUCCA9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hentrich, Mathias; Böttcher, Christine; Düchting, Petra; Cheng, Youfa; Zhao, Yunde; Berkowitz, Oliver; Masle, Josette; Medina, Joaquín; Pollmann, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    Interactions between phytohormones play important roles in the regulation of plant growth and development, but knowledge of the networks controlling hormonal relationships, such as between oxylipins and auxins, is just emerging. Here, we report the transcriptional regulation of two Arabidopsis YUCCA genes, YUC8 and YUC9, by oxylipins. Similar to previously characterized YUCCA family members, we show that both YUC8 and YUC9 are involved in auxin biosynthesis, as demonstrated by the increased auxin contents and auxin-dependent phenotypes displayed by gain-of-function mutants as well as the significantly decreased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in yuc8 and yuc8/9 knockout lines. Gene expression data obtained by qPCR analysis and microscopic examination of promoter-reporter lines reveal an oxylipin-mediated regulation of YUC9 expression that is dependent on the COI1 signal transduction pathway. In support of these findings, the roots of the analyzed yuc knockout mutants displayed a reduced response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The similar response of the yuc8 and yuc9 mutants to MeJA in cotyledons and hypocotyls suggests functional overlap of YUC8 and YUC9 in aerial tissues, while their function in roots shows some specificity, probably in part related to different spatio-temporal expression patterns of the two genes. These results provide evidence for an intimate functional relationship between oxylipin signaling and auxin homeostasis. PMID:23425284

  4. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  5. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in perfluorooctane sulfonic acid-induced inflammatory reaction in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingying; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-01

    Microglial activation is closely related to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by producing proinflammatory cytokines. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), known as an emerging persistent organic pollutant, is reported to disturb human immune homeostasis; however, whether it affects cytokine production or the immune response in the central nervous system remains unclear. The present study was aimed to explore whether PFOS contributed to inflammatory action and to investigate the corresponding mechanisms in BV2 microglia. PFOS-mediated morphologic changes, cytokine responses and signaling events were examined by light microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot assays. Our results indicated that PFOS increased BV2 cells activation and simultaneously increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 expression. In addition, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor (SP600125), as well as ERK1/2 blocker (PD98059), transcriptionally at least, displayed anti-inflammatory properties on PFOS-elicited cytokine responses. Moreover, the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was specifically activated by PFOS as well. These results, taken together, suggested that PFOS exerts its functional effects on the response of microglial cell activation via, in part, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways with its subsequent influence on proinflammatory action. PMID:25677194

  6. α-Lipoic acid up-regulates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β in skeletal muscle: involvement of the JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Sibille, Brigitte; Murdaca, Joseph; Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Grimaldi, Paul A; Neels, Jaap G

    2016-03-01

    We hypothesized that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) might interact with the transcriptional control of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β in skeletal muscle. Molecular mechanisms were investigated using differentiated C2C12 myotubes treated with α-LA and/or PPARβ agonist GW0742. In vivo studies with 3-mo-old C57Bl6 mice were realized: voluntary wheel running (VWR) training (7 wk), and a 6 wk diet containing (or not) α-LA (0.25% wt/wt). This last condition was combined with (or not) 1 bout of treadmill exercise (18 m/min for 1 h). Using a reporter assay, we demonstrate that α-LA is not an agonist of PPARβ but regulates PPARβ target gene expression through an active PPARβ pathway. GW0742-induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 mRNA is potentiated by α-LA. In C2C12, α-LA lowers the activation of the JNK signaling pathway and increases PPARβ mRNA and protein levels (2-fold) to the same extent as with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Similarly to VWR training effect, PPARβ expression increases (2-fold) in vastus lateralis of animals fed an α-LA-enriched diet. However, α-LA treatment does not further stimulate the adaptive up-regulation of PPARβ observed in response to 1 bout of exercise. We have identified a novel mechanism of regulation of PPARβ expression/action in skeletal muscle with potential physiologic application through the action of α-LA, involving the JNK pathway. PMID:26655383

  7. The Apoptotic Effect of Ursolic Acid on SK-Hep-1 Cells is Regulated by the PI3K/Akt, p38 and JNK MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Ling; Lin, Ping-Yi; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Yao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a pentacyclic triterpene acid that is present in a wide variety of medicinal herbs and edible plants. This study investigated the effect of UA on apoptosis and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells. After treatment of SK-Hep-1 cells with different concentrations of UA, we observed that cell viability was reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a dose-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 and G2/M phases, with cells treated with 60 μM showing the highest percentages of cells in those phases. UA-induced chromatin condensation of nuclei was observed by using DAPI staining. The western blot results revealed that exposure to UA was associated with decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and TCTP and increased expression of apoptosis-related proteins TNF-α, Fas, FADD, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that treatment with UA resulted in increased expression of caspase-3. Moreover, exposure to UA resulted in the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. These findings suggest that UA inhibits the proliferation of SK-Hep-1 cells and induces apoptosis. PMID:27104510

  8. The oncofusion protein FUS-ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-04-14

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS-ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS-ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS-ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS-ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS-ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  9. The oncofusion protein FUS–ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-01-01

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS–ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS–ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS–ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS–ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS–ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  10. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  11. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  12. Echinocystic acid inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by regulating NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hui; Li, Bing; Wu, Qiong; Lv, Jian-Guo; Nie, Hui-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) is a key factor in the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts. Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, was reported to prevent reduction of bone mass and strength and improve the cancellous bone structure and biochemical properties in ovariectomy rats. However, the molecular mechanism of EA on the osteoclast formation has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of EA on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our results showed that EA inhibited the formation of osteoclast, as well as the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker proteins in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). At molecular levels, EA inhibited RANKL-induced NF-κB activation and ERK phosphorylation in BMMs. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that EA can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Moreover, we clarified that these inhibitory effects of EA occur through suppression of NF-κB and ERK activation. Therefore, EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27349866

  13. Curcumin protects ANIT-induced cholestasis through signaling pathway of FXR-regulated bile acid and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Tang, Xiaowen; Ding, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Yang, Qiaoling; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinically significant symptom and widely associated with liver diseases, however, there are very few effective therapies for cholestasis. Danning tablet (DNT, a Chinese patent medicine preparation) has been clinically used to treat human liver and gallbladder diseases for more than 20 years in China. However, which ingredients of DNT contributed to this beneficial effect and their mechanistic underpinnings have been largely unknown. In the present study, we discovered that DNT not only demonstrated greater benefits for cholecystitis patients after cholecystectomy surgery in clinic but also showed protective effect against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis model in rodent. Curcumin, one major compound derived from DNT, exerted the protective effect against cholestasis through farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which has been focused as potential therapeutic targets for treating cholestasis. The underlying mechanism of curcumin against cholestasis was restoring bile acid homeostasis and antagonizing inflammatory responses in a FXR-dependent manner and in turn contributed to overall cholestasis attenuation. Collectively, curcumin can be served as a potential treatment option for liver injury with cholestasis. PMID:27624003

  14. Inhibition of Melanogenesis by Gallic Acid: Possible Involvement of the PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways in B16F10 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tzu-Rong; Lin, Jen-Jie; Tsai, Chi-Chu; Huang, Tsu-Kei; Yang, Zih-Yan; Wu, Ming-O; Zheng, Yu-Qing; Su, Ching-Chyuan; Wu, Yu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Gallic acid is one of the major flavonoids found in plants. It acts as an antioxidant, and seems to have anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of gallic acid on melanogenesis, including the activation of melanogenesis signaling pathways. Gallic acid significantly inhibited both melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and decreased the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP1), and dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). In addition, gallic acid also acts by phosphorylating and activating melanogenesis inhibitory proteins such as Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Using inhibitors against PI3K/Akt (LY294002) or MEK/ERK-specific (PD98059), the hypopigmentation effect was suppressed, and the gallic acid-initiated activation of MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt was also revoked. Gallic acid also increased GSK3β and p-β-catenin expression but down-regulated p-GSK3β. Moreover, GSK3β-specific inhibitor (SB216763) restored gallic acid-induced melanin reduction. These results suggest that activation of the MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt, and inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways is involved in the melanogenesis signaling cascade, and that activation by gallic acid reduces melanin synthesis via down-regulation of MITF and its downstream signaling pathway. In conclusion, gallic acid may be a potentially agent for the treatment of certain skin conditions. PMID:24129178

  15. Linoelaidic acid enhances adipogenic differentiation in adipose tissue-derived stromal cells through suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jihui; Liang, Yuan; Jian, Luyang; Zhang, Jingwei; Liang, Shuai; Xiao, Shan; Liu, Bingnan; Wang, Han

    2016-07-01

    Obesity has become a major health problem which is related with high-trans fatty acids diet. Adipogenic differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) plays an important role in the development of adipose tissue. In order to determine the effect of trans fatty acids on adipogenic differentiation in ADSCs, cells were treated with linoelaidic acid, as well as linoleic acid and linolenic acid. We found that linoelaidic acid significantly increased the lipid droplet formation and triglyceride content compared with linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Linoelaidic acid also down-regulated the levels of β-catenin in cells and inhibited the accumulation of β-catenin in cell nuclei. Lithium chloride, an activator of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, antagonized the enhancement of linoelaidic acid on adipogenesis and up-regulated the levels of β-catenin in ADSCs. These results indicated that linoelaidic acid could enhance the adipogenic differentiation in ADSCs in vitro, which is partly due to the suppression of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27255637

  16. MicroRNA-1207-5p inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth and invasion through the fatty acid synthase-mediated Akt/mTOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Dong, Lei; Shi, Haitao; Li, Hong; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jinhai

    2016-09-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) has emerged as a unique oncologic target for the treatment of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, effective inhibitors of FASN for cancer treatment are lacking. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as novel and endogenic inhibitors of gene expression. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of miR‑1207‑5p in HCC and the regulation of FASN through miR‑1207‑5p. The expression of miR-1207-5p was markedly reduced in HCC tissues and cell lines as detected with real‑time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Overexpression of miR-1207-5p significantly suppressed the cell growth and invasion of HCC cells. By contrast, inhibition of miR‑1207‑5p exhibited an opposite effect. Bioinformatics analysis showed that FASN is a predicted target of miR‑1207‑5p which was validated by dual‑luciferase reporter assay, qPCR and western blot analysis. Overexpression of miR‑1207‑5p inhibited the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway, and promotion of this pathway was noted following inhibition of miR‑1207‑5p. Rescue experiments showed that the restoration of FASN expression partially reversed the inhibitory effect of miR‑1207‑5p on cell growth, invasion and Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, our study suggests that miR‑1207‑5p/FASN plays an important role in HCC, and provides novel insight into developing new inhibitors for FASN for therapeutic interventions for HCC. PMID:27461404

  17. Bile acid signaling and biliary functions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hannah; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on various components of bile acid signaling in relation to cholangiocytes. Their roles as targets for potential therapies for cholangiopathies are also explored. While many factors are involved in these complex signaling pathways, this review emphasizes the roles of transmembrane G protein coupled receptor (TGR5), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and the bicarbonate umbrella. Following a general background on cholangiocytes and bile acids, we will expand the review and include sections that are most recently known (within 5–7 years) regarding the field of bile acid signaling and cholangiocyte function. These findings all demonstrate that bile acids influence biliary functions which can, in turn, regulate the cholangiocyte response during pathological events. PMID:26579437

  18. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    PubMed

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  19. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  20. Retinoic Acid Modulates Interferon-γ Production by Hepatic Natural Killer T Cells via Phosphatase 2A and the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Heng-Kwei

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite converted from vitamin A, plays an active role in immune function, such as defending against infections and immune regulation. Although RA affects various types of immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes, whether it affects natural killer T (NKT) cells remain unknown. In this study, we found that RA decreased interferon (IFN)-γ production by activated NKT cells through T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28. We also found that RA reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, but increased phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells. The increased PP2A activity, at least partly, contributed to the reduction of ERK phosphorylation. Since inhibition of ERK activation decreases IFN-γ production by TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells, RA may downregulate IFN-γ production by TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells through the PP2A-ERK pathway. Our results demonstrated a novel function of RA in modulating the IFN-γ expression by activated NKT cells. PMID:25343668

  1. Proliferative effects of gamma-amino butyric acid on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells are associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Tianyu; Ji, Ping; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Hongmei; Luo, Wenping

