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Sample records for acid sulfites

  1. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  2. Corrosion of some chromium-nickel steels and alloys in sulfuric acid solutions of sodium sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, D.K.; Glagolenko, Yu.V.; Ermolinskii, S.P.

    1988-05-01

    Steels 12Kh18N1OT and 10Kh17N13M3T and alloys 06KhN28MDT and 46KhNM were studied in sulfuric acid solutions containing sodium sulfite and sulfur dioxide to determine the effects of different concentrations of the corrosive constituents on the anodic and cathodic active and passive corrosion behavior of the metals. Polarization curves were obtained with a P-5827 M potentiostat. Addition of sulfite facilitated both electrode processes and the region of the reactive state was broadened due to the shift of passivation potentials to more positive values. The activating effect of sulfite reduction products were confirmed by tests of alloys in spent solutions. This increased likelihood of activation and the decrease of the solutions's own corrosion potential were both attributed to retardation of the cathodic process by lower valence sulfur compounds.

  3. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  4. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing. PMID:25047093

  5. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  6. An evaluation of Pt sulfite acid (PSA) as precursor for supported Pt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Regalbuto, J.R.; Ansel, O.; Miller, J.T.

    2010-11-12

    As a catalyst precursor, platinum sulfite acid (PSA) is easy to use and not relatively expensive, and is a potentially attractive precursor for many types of supported catalysts. The ultimate usefulness for many catalyst applications will depend on the extent that Pt can be dispersed and sulfur eliminated. To our knowledge, there exists no detailed characterization in the catalysis literature of PSA and the nanoparticulate Pt phases derived from it during catalyst pretreatment. To this end a series of supports including alumina, silica, magnesia, niobia, titania, magnesia and carbon were contacted with PSA solutions and subsequently analyzed with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize the Pt species formed upon impregnation, calcination, and reduction. While all catalysts show retention of some S, reasonably small particle sizes with relatively little Pt-S can in some instances be produced using PSA. The amount of retained sulfur appears to decrease with decreasing surface acidity, although even the most acidic supports (niobia and silica) display some storage of S even while only Pt-O bands are observed after calcination or reoxidation. More sulfur was eliminated by high temperature calcinations followed by reduction in hydrogen, at the expense of increasing Pt particle size.

  7. Optimization of Sulfide/Sulfite Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na2S and Na2SO3, which had high coefficient of determination (R2) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na2S and Na2SO3 remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na2S at 130°C for 2.3–3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na2SO3 showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na2S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0–3.0% less yield with Na2SO3. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL−1 of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  8. Optimization of sulfide/sulfite pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na₂S and Na₂SO₃, which had high coefficient of determination (R²) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na₂S and Na₂SO₃ remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na₂S at 130°C for 2.3-3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na₂SO₃ showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na₂S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0-3.0% less yield with Na₂SO₃. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL⁻¹ of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  9. Concentrated sulfite-yeast fermenting mixture as a corrosion inhibitor of copper in mixtures of sulfuric and nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Agaev, N.M.; Smorodin, A.E.; Rzaev, E.R.; Tyr, S.G.; Shlimak, Ya.B.; Geidarova, G.D.; Eremeeva, R.A.; Nasirov, G.N.

    1987-03-01

    At the Baku factory of residential air conditioning systems both preliminary and final pickling of copper tubing is carried out in a solution of sulfuric and nitric acids. The authors of this study, in seeking an inhibitor to control this process, evaluate the protective properties of an inhibitor based on a concentrated sulfite-yeast fermenting mixture that is generated as a common waste product by the cellulose-pulp industry. It consists of calcium, sodium, and ammonium salts of lignin sulfonic acids. Tests revealed not only its inhibiting effectiveness but also its capacity to lower toxic gas levels of nitrogen oxides in the plant environment.

  10. Sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Changjian; Tollin, Gordon; Enemark, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes are essential mononuclear molybdenum (Mo) proteins involved in sulfur metabolism of animals, plants and bacteria. There are three such enzymes presently known: (1) sulfite oxidase (SO) in animals, (2) SO in plants, and (3) sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH) in bacteria. X-ray crystal structures of enzymes from all three sources (chicken SO, Arabidopsis thaliana SO, and Starkeya novella SDH) show nearly identical square pyramidal coordination around the Mo atom, even though the overall structures of the proteins and the presence of additional cofactors vary. This structural information provides a molecular basis for studying the role of specific amino acids in catalysis. Animal SO catalyzes the final step in the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids and is critical in detoxifying excess sulfite. Human SO deficiency is a fatal genetic disorder that leads to early death, and impaired SO activity is implicated in sulfite neurotoxicity. Animal SO and bacterial SDH contain both Mo and heme domains, whereas plant SO only has the Mo domain. Intraprotein electron transfer (IET) between the Mo and Fe centers in animal SO and bacterial SDH is a key step in the catalysis, which can be studied by laser flash photolysis in the presence of deazariboflavin. IET studies on animal SO and bacterial SDH clearly demonstrate the similarities and differences between these two types of sulfite oxidizing enzymes. Conformational change is involved in the IET of animal SO, in which electrostatic interactions may play a major role in guiding the docking of the heme domain to the Mo domain prior to electron transfer. In contrast, IET measurements for SDH demonstrate that IET occurs directly through the protein medium, which is distinctly different from that in animal SO. Point mutations in human SO can result in significantly impaired IET or no IET, thus rationalizing their fatal effects. The recent developments in our understanding of sulfite oxidizing enzyme

  11. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  12. Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes during thermochemical reduction of native sulfur, sulfite and sulfate by amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Naraoka, H.; Ohmoto, H.

    2006-05-01

    Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) is recognized when the Δ33S value (= δ33S-0.515xδ34S) of a sample falls outside the range of 0±0.2 permil and the 33-34θ value (= ln33α/ ln34α) lies outside the range of 0.515±.005 (Farquhar and Wing, 2003). Previous investigators have concluded that the only mechanisms to create MIF-S are photochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases (SO2, H2S) and UV. Based on comparisons of the geochemical characteristics of Archean sedimentary rocks between those with large MIF-S values (e.g., the 2.5 Ga McRae and 2.7 Ga Jeerinah shales) and those with no (or very small) MIF- S values (e.g., 2.76 Ga Hardey shales and 2.92 Ga Mosquito Creek shales), we have developed a hypothesis that MIF-S in sedimentary rocks may have been created by reactions among organic-rich sediments, sulfur- bearing solid compounds, and sulfur-bearing hydrothermal fluids at T = 100-200°C during the early diagenetic stage of sediments. Most abundant organic compounds in immature sediments are amino acids. For these reasons, we have conducted series of laboratory experiments to investigate sulfur isotope fractionations during reactions between a variety of amino acids (alanine, glycine, hystidine, etc.) and native sulfur, sodium sulfite or sodium sulfate at 150-200°C. Previous researchers used a variety of organic compounds (sugars, methane, xylene, etc) and/or ferrous- bearing minerals to investigate non-bacterial sulfate reduction, but they failed to demonstrate thermochemical sulfate reduction at temperatures below 230°C. However, we were able to reduce sulfate (S6+), as well as sulfite (S4+) and native sulfur (S0), to hydrogen sulfide (S2-) even at 150°C using simple and common amino acids (e.g., alanine and glycine). The reduction rates generally decreased: (a) from native sulfur, to sulfite, and to sulfate; (b) from simple amino acids to more complex amino acids (e.g., histidine); and (c) with decreasing temperatures. The

  13. [Ion chromatography of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate using their postcolumn reactions with cerium (IV) and fluorescence detection of cerium (III)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Hu, K; Miura, Y

    1999-09-01

    An ion chromatographic method was used to separate the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in their mixtures. This method is based on the separation of each anion in their mixtures by using a separation column, and then on the fluorimetric measurement of cerium (III) formed by a postcolumn reaction of cerium (IV) with the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in the effluent. The optimal conditions for separating and determining the above three species have been established. By using a 3 mmol/L carbonate eluent, the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate could be eluted at the proper retention times of 1.7, 2.6 and 5.0 min, respectively, and these three anions could be separated completely. The effects of the concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid in the postcolumn reaction solution on the chromatographic peak-height were tested in order to obtain the optimal peak-height. It was found that the peak-height at first increases rapidly with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid respectively up to a certain concertation, then increases slowly. These critical concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid also depend on the amount of the analyte injected. Meanwhile the baseline signals of the sepectra increase with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV). Some concentrations above the critical concentration of sulfuric acid could be selected as the optimal concentration of sulfuric acid, but the concentration of cerium (IV) should be optimized by establishing a compromise between the higher peak-height and the lower baseline signal. The detection limit of this method was found to be 1 mumol/L for thiosulfate when an amount of 100 microL analyte was injected. PMID:12552889

  14. EFFECT OF TRACE METALS AND SULFITE OXIDATION OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the ...

  15. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  16. A novel photochemical system of ferrous sulfite complex: kinetics and mechanisms of rapid decolorization of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Danna; Chen, Long; Zhang, Changbo; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Li; Wu, Feng

    2014-06-15

    We previously reported the decolorization of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by sulfate radical (SO4(-)) in the presence of iron(II) sulfite complex and oxygen under UV-vis irradiation (photo-iron(II) sulfite system). This system, however, achieves very limited mineralization of AO7 (in terms of total organic carbon (TOC) removal), which is not in accordance with literature reports on the oxidation of organic contaminants by SO4(-). In the present work, kinetics and products under irradiation of xenon lamp (350 W) were analyzed to reveal the reaction pathway of decolorization of AO7. Steady-state approximation (SSA) of SO4(-) radicals and apparent kinetics of AO7 were examined. The reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to proceed in two steps, namely, electron transfer and SO4(-) addition. The second-order rate constant for the reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to be 8.07 ± 1.07 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by SSA and 6.80 ± 0.68 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by competition kinetics method. The apparent kinetics of the decolorization of AO7 under irradiation closely fits the mechanism of radical chain reactions of various reactive sulfur species. By liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified the sulfate adduct AO7-SO4 and confirmed the two-step reaction between AO7 and SO4(-). This stable sulfate adduct provides a good explanation of the poor TOC removal during decolorization of AO7 by the photo-iron(II) sulfite system. PMID:24704906

  17. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  18. VOLATILE COMPONENT RECOVERY FROM SULFITE EVAPORATOR CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is on the operation and modification of a demonstration unit to remove sulfur dioxide, methanol, furfural, and acetic acid from its sulfite evaporator condensate. This unit consisted of a steam stripper, vent tank SO2 recovery, activated carbon adsorption columns, and ...

  19. Limestone dissolution in flue gas scrubbing: Effect of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T. )

    1992-07-01

    Batch limestone dissolution experiments were carried out in a pH stat apparatus at 55 C with CO{sub 2} sparging and dissolved sulfite. Particle size distribution, utilization, sulfite in solution, limestone type, and the approach to calcite equilibrium were all found to contribute to the limestone reactivity. In the absence of sulfite, limestone dissolution was controlled solely by mass transfer. For a given stone under mass transfer control, film thickness was found to be independent of pH. The dissolution rate in the presence of sulfite was controlled by a combined surface kinetics/mass transfer regime. SEM micrographs supported this conclusion. A surface rate correlation was developed which accounted for observed inhibition by an inverse dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone surface. While the form of the rate expression was applicable to all stones, the surface rate constant was stone dependent. A computer code which accounted for mass transfer with surface kinetics was tested against experimental observations of four limestone types. Changes in pH and the concentrations of calcium, carbonate, sulfite, sulfate, and adipic acid were accurately modeled.

  20. Strategies for overcoming temporary phytotoxic effects of calcium sulfite applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, K.D.; Kinraide, T.B.; Wendell, R.R.; Clark, R.B.; Baligar, V.C.

    1994-12-31

    Calcium sulfite is a major component of scrubber residues produced by lime-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, widely used in the Ohio River Valley. Preliminary studies have shown that calcium sulfite severely decreased corn plant growth when incorporated into acid soils at moderate rates. Evidence is strong that the toxic effect on plant growth is due to generation of sulfur dioxide in acidic soil. Bioassay methods were used to demonstrate that raising soil pH reduced calcium sulfite toxicity. In solution and in soils, calcium sulfite oxidizes to calcium sulfate (gypsum), which is an agricultural soil amendment useful for increasing calcium levels in acidic subsoils. This potential for oxidation indicates the possibility of incorporating calcium sulfite several months before the crop is sown so that the calcium sulfite will transform to gypsum, which should, because of its relatively high solubility, leach below the plow layer and improve the subsoil.

  1. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  2. Sulfite Oxidation in Chlorobaculum Tepidum

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse; Hiras, Jennifer; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is proposed to oxidize sulfide and elemental sulfur via sulfite as an obligate intermediate. The sulfite pool is predicted to be contained in the cytoplasm and be oxidized by the concerted action of ApsBA, which directly oxidizes sulfite, and QmoABC, which transfers electrons from ApsBA to the quinone pool. Like other green sulfur bacteria, C. tepidum was unable to use exogenously provided sulfite as the sole electron donor. However, exogenous sulfite significantly stimulated the growth yield of sulfide limited batch cultures. The growth of C. tepidum mutant strains, CT0867/qmoB::TnOGm and CT0868/qmoC::TnOGm, was not increased by sulfite. Furthermore, these strains accumulated sulfite and displayed a growth yield decrease when grown on sulfide as the sole electron donor. These results support an obligate, cytoplasmic sulfite intermediate as part of the canonical sulfur oxidation pathway in C. tepidum that requires the Qmo complex for oxidation. PMID:21747809

  3. Evaluation of microbial diversity in sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohta, Tami; Masaki, Kazuo; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2014-05-01

    The difference in microbiota including non-lactic acid bacteria, non-acetic acid bacteria, and wild yeast during winemaking and in the end-products between sulfite-added and sulfite-free wine, was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and a culture-dependent method. There were differences between the microorganisms detected by PCR-DGGE and those detected by the culture-dependent method, probably because of the selectivity of culture medium and the characteristics of PCR-based method. In both the red wine and white wine, the microbial diversity of the sulfite-added wine was lower than that of the sulfite-free wine during fermentation. Tatumella terrea was detected from the fermenting must by PCR-DGGE and by the culture-dependent method, even though sulfite inhibited its growth to some extent. We confirmed that the addition of sulfite plays an important role in winemaking by inhibiting the growth of unexpected microorganisms, but on the other hand, it was revealed that some microorganisms can survive and grow in sulfite-added fermenting must. We also analyzed 15 samples of commercial wines by the PCR-DGGE method and detected various microorganisms. Among them, Sphingomonas sp., Pseudozyma sp., Ochromonas sp. and Methylophilus sp. were found for the first time in wine as far as we know. We did not identify a specific microorganism that was detected only from wines without sulfite addition. Thus, the microbiota of end-products seemed to be influenced by other factors, such as filtration before bottling, the production equipment and the storage environment. PMID:24239025

  4. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  5. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite.

    PubMed Central

    Neta, P; Huie, R E

    1985-01-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO3 and the peroxy derivative SO5 with organic compounds. PMID:3830699

  6. Critical Comparison between Modified Monier-Williams and Electrochemical Methods to Determine Sulfite in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Montes, C.; Vélez, J. H.; Ramírez, G.; Isaacs, M.; Arce, R.; Aguirre, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, known concentration of sulfite aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of gallic acid was measured to corroborate the validity of modified Monier-Williams method. Free and bound-sulfite was estimated by differential pulse voltammetry. To our surprise, the modified Monier-Williams method (also known as aspiration method) showed to be very inaccurate for free-sulfite, although suitable for bound-sulfite determination. The differential pulse approach, using the standard addition method and a correction coefficient, proved to be swift, cheap, and very precise and accurate. PMID:22619610

  7. Electrocatalytic sulfite biosensor with human sulfite oxidase co-immobilized with cytochrome c in a polyelectrolyte-containing multilayer.

    PubMed

    Spricigo, Roberto; Dronov, Roman; Lisdat, Fred; Leimkühler, Silke; Scheller, Frieder W; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electrocatalytic biosensor for sulfite detection was developed by co-immobilizing sulfite oxidase and cytochrome c with polyaniline sulfonic acid in a layer-by-layer assembly. QCM, UV-Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry revealed increasing loading of electrochemically active protein with the formation of multilayers. The sensor operates reagentless at low working potential. A catalytic oxidation current was detected in the presence of sulfite at the modified gold electrode, polarized at +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl 1 M KCl). The stability of the biosensor performance was characterized and optimized. A 17-bilayer electrode has a linear range between 1 and 60 microM sulfite with a sensitivity of 2.19 mA M(-1) sulfite and a response time of 2 min. The electrode retained a stable response for 3 days with a serial reproducibility of 3.8% and lost 20% of sensitivity after 5 days of operation. It is possible to store the sensor in a dry state for more than 2 months. The multilayer electrode was used for determination of sulfite in unspiked and spiked samples of red and white wine. The recovery and the specificity of the signals were evaluated for each sample. PMID:18932024

  8. Comparative study of sulfite pretreatments for robust enzymatic saccharification of corn cob residue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corn cob residue (CCR) is a kind of waste lignocellulosic material with enormous potential for bioethanol production. The moderated sulphite processes were used to enhance the hydrophily of the material by sulfonation and hydrolysis. The composition, FT-IR spectra, and conductometric titrations of the pretreated materials were measured to characterize variations of the CCR in different sulfite pretreated environments. And the objective of this study is to compare the saccharification rate and yield of the samples caused by these variations. Results It was found that the lignin in the CCR (43.2%) had reduced to 37.8%, 38.0%, 35.9%, and 35.5% after the sulfite pretreatment in neutral, acidic, alkaline, and ethanol environments, respectively. The sulfite pretreatments enhanced the glucose yield of the CCR. Moreover, the ethanol sulfite sample had the highest glucose yield (81.2%, based on the cellulose in the treated sample) among the saccharification samples, which was over 10% higher than that of the raw material (70.6%). More sulfonic groups and weak acid groups were produced during the sulfite pretreatments. Meanwhile, the ethanol sulfite treated sample had the highest sulfonic group (0.103 mmol/g) and weak acid groups (1.85 mmol/g) in all sulfite treated samples. In FT-IR spectra, the variation of bands at 1168 and 1190 cm-1 confirmed lignin sulfonation during sulfite pretreatment. The disappearance of the band at 1458 cm-1 implied the methoxyl on lignin had been removed during the sulfite pretreatments. Conclusions It can be concluded that the lignin in the CCR can be degraded and sulfonated during the sulfite pretreatments. The pretreatments improve the hydrophility of the samples because of the increase in sulfonic group and weak acid groups, which enhances the glucose yield of the material. The ethanol sulfite pretreatment is the best method for lignin removal and with the highest glucose yield. PMID:23206858

  9. Sulfite-sulfide-sulfate-carbonate equilibria with applications to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Crowley, J. K.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-07-01

    Mars volcanic SO2 and H2S gas emissions are likely the dominant source of martian sulfate, and the source of sulfuric acid. Until this work, the FREZCHEM model lacked SO2 and H2S gases and associated sulfite and sulfide minerals. The specific objectives of this paper were to add these components and associated sulfite and sulfide minerals and phases into FREZCHEM, and to explore some possible roles of these chemistries on Mars. New solid phases added included the sulfites: Na2SO3·7H2O, K2SO3, (NH4)2SO3·H2O, MgSO3·6H2O, CaSO3·0.5H2O, and FeSO3·1.5H2O, and the sulfide: FeS2. The lowest eutectic of these minerals was K2SO3 (= 6.57 m) at 228 K. Because sulfurous acid is stronger than carbonic acid, this causes a much larger fraction of S(IV) to exist as sulfite (SO32-) at acidic to mildly alkaline pH, whereas almost none of the C is present as carbonate anion. Model calculations show that small quantities of SO2 in an early CO2-rich martian atmosphere suppressed formation of carbonates because SO2 is much more water soluble than CO2 and a stronger acid, which may be a major reason why sulfates are much more common than carbonates on Mars. Also, perhaps equally important are low temperatures that favor sulfite mineral precipitation, the oxidation of which leads to sulfate minerals. Another potentially important factor that favors sulfite/sulfide mineral formation is low pH values that cannot allow carbonate minerals, but can allow sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2). The presence of pyrite, highly insoluble, would lead to sulfate minerals when oxygen becomes available in acidic environments. Major cations for both sulfites (or sulfates) and carbonates (Ca and Mg) can limit carbonates. Sulfite-sulfide volcanism on a cold, lower pH, Mars are the primary causes of high sulfate minerals (e.g., Ca and Mg sulfates), compared to volcanism on a warm, higher pH, Earth that led to more abundant carbonate minerals (e.g., Ca and Mg carbonates).