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system, has been reported to play an important physiological role in peripheral non-neuronal tissues, such as tumors. However, whether deregulated GABA is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of GABA on the proliferation of the OSCC cell line, Tca8113. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to examine the expression of GABA A type receptor pi subunit (GABRP) in human OSCC tissues, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis were performed to examine the expression of GABRP in Tca8113 cells. The proliferative effects of GABA on Tca8113 cells were analyzed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. The activation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was examined by western blot analysis. GABRP expression was observed in the cytoplasm with a higher level in poorly differentiated OSCC tissues. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GABRP were detected in the Tca8113 cells. The addition of GABA and the GABA A type receptor agonist, Muscimol, promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis through the activation of the p38 MAPK and the inhibition of the JNK MAPK signaling pathways. These results imply a novel role of GABA in OSCC. PMID:27222045

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine isolated from Cucumaria frondosa exhibits anti-hyperglycemic effects via activating phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiwei; Xu, Leilei; Shi, Di; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Lou, Qiaoming; Xue, Changhu

    2014-04-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine was isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa (Cucumaria-PC) and its effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic rats were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control, model control (STZ), low- and high-dose Cucumaria-PC groups (STZ + Cucumaria-PC at 25 and 75 mg/Kg·b·wt, intragastrically, respectively). Blood glucose, insulin, glycogen in liver and gastrocnemius were determined over 60 days. Insulin signaling in the rats' gastrocnemius was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The results showed that Cucumaria-PC significantly decreased blood glucose level, increased insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis in diabetic rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cucumaria-PC significantly promoted the expressions of glycometabolism-related genes of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB), and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in gastrocnemius. Western blotting assay demonstrated that Cucumaria-PC remarkably enhanced the proteins abundance of IR-β, PI3K, PKB, GLUT4, as well as phosphorylation of Tyr-IR-β, p85-PI3K, Ser473-PKB (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). These findings suggested that Cucumaria-PC exhibited significant anti-hyperglycemic activities through up-regulating PI3K/PKB signal pathway mediated by insulin. Nutritional supplementation with Cucumaria-PC, if validated for human studies, may offer an adjunctive therapy for diabetes mellitus. PMID:24168893

  3. Bile acids are nutrient signaling hormones.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiping; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2014-08-01

    Bile salts play crucial roles in allowing the gastrointestinal system to digest, transport and metabolize nutrients. They function as nutrient signaling hormones by activating specific nuclear receptors (FXR, PXR, Vitamin D) and G-protein coupled receptors [TGR5, sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2), muscarinic receptors]. Bile acids and insulin appear to collaborate in regulating the metabolism of nutrients in the liver. They both activate the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Bile acid induction of the FXR-α target gene, small heterodimer partner (SHP), is highly dependent on the activation PKCζ, a branch of the insulin signaling pathway. SHP is an important regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver. One might hypothesize that chronic low grade inflammation which is associated with insulin resistance, may inhibit bile acid signaling and disrupt lipid metabolism. The disruption of these signaling pathways may increase the risk of fatty liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Finally, conjugated bile acids appear to promote cholangiocarcinoma growth via the activation of S1PR2. PMID:24819989

  4. [Hedgehog signaling pathway and human disorders].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and cancer formation. This pathway in mammals consists of multiple molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog, PTCH, SMO, and GLI. Mutations of these components result in various human malformations or tumors, i.e., holoprosencephaly, Gorlin syndrome, Greig encephalopolysyndactyly, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, basal cell carcinomas, and medulloblastomas. Recently, small molecules that inhibit this signaling pathway were developed, and clinically applied to cancer therapy. Thus, understanding of these molecular relationships may facilitate the development of new therapies and treatments for diseases caused by hedgehog signaling disorders. PMID:19618878

  5. [Unsaturated fatty acid of Actinidia chinesis Planch seed oil enhances the antioxidative stress ability of rats with pulmonary fibrosis through activating Keap 1/Nrf 2 signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijing; Qian, Hong; Yin, Huiming; He, Jianbin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Zaiyan

    2016-04-01

    Objective To observe the effects of unsaturated fatty acid of Actinidia chinesis Planch(USFA-ACP) seed oil on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, and to explore whether the effect is mediated by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap 1)/nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf 2)signaling pathway. Methods Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, (60, 120, 180) mg/kg USFA-ACP seed oil treatment group and 5 mg/kg prednisone group. Each group included 10 animals. Rats in the control group were intratracheally administered with normal saline, and the rest of five groups were intratracheally administered with bleomycin A5 to establish pulmonary fibrosis models. From the second day, rats in the three USFA-ACP seed oil treatment groups were intragastrically treated with 60, 120 and 180 mg/kg USFA-ACP seed oil correspondingly. The prednisone group were intragastrically administrated with 5 mg/kg prednisone acetate. Control and model groups were treated with normal saline. All rats were sacrificed on day 28. Pulmonary tissues were then removed, and HE and Masson staining were performed. The contents of hydroxyproline (HYP), reactive oxygen species(ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) in pulmonary tissue homogenates were measured through the commercial kits. The protein expressions of Keap 1 and Nrf2 in pulmonary tissues were analyzed using Western blotting. Results Compared with the model group, the alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis extent in 60, 120, 180 mg/kg USFA-ACP seed oil treatment groups as well as the prednisone group were significantly alleviated, HYP, ROS and MDA contents in pulmonary tissues, Keap 1 protein expression in the cytoplasm decreased remarkably, while SOD, CAT and GSH-Px contents in pulmonary tissues, Nrf2 protein expression in the nucleus increased. Moreover, compared with 60 mg/kg USFA-ACP seed oil treatment group, the above

  6. Gallic acid suppresses the migration and invasion of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-Ching; Huang, An-Cheng; Wu, Ping-Ping; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Meng, Menghsiao; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a natural diet or consumption of fruits or vegetables can decrease the risk of cancer development. Cancer cells can migrate to and invade other organs or tissues that cause more difficulty to treat them and this also results in the need for treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Gallic acid (GA) has been demonstrated to possess multiple biological activities including anticancer function. However, no report exist on GA inhibited invasion and migration of human prostate cancer cells. We investigated the effects of migration and invasion in GA-treated PC-3 human prostate cancer cells with a series of in vitro experiments. Boyden chamber transwell assay was used to examine the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. Western blotting, real-time PCR and gelatin zymography were used for determining the protein levels, gene expression and enzyme activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 in vitro. Results indicated that GA inhibited the invasion and migration of PC-3 cells and these effects are dose-dependent. GA inhibited the protein levels of MMP-2 and -9, son of sevenless homolog 1 (SOS1), growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB) p65, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, p-AKT (Thr308) and p-AKT (Ser473), but it promoted the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and AKT in PC-3 cells. GA also reduced the enzyme activities of MMP-2 and -9 in the examined cells. Moreover, the down-regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Ras homolog gene family, member A (Rho A) mRNA expression levels, and up-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP1) gene levels occurred in GA-treated PC-3 cells after 24 h treatment. Based on these observations, we suggest that GA might modulate through blocking the p38, JNK, PKC and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways and reducing the NF

  7. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs. PMID:24962881

  8. Function and Regulation in MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Raymond E.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Signaling pathways that activate different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) elicit many of the responses that are evoked in cells by changes in certain environmental conditions and upon exposure to a variety of hormonal and other stimuli. These pathways were first elucidated in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Studies of MAPK pathways in this organism continue to be especially informative in revealing the molecular mechanisms by which MAPK cascades operate, propagate signals, modulate cellular processes, and are controlled by regulatory factors both internal to and external to the pathways. Here we highlight recent advances and new insights about MAPK-based signaling that have been made through studies in yeast, which provide lessons directly applicable to, and that enhance our understanding of, MAPK-mediated signaling in mammalian cells. PMID:17604854

  9. Modularized TGFbeta-Smad Signaling Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, M.; Carra, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway is a prominent regulatory signaling pathway controlling various important cellular processes. It can be induced by several factors, including ionizing radiation. It is regulated by Smads in a negative feedback loop through promoting increases in the regulatory Smads in the cell nucleus, and subsequent expression of inhibitory Smad, Smad7 to form a ubiquitin ligase with Smurf targeting active TGF receptors for degradation. In this work, we proposed a mathematical model to study the radiation-induced Smad-regulated TGF signaling pathway. By modularization, we are able to analyze each module (subsystem) and recover the nonlinear dynamics of the entire network system. Meanwhile the excitability, a common feature observed in the biological systems, along the TGF signaling pathway is discussed by mathematical analysis and numerical simulation.

  10. Premetazoan origin of the Hippo signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Zheng, Yonggang; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Pan, Duojia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Non-aggregative multicellularity requires strict control of cell number. The Hippo signaling pathway coordinates cell proliferation and apoptosis and is a central regulator of organ size in animals. Recent studies have shown the presence of key members of the Hippo pathway in non-bilaterian animals, but failed to identify this pathway outside Metazoa. Through comparative analyses of recently sequenced holozoan genomes, we show that Hippo pathway components, such as the kinases Hippo and Warts, the co-activator Yorkie and the transcription factor Scalloped, were already present in the unicellular ancestors of animals. Remarkably, functional analysis of Hippo components of the amoeboid holozoan Capsaspora owczarzaki, performed in Drosophila, demonstrate that the growth-regulatory activity of the Hippo pathway is conserved in this unicellular lineage. Our findings show that the Hippo pathway evolved well before the origin of Metazoa and highlight the importance of Hippo signaling as a key developmental mechanism pre-dating the origin of Metazoa. PMID:22832104

  11. Optogenetic control of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cells employ a plethora of signaling pathways to make their life-and-death decisions. Extensive genetic, biochemical, and physiological studies have led to the accumulation of knowledge about signaling components and their interactions within signaling networks. These conventional approaches, though useful, lack the ability to control the spatial and temporal aspects of signaling processes. The recently emerged optogenetic tools open up exciting opportunities by enabling signaling regulation with superior temporal and spatial resolution, easy delivery, rapid reversibility, fewer off-target side effects, and the ability to dissect complex signaling networks. Here we review recent achievements in using light to control intracellular signaling pathways, and discuss future prospects for the field, including integration of new genetic approaches into optogenetics. PMID:25529484

  12. Involvement of the salicylic acid signaling pathway in the systemic resistance induced in Arabidopsis by plant growth-promoting fungus Fusarium equiseti GF19-1.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hanae; Hossain, Md Motaher; Kubota, Mayumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) are effective biocontrol agents for a number of soil-borne diseases and are known for their ability to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms triggered by PGPF Fusarium equiseti GF19-1, which is known to increase pathogen resistance in plants, by using GF19-1 spores and the culture filtrate (CF) to treat the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Subsequently, the leaves were challenged with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst) bacteria. Arabidopsis plants treated with GF19-1 spores or the CF elicited ISR against the Pst pathogen, resulting in a restriction of disease severity and suppression of pathogen proliferation. Examination of ISR in various signaling mutants and transgenic plants showed that GF19-1-induced protection was observed in the jasmonate response mutant jar1 and the ethylene response mutant etr1, whereas it was blocked in Arabidopsis plants expressing the NahG transgene or demonstrating a disruption of the NPR1 gene (npr1). Analysis of systemic gene expression revealed that GF19-1 modulates the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5 genes. Moreover, transient accumulation of SA was observed in GF19-1-treated plant, whereas the level was further enhanced after Pst infection of GF19-1-pretreated plants, indicating that accumulation of SA was potentiated when Arabidopsis plants were primed for disease resistance by GF19-1. In conclusion, these findings imply that the induced protective effect conferred by F. equiseti GF19-1 against the leaf pathogen Pst requires responsiveness to an SA-dependent pathway. PMID:23728333

  13. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  14. Betulinic acid alleviates non-alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting SREBP1 activity via the AMPK-mTOR-SREBP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hai Yan; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Soo Jung; Jo, Hee Kyung; Kim, Go Woon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as the most common liver disease in industrialized countries. The discovery of food components that can ameliorate NAFLD is therefore of interest. Betulinic acid (BA) is a triterpenoid with many pharmacological activities, but the effect of BA on fatty liver is as yet unknown. To explore the possible anti-fatty liver effects and their underlying mechanisms, we used insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, primary rat hepatocytes and liver tissue from ICR mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Oil Red O staining revealed that BA significantly suppressed excessive triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells and in the livers of mice fed a HFD. Ca(+2)-calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase (CAMKK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were both activated by BA treatment. In contrast, the protein levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase (S6K) were all reduced when hepatocytes were treated with BA for up to 24h. We found that BA activates AMPK via phosphorylation, suppresses SREBP1 mRNA expression, nuclear translocation and repressed SREBP1 target gene expression in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes, leading to reduced lipogenesis and lipid accumulation. These effects were completely abolished in the presence of STO-609 (a CAMKK inhibitor) or compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), indicating that the BA-induced reduction in hepatic steatosis was mediated via the CAMKK-AMPK-SREBP1 signaling pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that BA effectively ameliorates intracellular lipid accumulation in liver cells and thus is a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of fatty liver disease. PMID:23435355