  10. The effect of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status of brain in normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ozkan, Ayse; Parlak, Hande; Aslan, Mutay; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Agar, Aysel

    2016-07-01

    Sulfite, commonly used as a preservative in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals, is a very reactive and potentially toxic molecule which is detoxified by sulfite oxidase (SOX). Changes induced by aging may be exacerbated by exogenous chemicals like sulfite. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain antioxidant statuses by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Brain lipid oxidation status was also determined via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in normal- and SOX-deficient aged rats. Rats do not mimic the sulfite responses seen in humans because of their relatively high SOX activity level. Therefore this study used SOX-deficient rats since they are more appropriate models for studying sulfite toxicity. Forty male Wistar rats aged 24 months were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), sulfite (S), SOX-deficient (D) and SOX-deficient + sulfite (DS). SOX deficiency was established by feeding rats with low molybdenum (Mo) diet and adding 200 ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite in the form of sodium metabisulfite (25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given by gavage. Treatment continued for 6 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, flash VEPs were recorded. Hepatic SOX activity was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. SOX-deficient rats had an approximately 10-fold decrease in hepatic SOX activity compared with the normal rats. The activity of SOX in deficient rats was thus in the range of humans. There was no significant difference between control and treated groups in either latence or amplitude of VEP components. Brain SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and brain TBARS levels were similar in all experimental groups compared with the control group. Our results indicate that exogenous administration of sulfite does not affect VEP components and the antioxidant/oxidant status of aged rat brains. PMID:25342669

  11. Improvements in amperometric detection of sulfite in food matrixes.

    PubMed

    Wygant, M B; Statler, J A; Henshall, A

    1997-01-01

    Sulfite is added to foods as an antimicrobial, antibrowning agent, or antioxidant. It also can occur naturally, and is often used in the production of beer and wine. For years the standard methodology for determination of sulfite in foods has been the Monier-Williams method, which is a combination of acid distillation and titration. Recently, AOAC adopted a chromatographic method based on a method developed by Kim and Kim for the determination of sulfite. The method combines ion exclusion chromatography with direct-current (DC) amperometric detection to provide more convenient and accurate quantitation of sulfite. However, fouling of the platinum working electrode results in a rapid decrease in method sensitivity. As a result, standards must be injected before and after every sample, and the electrode must be polished frequently to maintain adequate detection limits. Pulsed amperometric detection overcomes electrode fouling problems by repeatedly and continuously applying cleaning potentials to the working electrode. Using this technique, a reproducible electrode surface can be maintained, and injection-to-injection repeatability is greatly improved. A comparison of method performance for both DC and pulsed amperometric detection is presented. Also investigated was the stability of sulfite samples at varying pH, and in the presence or absence of a preservative. PMID:9419871

  12. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  13. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.; Huie, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO/sub 3/ and the peroxy derivative SO/sub 5/ with organic compounds. 98 references.

  14. Actinide sulfite tetrahydrate and actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, D.; Watt, G.

    1980-07-08

    A compound is prepared that comprises an actinide sulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) sulfite tetrahydrate. A compound is also prepared that comprises an actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate selected from the group consisting of uranium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate and plutonium (IV) oxysulfite tetrahydrate

  15. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  20. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  1. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  2. 21 CFR 582.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 582.3798 Section 582.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  3. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium sulfite. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  4. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 μmol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ≤20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  5. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  6. An Essential Role for Tomato Sulfite Oxidase and Enzymes of the Sulfite Network in Maintaining Leaf Sulfite Homeostasis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Brychkova, Galina; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the homeostasis of sulfite levels, a cytotoxic by-product of plant sulfur turnover. By employing extended dark to induce catabolic pathways, we followed key elements of the sulfite network enzymes that include adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase and the sulfite scavengers sulfite oxidase (SO), sulfite reductase, UDP-sulfoquinovose synthase, and β-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferases. During extended dark, SO was enhanced in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) wild-type leaves, while the other sulfite network components were down-regulated. SO RNA interference plants lacking SO activity accumulated sulfite, resulting in leaf damage and mortality. Exogenous sulfite application induced up-regulation of the sulfite scavenger activities in dark-stressed or unstressed wild-type plants, while expression of the sulfite producer, adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase, was down-regulated. Unstressed or dark-stressed wild-type plants were resistant to sulfite applications, but SO RNA interference plants showed sensitivity and overaccumulation of sulfite. Hence, under extended dark stress, SO activity is necessary to cope with rising endogenous sulfite levels. However, under nonstressed conditions, the sulfite network can control sulfite levels in the absence of SO activity. The novel evidence provided by the synchronous dark-induced turnover of sulfur-containing compounds, augmented by exogenous sulfite applications, underlines the role of SO and other sulfite network components in maintaining sulfite homeostasis, where sulfite appears to act as an orchestrating signal molecule. PMID:23148079

  7. Comparison of the ion exclusion chromatographic method with the Monier-Williams method for determination of total sulfite in foods.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data comparing the alkali extraction/ion exclusion chromatographic method with the Monier-Williams method for determination of total sulfite are presented in (a) enzymatic and nonenzymatic browning systems, (b) vegetables containing naturally occurring sulfite, and (c) a carbohydrate-type food additive, erythorbic acid. Excellent agreement, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99, was observed in fresh potato samples homogenized with sulfite and allowed to react for different time intervals (enzymatic browning system). A good overall correlation was observed in dehydrated, sulfited apple samples heated for different times (nonenzymatic browning system); however, as heating time increased, higher results were obtained by the Monier-Williams method than by the alkali extraction/ion exclusion chromatographic method. The results of determining sulfite in the alkali trapping solution following acid distillation or acid treatment without heat suggested that this deviation was due to a fraction of sulfite bound to the browning reaction products in such a way that it was released by acid distillation but not by alkali extraction or acid treatment without heat. Similar behavior was demonstrated in cabbage with naturally occurring sulfite, which was released by acid distillation but not by alkali extraction or acid treatment without heat. The ion exclusion chromatographic method could overcome interference by the volatile caramelization reaction products in the Monier-Williams determination of erythorbic acid. PMID:2708275

  8. Synergetic Transformations of Multiple Pollutants Driven by Cr(VI)-Sulfite Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yukun; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wang, Zhaohui; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-10-20

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is often deemed necessary to detoxify chromium contaminants; however, few investigations utilized this reaction for the purpose of treating other industrial wastewaters. Here a widely used Cr(VI)-sulfite reaction system was upgraded to simultaneously transform multiple pollutants, namely, the reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of sulfite and other organic/inorganic pollutants in an acidic solution. As(III) was selected as a probe pollutant to examine the oxidation capacity of a Cr(VI)-sulfite system. Both (•)OH and SO4(•-) were considered as the primary oxidants for As(III) oxidation, based on the results of electron spin resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and specific radicals quenching. As(III)-scavenging, oxidative radicals greatly accelerated Cr(VI) reduction and simultaneously consumed less sulfite. In comparison with a Cr(VI)-H2O2 system with 50 μM Cr(VI), Cr(VI), the sulfite system had excellent performance for both As(III) oxidation and Cr(VI) reduction at pH 3.5. Moreover, in this escalated process, less sulfite was required to reduce Cr(VI) than the traditional Cr(VI) reduction by sulfite process. This effectively improves the environmental compatibility of this Cr(VI) detoxification process, alleviating the potential for SO2 release and sulfate ion production in water. Generally, this study provides an excellent example of a "waste control by waste" strategy for the detoxification of multiple industrial pollutants. PMID:26384045

  9. Use of sulfite and hydrogen peroxide to control bacterial contamination in ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, I S; Kim, B H; Shin, P K

    1997-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from an industrial-scale ethanol fermentation process were used to evaluate sulfite as a bacterial-contamination control agent in a cell-recycled continuous ethanol fermentation process. The viabilities of bacteria were decreased by sulfite at concentrations of 100 to 400 mg liter-1, while sulfite at the same concentrations did not change the viability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain used in this process. Sulfite was effective only in the presence of oxygen. Bacteria showed differences in their susceptibilities to sulfite. Facultatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus casei 4-3 was more susceptible than was obligatory heterofermentative Lactobacillus fermentum 7-1. The former showed higher enzyme activities involved in the production and consumption of hydrogen peroxide than did the latter. The viability of L. fermentum 7-1 could be selectively controlled by hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 1 to 10 mM. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that the sulfur trioxide radical anions formed by peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide are responsible for the control of contaminating bacteria. Sulfite did not kill the yeast strain, which has catalase to degrade hydrogen peroxide. A cell-recycled continuous ethanol fermentation process was run successfully with sulfite treatments. PMID:8979332

  10. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  11. 21 CFR 182.3798 - Sodium sulfite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium sulfite. 182.3798 Section 182.3798 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3798 Sodium sulfite. (a) Product. Sodium...

  12. Sulfite Reductase Protects Plants against Sulfite Toxicity1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rheinlands Ruhm’) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation. PMID:23221833

  13. Measurement of oxidation rate of sulfite in rain water in Yokohama, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Yamanaka, K.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1986-04-01

    In recent years, the influences of acid rain such as the acidification of lake water, on bio-system by the heavy metals from effluent of soils with acid rain and also on the structural materials of buildings are seriously discussed. Sulfur and nitrogen that are contained in fossil fuels are released into the atmosphere by the fuel combustion as their oxides dissolve in rain drops as sulfite and nitrous ions, where they are further oxidized into sulfate and nitrate ions These ions lower the pH of rain water resulting so-called acid rain. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine these ions in rain water for the investigation of reality of acid rain. However, it is not easy to accurately determine these ions, especially for sulfite ions in rain water, since they are quickly oxidized by the catalytic action of metallic ions such as ferric and manganous ions. And light, temperature, pH of solution and also species and concentrations of dissolved metallic ions as catalysts, must be influential factors for the rate of oxidation of sulfite ions. In this paper, first, the rate of oxidation of sulfite ion in the test solutions by the catalytic reactions of metallic ions was examined, since the metallic ions is most influential in the oxidation of sulfite ion, and then the relations between the rate of oxidation of sulfite ion and the metallic ions were investigated for rain samples. The contribution of hydrogen ion that was produced by the oxidation of sulfite ion to sulfate was also examined for the change of pH values of rain water.