  15. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  16. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and β-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for

  17. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A.; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  18. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  19. The Hedgehog signalling pathway in bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Andre, Philipp; Ye, Ling; Yang, Ying-Zi

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway plays many important roles in development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The critical function of Hh signalling in bone formation has been identified in the past two decades. Here, we review the evolutionarily conserved Hh signalling mechanisms with an emphasis on the functions of the Hh signalling pathway in bone development, homeostasis and diseases. In the early stages of embryonic limb development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a major morphogen in patterning the limb buds. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has an essential function in endochondral ossification and induces osteoblast differentiation in the perichondrium. Hh signalling is also involved intramembrane ossification. Interactions between Hh and Wnt signalling regulate cartilage development, endochondral bone formation and synovial joint formation. Hh also plays an important role in bone homeostasis, and reducing Hh signalling protects against age-related bone loss. Disruption of Hh signalling regulation leads to multiple bone diseases, such as progressive osseous heteroplasia. Therefore, understanding the signalling mechanisms and functions of Hh signalling in bone development, homeostasis and diseases will provide important insights into bone disease prevention, diagnoses and therapeutics. PMID:26023726

  20. Canonical WNT signaling pathway and human AREG.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    AREG (Amphiregulin), BTC (beta-cellulin), EGF, EPGN (Epigen), EREG (Epiregulin), HBEGF, NRG1, NRG2, NRG3, NRG4 and TGFA (TGFalpha) constitute EGF family ligands for ERBB family receptors. Cetuximab (Erbitux), Pertuzumab (Omnitarg) and Trastuzumab (Herceptin) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to EGF family ligands, while Gefitinib (Iressa), Erlotinib (Tarceva) and Lapatinib (GW572016) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to ERBB family receptors. AREG and TGFA are biomarkers for Gefitinib non-responders. The TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human EGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because three TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human AREG gene, comparative genomics analyses on AREG orthologs were further performed. The EPGN-EREG-AREG-BTC cluster at human chromosome 4q13.3 was linked to the PPBP-CXCL segmental duplicons. AREG was the paralog of HBEGF at human chromosome 5q31.2. Chimpanzee AREG gene, consisting of six exons, was located within NW_105918.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee AREG was a type I transmembrane protein showing 98.0% and 71.4% total amino-acid identity with human AREG and mouse Areg, respectively. Three TCF/LEF-binding sites within human AREG promoter were conserved in chimpanzee AREG promoter, but not in rodent Areg promoters. Primate AREG promoters were significantly divergent from rodent Areg promoters. AREG mRNA was expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as colorectal cancer, liver cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, esophageal cancer and myeloma. Because human AREG was characterized as potent target gene of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway, WNT signaling activation could lead to Gefitinib resistance through AREG upregulation. AREG is a target of systems medicine in the field of oncology. PMID:16685431

  1. GPCR signaling along the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Irannejad, Roshanak; von Zastrow, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) internalize after agonist-induced activation. While endocytosis has long been associated with homeostatic attenuation of cellular responsiveness, accumulating evidence from study of a wide range of eukaryotes reveals that the endocytic pathway also contributes to generating receptor-initiated signals themselves. Here we review recent progress in this area, discussing primarily but not exclusively GPCR signaling in mammalian cells. PMID:24680436

  2. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  3. Inhibitory effects of omega-3 fatty acids on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats: Possible involvement of G protein-coupled receptor 120/β-arrestin2/TGF-β activated kinase-1 binding protein-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Li, Haiying; Meng, Chengjie; Chen, Dongdong; Chen, Zhouqing; Wang, Yibin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been reported to improve neuron functions during aging and in patients affected by mild cognitive impairment, and mediate potent anti-inflammatory via G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) signal pathway. Neuron dysfunction and inflammatory response also contributed to the progression of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI). This study was to examine the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on SAH-induced EBI. Two weeks before SAH, 30% Omega-3 fatty acids was administered by oral gavage at 1g/kg body weight once every 24h. Specific siRNA for GPR120 was exploited. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, fluoro-Jade B staining, and neurobehavioral scores and brain water content test showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced brain cell apoptosis and neuronal degradation, behavioral impairment, and brain edema. Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays results showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced elevation of inflammatory factors, including cyclooxygenase-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1), MEK4, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and IkappaB kinase as well as activation of nuclear factor kappa B through regulating GPR120/β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1 pathway. Furthermore, siRNA-induced GPR120 silencing blocked the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Here, we show that stimulation of GPR120 with omega-3 fatty acids pretreatment causes anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammatory effects via β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1/TAK1 pathway in the brains of SAH rats. Fish omega-3 fatty acids as part of a daily diet may reduce EBI in an experimental rat model of SAH. PMID:27000704

  4. GA signalling and cross-talk with other signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lor, Vai S; Olszewski, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate growth and development. DELLA proteins repress GA responses. GA binding to its receptor triggers a series of events that culminate in the destruction of DELLA proteins by the 26S proteasome, which removes the repression of GA signalling. DELLA proteins are transcription co-activators that induce the expression of genes which encode products that inhibit GA responses. In addition to repressing GA responses, DELLA proteins influence the activity of other signalling pathways and serve as a central hub from which other pathways influence GA signalling. In this role, DELLA proteins bind to and inhibit proteins, including transcription factors that act in the signalling pathways of other hormones and light. The binding of these proteins to DELLA proteins also inhibits DELLA activity. GA signalling is subject to homoeostatic regulation through GA-induced repression of GA biosynthesis gene expression, and increased production of the GA receptor and enzymes that catabolize bioactive GAs. This review also discusses the nature of mutant DELLA alleles that are used to produce high-yielding 'Green Revolution' cereal varieties, and highlights important gaps in our knowledge of GA signalling. PMID:26374886

  5. Research Resources for Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) signaling pathways impact cellular function in a broad variety of tissues in both normal physiology and disease states. The complex tissue-specific biology of these pathways is an enduring impediment to the development of clinical NR small-molecule modulators that combine therapeutically desirable effects in specific target tissues with suppression of off-target effects in other tissues. Supporting the important primary research in this area is a variety of web-based resources that assist researchers in gaining an appreciation of the molecular determinants of the pharmacology of a NR pathway in a given tissue. In this study, selected representative examples of these tools are reviewed, along with discussions on how current and future generations of tools might optimally adapt to the future of NR signaling research. PMID:27216565

  6. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA), which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and rhynchophylline (RP) have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg), RP (0.25 mg/kg), and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg) for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp) of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β , IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period. PMID:24381640

  7. Is alpha-lipoic acid a scavenger of reactive oxygen species in vivo? Evidence for its initiation of stress signaling pathways that promote endogenous antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Petersen Shay, Kate; Moreau, Régis F; Smith, Eric J; Hagen, Tory M

    2008-06-01

    The chemical reduction and oxidation (redox) properties of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) suggest that it may have potent antioxidant potential. A significant number of studies now show that LA and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), directly scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) species and protect cells against a host of insults where oxidative stress is part of the underlying etiology. However, owing to its limited and transient accumulation in tissues following oral intake, the efficacy of nonprotein-bound LA to function as a physiological antioxidant has been questioned. Herein, we review the evidence that the micronutrient functions of LA may be more as an effector of important cellular stress response pathways that ultimately influence endogenous cellular antioxidant levels and reduce proinflammatory mechanisms. This would promote a sustained improvement in cellular resistance to pathologies where oxidative stress is involved, which would not be forthcoming if LA solely acted as a transient ROS scavenger. PMID:18409172

  8. Environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid inhibit IL-7/STAT5 cytokine signaling pathways in mouse CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-04-15

    Environmental arsenic exposure is a public health issue. Immunotoxicity induced by arsenic has been reported in humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms of As(+3) and MMA(+3) toxicity in mouse thymus cells. Because we know that MMA(+3) inhibits IL-7 signaling in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells, we studied the influence of As(+3) and MMA(+3) on T cell development in the thymus at the earliest stage of T cell development (CD4-CD8-, double negative, DN) which requires IL-7 dependent signaling. We found in a DN thymus cell line (D1) that a low concentration of MMA(+3) (50 nM) suppressed IL-7 dependent JAK1, 3 and STAT5 signaling. As(+3) suppressed STAT5 and JAK3 at higher concentrations (500 nM). Cell surface expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127) was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+)3, but was increased by 500 NM As(+3), indicating possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these agents. A decrease in cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in D1 cells exposed to As(+3) at 500 nM and MMA(+3) starting at 50 nM, suggesting that arsenic at these environmentally-relevant doses suppresses early T cell development through the inhibition of IL-7 signaling pathway. PMID:26921788

  9. Targeting RTK Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Regad, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The RAS/MAP kinase and the RAS/PI3K/AKT pathways play a key role in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and survival. The induction of these pathways depends on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) that are activated upon ligand binding. In cancer, constitutive and aberrant activations of components of those pathways result in increased proliferation, survival and metastasis. For instance, mutations affecting RTKs, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K and AKT are common in perpetuating the malignancy of several types of cancers and from different tissue origins. Therefore, these signaling pathways became prime targets for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide an overview about the most frequently encountered mutations, the pathogenesis that results from such mutations and the known therapeutic strategies developed to counteract their aberrant functions. PMID:26404379

  10. Targeting Apoptosis Signaling Pathways for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Treatment approaches for cancer, for example chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or immunotherapy, primarily act by inducing cell death in cancer cells. Consequently, the inability to trigger cell death pathways or alternatively, evasion of cancer cells to the induction of cell death pathways can result in resistance of cancers to current treatment protocols. Therefore, in order to overcome treatment resistance a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate cell death and survival pathways in cancers and in response to cancer therapy is necessary to develop molecular-targeted therapies. This strategy should lead to more effective and individualized treatment strategies that selectively target deregulated signaling pathways in a tumor type- and patient-specific manner. PMID:22655234

  11. Targeting Signaling Transduction Pathways in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbosh, Phillip H; McConkey, David J; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Systemic therapy for urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder has largely revolved around cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. However, several recent clinical trials have explored the roles of targeted therapies which specifically inhibit signal transduction pathways. Simultaneously, a rationale for such therapies has come to the forefront of management of this disease because an overabundance of signaling pathways are genetically deranged as a result of point mutation or copy number alteration (CNA) as identified by several recent next generation sequencing (NGS) studies. Importantly, these derangements are found in all stages of disease, and therefore targeted therapies hold promise as a next step in the evolution of the medical management of both localized and metastatic UCC. We review the rationale for and progress in studying inhibition of signal transduction as a means of treatment of UCC. PMID:26472299

  12. The Fog signaling pathway: insights into signaling in morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Rogers, Stephen L

    2014-10-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell-cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system׳s relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992

  13. The Fog signaling pathway: Insights into signaling in morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alyssa J.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell–cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system's relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992

  14. Chlorogenic acid induces apoptosis to inhibit inflammatory proliferation of IL-6-induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes through modulating the activation of JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    LOU, LIXIA; ZHOU, JINGWEI; LIU, YUJUN; WEI, YI; ZHAO, JIULI; DENG, JIAGANG; DONG, BIN; ZHU, LINGQUN; WU, AIMING; YANG, YINGXI; CHAI, LIMIN

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the primary constituent of Caulis Lonicerae, a Chinese herb used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study aimed to investigate whether CGA was able to inhibit the proliferation of the fibroblast-like synoviocyte cell line (RSC-364), stimulated by interleukin (IL)-6, through inducing apoptosis. Following incubation with IL-6 or IL-6 and CGA, the cellular proliferation of RSC-364 cells was detected by MTT assay. The ratio of apoptosed cells were detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to observe protein expression levels of key molecules involved in the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-STAT3, JAK1 and gp130] and the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-inhibitor of κB kinase subunit α/β and NF-κB p50). It was revealed that CGA was able to inhibit the inflammatory proliferation of RSC-364 cells mediated by IL-6 through inducing apoptosis. CGA was also able to suppress the expression levels of key molecules in the JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways, and inhibit the activation of these signaling pathways in the inflammatory response through IL-6-mediated signaling, thereby resulting in the inhibition of the inflammatory proliferation of synoviocytes. The present results indicated that CGA may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent for inhibiting inflammatory hyperplasia of the synovium through inducing synoviocyte apoptosis in patients with RA. PMID:27168850

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid signalling in development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yung, Yun C; Chen, Allison; Chun, Jerold