  14. Overexpression of a maize sulfite oxidase gene in tobacco enhances tolerance to sulfite stress via sulfite oxidation and CAT-mediated H2O2 scavenging.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Sun, Kaile; Wang, Meiping; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Jianyu

    2012-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) plays an important role in sulfite metabolism. To date, the molecular mechanisms of sulfite metabolism in plants are largely unknown. Previously, a full-length cDNA of the putative sulfite oxidase gene from maize (ZmSO) was cloned, and its response to SO(2)/sulfite stress at the transcriptional level was characterized. In this study, the recombinant ZmSO protein was purified from E. coli. It exhibited sulfite-dependent activity and had strong affinity for the substrate sulfite. Over-expression (OE) of ZmSO in tobacco plants enhanced their tolerance to sulfite stress. The plants showed much less damage, less sulfite accumulation, but greater amounts of sulfate. This suggests that tolerance of transgenic plants to sulfite was enhanced by increasing SO expression levels. Interestingly, H(2)O(2) accumulation levels by histochemical detection and quantitative determination in the OE plants were much less than those in the wild-type upon sulfite stress. Furthermore, reductions of catalase levels detected in the OE lines were considerably less than in the wild-type plants. This indicates that SO may play an important role in protecting CAT from inhibition by excess sulfite. Collectively, these data demonstrate that transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing ZmSO enhance tolerance to excess sulfite through sulfite oxidation and catalase-mediated hydrogen peroxide scavenging. This is the first SO gene from monocots to be functionally characterized. PMID:22693572

  15. A sensitive and selective on-line amperometric sulfite biosensor using sulfite oxidase immobilized on a magnetite-gold-folate nanocomposite modified carbon-paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Sroysee, Wongduan; Ponlakhet, Kitayanan; Chairam, Sanoe; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan

    2016-08-15

    We describe a novel amperometric sulfite biosensor, comprising a carbon-paste electrode (Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA/CPE) modified with immobilized sulfite oxidase (SOx) on a gold-coated magnetite nanoparticle core, encased within a conjugated folic acid (FA) cysteine (Cys) shell. The biosensor electrode was fabricated using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and mineral oil mixture as binder, which also enhances the physical stability and sensitivity of the electrode. The developed biosensor displays good electrocatalytic activity toward oxidation of H2O2, which occurs by an enzymatic reaction between SOx and sulfite. The Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, and has good retention of chemisorbed SOx on the electrode because of its large surface area. Sulfite was quantified using amperometric measurements from the Fe3O4@Au-Cys-FA/CPE biosensor, and using an in-house assembled flow cell at +0.35V (vs. Ag/AgCl), with a phosphate buffer carrier (0.10M, pH 7.0) at a flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). The system detects sulfite over the range 0.1-200mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998), with a detection limit of 10µgL(-1) (3σ of blank). The system exhibits acceptable precision (%R.S.D.=3.1%), rapid sample throughput (109samplesh(-1)), and good stability (2w). The developed biosensor shows satisfactory tolerance to potential interferences, such as sugars, anions, ascorbic acid, and ethanol. We applied the developed method to the determination of sulfite content in wines and pickled food extracts, and our results are in good agreement with those obtained by the standard iodometric method. PMID:27260448

  16. Vanillin: Synthetic Flavoring from Spent Sulfite Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Martin B.

    1997-09-01

    Separation of the lignin component of wood from the cellulose presents an opportunity to access various interesting products from the lignin fragments. The lignin represents availability of a sizable renewable resource. Vanillin, or 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, is one of a series of related substituted aromatic flavor constituents, and represents one of the potentially profitable possibilities. Vanillin production from the lignin-containing waste liquor obtained from acid sulfite pulping of wood began in North America in the mid 1930's. By 1981 one plant at Thorold, Ontario produced 60% of the contemporary world supply of vanillin. The process also simultaneously decreased the organic loading of the aqueous waste streams of the pulping process. Today, however, whilst vanillin production from lignin is still practiced in Norway and a few other areas, all North American facilities using this process have closed, primarily for environmental reasons. New North American vanillin plants use petrochemical raw materials. An innovation is needed to help overcome the environmental problems of this process before vanillin production from lignin is likely to resume here. Current interest in the promotion of chemicals production from renewable raw materials reinforces the incentive to do this.

  17. Sulfite Oxidase Activity Is Essential for Normal Sulfur, Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Batushansky, Albert; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Fait, Aaron; Amir, Rachel; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Plant sulfite oxidase [SO; E.C.1.8.3.1] has been shown to be a key player in protecting plants against exogenous toxic sulfite. Recently we showed that SO activity is essential to cope with rising dark-induced endogenous sulfite levels in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum/Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Rheinlands Ruhm). Here we uncover the ramifications of SO impairment on carbon, nitrogen and sulfur (S) metabolites. Current analysis of the wild-type and SO-impaired plants revealed that under controlled conditions, the imbalanced sulfite level resulting from SO impairment conferred a metabolic shift towards elevated reduced S-compounds, namely sulfide, S-amino acids (S-AA), Co-A and acetyl-CoA, followed by non-S-AA, nitrogen and carbon metabolite enhancement, including polar lipids. Exposing plants to dark-induced carbon starvation resulted in a higher degradation of S-compounds, total AA, carbohydrates, polar lipids and total RNA in the mutant plants. Significantly, a failure to balance the carbon backbones was evident in the mutants, indicated by an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle intermediates, whereas a decrease was shown in stressed wild-type plants. These results indicate that the role of SO is not limited to a rescue reaction under elevated sulfite, but SO is a key player in maintaining optimal carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in tomato plants. PMID:27135342

  18. A Sulfite Respiration Pathway from Thermus thermophilus and the Key Role of Newly Identified Cytochrome c550 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Sylvain; Arese, Marzia; Forte, Elena; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2011-01-01

    Sulfite, produced for instance during amino acid metabolism, is a very reactive and toxic compound. Various detoxification mechanisms exist, but sulfite oxidoreductases (SORs) are one of the major actors in sulfite remediation in bacteria and animals. Here we describe the existence of an operon in the extreme thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 encoding both a SOR and a diheme c-type cytochrome. The in vitro analysis clearly showed that the newly identified cytochrome c550 acts as an acceptor of the electrons generated by the SOR enzyme during the oxidation of sulfite. The electrons are then rapidly shuttled via cytochrome c552 to the terminal ba3- and caa3-type oxidases, thereby unveiling a novel electron transfer pathway, linking sulfite oxidation to oxygen reduction in T. thermophilus: sulfite → SORHB8 → cytochrome c550 → cytochrome c552 → ba3 oxidase/caa3 oxidase → O2. The description of the complete pathway reveals that electrons generated during sulfite oxidation by the SOR are funneled into the respiratory chain, participating in the energy production of T. thermophilus. PMID:21665981

  19. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite... at dissolving sulfite mills....

  20. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite... at dissolving sulfite mills....

  1. Amperometric Determination of Sulfite by Gas Diffusion-Sequential Injection with Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Chinvongamorn, Chakorn; Pinwattana, Kulwadee; Praphairaksit, Narong; Imato, Toshihiko; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2008-01-01

    A gas diffusion sequential injection system with amperometric detection using a boron-doped diamond electrode was developed for the determination of sulfite. A gas diffusion unit (GDU) was used to prevent interference from sample matrices for the electrochemical measurement. The sample was mixed with an acid solution to generate gaseous sulfur dioxide prior to its passage through the donor channel of the GDU. The sulfur dioxide diffused through the PTFE hydrophobic membrane into a carrier solution of 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 8)/0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate in the acceptor channel of the GDU and turned to sulfite. Then the sulfite was carried to the electrochemical flow cell and detected directly by amperometry using the boron-doped diamond electrode at 0.95 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Sodium dodecyl sulfate was added to the carrier solution to prevent electrode fouling. This method was applicable in the concentration range of 0.2-20 mg SO32−/L and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.05 mg SO32−/L was achieved. This method was successfully applied to the determination of sulfite in wines and the analytical results agreed well with those obtained by iodimetric titration. The relative standard deviations for the analysis of sulfite in wines were in the range of 1.0-4.1 %. The sampling frequency was 65 h−1.

  2. Oxidation and Reduction of Sulfite by Chloroplasts and Formation of Sulfite Addition Compounds 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Andreas P. M.; Pfanz, Hardy; Heber, Ulrich

    1992-01-01

    After exposing intact chloroplasts isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Yates) and capable of photoreducing CO2 at high rates to different concentrations of radioactive sulfite in the light or in the dark, 35SO2 and H235S were removed from the acidified suspensions in a stream of nitrogen. Remaining activity could be fractionated into sulfate, organic sulfides, and sulfite addition compounds. When chloroplast suspensions contained catalase, superoxide dismutase and O-acetylserine, the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate was slower in the light than the reductive formation of sulfides that exhibited a maximum rate of about 2 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, equivalent to about 1% of maximum carbon assimilation. Botht the oxidative and the reductive detoxification of sulfite were very slow in the dark. Oxidation was somewhat, but not much, accelerated in the light in the absence of O-acetylserine, which caused a dramatic decrease in the formation of organic sulfides and an equally dramatic increase in the concentration of sulfite addition compounds whose formation was light-dependent. The sulfite addition compounds were not identified. Addition compounds did not accumulate in the dark. In the light, the electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, diuron, decreased not only the reduction, but also the oxidation of sulfite and the formation of addition compounds. PMID:16668703

  3. Rapid microstill determination of free and total sulfite in wine with conductimetric detection.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stan; Davey, David E

    2007-09-26

    The development and optimization of on-line microdistillation for free and total sulfite (S(IV)) in grape juice and wine is reported. The microstill used both heat and an air stream to separate sulfur dioxide from the wine samples; the distillation product was captured in a peroxide solution, and converted to sulfuric acid, mirroring accepted industry practice. Measured from 1 to 300 mgL(-1) as SO(2) by conductance, sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) for free and 20 h(-1) for total sulfite were achieved. Data for bound S(IV) emphasises the slow kinetics of release reactions in some wines. The microstill method is more efficient for total sulfite than the accepted manual technique. Good correlation was found between the microstill and manual methods under specified control conditions. PMID:17903466

  4. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 4, A laboratory study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 1 titled. Inhibition of acid production in coal refuse amended with calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate - containing FGD solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Dick, W. A.; Stehouwer, R. C.; Bigham, J. M.

    1998-06-30

    Control of S02 emission from coal combustion requires desulfurization of coal before its combustion to produce coal refuse. Alternatively, gaseous emissions from coal combustion may be scrubbed to yield flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products that include calcium sulfite (CaSO3∙0.5H2O or simply CaS03). Acid production in coal refuse due to pyrite oxidation and disposal of large amounts of FGD can cause environmental degradation. Addition of CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD to coal refuse may reduce the amounts of oxygen and ferric ion available to oxidize pyrite because the sulfite moiety in CaS03 is a strong reductant and thus may mitigate acid production in coal refuse. In Chapter 1, it was shown that CaS03 efficiently scavenged dissolved oxygen and ferric ion in water under the conditions commonly encountered in a coal refuse disposal environment. In the presence ofCaS03, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water exposed to the atmosphere declined to below 0.01 mg L"1 at pH <8.0. In Chapter 2, it was demonstrated that CaS03 prevented a pH drop in coal refuse slurry when 0.2 gCaS03 was added to a 2% fresh coal refuse slurry every three days. Calcium sulfite also inhibited acid leaching from fresh coal refuse in bench-scale columns under controlled conditions. During the initial 13 weeks of leaching, the total amounts of titratable acidity, soluble H\\ Fe, and Al from CaS03-treated refuse (6.4 gin 50 g fresh coal refuse) were only 26%,10%, 32%, and 39% of those of the control columns, respectively. A combination of CaS03 with CaC03 or fly ash enhanced the inhibitory effect of CaS03 on acid leaching. Calcium sulfite-containing FGD which combined CaS03, CaC03, fly ash, and gypsum showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on acid leaching than CaS03 alone. This

  5. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    How to deal with unstable ammonium sulfite, the byproduct of flue gas desulfuration by ammonia absorption methods, has been a difficult problem in recent years. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite in aqueous solutions using ozone produced by a surface discharge system was investigated in the paper. The oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone and traditional air aeration were compared, and the factors including ozone concentration, gas flow rate, initial concentration of ammonium sulfite solution and reaction temperature were discussed. The results show that the oxidation efficiency of ammonium sulfite by ozone technology reached nearly 100% under the optimum conditions, which had a significant increase compared with that by air aeration.