    2015-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that is present in all tissues examined to date. LPA signals extracellularly via cognate G protein-coupled receptors to mediate cellular processes such as survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and morphology. These LPA-influenced processes impact many aspects of organismal development. In particular, LPA signalling has been shown to affect fertility and reproduction, formation of the nervous system, and development of the vasculature. Here and in the accompanying poster, we review the developmentally related features of LPA signalling. PMID:25852197

  16. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J; Smith, David W; Burgess, Antony W

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated with the parameters

  17. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages. PMID:26776055

  19. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  20. Obesity-Induced Hypertension: Brain Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Fang, Taolin; Aberdein, Nicola; de Lara Rodriguez, Cecilia E P; Hall, John E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity greatly increases the risk for cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal diseases and is one of the most significant and preventable causes of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of central nervous system (CNS) signaling pathways that contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension. We discuss the role of excess adiposity and activation of the brain leptin-melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity. In addition, we highlight other potential brain mechanisms by which increased weight gain modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions. Unraveling the CNS mechanisms responsible for increased sympathetic activation and hypertension and how circulating hormones activate brain signaling pathways to control BP offer potentially important therapeutic targets for obesity and hypertension. PMID:27262997

  1. Fumaric acid esters promote neuronal survival upon ischemic stress through activation of the Nrf2 but not HIF-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin-Holderer, Jiemeng; Li, Lexiao; Gruneberg, Daniel; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of ischemic stroke pathogenesis causing neuronal malfunction and cell death. Up-regulation of anti-oxidative genes through activation of the NF-E2-related transcription factor 2 (Nrf2) is one of the key mechanisms in cellular defense against oxidative stress. Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) represent a class of anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory molecules that are already in clinical use for multiple sclerosis therapy. Purpose of this study was to investigate whether FAEs promote neuronal survival upon ischemia, and analyze putative underlying molecular mechanisms in neurons. Murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, and two neuronal cell lines were treated with dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and monomethyl fumarate (MMF). Ischemic conditions were generated by exposing cells and slice cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was determined through propidium iodide staining. Treatment with both DMF and MMF immediately after OGD during reoxygenation strongly reduced cell death in hippocampal cultures ex vivo. Both DMF and MMF promoted neuronal survival in HT-22 and SH-SY5Y cell lines exposed to ischemic stress. DMF but not MMF activated the anti-oxidative Nrf2 pathway in neurons. Accordingly, Nrf2 knockdown in murine neurons abrogated the protective effect of DMF but not MMF. Moreover, FAEs did not activate the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway suggesting that this pathway may not significantly contribute to FAE mediated neuroprotection. Our results may provide the basis for a new therapeutic approach to treat ischemic pathologies such as stroke with a drug that already has a broad safety record in humans. PMID:26801077

  2. Phylogenetic diversity of stress signalling pathways in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Elissavet; Agrafioti, Ino; Stumpf, Michael; Quinn, Janet; Stansfield, Ian; Brown, Alistair JP

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbes must sense environmental stresses, transduce these signals and mount protective responses to survive in hostile environments. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that fungal stress signalling pathways have evolved rapidly in a niche-specific fashion that is independent of phylogeny. To test this hypothesis we have compared the conservation of stress signalling molecules in diverse fungal species with their stress resistance. These fungi, which include ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and microsporidia, occupy highly divergent niches from saline environments to plant or mammalian hosts. Results The fungi displayed significant variation in their resistance to osmotic (NaCl and sorbitol), oxidative (H2O2 and menadione) and cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red). There was no strict correlation between fungal phylogeny and stress resistance. Rather, the human pathogens tended to be more resistant to all three types of stress, an exception being the sensitivity of Candida albicans to the cell wall stress, Calcofluor White. In contrast, the plant pathogens were relatively sensitive to oxidative stress. The degree of conservation of osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways amongst the eighteen fungal species was examined. Putative orthologues of functionally defined signalling components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by performing reciprocal BLASTP searches, and the percent amino acid identities of these orthologues recorded. This revealed that in general, central components of the osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways are relatively well conserved, whereas the sensors lying upstream and transcriptional regulators lying downstream of these modules have diverged significantly. There was no obvious correlation between the degree of conservation of stress signalling pathways and the resistance of a particular fungus to the corresponding stress. Conclusion Our data are consistent with

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  4. Nongenomic Signaling Pathways of Estrogen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.

    2010-01-01

    Xenoestrogens can affect the healthy functioning of a variety of tissues by acting as potent estrogens via nongenomic signaling pathways or by interfering with those actions of multiple physiological estrogens. Collectively, our and other studies have compared a wide range of estrogenic compounds, including some closely structurally related subgroups. The estrogens that have been studied include environmental contaminants of different subclasses, dietary estrogens, and several prominent physiological metabolites. By comparing the nongenomic signaling and functional responses to these compounds, we have begun to address the structural requirements for their actions through membrane estrogen receptors in the pituitary, in comparison to other tissues, and to gain insights into their typical non-monotonic dose-response behavior. Their multiple inputs into cellular signaling begin processes that eventually integrate at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase activities to coordinately regulate broad cellular destinies, such as proliferation, apoptosis, or differentiation. PMID:19955490

  5. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  6. Subpathway Analysis based on Signaling-Pathway Impact Analysis of Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianbin; Shen, Liangzhong; Shang, Xuequn; Liu, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Pathway analysis is a common approach to gain insight from biological experiments. Signaling-pathway impact analysis (SPIA) is one such method and combines both the classical enrichment analysis and the actual perturbation on a given pathway. Because this method focuses on a single pathway, its resolution generally is not very high because the differentially expressed genes may be enriched in a local region of the pathway. In the present work, to identify cancer-related pathways, we incorporated a recent subpathway analysis method into the SPIA method to form the “sub-SPIA method.” The original subpathway analysis uses the k-clique structure to define a subpathway. However, it is not sufficiently flexible to capture subpathways with complex structure and usually results in many overlapping subpathways. We therefore propose using the minimal-spanning-tree structure to find a subpathway. We apply this approach to colorectal cancer and lung cancer datasets, and our results show that sub-SPIA can identify many significant pathways associated with each specific cancer that other methods miss. Based on the entire pathway network in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, we find that the pathways identified by sub-SPIA not only have the largest average degree, but also are more closely connected than those identified by other methods. This result suggests that the abnormality signal propagating through them might be responsible for the specific cancer or disease. PMID:26207919

  7. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N.

    2016-01-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling. PMID:27255611

  8. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N

    2016-01-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling. PMID:27255611

  9. The immune signaling pathways of Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Bryant, Bart; Clem, Rollie J.; Schwartz, Lawrence M.; Blissard, Gary; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways and their coordination are critically important for proper functioning of animal immune systems. Our knowledge of the constituents of the intracellular signaling network in insects mainly comes from genetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster. To facilitate future studies of similar systems in the tobacco hornworm and other lepidopteran insects, we have identified and examined the homologous genes in the genome of Manduca sexta. Based on 1:1 orthologous relationships in most cases, we hypothesize that the Toll, Imd, MAPK-JNK-p38 and JAK-STAT pathways are intact and operative in this species, as are most of the regulatory mechanisms. Similarly, cellular processes such as autophagy, apoptosis and RNA interference probably function in similar ways, because their mediators and modulators are mostly conserved in this lepidopteran species. We have annotated a total of 186 genes encoding 199 proteins, studied their domain structures and evolution, and examined their mRNA levels in tissues at different life stages. Such information provides a genomic perspective of the intricate signaling system in a non-drosophiline insect. PMID:25858029

  10. The immune signaling pathways of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Bryant, Bart; Clem, Rollie J; Schwartz, Lawrence M; Blissard, Gary; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Signal transduction pathways and their coordination are critically important for proper functioning of animal immune systems. Our knowledge of the constituents of the intracellular signaling network in insects mainly comes from genetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster. To facilitate future studies of similar systems in the tobacco hornworm and other lepidopteran insects, we have identified and examined the homologous genes in the genome of Manduca sexta. Based on 1:1 orthologous relationships in most cases, we hypothesize that the Toll, Imd, MAPK-JNK-p38 and JAK-STAT pathways are intact and operative in this species, as are most of the regulatory mechanisms. Similarly, cellular processes such as autophagy, apoptosis and RNA interference probably function in similar ways, because their mediators and modulators are mostly conserved in this lepidopteran species. We have annotated a total of 186 genes encoding 199 proteins, studied their domain structures and evolution, and examined their mRNA levels in tissues at different life stages. Such information provides a genomic perspective of the intricate signaling system in a non-drosophiline insect. PMID:25858029

  11. The retinoic acid signaling pathway regulates anterior/posterior patterning in the nerve cord and pharynx of amphioxus, a chordate lacking neural crest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escriva, Hector; Holland, Nicholas D.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Laudet, Vincent; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    Amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates, has a notochord, segmental axial musculature, pharyngeal gill slits and dorsal hollow nerve cord, but lacks neural crest. In amphioxus, as in vertebrates, exogenous retinoic acid (RA) posteriorizes the embryo. The mouth and gill slits never form, AmphiPax1, which is normally downregulated where gill slits form, remains upregulated and AmphiHox1 expression shifts anteriorly in the nerve cord. To dissect the role of RA signaling in patterning chordate embryos, we have cloned the single retinoic acid receptor (AmphiRAR), retinoid X receptor (AmphiRXR) and an orphan receptor (AmphiTR2/4) from amphioxus. AmphiTR2/4 inhibits AmphiRAR-AmphiRXR-mediated transactivation in the presence of RA by competing for DR5 or IR7 retinoic acid response elements (RAREs). The 5' untranslated region of AmphiTR2/4 contains an IR7 element, suggesting possible auto- and RA-regulation. The patterns of AmphiTR2/4 and AmphiRAR expression during embryogenesis are largely complementary: AmphiTR2/4 is strongly expressed in the cerebral vesicle (homologous to the diencephalon plus anterior midbrain), while AmphiRAR expression is high in the equivalent of the hindbrain and spinal cord. Similarly, while AmphiTR2/4 is expressed most strongly in the anterior and posterior thirds of the endoderm, the highest AmphiRAR expression is in the middle third. Expression of AmphiRAR is upregulated by exogenous RA and completely downregulated by the RA antagonist BMS009. Moreover, BMS009 expands the pharynx posteriorly; the first three gill slit primordia are elongated and shifted posteriorly, but do not penetrate, and additional, non-penetrating gill slit primordia are induced. Thus, in an organism without neural crest, initiation and penetration of gill slits appear to be separate events mediated by distinct levels of RA signaling in the pharyngeal endoderm. Although these compounds have little effect on levels of AmphiTR2/4 expression, RA

  12. Functional analysis of the role of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the ROS signaling pathway, hyphal branching and the regulation of ganoderic acid biosynthesis in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenyang; Shi, Liang; Chen, Dongdong; Ren, Ang; Gao, Tan; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a hallmark of traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used as a pharmacologically active compound. Although numerous research studies have focused on the pharmacological mechanism, fewer studies have explored the basic biological features of this species, restricting the further development and application of this important mushroom. Because of the ability of this mushroom to reduce and detoxify the compounds produced by various metabolic pathways, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes with respect to ROS. Although studies in both animals and plants have suggested many important physiological functions of GPx, there are few systematic research studies concerning the role of this enzyme in fungi, particularly in large basidiomycetes. In the present study, we cloned the GPx gene and created GPx-silenced strains by the down-regulation of GPx gene expression using RNA interference. The results indicated an essential role for GPx in controlling the intracellular H2O2 content, hyphal branching, antioxidant stress tolerance, cytosolic Ca(2+) content and ganoderic acid biosynthesis. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that GPx is regulated by intracellular H2O2 levels and suggested that crosstalk occurs between GPx and intracellular H2O2. Moreover, evidence was obtained indicating that GPx regulation of hyphal branching via ROS might occur independently of the cytosolic Ca(2+) content. Further mechanistic investigation also revealed that the effects of GPx on ganoderic acid synthesis via ROS are regulated by the cytosolic Ca(2+) content. Taken together, these findings indicate that ROS have a complex influence on growth, development and secondary metabolism in fungi and that GPx serves an important function. The present study provides an excellent framework to identify GPx functions and highlights a role for this enzyme in ROS regulation. PMID:26216672

  13. Effects of bile acids on hepatocellular signaling and secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Beuers, U.