  6. Sulfite-containing Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, M; Schuster, B; Schellenberg, R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compile an inclusive list of Canadian pharmaceutical products available in 1991 that contained sulfites. DATA SOURCES: Written and oral responses from 94 pharmaceutical companies selected from the 1989 Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. RESULTS: A list of sulfite-containing pharmaceutical products was compiled from data supplied by the 90 responding companies. Companies whose products contained no sulfites were separately identified. CONCLUSIONS: Sulfites are present in many pharmaceutical products and are one of many excipients and additives that have been reported to cause severe adverse reactions. The provided list should be a useful aid for health care practitioners when prescribing pharmaceutical products for sulfite-sensitive patients. PMID:1483237

  7. An electrochemical sulfite biosensor based on gold coated magnetic nanoparticles modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Rachna; Chawla, Sheetal; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2012-01-15

    A sulfite oxidase (SO(X)) (EC 1.8.3.1) purified from Syzygium cumini leaves was immobilized onto carboxylated gold coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@GNPs) electrodeposited onto the surface of a gold (Au) electrode through N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)-N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) chemistry. An amperometric sulfite biosensor was fabricated using SO(X)/Fe(3)O(4)@GNPs/Au electrode as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode. The working electrode was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) before and after immobilization of SO(X). The biosensor showed optimum response within 2s when operated at 0.2V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 8.5 and at 35 °C. Linear range and detection limit were 0.50-1000 μM and 0.15 μM (S/N=3) respectively. Biosensor was evaluated with 96.46% recovery of added sulfite in red wine and 1.7% and 3.3% within and between batch coefficients of variation respectively. Biosensor measured sulfite level in red and white wines. There was good correlation (r=0.99) between red wines sulfite value by standard DTNB (5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)) method and the present method. Enzyme electrode was used 300 times over a period of 4 months, when stored at 4 °C. Biosensor has advantages over earlier biosensors that it has excellent electrocatalysis towards sulfite, lower detection limit, higher storage stability and no interference by ascorbate, cysteine, fructose and ethanol. PMID:22035973

  8. Determination of sulfite ion by using microbial sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Masayasu; Lee, Soomi; Karube, Isao ); Fujii, Keiko; Arikawa, Yoshiko ); Kubo, Izumi ); Kanagawa, Takahiro; Mikami, Eiichi )

    1992-06-01

    Chemoautotrophic and aerobic bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m, which has sulfite oxidation pathways, was used for the development of sulfite ion sensor. The sensor consists of an oxygen electrode and T.thioparus immobilized between two nitrocellulose membranes. Since T.thioparus could not be cultivated in the medium containing sulfite as sulfur source, T.thiparus grown in the thiosulfate containing medium was used for the experiment. The selectivity for sulfite was gradually increased during the use as sulfite sensor. After 6 days, the response to thiosulfate became approximately 10% of that of sulfite. When the sensor was applied to the sulfite determination in batch system, calibration curve showed the linearity in the concentration range between 4 {mu}M and 280 {mu}M.

  9. Structure-Based Alteration of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of Sulfite Oxidase from Sulfite Oxidation to Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2012-04-18

    Eukaryotic sulfite oxidase is a dimeric protein that contains the molybdenum cofactor and catalyzes the metabolically essential conversion of sulfite to sulfate as the terminal step in the metabolism of cysteine and methionine. Nitrate reductase is an evolutionarily related molybdoprotein in lower organisms that is essential for growth on nitrate. In this study, we describe human and chicken sulfite oxidase variants in which the active site has been modified to alter substrate specificity and activity from sulfite oxidation to nitrate reduction. On the basis of sequence alignments and the known crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase, two residues are conserved in nitrate reductases that align with residues in the active site of sulfite oxidase. On the basis of the crystal structure of yeast nitrate reductase, both positions were mutated in human sulfite oxidase and chicken sulfite oxidase. The resulting double-mutant variants demonstrated a marked decrease in sulfite oxidase activity but gained nitrate reductase activity. An additional methionine residue in the active site was proposed to be important in nitrate catalysis, and therefore, the triple variant was also produced. The nitrate reducing ability of the human sulfite oxidase triple mutant was nearly 3-fold greater than that of the double mutant. To obtain detailed structural data for the active site of these variants, we introduced the analogous mutations into chicken sulfite oxidase to perform crystallographic analysis. The crystal structures of the Mo domains of the double and triple mutants were determined to 2.4 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively.

  10. Highly sensitive and stable electrochemical sulfite biosensor incorporating a bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Tkac, Jan; Kappler, Ulrike; Davis, Jason J; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a highly sensitive electrochemical (voltammetric) determination of sulfite using a combination of Starkeya novella sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c), and a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol (MU) cast on a gold electrode. The biosensor was optimized in terms of pH and the ratio of cyt c/SDH. The electrocatalytic oxidation current of sulfite increased linearly from 1 to 6 microM at the enzyme-modified electrode with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 and an apparent Michaelis constant (K(M,app)) of 43 microM. Using an amperometric method, the low detection limit for sulfite at the enzyme-modified electrode was 44 pM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3). The modified electrode retained a stable response for 3 days while losing only ca. 4% of its initial sensitivity during a 2 week storage period in 50 mM Tris buffer solution at 4 degrees C. The enzyme electrode was successfully used for the determination of sulfite in beer and white wine samples. The results of these electrochemical analyses agreed well with an independent spectrophotometric method using Ellman's reagent, but the detection limit was far superior using the electrochemical method. PMID:20698497

  11. Thermodynamic fundamentals of ferrous cake sulfitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, A. G.; Vasekha, M. V.; Biryukov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The Pourbaix diagrams of the systems SO 4 2- -SO 3 2- -H2O and iron hydroxide (oxide)-H2O are refined. The E(pH) dependence of the sulfitization of iron(III) hydroxide is refined with allowance for the regions of predominant phase constituents of the systems. The potential E-pH electrochemical equilibrium diagrams of the systems Fe(OH)3-H2SO4-SO 3 2- -H2O, FeOOH-H2SO4-SO 3 2- -H2O, and Fe2O3-H2SO4-SO 3 2- -H2O are plotted. These diagrams can be considered as a thermodynamic basis for the sulfite conversion of the ferrous cake of copper-nickel production.

  12. Differential sensitivity of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) to sulfite: I. Carbon assimilation and frond replication rate as factors influencing sulfite phytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, B.K.; Noble, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The thiol content and hydrogen sulfide emission responses of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) differentially sensitive to sulfite enrichment were studied, at two levels of irradiance. The objectives were to examine the relationship of selected parameters of sulfite metabolism to sulfite sensitivity, and the role of light level on modifying sulfite metabolic responses and duckweed sulfite sensitivity. Under low light, thiol contents were increased 30 to 40% by sulfite in all three duckweeds examined. Hydrogen sulfide was emitted by all three species, and emission rates were up to four times higher in the sulfite tolerant duckweed Lemna valdiviana. Under high light, sulfite increased thiol contents by an average of 40% in L. valdiviana and Spirodela oligorhiza, but only 20% in Lemna gibba. The greater light enhancement of thiol content exhibited by L. valdiviana and S. oligorhiza may be indicative of larger or more numerous sulfur sinks. Hydrogen sulfide emission rates were also enhanced under high light, and L. gibba exhibited a 17% increase relative to its low light rate. In comparison, L. valdiviana and S. oligorhiza exhibited 55% and 60% increases, respectively. The ability to form elevated internal thiols and hydrogen sulfide were found to be important to sulfite tolerance in duckweeds. Enhancement of both processes under high light may contribute to increased tolerance of sulfite in L. gibba and S. oligorhiza. It is hypothesized that thiol production and hydrogen sulfide emission are important sulfite detoxification processes in duckweeds, and enhancement of sulfite detoxification is fundamental to the modification of duckweed sulfite sensitivity by the photoenvironment. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Investigation of the radiation stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Muratbekov, M.B.; Koroleva, G.Y.

    1986-09-01

    The principles of the radiation-stimulated oxidation of sulfite by molecular oxygen in the range of pH 11.0-14.6 were investigated. It was established that with increasing sulfite concentration, the kinetic order of the reaction with respect to sulfite falls from 1 to 0, and with respect to oxygen it increases from 0 to 1. This is explained by the fact that at low sulfite concentrations the rate-determining step of the process is the reaction SO/sub 5//sup -/ (HSO/sub 5/) + SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ ..-->.. SO/sub 4//sup -/ (HSO/sub 4/) + SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, while at high concentrations it is the reaction SO/sub 3/ + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. SO/sub 5//sup -/. The influence of the pH is explained on the assumption of the existence of two forms of the peroxomonosulfate radical, the more reactive of which is the acid. A number of ratios of reaction rate constants were determined.

  14. Generation, behavior, and toxicity of ammonium sulfite aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, S.J.; Dahl, A.R.; Barr, E.B.; Wolff, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Ammonium sulfite aerosols were continuously generated for periods up to 6 h by gas phase reaction of sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and water vapor in nitrogen carrier gas. Concentrations from 1 to 500 mg/m/sup 3/ were obtained. Aerosol leaving the generator was greater than 90% sulfite, but when diluted with air preparatory to animal exposures, the aerosol was rapidly oxidized. Sulfite concentrations in a large exposure chamber with a long residence time were consistently less than 25 percent of the aerosol mass. Sulfite concentrations in a nose-only or head-only inhalation chamber 1 ft downstream from a radial air injection system ranged from 10 to 80 percent sulfite. The latter system, with a short residence time, was used to expose animals to aerosols. Effects of the mixed sulfite/sulfate aerosol on acute mortality of guinea pigs and tracheal mucous clearance of dogs were measured and no effects were observed.

  15. Composition of sulfited potatoes: comparison with fresh and frozen potatoes.

    PubMed

    Chalom, S; Elrezzi, E; Peña, P; Astiarsarán, I; Bello, J

    1995-02-01

    The content in moisture, fat, protein, carbohydrate, fibre and vitamin C was analyzed in three commercial types of potatoes: sulfited (treated with E223), frozen potatoes (pre-fried) and fresh potatoes (not processed). The composition of sulfited potatoes does not usually appear in food composition tables. Our results showed significant differences in the content of carbohydrates and fibre between sulfited and fresh potatoes. The content of vitamin C in sulfited potatoes, which is similar to that of frozen potatoes, was shown to be approximately half of that found in fresh potatoes. PMID:7792261

  16. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  17. The oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite species and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Breuer, Christian; Coleman, Max; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Sulfite is an important sulfoxy intermediate in oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling in the marine and terrestrial environment. Different aqueous sulfite species exist, such as dissolved sulfur dioxide (SO2), bisulfite (HSO3-), pyrosulfite (S2O52-) and sulfite sensu stricto (SO32-), whereas their relative abundance in solution depends on the concentration and the pH. Conversion of one species into another is rapid and involves in many cases incorporation of oxygen from, or release of oxygen to, water (e.g. SO2 + H2O ↔ HSO3- + H+), resulting in rapid oxygen isotope exchange between sulfite species and water. Consequently, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfite is strongly influenced by the oxygen isotope composition of water. Since sulfate does not exchange oxygen isotopes with water under most earth surface conditions, it can preserve the sulfite oxygen isotope signature that it inherits via oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling. Therefore, interpretation of δO values strongly hinges on the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water which is poorly constrained. This is in large part due to technical difficulties in extraction of sulfite from solution for oxygen isotope analysis.

  18. A biocatalyst for the removal of sulfite from alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Chyr; Georgiou, George

    2005-01-01

    The presence of sulfites in alcoholic beverages, particularly in wines, can cause allergic responses with symptoms ranging from mild gastrointestinal problems to life threatening anaphylactic shock in a substantial portion of the population. We have developed a simple and inexpensive biocatalytic method that employs wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum) chloroplasts for the efficient oxidation of sulfites in wines to innocuous sulfates. A sufficiently high rate of sulfite oxidation was obtained in the presence of ethanol at concentrations commonly found in most wines. Crude chloroplast preparations at a concentration as low as 5 mg/mL were capable of reducing sulfite in commercial white wines from 150 ppm to under 7.5 ppm within 3 hours. A 93% removal of sulfite in commercial red wines was observed with 1 mg/mL chloroplasts within 45 min. Optimal sulfite removal efficiency was observed at pH 8.5 and was promoted by illumination, indicating the participation of light-induced photosynthetic electron transport processes in sulfite oxidation. Overall, this work indicates that biocatalytic oxidation using wheatgrass chloroplasts can be employed to remove sulfites from beverages prior to consumption. PMID:15540199

  19. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO. PMID:26171830

  20. Sulfite-dependent mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Reed, G A

    1987-08-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are ubiquitous air pollutants and are also components of tobacco smoke. Although SO2 itself is not carcinogenic, concurrent administration with BP results in enhancement of respiratory tract tumorigenesis. In biological systems, SO2 exists as its hydrated form, sulfite (SO3(2-) ). Sulfite readily undergoes autoxidation, generating potent oxidant species. When 7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BP-7,8-diol) is included in sulfite autoxidation mixtures it is converted to more polar products, most notably 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrenes (BP tetraols). This implies the intermediacy of 7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy- 7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrenes (BPDE). We report here the sulfite-dependent conversion of BP-7,8-diol to forms highly mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98. This activation is observed at BP-7,8-diol concentrations of from 2 to 40 microM and at sulfite concentrations of from 0.5 to 10 mM. In the presence of 10 microM BP-7,8-diol, half-maximal activation is observed at 1.6 mM sulfite. Sulfite itself is neither toxic nor mutagenic to the bacteria under these conditions. The time course of the activation of BP-7,8-diol and its sensitivity to inhibition by antioxidants indicate a requirement for sulfite autoxidation. These data further support the sulfite-dependent epoxidation of BP-7,8-diol. Not only does sulfite convert this promutagen to its active mutagenic form, sulfite also enhances the mutagenic activity of BP diolepoxides toward the tester strain. The reversion frequency in response to 0.1-0.5 microM anti-BPDE is increased by up to 33% in the presence of 1 mM sulfite, and by up to 270% with 10 mM sulfite. The mechanism of this enhancement of anti-BPDE activity is not known, but could be related to inhibition of the glutathione-S-transferase system which has been previously reported for sulfite. These results are discussed in regard to the noted cocarcinogenicity of

  1. [Sulfite oxidase activity deficiency caused by cofactor molybdenum deficiency: A case of early severe encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Durousset, C; Gay, C; Magnin, S; Acquaviva, C; Patural, H

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal seizure incidence is approximately 3.5/1000 live births. Inborn metabolic diseases account for approximately 1-4% of neonatal seizure cases. Among them, the catabolism anomaly of sulfite to sulfate caused by sulfite oxidase or cofactor molybdenum deficiency (MoCD) is a rare metabolic disorder in which neurological damage is similar to that found in neonatal asphyxia. We report the case of a newborn child with a MoCD. Born of related parents, this child had intrauterine growth retardation predominating on size diagnosed in the third trimester of pregnancy. After an uneventful birth, he presented convulsions at the 12th hour of life, confirmed by an electroencephalogram. Anticonvulsants and adjuvant treatments were ineffective; the child then required intubation at day 5 of life. The initial biological assessment found an elevated blood lactate level and the chromatography of amino acids showed a significant decrease of cystine and the abnormal presence of sulfocysteine, suggestive of a lack of sulfite oxidase activity. The uric acid level measured secondarily was low, suggesting a MoCD. Brain MRI was performed at day 5 for diffuse ischemic injury of different ages. After limiting acute care, the child died at day 14 of life. The genetic study of the child found a homozygous mutation c.564+1G>A in the MOCS2 gene, confirming the diagnosis of MoCD, present in the heterozygous state in both parents. Investigations in a logical sequence quickly suggested the MoCD diagnosis in presence of a low plasma concentration of cysteine, the abnormal presence of sulfocysteine, and low uric acid levels. The diagnosis of sulfite oxidase deficiency was made. Until now, no treatment has proven effective but a new treatment appears to be effective in cases with a MOCS1 mutation. PMID:26775885

  2. Comparison of sulfite-polymyxin-sulfadiazine medium and tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine medium without egg yolk for recovering Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Orth, D S

    1977-04-01

    The overall recoveries of spores and of actively growing, heat-stressed, coldshocked, and frozen cells of five strains of Clostridium perfringens were significantly greater (95% confidence limits) on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine medium without egg yolk than on sulfite-polymyxin-sulfadiazine medium. PMID:194535

  3. Comparison of Sulfite-Polymyxin-Sulfadiazine Medium and Tryptose-Sulfite-Cycloserine Medium Without Egg Yolk for Recovering Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Orth, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The overall recoveries of spores and of actively growing, heat-stressed, coldshocked, and frozen cells of five strains of Clostridium perfringens were significantly greater (95% confidence limits) on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine medium without egg yolk than on sulfite-polymyxin-sulfadiazine medium. PMID:194535

  4. Sulfite oxidase biosensors based on tetrathiafulvalene modified screen-printed carbon electrodes for sulfite determination in wine.

    PubMed

    Molinero-Abad, Begoña; Alonso-Lomillo, M Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, M Julia

    2014-02-17

    Screen-printed carbon electrodes have been modified with tetrathiafulvalene and sulfite oxidase enzyme for the sensitive and selective detection of sulfite. Amperometric experimental conditions were optimized taking into account the importance of quantifying sulfite in wine samples and the inherent complexity of these samples, particularly red wine. The biosensor responds to sulfite giving a cathodic current (at +200 mV vs screen-printed Ag/AgCl electrode and pH 6) in a wide concentration range, with a capability of detection of 6 μM (α=β=0.05) at 60°C. The method has been applied to the determination of sulfite in white and red samples, with averages recoveries of 101.5% to 101.8%, respectively. PMID:24491762

  5. Determination of total sulfite in wine by ion chromatography after in-sample oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Matthias; Köppen, Robert; Siegel, David; Witt, Angelika; Nehls, Irene

    2010-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) or sulfites are the most common preservatives used in winemaking. The level of total SO2 is subject to regulation. Currently, the regulatory determination of total SO2 (including sulfites) is done by the optimized Monier-Williams (OMW) method, which includes time-consuming distillation and titration steps. This paper describes the development and application of an alternative, rapid, straightforward, and reliable method for the determination of total sulfite in wine. In this method, a simple oxidation step using alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution is followed by ion chromatographic (IC) analysis of sulfate coupled with conductometric detection. Thirteen wines were analyzed in order to compare the in-sample oxidation method with the OMW-procedure. A t-test revealed satisfying compliance regarding sample preparation, i.e., alkaline H2O2 treatment and acidic distillation (OMW method). Comparable results were also obtained between IC analysis and acid/base titration. Our results indicate that the novel method (limit of quantification: 4 mg SO2 L(-1)) is well suited for the cost-efficient monitoring of regulatory limits. PMID:20690603

  6. 40 CFR 430.50 - Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... papergrade sulfite subcategory. 430.50 Section 430.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.50 Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite... pulp and paper at papergrade sulfite mills, where blow pit pulp washing techniques are used; and...

  7. 40 CFR 430.50 - Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... papergrade sulfite subcategory. 430.50 Section 430.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.50 Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite... pulp and paper at papergrade sulfite mills, where blow pit pulp washing techniques are used; and...

  8. Fluorometric determination of total and bound sulfite in wine by N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, K; Ohrui, H; Meguro, H; Suzuki, T; Miwa, H

    1993-01-01

    N-(9-Acridinyl)maleimide (NAM) reacts with sulfite in wine and gives strong fluorescent derivatives that lead to highly sensitive fluorometry of both total and bound sulfite in wine. Values of free and bound sulfite in wine determined by the NAM method and the modified Rankine method agreed. Sulfite was determined in < 200 microL wine within 2 h. PMID:8286979

  9. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  10. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  11. Reaction of ferric heme proteins with nitrite and sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Siegel, L.M.

    1988-04-19

    Optical and EPR spectroscopy of ferric heme proteins of the porphyrin, oxyporphyrin, and isobacteriochlorin classes has indicated that nitrite reacts with these proteins at the heme iron. Sulfite has been conclusively proven to react only with proteins containing the isobacteriochlorin macrocycle. Quantitative EPR spectroscopy of these nitrite and sulfite adducts showed that most contained a substantial quantity of undetectable heme. It is suggested that protein-induced autoreduction of nitrite (but not sulfite) and a strained and/or uniaxial g-tensor are the principal ways by which the silent state is produced.