    1997-01-01

    Bile acids modulate hepatocellular signaling pathways in vitro at physiological concentrations. The present paper provides a brief overview of the effects of bile acids on three key messengers in liver cells: cytosolic free calcium, protein kinase A and protein kinase C. PMID:9626754

  14. Parameter estimate of signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Arisi, Ivan; Cattaneo, Antonino; Rosato, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Background The "inverse" problem is related to the determination of unknown causes on the bases of the observation of their effects. This is the opposite of the corresponding "direct" problem, which relates to the prediction of the effects generated by a complete description of some agencies. The solution of an inverse problem entails the construction of a mathematical model and takes the moves from a number of experimental data. In this respect, inverse problems are often ill-conditioned as the amount of experimental conditions available are often insufficient to unambiguously solve the mathematical model. Several approaches to solving inverse problems are possible, both computational and experimental, some of which are mentioned in this article. In this work, we will describe in details the attempt to solve an inverse problem which arose in the study of an intracellular signaling pathway. Results Using the Genetic Algorithm to find the sub-optimal solution to the optimization problem, we have estimated a set of unknown parameters describing a kinetic model of a signaling pathway in the neuronal cell. The model is composed of mass action ordinary differential equations, where the kinetic parameters describe protein-protein interactions, protein synthesis and degradation. The algorithm has been implemented on a parallel platform. Several potential solutions of the problem have been computed, each solution being a set of model parameters. A sub-set of parameters has been selected on the basis on their small coefficient of variation across the ensemble of solutions. Conclusion Despite the lack of sufficiently reliable and homogeneous experimental data, the genetic algorithm approach has allowed to estimate the approximate value of a number of model parameters in a kinetic model of a signaling pathway: these parameters have been assessed to be relevant for the reproduction of the available experimental data. PMID:17118160

  15. Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling: Triggers, Pathways, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Fernanda Marques; Torelli, Nicole Quesada; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles for eukaryotic homeostasis. Although these organelles possess their own DNA, the vast majority (>99%) of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus. This situation makes systems that allow the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus a requirement not only to coordinate mitochondrial protein synthesis during biogenesis but also to communicate eventual mitochondrial malfunctions, triggering compensatory responses in the nucleus. Mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling has been described in various organisms, albeit with differences in effector pathways, molecules, and outcomes, as discussed in this review. PMID:26583058

  16. The TAK1-TRAF6 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Landström, Marene

    2010-05-01

    Cellular responses to pathogens, growth factors, cytokines, extra- or intra-cellular stress, is a prerequisite for the cell to adapt to novel and potentially dangerous situations. If the changes in the extra- or intra-cellular milieu causes DNA-damage or revoke a signalling pathway utilized during morphogenesis, the epithelial cells might be forced to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) in the benefit for the whole organism or transform to a mesenchymal cell type (epithelial to mesenchymal transition; EMT), in respond to a specific stimuli. An overview is presented over the current knowledge for the key components in signal transduction in homeostasis, inflammation and cancer. A handful of transcription factors are crucial for the determination of the specific cellular responses, where the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is an important factor as discussed in this review. PMID:20060931

  17. MAPKs in development: insights from Dictyostelium signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in the development of eukaryotic organisms through the regulation of signal transduction pathways stimulated by external signals. MAPK signaling pathways have been associated with the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and chemotaxis, indicating MAPKs contribute to a diverse set of developmental processes. In most eukaryotes, the diversity of external signals is likely to far exceed the diversity of MAPKs, suggesting that multiple signaling pathways might share MAPKs. Do different signaling pathways converge before MAPK function or can MAPKs maintain signaling specificity through interactions with specific proteins? The genetic and biochemical analysis of MAPK pathways in simple eukaryotes such as Dictyostelium offers opportunities to investigate functional specificity of MAPKs in G protein-mediated signal transduction pathways. This review considers the regulation and specificity of MAPK function in pathways that control Dictyostelium growth and development. PMID:21666837

  18. Cell signaling pathways elicited by asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, B T; Faux, S; Janssen, Y; Jimenez, L A; Timblin, C; Zanella, C; Goldberg, J; Walsh, E; Barchowsky, A; Driscoll, K

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that minerals can trigger alterations in gene expression by initiating signaling events upstream of gene transactivation. These cascades may be initiated at the cell surface after interaction of minerals with the plasma membrane either through receptorlike mechanisms or integrins. Alternatively, signaling pathways may be stimulated by active oxygen species generated both during phagocytosis of minerals and by redox reactions on the mineral surface. At least two signaling cascades linked to activation of transcription factors, i.e., DNA-binding proteins involved in modulating gene expression and DNA replication, are stimulated after exposure of lung cells to asbestos fibers in vitro. These include nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade important in regulation of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Both NF kappa B and AP-1 bind to specific DNA sequences within the regulatory or promoter regions of genes that are critical to cell proliferation and inflammation. Unraveling the cell signaling cascades initiated by mineral dusts and pharmacologic inhibition of these events may be important for the control and treatment of mineral-associated occupational diseases. Images Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:9400710

  19. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lichan; Bei, Yihua; Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-08-28

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: (1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and (2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  20. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: 1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and 2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  1. Perfluorooctanoic acid disrupts the blood-testis barrier and activates the TNFα/p38 MAPK signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Luo, Bin; Li, Jing; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is correlated with male reproductive dysfunction in animals and humans, but the underlying mechanisms for this remain unknown. To explore the potential reproductive toxicity of PFOA, we studied blood-testis barrier (BTB) damage using in vivo and in vitro models. Male mice were gavage-administered PFOA (0-20 mg/kg/d) for 28 consecutive days, and breeding capacity and permeability of the Sertoli cell-based BTB were estimated. Primary Sertoli cells (SCs) were exposed to PFOA (0-500 μM) for 48 h, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was assessed. Furthermore, BTB-associated protein expression, TNFα content, and phosphorylation and protein levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway were detected. An apparent decrease in mated and pregnant females per male mouse as well as litter weight was observed. Marked BTB damage was evidenced by increased red biotin fluorescence in the lumen tubular of the testes and the decrease in TER in SCs in vitro. The protein levels of claudin-11, connexin-43, N-cadherin, β-catenin, and occludin were significantly decreased in the testes and also in the SCs in vitro except for N-cadherin and β-catenin. TNFα content showed a dose-dependent increase in the testes and a dose- and time-dependent increase in the SCs, with the p-p38/p38 MAPK ratio also increasing in testes and SCs after PFOA exposure. Moreover, PFOA altered expressions of claudin-11, connexin-43, TNFα, and p-p38 MAPK were recovered 48 h after PFOA removal in the SCs. The SCs appeared to be target to PFOA, and the disruption of the BTB may be crucial to PFOA-induced reproductive dysfunction in mice. PMID:25743374

  2. Altered retinoic acid signalling underpins dentition evolution.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Yann; Samarut, Eric; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Bernard, Laure; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Sadier, Alexa; Labbé, Catherine; Viriot, Laurent; Laudet, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Small variations in signalling pathways have been linked to phenotypic diversity and speciation. In vertebrates, teeth represent a reservoir of adaptive morphological structures that are prone to evolutionary change. Cyprinid fish display an impressive diversity in tooth number, but the signals that generate such diversity are unknown. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) availability influences tooth number size in Cyprinids. Heterozygous adult zebrafish heterozygous for the cyp26b1 mutant that encodes an enzyme able to degrade RA possess an extra tooth in the ventral row. Expression analysis of pharyngeal mesenchyme markers such as dlx2a and lhx6 shows lateral, anterior and dorsal expansion of these markers in RA-treated embryos, whereas the expression of the dental epithelium markers dlx2b and dlx3b is unchanged. Our analysis suggests that changes in RA signalling play an important role in the diversification of teeth in Cyprinids. Our work illustrates that through subtle changes in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes, the RA pathway is an active player of tooth evolution in fish. PMID:25652838

  3. Altered retinoic acid signalling underpins dentition evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Yann; Samarut, Eric; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Bernard, Laure; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Sadier, Alexa; Labbé, Catherine; Viriot, Laurent; Laudet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Small variations in signalling pathways have been linked to phenotypic diversity and speciation. In vertebrates, teeth represent a reservoir of adaptive morphological structures that are prone to evolutionary change. Cyprinid fish display an impressive diversity in tooth number, but the signals that generate such diversity are unknown. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) availability influences tooth number size in Cyprinids. Heterozygous adult zebrafish heterozygous for the cyp26b1 mutant that encodes an enzyme able to degrade RA possess an extra tooth in the ventral row. Expression analysis of pharyngeal mesenchyme markers such as dlx2a and lhx6 shows lateral, anterior and dorsal expansion of these markers in RA-treated embryos, whereas the expression of the dental epithelium markers dlx2b and dlx3b is unchanged. Our analysis suggests that changes in RA signalling play an important role in the diversification of teeth in Cyprinids. Our work illustrates that through subtle changes in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes, the RA pathway is an active player of tooth evolution in fish. PMID:25652838

  4. PSFC: a Pathway Signal Flow Calculator App for Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    Nersisyan, Lilit; Johnson, Graham; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Pico, Alexander; Arakelyan, Arsen

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are sequences of biochemical reactions that propagate an input signal, such as a hormone binding to a cell-surface receptor, into the cell to trigger a reactive process. Assessment of pathway activities is crucial for determining which pathways play roles in disease versus normal conditions. To date various pathway flow/perturbation assessment tools are available, however they are constrained to specific algorithms and specific data types. There are no accepted standards for evaluation of pathway activities or simulation of flow propagation events in pathways, and the results of different software are difficult to compare. Here we present Pathway Signal Flow Calculator (PSFC), a Cytoscape app for calculation of a pathway signal flow based on the pathway topology and node input data. The app provides a rich framework for customization of different signal flow algorithms to allow users to apply various approaches within a single computational framework. PMID:26834984

  5. The LeATL6-associated ubiquitin/proteasome system may contribute to fungal elicitor-activated defense response via the jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathway in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hondo, Daisuke; Hase, Shu; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Takenaka, Shigehito; Takahashi, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    The expression of LeATL6, an ortholog of Arabidopsis ATL6 that encodes a RING-H2 finger protein, was induced in tomato roots treated with a cell wall protein fraction (CWP) elicitor of the biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum. The LeATL6 protein was expressed as a fusion protein with a maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli, and it catalyzed the transfer of ubiquitin to the MBP moiety on incubation with ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2; this indicated that LeATL6 represents ubiquitin ligase E3. LeATL6 expression also was induced by elicitor treatment of jail-1 mutant tomato cells in which the jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathway was impaired; however, JA-dependent expression of the basic PR-6 and TPI-1 genes that encode proteinase inhibitor II and I, respectively, was not induced in elicitor-treated jail-1 mutants. Furthermore, transient overexpression of LeATL6 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induced the basic PR6 and TPI-1 expression in wild tomato but not in the jail-1 mutant. In contrast, LeATL6 overexpression did not activate salicylic acid-responsive acidic PR-1 and PR-2 promoters in wild tomato. These results indicated that elicitor-responsive LeATL6 probably regulates JA-dependent basic PR6 and TPI-1 gene expression in tomato. The LeATL6-associated ubiquitin/proteasome system may contribute to elicitor-activated defense responses via a JA-dependent signaling pathway in plants. PMID:17249424

  6. Salvianolic acid B lowers portal pressure in cirrhotic rats and attenuates contraction of rat hepatic stellate cells by inhibiting RhoA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhou, Yang; Lu, Chao; Ping, Jian; Xu, Lie-Ming

    2012-12-01

    The contraction of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has a critical role in the regulation of intrahepatic vascular resistance and portal hypertension. Previous studies have confirmed that salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is effective against liver fibrosis. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Sal B on portal hypertension and on HSCs contractility. Liver cirrhosis was induced in rats by peritoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine and the portal pressure was measured. HSCs contraction was evaluated by collagen gel contraction assay. Glycerol-urea gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2). F-actin stress fiber polymerization was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled phalloidin. Intracellular Ca(2+) and RhoA signaling activation were also measured. Sal B effectively reduced the portal pressure in DMN-induced cirrhotic rats. It decreased the contraction by endothelin-1 (ET-1)-activated HSCs by ∼66.5% and caused the disassembly of actin stress fibers and MLC2 dephosphorylation. Although Sal B reduced ET-1-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase, blocking Ca(2+) increase completely by BAPTA-AM, a Ca(2+) chelator, barely affected the magnitude of contraction. Sal B decreased ET-1-induced RhoA and Rho-associated coiled coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) II activation by 66.84% and by 76.79%, respectively, and inhibited Thr(696) phosphorylation of MYPT1 by 80.09%. In vivo, Sal B lowers the portal pressure in rats with DMN-induced cirrhosis. In vitro, Sal B attenuates ET-1-induced HSCs contraction by inhibiting the activation of RhoA and ROCK II and the downstream MYPT1 phosphorylation at Thr(696). We consider Sal B a potential candidate for the pharmacological treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:22986787