  12. Determination of added sulfites in dried garlic with a modified version of the optimized Monier-Williams method.

    PubMed

    Lafeuille, Jean-Louis; Lefevre, Stephane; Achouri, Djamila

    2007-01-01

    The optimized Monier-Williams method is slightly modified so that it could be applied for determining sulfite content in dried garlic. Dried garlic sample is directly acidified in a reactor at a pH below 3. At this pH level, the alliinase enzyme activity is irreversibly blocked, and the sulfur-containing amino acids such as alliin (the most abundant) present in dried garlic cannot be transformed into corresponding thiosulfinates such as allicin, which is absent in dried garlic. This prevents allicin from reacting with added sulfites and being probably converted to S-allyl thiosulfate, which is not volatile and has no taste. It is found that at a pH below 2.4 and at boiling water temperature, allicin produces sulfur dioxide in adequate quantity to explain the false-positive results when utilizing the optimized Monier-Williams method with allicin suppression for unsulfited dried garlic samples. Finally, when garlic samples are stabilized in a phosphoric acid buffer at a final pH around 2.4, no sulfite is produced during the Monier-Williams distillation, which is further proof there are no naturally occurring sulfites in unsulfited dried garlic under these mild conditions. PMID:17760347

  13. The determination of sulfite levels and its oxidation in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2012-07-01

    Sulfur is the sixth most abundant element in life and an important building block of proteins and cellular metabolites. Plants like bacteria can synthesize their sulfur-containing biomolecules from sulfate, where sulfite is an intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Above a certain threshold SO(2)/sulfite is cytotoxic and is rapidly metabolized to avoid damage. However, the existing data show considerable differences in basal sulfite levels both between species and apparent discrepancies in measured levels in the same species. In order to resolve this question we employed a sulfite detection method using chicken sulfite oxidase and developed an independent enzymatic assay, based on the specific detection of sulfite by sulfite reductase and compared those measurements to a modified colorimetric fuchsin-based method, specific for sulfite detection. We show here that when properly used the sulfite levels detected by the three methods can yield identical results. Furthermore, to examine the capacity of the plant to detoxify sulfite we injected sub-lethal sulfite solutions (yet, several folds higher than the basal levels) into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves and monitored the excess sulfite turnover. Within 3h of sulfite injection, more than 80% of the injected sulfite in Arabidopsis and 91% in tomato were oxidized to sulfate, demonstrating the high capacity of the sulfite oxidation mechanism/s in plants. PMID:22608526

  14. Identification and biochemical characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana sulfite oxidase. A new player in plant sulfur metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eilers, T; Schwarz, G; Brinkmann, H; Witt, C; Richter, T; Nieder, J; Koch, B; Hille, R; Hänsch, R; Mendel, R R

    2001-12-14

    In mammals and birds, sulfite oxidase (SO) is a homodimeric molybdenum enzyme consisting of an N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal molybdenum domain (EC ). In plants, the existence of SO has not yet been demonstrated, while sulfite reductase as part of sulfur assimilation is well characterized. Here we report the cloning of a plant sulfite oxidase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana and the biochemical characterization of the encoded protein (At-SO). At-SO is a molybdenum enzyme with molybdopterin as an organic component of the molybdenum cofactor. In contrast to homologous animal enzymes, At-SO lacks the heme domain, which is evident both from the amino acid sequence and from its enzymological and spectral properties. Thus, among eukaryotes, At-SO is the only molybdenum enzyme yet described possessing no redox-active centers other than the molybdenum. UV-visible and EPR spectra as well as apparent K(m) values are presented and compared with the hepatic enzyme. Subcellular analysis of crude cell extracts showed that SO was mostly found in the peroxisomal fraction. In molybdenum cofactor mutants, the activity of SO was strongly reduced. Using antibodies directed against At-SO, we show that a cross-reacting protein of similar size occurs in a wide range of plant species, including both herbacious and woody plants. PMID:11598126

  15. Carbon Monoxide-Reacting Pigment from Desulfotomaculum nigrificans and Its Possible Relevance to Sulfite Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Trudinger, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    The separation of an autoxidizable brown pigment, P582, from Desulfotomaculum nigrificans is described. It reacted with Na2S2O4 and was characterized by absorption maxima in the oxidized state at 392, 582, and 700 nm. In the presence of Na2S2O4, P582 formed complexes with CO and, under alkaline conditions, pyridine. There was no reaction with cyanide. The molecular weight of P582 was approximately 145,000, and the purest preparations contained Fe, Zn, and acid-labile sulfide but not Cu, Mo, or Mn. Preparations of P582 catalyzed the reduced methyl viologen (MVH)-linked reduction of sulfite, hydroxylamine, and nitrite but not of sulfate, thiosulfate, or nitrate. Reduced pyridine nucleotides did not substitute for MVH. A major product of the MVH-sulfite reaction was sulfide. CO partially inhibited the enzymatic activities. Sulfite, hydroxylamine, and nitrite and CO caused changes in the spectrum of Na2S2O4-reduced P582. Fe2+-chelating reagents reacted with part of the Fe of P582 and caused partial losses of labile sulfide and enzymatic activity. The spectral and CO-reacting properties of P582 were, however, unaffected by chelating agents. The reaction between P582 and chelating agents was stimulated by reducing agents. PMID:5473884

  16. Effect of sulfite intake on intestinal enzyme activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Vieytes, M; Martinez-Sapiña, J; Taboada Montero, C; Lamas Aneiros, M

    1994-01-01

    Sulfites are usually added to food, beverages and pharmaceuticals as preservative antioxidants, bleaching agents, and dough conditioning agents. Ingestion of foods containing sulfites can cause abdominal pain, diarrhoea, seizures and death. Sulfite can react with cellular components and can cause toxicity. Changes in mucosal disaccharidases and phosphatase alkaline after sodium metabisulfite administration were investigated in the small intestine of rats. Female Wistar rats were given a diet supplemented with 0.25 or 2.5% sodium metabisulfite for 5 weeks. Sucrase, maltase, lactase and alkaline phosphatase were assayed in intestinal homogenates and in brush border membrane fractions. The intake of only 2.5% sulfite induced an increase in the specific activities of sucrase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase compared to control levels (P < 0.05). Lactase levels were affected in a variable manner. The origin of such altered enzyme activities is still unknown. PMID:7958644

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  18. Enzymatic determination of sulfite in foods: NMKL interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Edberg, U

    1993-01-01

    An enzymatic method for the determination of sulfite in foods was collaboratively studied in Nordic industry and government laboratories. The sulfite in liquid foods or extracts of solid foods is analyzed according to the following principle: Sulfite ions are oxidized to sulfate ions by oxygen in the presence of sulfite oxidase, thereby forming hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is transformed to water by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in the presence of NADH peroxidase. In this reaction, NAD+ is formed (and NADH is consumed) in amounts proportional to the sulfite concentration. Consumption of NADH can be measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm. The method was collaboratively tested in 2 separate studies with high and low levels of sulfite tested. Results of both studies are reported here. The study samples consisted of potato flakes, wine, juice, and dried apples containing between 0 and about 960 mg SO2/kg. Eleven laboratories participated in the full study and analyzed 12 samples. Six laboratories analyzed 8 samples in the complementary study. Before statistical evaluation of the collaborative study data, results were adjusted for the time-dependent decrease of sulfite in the case of materials with high sulfite content (dried apples and wine). For 2 blind duplicate samples of wine containing 75 mg SO2/kg, the relative standard deviation for repeatability (RSDr, within-laboratory variation) was 3.9%. Relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR, between-laboratory variation) was 7.6%. For 2 samples of dried apples containing 800 and 960 mg SO2/kg, an RSDr value of 13.3% and an RSDR value of 13.9% were calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8448446

  19. Distribution, metabolism and toxicity of inhaled sulfur dioxide and endogenously generated sulfite in the respiratory tract of normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Sellakumar, A.; Currie, D.; Snyder, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report on the distribution, metabolism, and toxicity of sulfite in the respiratory tract and other tissues of rats exposed to endogenously generated sulfite or to inhaled sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). Graded sulfite oxidase deficiency was induced in several groups of rats by manipulating their tungsten to molybdenum intake ratio. Endogenously generated sulfite and S-sulfonate compounds (a class of sulfite metabolite) accumulated in the respiratory tract tissues and in the plasma of these rats in inverse proportion to hepatic sulfite oxidase activity. In contrast to this systemic mode of exposure, sulfite exposure of normal, sulfite oxidase-competent rats via inhaled SO/sub 2/ (10 and 30 ppm) was restricted to the airways. Minor pathological changes consisting of epithelial hyperplasia, mucoid degeneration, and desquamation of epithelium were observed only in the tracheas and bronchi of the rats inhaling SO/sub 2/, even though the concentration of sulfite plus S-sulfonates in the tracheas and bronchi of these rats was considerably lower than that in the endogenously exposed rats. We attribute this histological damage to hydrogen ions stemming from inhaled SO/sub 2/, not to the sulfite/bisulfite ions that are also a product of inhaled SO/sub 2/. In addition to the lungs and trachea, all other tissues examined, except the testes, appeared to be refractory to high concentrations of endogenously generated sulfite. The testes of grossly sulfite oxidase-deficient rats were severely atrophied and devoid of spermatogenic cells.

  20. Removal of sulfur oxides from gas streams with ammonium sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, A.W.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for removal of sulfur oxides from sulfur oxide containing flue gases comprising scrubbing the flue gases in the first stage scrubber with an ammonium sulfite solution to remove most of the sulfur oxides and producing a liquor comprising ammonium sulfite, bisulfite and sulfate salts; recycling the liquor in the first state scrubber and producing a 40% to 50% solution of dissolved ammonium sulfite, bisulfite and sulfate salts in a first stage reservoir while maintaining the pH between about 5 and 5.8; maintaining the ratio of bisulfite to sulfite between approximately 2.3 to 1 and 1 to 1 without liberating ammonia; removing portions of the 40% to 50% solution of dissolved salts from the first stage reservoir; scrubbing the flue gases in a second stage scrubber with an ammonium sulfite solution of pH between 6.2 and 6.8 to remove additional sulfur oxides and producing a dilute liquor of 1% to 10% solids comprising ammonium sulfite, bisulfite and sulfate salts in a second stage reservoir; and pumping the dilute liquor from the second stage reservoir to the first stage reservoir in amounts sufficient to replace the removed portions.