  7. SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MELANOSOME BIOGENESIS AND PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are the specialized intracellular organelles of pigment cells devoted to the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin pigments, which are responsible for most visible pigmentation in mammals and other vertebrates. As a direct consequence, any genetic mutation resulting in alteration of melanosomal function, either because affecting pigment cell survival, migration and differentiation, or because interfering with melanosome biogenesis, transport and transfer to keratinocytes, is immediately translated into color variations of skin, fur, hair or eyes. Thus, over one hundred genes and proteins have been identified as pigmentary determinants in mammals, providing us with a deep understanding of this biological system, which functions by using mechanisms and processes that have parallels in other tissues and organs. In particular, many genes implicated in melanosome biogenesis have been characterized, so that melanosomes represent an incredible source of information and a model for organelles belonging to the secretory pathway. Furthermore, the function of melanosomes can be associated with common physiological phenotypes, such as variation of pigmentation among individuals, and with rare pathological conditions, such as albinism, characterized by severe visual defects. Among the most relevant mechanisms operating in melanosome biogenesis are the signal transduction pathways mediated by two peculiar G protein-coupled receptors: the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), involved in the fair skin/red hair phenotype and skin cancer; and OA1 (GPR143), whose loss-of-function results in X-linked ocular albinism. This review will focus on the most recent novelties regarding the functioning of these two receptors, by highlighting emerging signaling mechanisms and general implications for cell biology and pathology. PMID:20381640

  8. GmCYP82A3, a Soybean Cytochrome P450 Family Gene Involved in the Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathway, Enhances Plant Resistance to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lin, Shuai; Gan, Shuping; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) represent a large and important enzyme superfamily in plants. They catalyze numerous monooxygenation/hydroxylation reactions in biochemical pathways, P450s are involved in a variety of metabolic pathways and participate in the homeostasis of phytohormones. The CYP82 family genes specifically reside in dicots and are usually induced by distinct environmental stresses. However, their functions are largely unknown, especially in soybean (Glycine max L.). Here, we report the function of GmCYP82A3, a gene from soybean CYP82 family. Its expression was induced by Phytophthora sojae infection, salinity and drought stresses, and treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or ethephon (ETH). Its expression levels were consistently high in resistant cultivars. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants overexpressing GmCYP82A3 exhibited strong resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora parasitica, and enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought stresses. Furthermore, transgenic plants were less sensitive to jasmonic acid (JA), and the enhanced resistance was accompanied with increased expression of the JA/ET signaling pathway-related genes. PMID:27588421

  9. Rhamnolipids elicit defense responses and induce disease resistance against biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, and necrotrophic pathogens that require different signaling pathways in Arabidopsis and highlight a central role for salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lisa; Courteaux, Barbara; Hubert, Jane; Kauffmann, Serge; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan

    2012-11-01

    Plant resistance to phytopathogenic microorganisms mainly relies on the activation of an innate immune response usually launched after recognition by the plant cells of microbe-associated molecular patterns. The plant hormones, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid, and ethylene have emerged as key players in the signaling networks involved in plant immunity. Rhamnolipids (RLs) are glycolipids produced by bacteria and are involved in surface motility and biofilm development. Here we report that RLs trigger an immune response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) characterized by signaling molecules accumulation and defense gene activation. This immune response participates to resistance against the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. We show that RL-mediated resistance involves different signaling pathways that depend on the type of pathogen. Ethylene is involved in RL-induced resistance to H. arabidopsidis and to P. syringae pv tomato whereas jasmonic acid is essential for the resistance to B. cinerea. SA participates to the restriction of all pathogens. We also show evidence that SA-dependent plant defenses are potentiated by RLs following challenge by B. cinerea or P. syringae pv tomato. These results highlight a central role for SA in RL-mediated resistance. In addition to the activation of plant defense responses, antimicrobial properties of RLs are thought to participate in the protection against the fungus and the oomycete. Our data highlight the intricate mechanisms involved in plant protection triggered by a new type of molecule that can be perceived by plant cells and that can also act directly onto pathogens. PMID:22968829

  10. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  11. A conjugated fatty acid present at high levels in bitter melon seed favorably affects lipid metabolism in hepatocytes by increasing NAD(+)/NADH ratio and activating PPARα, AMPK and SIRT1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gou-Chun; Su, Hui-Min; Lin, Yu-Shun; Tsou, Po-Yen; Chyuan, Jong-Ho; Chao, Pei-Min

    2016-07-01

    α-Eleostearic acid (α-ESA), or the cis-9, trans-11, trans-13 isomer of conjugated linolenic acid, is a special fatty acid present at high levels in bitter melon seed oil. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of α-ESA on hepatic lipid metabolism. Using H4IIEC3 hepatoma cell line, we showed that α-ESA significantly lowered intracellular triglyceride accumulation compared to α-linolenic acid (LN), used as a fatty acid control, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The effects of α-ESA on enzyme activities and mRNA profiles in H4IIEC3 cells suggested that enhanced fatty acid oxidation and lowered lipogenesis were involved in α-ESA-mediated triglyceride lowering effects. In addition, α-ESA triggered AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation without altering sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein levels. When cells were treated with vehicle control (VC), LN alone (LN; 100μmol/L) or in combination with α-ESA (LN+α-ESA; 75+25μmol/L) for 24h, acetylation of forkhead box protein O1 was decreased, while the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, mRNA levels of NAMPT and PTGR1 and enzyme activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase were increased by LN+α-ESA treatment compared to treatment with LN alone, suggesting that α-ESA activates SIRT1 by increasing NAD(+) synthesis and NAD(P)H consumption. The antisteatosis effect of α-ESA was confirmed in mice treated with a high-sucrose diet supplemented with 1% α-ESA for 5weeks. We conclude that α-ESA favorably affects hepatic lipid metabolism by increasing cellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio and activating PPARα, AMPK and SIRT1 signaling pathways. PMID:27260465

  12. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS MEDIATING OXIDATIVE BURST BY CHICKEN HETEROPHILS IN RESPONSE TO STIMULATION WITH SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS LIPOTEICHOIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to determine which molecular pathways are involved in TLR mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known...

  13. Dietary influence on MAPK-signaling pathways and risk of colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Associations between genes in the DUSP, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK-signaling pathways and dietary factors associated with growth factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress and risk of colon and rectal cancer were evaluated. Data include colon cases (n=1555) and controls (n=1956) and rectal cases (n=754) and controls (n=959). Statistically significant interactions were observed for the MAPK-signaling pathways after adjustment for multiple comparisons. DUSP genes interacted with carbohydrates, mutagen index, calories, calcium, vitamin D, lycopene, dietary fats, folic acid, and selenium. MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK1 and RAF1 within the ERK1/2 MAPK-signaling pathway interacted with dietary fats and cruciferous vegetables. Within the JNK MAPK-signaling pathway, interactions between MAP3K7 and protein, vitamin C, iron, folic acid, carbohydrates, and cruciferous vegetables; MAP3K10 and folic acid; MAP3K9 and lutein/zeaxanthin; MAPK8 and calcium; MAP3K3 and calcium and lutein; MAP3K1 and cruciferous vegetables. Interaction within the p38-signaling pathway included: MAPK14 with calories, carbohydrates saturated fat, selenium, vitamin C; MAP3K2 and carbohydrates, and folic acid. These data suggest that dietary factors involved in inflammation and oxidative stress interact with MAPK-signaling genes to alter risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23859041

  14. Deoxycholic acid induces the overexpression of intestinal mucin, MUC2, via NF-kB signaling pathway in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, JianTao; Gong, Jun; Geng, Juan; Song, YinXue

    2008-01-01

    Background Mucin alterations are a common feature of esophageal neoplasia, and alterations in MUC2 mucin have been associated with tumor progression in the esophagus. Bile acids have been linked to esophageal adenocarcinoma and mucin secretion, but their effects on mucin gene expression in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells is unknown. Methods Human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells were treated 18 hours with 50–300 μM deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, or taurocholic acid. MUC2 transcription was assayed using a MUC2 promoter reporter luciferase construct and MUC2 protein was assayed by Western blot analysis. Transcription Nuclear factor-κB activity was measured using a Nuclear factor-κB reporter construct and confirmed by Western blot analysis for Nuclear factor-κB p65. Results MUC2 transcription and MUC2 protein expression were increased four to five fold by bile acids in a time and dose-dependent manner with no effect on cell viability. Nuclear factor-κB activity was also increased. Treatment with the putative chemopreventive agent aspirin, which decreased Nuclear factor-κB activity, also decreased MUC2 transcription. Nuclear factor-κB p65 siRNA decreased MUC2 transcription, confirming the significance of Nuclear factor-κB in MUC2 induction by deoxycholic acid. Calphostin C, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), greatly decreased bile acid induced MUC2 transcription and Nuclear factor-κB activity, whereas inhibitors of MAP kinase had no effect. Conclusion Deoxycholic acid induced MUC2 overexpression in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells by activation of Nuclear factor-κB transcription through a process involving PKC-dependent but not PKA, independent of activation of MAP kinase. PMID:19014523

  15. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  16. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids regulate bovine whole-body protein metabolism by promoting muscle insulin signalling to the Akt–mTOR–S6K1 pathway and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Andrée-Anne; White, Phillip James; Chouinard, P Yvan; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A; Dombrowski, Luce; Couture, Yvon; Dubreuil, Pascal; Myre, Alexandre; Bergeron, Karen; Marette, André; Thivierge, M Carole

    2007-01-01

    The ability of the skeletal musculature to use amino acids to build or renew constitutive proteins is gradually lost with age and this is partly due to a decline in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn–3PUFA) from fish oil are known to improve insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in insulin-resistant states, their potential role in regulating insulin-mediated protein metabolism was investigated in this study. Experimental data are based on a switchback design composed of three 5 week experimental periods using six growing steers to compare the effect of a continuous abomasal infusion of LCn–3PUFA-rich menhaden oil with an iso-energetic control oil mixture. Clamp and insulin signalling observations were combined with additional data from a second cohort of six steers. We found that enteral LCn–3PUFA potentiate insulin action by increasing the insulin-stimulated whole-body disposal of amino acids from 152 to 308 μmol kg−1 h−1 (P = 0.006). The study further showed that in the fed steady-state, chronic adaptation to LCn–3PUFA induces greater activation (P < 0.05) of the Akt–mTOR–S6K1 signalling pathway. Simultaneously, whole-body total flux of phenylalanine was reduced from 87 to 67 μmol kg−1 h−1 (P = 0.04) and oxidative metabolism was decreased (P = 0.05). We conclude that chronic feeding of menhaden oil provides a novel nutritional mean to enhance insulin-sensitive aspects of protein metabolism. PMID:17158167

  17. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids regulate bovine whole-body protein metabolism by promoting muscle insulin signalling to the Akt-mTOR-S6K1 pathway and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Andrée-Anne; White, Phillip James; Chouinard, P Yvan; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A; Dombrowski, Luce; Couture, Yvon; Dubreuil, Pascal; Myre, Alexandre; Bergeron, Karen; Marette, André; Thivierge, M Carole

    2007-02-15

    The ability of the skeletal musculature to use amino acids to build or renew constitutive proteins is gradually lost with age and this is partly due to a decline in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) from fish oil are known to improve insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in insulin-resistant states, their potential role in regulating insulin-mediated protein metabolism was investigated in this study. Experimental data are based on a switchback design composed of three 5 week experimental periods using six growing steers to compare the effect of a continuous abomasal infusion of LCn-3PUFA-rich menhaden oil with an iso-energetic control oil mixture. Clamp and insulin signalling observations were combined with additional data from a second cohort of six steers. We found that enteral LCn-3PUFA potentiate insulin action by increasing the insulin-stimulated whole-body disposal of amino acids from 152 to 308 micromol kg(-1) h(-1) (P=0.006). The study further showed that in the fed steady-state, chronic adaptation to LCn-3PUFA induces greater activation (P<0.05) of the Akt-mTOR-S6K1 signalling pathway. Simultaneously, whole-body total flux of phenylalanine was reduced from 87 to 67 micromol kg(-1) h(-1) (P=0.04) and oxidative metabolism was decreased (P=0.05). We conclude that chronic feeding of menhaden oil provides a novel nutritional mean to enhance insulin-sensitive aspects of protein metabolism. PMID:17158167

  18. Notch -- a goldilocks signaling pathway in disease and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Braune, Eike-Benjamin; Lendahl, Urban

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a fundamental signaling mechanism operating in most, if not all, multicellular organisms and in most cell types in the body. Like other "ivy league" pathways such as Wnt, PI3K, Sonic Hedgehog, Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs), and JAK/STAT signaling, the Notch pathway is a linear signaling mechanism, i.e., an extracellular ligand activates a receptor, which ultimately leads to transcriptional alterations in the cell nucleus, but Notch signaling is a strict cell-cell communication mechanism and lacks built-in amplification steps in the signaling pathway. Dysregulated Notch signaling, either by direct mutations in the pathway or by altered signaling output, is increasingly linked to disease, and Notch can act as an oncogene or tumor suppressor depending on the cellular context. This underscores that appropriate level of Notch signaling is important for differentiation and tissue homeostasis, a notion supported also by genetic data indicating that Notch signaling is very gene dosage-sensitive. Thus, too much or too little signaling can lead to disease and Notch can therefore be considered a Goldilocks signaling pathway. Given the emerging role of dysregulated Notch signaling in disease, there is increasing interest in developing therapeutic approaches to modulate Notch signaling. In this review we discuss recent findings on how signal transduction is tuned in the Notch pathway and how Notch signaling is dysregulated in disease. We also discuss different strategies to modulate Notch signaling for clinical use, for example by novel antibody-based tools and by taking advantage of the cross-talk between Notch and other signaling mechanisms. PMID:27115169

  19. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  20. Berberine attenuates high glucose-induced fibrosis by activating the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 and repressing the S1P2/MAPK signaling pathway in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiying; Li, Jie; Xiong, Fengxiao; Huang, Junying; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2016-08-15

    Berberine (BBR) exerts powerful renoprotective effects on diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 ameliorates diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the activation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) signaling pathway. In this study, we explored the role of TGR5 in the BBR-induced downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated fibrosis in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Results showed that, BBR suppressed the expression of FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 in high-glucose cultures of GMCs, and the phosphorylation level of c-Jun/c-Fos was downregulated. The high glucose lowered TGR5 expression in a time-dependent manner; this effect was reversed by BBR in a dose-dependent manner. The TGR5 agonist INT-777 decreased the high glucose-induced FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 protein contents. In addition, TGR5 siRNA blocked S1P2 degradation by BBR. And MAPK signaling, which plays important regulatory roles in the pathological progression of DN, was activated by TGR5 siRNA. Apart from this, MAPK signaling as well as FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 suppressed by BBR under high glucose conditions were limited by TGR5 depletion. Thus, BBR decreases FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 levels under high glucose conditions in GMCs possibly by activating TGR5 and inhibiting S1P2/MAPK signaling. PMID:27292312

  1. Charged Amino Acid-rich Leucine Zipper-1 (Crlz-1) as a Target of Wnt Signaling Pathway Controls Pre-B Cell Proliferation by Affecting Runx/CBFβ-targeted VpreB and λ5 Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Young; Park, Sung-Kyun; Yoo, Han-Woong; Pi, Joo-Hyun; Kang, Chang-Joong

    2016-07-15

    The proliferation of pre-B cells is known to further increase the clonal diversity of B cells at the stage of pre-B cells by allowing the same rearranged heavy chains to combine with differently rearranged light chains in a subsequent developmental stage. Crlz-1 (charged amino acid-rich leucine zipper-1) was found to control this proliferation of pre-B cells by working as a Wnt (wingless-related mouse mammary tumor virus integration site) target gene in these cells. Mechanistically, Crlz-1 protein functioned by mobilizing cytoplasmic CBFβ (core binding factor β) into the nucleus to allow Runx (runt-related transcription factor)/CBFβ heterodimerization. Runx/CBFβ then turned on its target genes such as EBF (early B cell factor), VpreB, and λ5 and thereby pre-B cell receptor signaling, leading to the expression of cyclins D2 and D3 Actually, the proliferative function of Crlz-1 was demonstrated by not only Crlz-1 or β-catenin knockdown but also Crlz-1 overexpression. Furthermore, the mechanistic view that the proliferative function of Crlz-1 is caused by relaying Wnt/β-catenin to pre-B cell receptor signaling pathways through the regulation of Runx/CBFβ heterodimerization was also verified by employing niclosamide, XAV939, and LiCl as Wnt inhibitors and activator, respectively. PMID:27226553

  2. Suppression of MMP-9 and FAK expression by pomolic acid via blocking of NF-κB/ERK/mTOR signaling pathways in growth factor-stimulated human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Yoon Young; Yoon, Seong Woo; Park, Byoungduck

    2016-09-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) have been implicated in the invasion, metastasis and cell motility of cancer cells. It is considered that epidermal growth factor (EGF) may increase cell motility, an event involved in cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Pomolic acid (PA), an active triterpenoid from Euscaphis japonica, is known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells, but the effect of PA on the invasiveness of cancer cells is largely unknown. In this study, we first determined the molecular mechanism by which PA inhibits the migratory and invasive abilities of highly metastatic MDA-MB‑231 cells. Transwell invasion, wound-healing assay and F-actin reorganization showed that PA significantly inhibits the EGF-induced invasion, migration and cell motility by reducing expression of MMP-9 and FAK phosphorylation. In particular, PA potently suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, extraceullar signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Furthermore, PA treatment inhibited the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and activator protein (AP)-1, which is known to mediate the expression of EGFR and MMP-9. These results suggest that PA may be a potential therapeutic candidate for treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27573547

  3. Oleic acid-enhanced transdermal delivery pathways of fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Ghazaryan, Ara; Tso, Chien-Hsin; Hu, Po-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Transdermal delivery of nanocarriers provides an alternative pathway to transport therapeutic agents, alleviating pain, improving compliance of patients, and increasing overall effectiveness of delivery. In this work, enhancement of transdermal delivery of fluorescent nanoparticles and sulforhodamine B with assistance of oleic acid was visualized utilizing multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and analyzed quantitatively using multi-photon excitation-induced fluorescent signals. Results of MPM imaging and MPM intensity-based spatial depth-dependent analysis showed that oleic acid is effective in facilitating transdermal delivery of nanoparticles.

  4. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  5. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-10

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  6. The octadecanoic pathway: signal molecules for the regulation of secondary pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Blechert, S; Brodschelm, W; Hölder, S; Kammerer, L; Kutchan, T M; Mueller, M J; Xia, Z Q; Zenk, M H

    1995-01-01

    Plant defense against microbial pathogens and herbivores relies heavily on the induction of defense proteins and low molecular weight antibiotics. The signals between perception of the aggression, gene activation, and the subsequent biosynthesis of secondary compounds are assumed to be pentacylic oxylipin derivatives. The rapid, but transient, synthesis of cis-jasmonic acid was demonstrated after insect attack on a food plant and by microbial elicitor addition to plant suspension cultures. This effect is highly specific and not caused by a number of environmental stresses such as light, heavy metals, or cold or heat shock. Elicitation of Eschscholtzia cell cultures also led to a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium prior to jasmonate formation. Inhibition of this alkalinization process by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine also inhibited jasmonate formation. The induction of specific enzymes in the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid pathway leading to the antimicrobial sanguinarine was induced to a qualitatively and quantitatively similar extent by fungal elicitor, methyl jasmonate, and its linolenic acid-derived precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid. It is herein proposed that a second oxylipid cascade may exist in plants starting from linoleic acid via 15,16-dihydro-12-oxophytodienoic acid to 9,10-dihydrojasmonate. Experiments with synthetic trihomojasmonate demonstrated that beta-oxidation is not a prerequisite for biological activity and that 12-oxophytodienoic acid and derivatives are most likely fully active as signal transducers. Octadecanoic acid-derived compounds are essential elements in modulating the synthesis of antibiotic compounds and are thus integral to plant defense. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 9 PMID:7753776

  7. Development of a model describing regulation of casein synthesis by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in response to insulin, amino acids, and acetate.

    PubMed

    Castro, J J; Arriola Apelo, S I; Appuhamy, J A D R N; Hanigan, M D

    2016-08-01

    To improve dietary protein use efficiency in lactating cows, mammary protein synthesis responses to AA, energy substrates, and hormones must be better understood. These entities exert their effects through stimulation of mRNA translation via control of initiation and elongation rates at the cellular level. A central protein kinase of this phenomenon is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which transfers the nutritional and hormonal stimuli onto a series of proteins downstream through a cascade of phosphorylation reactions that ultimately affect protein synthesis. The objective of this work was to further develop an existing mechanistic model of mTOR phosphorylation responses to insulin and total essential AA to include the effects of specific essential AA and acetate mediated by signaling proteins including protein kinase B (Akt), adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mTOR and to add a representation of milk protein synthesis. Data from 6 experiments in MAC-T cells and mammary tissue slices previously conducted in our laboratory were assembled and used to parameterize the dynamic system of differential equations representing Akt, AMPK, and mTOR in their phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states and the resulting regulation of milk protein synthesis. The model predicted phosphorylated Akt, mTOR, AMPK, and casein synthesis rates with root mean square prediction errors of 16.8, 28.4, 33.0, and 54.9%, respectively. All other dependent variables were free of mean and slope bias, indicating an adequate representation of the data. Whereas mTOR was not very sensitive to changes in insulin or acetate levels, it was highly sensitive to leucine and isoleucine, and this signal appeared to be effectively transduced to casein synthesis. Although prior work had observed a relationship with additional essential AA, and data supporting those conclusions were present in the data set, we were unable to derive significant relationships with any essential

  8. Signaling Pathways in Thyroid Cancer and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Bao, Wuyuntu; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of endocrine system, and has now become the fastest increasing cancer among all the malignancies. The development, progression, invasion, and metastasis are closely associated with multiple signaling pathways and the functions of related molecules, such as Src, Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, NF-κB, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), Wnt-β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. Each of the signaling pathways could exert its function singly or through network with other pathways. These pathways could cooperate, promote, antagonize, or interact with each other to form a complex network for the regulation. Dysfunction of this network could increase the development, progression, invasion, and metastasis of thyroid cancer. Inoperable thyroid cancer still has a poor prognosis. However, signaling pathway-related targeted therapies offer the hope of longer quality of meaningful life for this small group of patients. Signaling pathway-related targets provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. In the present work, the advances in these signaling pathways and targeted treatments of thyroid cancer were reviewed. PMID:26985248

  9. Targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwok-Kin; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Cantley, Lewis C

    2009-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is activated in a variety of different human cancers, and inhibitors of this pathway are under active development as anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the data supporting the use of PI3K pathway inhibitors in genetically and clinically defined cancers. This review focuses on their efficacy as single-agents and in combination with other targeted therapies, specifically those targeting the MEK-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:20006486

  10. Death and dessert: Nutrient signalling pathways and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition can delay ageing and extend healthy life in diverse organisms from yeast to primates. This effect can be recapitulated by genetic or pharmacological dampening of the signal through nutrient signalling pathways, making them a promising target for intervention into human ageing and age-related diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between nutrient signalling pathways and ageing, focusing on the findings emerged in the last few years. PMID:21835601

  11. Betulinic acid ameliorates experimental diabetic-induced renal inflammation and fibrosis via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaogui; Yang, Zhiying; Xiong, Fengxiao; Chen, Cheng; Chao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Junying; Huang, Heqing

    2016-10-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure and is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin (FN), in the glomerular mesangium and tubulointerstitium. Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic triterpene derived from the bark of the white birch tree, has been demonstrated to have many pharmacological activities. However, the effect of BA on DN has not been fully elucidated. To explore the possible anti-inflammatory effects of BA and their underlying mechanisms, we used streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat kidneys and high glucose-treated glomerular mesangial cells. Our study showed BA could inhibit the degradation of IκBα and the activity of NF-κB in diabetic rat kidneys and high glucose-induced mesangial cells, resulting in reduction of FN expression. In addition, BA suppressed the DNA binding activity and transcriptional activity of NF-κB in high glucose-induced glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Furthermore, BA enhanced the interaction between IκBα and β-arrestin2 in mesangial cells. Taken together, our data suggest BA inhibits NF-κB activation through stabilizing NF-κB inhibitory protein IκBα, thereby preventing diabetic renal fibrosis. PMID:27364889

  12. Quercetin Protects against Okadaic Acid-Induced Injury via MAPK and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathways in HT22 Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Luo, Tao; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Yue; Shen, Xiu-Yin; He, Feng; Xu, Jie; Wang, Hua-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress and the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein play essential roles in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Quercetin is a major flavonoid that has anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of quercetin to HT22 cells (a cell line from mouse hippocampal neurons). We found that Okadaic acid (OA) induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein at Ser199, Ser396, Thr205, and Thr231 and produced oxidative stress to the HT22 cells. The oxidative stress suppressed the cell viability and decreased the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) and Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). It up-regulated malondialdehyde (MDA) production and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase3β (PI3K/Akt/GSK3β) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) were also involved in this process. We found that pre-treatment with quercetin can inhibited OA-induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and oxidative stress. Moreover, pre-treatment with quercetin not only inhibited OA-induced apoptosis via the reduction of Bax, and up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3, but also via the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, MAPKs and activation of NF-κB p65. Our findings suggest the therapeutic potential of quercetin to treat AD. PMID:27050422

  13. Quercetin Protects against Okadaic Acid-Induced Injury via MAPK and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathways in HT22 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Zhou, Yue; Shen, Xiu-Yin; He, Feng; Xu, Jie; Wang, Hua-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress and the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein play essential roles in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Quercetin is a major flavonoid that has anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of quercetin to HT22 cells (a cell line from mouse hippocampal neurons). We found that Okadaic acid (OA) induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein at Ser199, Ser396, Thr205, and Thr231 and produced oxidative stress to the HT22 cells. The oxidative stress suppressed the cell viability and decreased the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) and Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). It up-regulated malondialdehyde (MDA) production and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase3β (PI3K/Akt/GSK3β) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) were also involved in this process. We found that pre-treatment with quercetin can inhibited OA-induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and oxidative stress. Moreover, pre-treatment with quercetin not only inhibited OA-induced apoptosis via the reduction of Bax, and up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3, but also via the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, MAPKs and activation of NF-κB p65. Our findings suggest the therapeutic potential of quercetin to treat AD. PMID:27050422

  14. Gardenia jasminoides extracts and gallic acid inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by suppression of JNK2/1 signaling pathways in BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Hung; Kuo, Heng-Hung; Ho, Li-Hsing; Tseng, Ming-Lang; Siao, An-Ci; Hung, Chang-Tsen; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Hou, Chien-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ, Cape Jasmine Fruit, Zhi Zi) has been traditionally used for the treatment of infectious hepatitis, aphthous ulcer, and trauma; however, the direct evidence is lacking. Materials and Methods: We investigated the effect of the GJ extract (GJ) and gallic acid (GA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation of BV-2 microglial cells and acute liver injury in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Results: Our results showed that the GJ extract and GA reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and prostaglandin (PGE2) production in BV-2 cells. The GJ extract and GA significantly decreased serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in LPS-treated rats. Furthermore, the water extract, but not the ethanol extract, of the GJ dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced JNK2/1 and slightly p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in BV-2 cells. Conclusion: Taken together, these results indicate that the protective mechanism of the GJ extract involves an antioxidant effect and inhibition of JNK2/1 MAP kinase and COX-2 expressions in LPS-induced inflammation of BV-2 cells. PMID:26221479

  15. Information processing in multi-step signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Ambhi; Hamidzadeh, Archer; Zhang, Jin; Levchenko, Andre

    Information processing in complex signaling networks is limited by a high degree of variability in the abundance and activity of biochemical reactions (biological noise) operating in living cells. In this context, it is particularly surprising that many signaling pathways found in eukaryotic cells are composed of long chains of biochemical reactions, which are expected to be subject to accumulating noise and delayed signal processing. Here, we challenge the notion that signaling pathways are insulated chains, and rather view them as parts of extensively branched networks, which can benefit from a low degree of interference between signaling components. We further establish conditions under which this pathway organization would limit noise accumulation, and provide evidence for this type of signal processing in an experimental model of a calcium-activated MAPK cascade. These results address the long-standing problem of diverse organization and structure of signaling networks in live cells.

  16. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centuori, Sara M.; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    A high fat diet coincides with elevated levels of bile acids. This elevation of bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway. PMID:25027205

  17. Evolutionary conservation of plant gibberellin signalling pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Filip; Fierro, Ana C; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Background: Gibberellins (GA) are plant hormones that can regulate germination, elongation growth, and sex determination. They ubiquitously occur in seed plants. The discovery of gibberellin receptors, together with advances in understanding the function of key components of GA signalling in Arabidopsis and rice, reveal a fairly short GA signal transduction route. The pathway essentially consists of GID1 gibberellin receptors that interact with F-box proteins, which in turn regulate degradation of downstream DELLA proteins, suppressors of GA-controlled responses. Results: Arabidopsis sequences of the gibberellin signalling compounds were used to screen databases from a variety of plants, including protists, for homologues, providing indications for the degree of conservation of the pathway. The pathway as such appears completely absent in protists, the moss Physcomitrella patens shares only a limited homology with the Arabidopsis proteins, thus lacking essential characteristics of the classical GA signalling pathway, while the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii contains a possible ortholog for each component. The occurrence of classical GA responses can as yet not be linked with the presence of homologues of the signalling pathway. Alignments and display in neighbour joining trees of the GA signalling components confirm the close relationship of gymnosperms, monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants, as suggested from previous studies. Conclusion: Homologues of the GA-signalling pathway were mainly found in vascular plants. The GA signalling system may have its evolutionary molecular onset in Physcomitrella patens, where GAs at higher concentrations affect gravitropism and elongation growth. PMID:18047669

  18. Role for the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling pathway in the protective effects of carnosic acid against methylglyoxal-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Dal Bosco, Simone Morelo

    2015-12-01

    Glycation, a process that occurs endogenously and generates advanced glycation end products (AGEs), presents an important role in cases of neurodegeneration, as for instance Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methylglyoxal (MG), a dicarbonyl compound, is the most potent inducer of AGEs, whose levels have been found increased in samples obtained from subjects suffering from AD. Moreover, MG induces protein cross-linking and redox impairment in vitro and in vivo. Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis, exerts protective effects in neuronal cells by increasing antioxidant defenses and detoxification systems. In the present work, we aimed to investigate whether there is a role for CA against MG-induced neurotoxicity. Data obtained here clearly demonstrate that CA pretreatment (1 μM for 12 h) caused cytoprotective effects and counteracted the damage elicited by MG in SH-SY5Y cells. CA inhibited loss of mitochondrial membrane polarity (MMP) and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, consequently blocking activation of pro-apoptotic caspase enzymes. Furthermore, CA alleviated MG-induced oxidative and nitrosative damage. CA prevented MG-dependent neurotoxicity by activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling pathway and the antioxidant enzymes modulated by Nrf2 transcription factor. Overall, the data presented here show the protective role of CA by its ability to counteract MG negative effects. PMID:26577515

  19. Salvianolic acid B improves the disruption of high glucose-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cells via the ROS/HIF-1α/VEGF and miR-200b/VEGF signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chao; You, Fu-Li; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xiang-Nan; Wang, Yan-Feng

    2016-09-01

    The study investigated the roles and mechanisms of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on permeability of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs) exposed to high glucose. The results demonstrated that Sal B greatly up-regulated the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and decreased the permeability of RBMECs compared with the control group. And the increase of reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein induced by high glucose were antagonized by Sal B. In addition, a great decrease of microRNA-200b (miR-200b) was observed in the RBMECs under high-glucose condition, which was significantly increased by Sal B pretreatment. And overexpression of miR-200b markedly attenuated the RBMECs permeability and inhibited the expression of VEGF protein by targeting with 3'-UTR of its mRNA. This led to the conclusion that Sal B-mediated improvement of blood-brain barrier dysfunction induced by high-glucose is related to the ROS/HIF-1α/VEGF and miR-200b/VEGF signaling pathways. PMID:27497919

  20. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid inhibits invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells through the inactivation of p70S6K and Akt activity: Involvement of p53 in differential regulation of signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    In, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Oh, Joa Sub; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanism of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Ligularia fischeri, on cell invasion, proliferation and adhesion in p53 wild-type A549 and p53-deficient H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. 5-CQA abrogated mitogen-stimulated invasion, but not proliferation, in both A549 and H1299 cells. In addition, 5-CQA inhibited mitogen-stimulated adhesion in A549 cells only. Anti-invasive activity of 5-CQA in A549 cells was mediated by the inactivation of p70S6K-dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, in H1299 cells the inactivation of Akt was found to be involved in 5-CQA-mediated inhibition of cell invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the pharmacological roles and molecular targets of 5-CQA in regulating NSCLC cell fate, and suggest further evaluation and development of 5-CQA as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment and prevention of lung cancer. PMID:26984670

  1. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production. PMID:26851027

  2. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  3. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  4. UV signaling pathways within the skin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongxiang; Weng, Qing Yu; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of UVR on the skin include tanning, carcinogenesis, immunomodulation, and synthesis of vitamin D, among others. Melanocortin 1 receptor polymorphisms correlate with skin pigmentation, UV sensitivity, and skin cancer risk. This article reviews pathways through which UVR induces cutaneous stress and the pigmentation response. Modulators of the UV tanning pathway include sunscreen agents, MC1R activators, adenylate cyclase activators, phosphodiesterase 4D3 inhibitors, T oligos, and MITF regulators such as histone deacetylase (HDAC)-inhibitors. UVR, as one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens, represents both a challenge and enormous opportunity in skin cancer prevention. PMID:24759085

  5. Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takumi; Kawai, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play crucial roles in the innate immune system by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns derived from various microbes. TLRs signal through the recruitment of specific adaptor molecules, leading to activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRFs, which dictate the outcome of innate immune responses. During the past decade, the precise mechanisms underlying TLR signaling have been clarified by various approaches involving genetic, biochemical, structural, cell biological, and bioinformatics studies. TLR signaling appears to be divergent and to play important roles in many aspects of the innate immune responses to given pathogens. In this review, we describe recent progress in our understanding of TLR signaling regulation and its contributions to host defense. PMID:25309543

  6. UNDERSTANDING PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY: MAKING SENSE OF CHANGING SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title:
    Understanding Pathways of Toxicity: Making sense of changing signals
    Authors & affiliations:
    Sid Hunter, Maria Blanton, Edward Karoly, Ellen Rogers, Leonard Mole, Phillip Hartig, James Andrews. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Ef...

  7. Mechanical Regulation of Signaling Pathways in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Rubin, Clinton T.; Rubin, Janet

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of cell types depend on mechanically induced signals to enable appropriate physiological responses. The skeleton is particularly dependent on mechanical information to guide the resident cell population towards adaptation, maintenance and repair. Research at the organ, tissue, cell and molecular levels has improved our understanding of how the skeleton can recognize the functional environment, and how these challenges are translated into cellular information that can site-specifically alter phenotype. This review first considers those cells within the skeleton that are responsive to mechanical signals, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and osteoprogenitors. This is discussed in light of a range of experimental approaches that can vary parameters such as strain, fluid shear stress, and pressure. The identity of mechanoreceptor candidates is approached, with consideration of integrins, pericellular tethers, focal adhesions, ion channels, cadherins, connexins, and the plasma membrane including caveolar and non-caveolar lipid rafts and their influence on integral signaling protein interactions. Several mechanically regulated intracellular signaling cascades are detailed including activation of kinases (Akt, MAPK, FAK), β-catenin, GTPases, and calcium signaling events. While the interaction of bone cells with their mechanical environment is complex, an understanding of mechanical regulation of bone signaling is crucial to understanding bone physiology, the etiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, and to the development of interventions to improve bone strength. PMID:22575727

  8. Linear effects models of signaling pathways from combinatorial perturbation data

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Ewa; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Perturbations constitute the central means to study signaling pathways. Interrupting components of the pathway and analyzing observed effects of those interruptions can give insight into unknown connections within the signaling pathway itself, as well as the link from the pathway to the effects. Different pathway components may have different individual contributions to the measured perturbation effects, such as gene expression changes. Those effects will be observed in combination when the pathway components are perturbed. Extant approaches focus either on the reconstruction of pathway structure or on resolving how the pathway components control the downstream effects. Results: Here, we propose a linear effects model, which can be applied to solve both these problems from combinatorial perturbation data. We use simulated data to demonstrate the accuracy of learning the pathway structure as well as estimation of the individual contributions of pathway components to the perturbation effects. The practical utility of our approach is illustrated by an application to perturbations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability and Implementation: lem is available as a R package at http://www.mimuw.edu.pl/∼szczurek/lem. Contact: szczurek@mimuw.edu.pl; niko.beerenwinkel@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307630

  9. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1. PMID:27015742

  10. Temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Michael E; Laub, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory features, including the bifunctionality of histidine kinases as well as positive and negative feedback loops. Two-component signaling pathways are also dynamic on evolutionary time-scales, expanding dramatically in many species through gene duplication and divergence. Here, we review recent work probing the temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling systems. PMID:25589045