  1. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Comparison of three liquid chromatographic methods with FDA optimized Monier-Williams method for determination of total sulfite in foods.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F; Chadha, R K; Ménard, C

    1990-01-01

    Three liquid chromatographic (LC) methods employing amperometric detection were compared with the collaboratively studied FDA optimized Monier-Williams distillation method for the determination of total sulfite in 5 food types. The foods included lemon juice, white wine, instant mashed potatoes, golden raisins, and onion flakes. Two of the LC methods (one employing headspace sampling and the other direct injection) used ion-exchange chromatography with a basic mobile phase (pH about 10.8) and a glassy carbon electrode; the third (employing direct injection) used ion-exclusion chromatography with an acidic mobile phase (pH about 2) and a platinum electrode. All 4 methods produced similar results for the wine, lemon juice, and raisins. Results were different for instant mashed potatoes and onion flakes. The headspace-LC method and direct ion-exclusion LC method, both of which employed an alkaline sample extraction, yielded significantly higher values for sulfite in instant potatoes than did the other 2 methods. A large interfering peak with both direct LC methods prevented quantitation of sulfite in the onion flakes. All methods can detect sulfite as low as about 1 microgram/g in 4 of 5 food types examined. PMID:2312516

  3. (Bi)sulfite Oxidation by Copper,Zinc-Superoxide Dismutase: Sulfite-Derived, Radical-Initiated Protein Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sulfur dioxide, formed during the combustion of fossil fuels, is a major air pollutant near large cities. Its two ionized forms in aqueous solution, sulfite and (bi)sulfite, are widely used as preservatives and antioxidants to prevent food and beverage spoilage. (Bi)sulfite can be oxidized by peroxidases to form the very reactive sulfur trioxide anion radical (•SO3−). This free radical further reacts with oxygen to form the peroxymonosulfate anion radical (−O3SOO•) and sulfate anion radical (SO4• −). Objective To explore the critical role of these radical intermediates in further oxidizing biomolecules, we examined the ability of copper,zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) to initiate this radical chain reaction, using human serum albumin (HSA) as a model target. Methods We used electron paramagnetic resonance, optical spectroscopy, oxygen uptake, and immuno-spin trapping to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. Results We found that when Cu,Zn-SOD reacted with (bi)sulfite, •SO3− was produced, with the concomitant reduction of SOD-Cu(II) to SOD-Cu(I). Further, we demonstrated that sulfite oxidation mediated by Cu,Zn-SOD induced the formation of radical-derived 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin-trapped HSA radicals. Conclusions The present study suggests that protein oxidative damage resulting from (bi)sulfite oxidation promoted by Cu,Zn-SOD could be involved in oxidative damage and tissue injury in (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions. PMID:20348042

  4. Cloning and characterization of sulfite dehydrogenase, two c-type cytochromes, and a flavoprotein of Paracoccus denitrificans GB17: essential role of sulfite dehydrogenase in lithotrophic sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wodara, C; Bardischewsky, F; Friedrich, C G

    1997-08-01

    A 13-kb genomic region of Paracoccus dentrificans GB17 is involved in lithotrophic thiosulfate oxidation. Adjacent to the previously reported soxB gene (C. Wodara, S. Kostka, M. Egert, D. P. Kelly, and C. G. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 176:6188-6191, 1994), 3.7 kb were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed four additional open reading frames, soxCDEF. soxC coded for a 430-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 47,339 that included a putative signal peptide of 40 amino acids (Mr of 3,599) with a RR motif present in periplasmic proteins with complex redox centers. The mature soxC gene product exhibited high amino acid sequence similarity to the eukaryotic molybdoenzyme sulfite oxidase and to nitrate reductase. We constructed a mutant, GBsoxC delta, carrying an in-frame deletion in soxC which covered a region possibly coding for the molybdenum cofactor binding domain. GBsoxC delta was unable to grow lithoautotrophically with thiosulfate but grew well with nitrate as a nitrogen source or as an electron acceptor. Whole cells and cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta contained 10% of the thiosulfate-oxidizing activity of the wild type. Only a marginal rate of sulfite-dependent cytochrome c reduction was observed from cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta. These results demonstrated that sulfite dehydrogenase was essential for growth with thiosulfate of P. dentrificans GB17. soxD coded for a periplasmic diheme c-type cytochrome of 384 amino acids (Mr of 39,983) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 2,363. soxE coded for a periplasmic monoheme c-type cytochrome of 236 amino acids (Mr of 25,926) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 1,833. SoxD and SoxE were highly identical to c-type cytochromes of P. denitrificans and other organisms. soxF revealed an incomplete open reading frame coding for a peptide of 247 amino acids with a putative signal peptide (Mr of 2,629). The deduced amino acid sequence of soxF was 47% identical and 70% similar to the sequence

  5. Estimate of intake of sulfites in the Belgian adult population.

    PubMed

    Vandevijvere, S; Temme, E; Andjelkovic, M; De Wil, M; Vinkx, C; Goeyens, L; Van Loco, J

    2010-08-01

    An exposure assessment was performed to estimate the usual daily intake of sulfites in the Belgian adult population. Food consumption data were retrieved from the national food consumption survey. In a first step, individual food consumption data were multiplied with the maximum permitted use levels for sulfites, expressed as sulphur dioxide, per food group (Tier 2). In a second step, on the basis of a literature review of the occurrence of sulfites in different foods, the results of the Tier 2 exposure assessment and available occurrence data from the control programme of the competent authority, a refined list of foods was drafted for the quantification of sulphite. Quantification of sulphite was performed by a high-performance ion chromatography method with eluent conductivity detector in beers and potato products. Individual food consumption data were then multiplied with the actual average concentrations of sulfite per food group, or the maximum permitted levels in case actual levels were not available (partial Tier 3). Usual intakes were calculated using the Nusser method. The mean intake of sulfites was 0.34 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) (Tier 2), corresponding to 49% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) and 0.19 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1), corresponding to 27% of the ADI (partial Tier 3). The food group contributing most to the intake of sulfites was wines. The results showed that the intake of sulfites is likely to be below the ADI in Belgium. However, there are indications that high consumers of wine have an intake around the ADI. PMID:20503127

  6. Rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens: comparison of lactose sulfite broth with tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar.

    PubMed

    Neut, C; Pathak, J; Romond, C; Beerens, H

    1985-01-01

    The lactose sulfite (LS) medium recommended for the detection and identification of Clostridium perfringens in foods was compared with a reference method using tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) agar for the enumeration of this organism in a variety of foods and food ingredients. C. perfringens was detected and enumerated in 17 of the 54 samples examined with LS broth, but its presence could be confirmed in only 9 of the samples with TSC agar. In only 2 instances, C. perfringens was detected on TSC agar but not in LS broth. A positive response (FeS + and gas +) in LS broth incubated at 46 degrees C always corresponded to the presence of C. perfringens; whereas the black colonies formed on TSC agar incubated at 37 degrees C were frequently found to be Clostridium species other than C. perfringens. Thus, because of its highly selective nature, LS broth was superior to TSC agar for enumerating and confirming the small numbers of C. perfringens that were present in a majority of the samples. This was especially true when other clostridia were also present. Besides its greater selectivity and sensitivity, LS broth had the additional advantages of requiring less work and giving confirmed results within 24-48 h compared with 3 days for the TSC agar method. PMID:2865247

  7. Trace determination of aqueous sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol by fluorometric flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Yang, H.C.

    1986-11-01

    Preservation of sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol in buffered formaldehyde and oxaldihydroxamic acid stabilizers has been studied. Flow injection analysis procedures that involve T mixing or membrane-based reagent introduction have been developed for the fast (24 samples/h) analysis of these anions based upon the reaction with N-acridinylmaleimide in a water-N,N-dimethylformamide medium to form a fluorescent product. Detection limits are 0.04, 0.60, and 0.80 ..mu..M, respectively, for the three sulfur species; differential analysis is possible.

  8. False positive and false negative reactions encountered in the use of sulfite test strips for the detection of sulfite-treated foods.

    PubMed

    Nordlee, J A; Naidu, S G; Taylor, S L

    1988-03-01

    The reliability of a qualitative test for sulfites in foods (Sulfitest sulfite test strips) was evaluated by comparison of the results obtained from the analysis of 90 food and beverage samples to results obtained by the quantitative, modified Monier-Williams method (the preferred procedure for sulfite analysis in foods of the Food and Drug Administration). The results obtained with the sulfite test strips compared favorably to the results of the Monier-Williams procedure when the sulfite test strips were used on sulfite-treated lettuce and raw or cooked potatoes. However, the strips yielded many false negative and false positive results with other types of foods. False positive results (strips indicated a substantial amount of sulfite when sulfite was not detectable by the Monier-Williams method) were obtained with fin fish, red meats, and poultry. False negative results (strips indicated the absence of sulfites when sulfite was detected at levels greater than 10 ppm total sulfur dioxide by the Monier-Williams method) were obtained with dried fruits and wines under certain conditions of testing. The false negative responses with the test strips may result in the hazardous consumption of foods with high levels of sulfites, such as dried fruit or wine, by a sulfite-sensitive individual. The false positive responses would not be hazardous but could lead sensitive individuals to avoid foods that could be safely consumed. Although the strips may be useful for the detection of sulfites in certain foods, such as lettuce and potatoes, their use by sulfite-sensitive individuals cannot be recommended because of the confusion and potential hazards posed by the false negative and false positive responses. PMID:3346484

  9. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 2: An electrospray mass spectrometry investigation into the chemical composition of sulfited quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii and Schinopsis balansae) heartwood extract.

    PubMed

    Venter, Pieter B; Senekal, Nadine D; Amra-Jordaan, Maryam; Bonnet, Susan L; Van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2012-06-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PACs) are natural plant-derived polymers used in leather tanning, wood adhesives, water purification, and mud additives for oil drilling. Quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii and Schinopsis balansae) heartwood and mimosa (Acacia mearnsii) bark extracts are the major industrial sources of PACs. These commercial extracts are often sulfited via treatment with sodium hydrogen sulfite to reduce their viscosity and increase their solubility in water. An ESI-MS investigation into the molecular composition of sulfited (cold-water-soluble) quebracho heartwood extract indicates that sulfitation of the PACs occurs via S(N)2 attack of a sulfite ion at both C-2 and C-4 of the constituent flavan-3-ol monomer extender units. Attack at C-2 leads to the opening of the pyran ring. This releases an additional electron-donating phenolic hydroxy group on the A-ring and renders the extract more nucleophilic and suitable for the manufacturing of adhesives. Attack at C-4 leads to interflavanyl bond fission and decrease of the PAC oligomer chain length. The introduction of sulfonic acid moieties at C-2 or C-4 increases the polarity and water solubility of the hot water soluble (unsulfited) extract and transforms it into a cold-water-soluble extract. PMID:22513010

  10. Polyphenols content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to conventional red wines.

    PubMed

    Garaguso, Ivana; Nardini, Mirella

    2015-07-15

    Wine exerts beneficial effects on human health when it is drunk with moderation. Nevertheless, wine may also contain components negatively affecting human health. Among these, sulfites may induce adverse effects after ingestion. We examined total polyphenols and flavonoids content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of eight organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to those of eight conventional red wines. Polyphenols and flavonoids content were slightly higher in organic wines in respect to conventional wines, however differences did not reach statistical significance. The phenolic acids profile was quite similar in both groups of wines. Antioxidant activity was higher in organic wines compared to conventional wines, although differences were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition are comparable to conventional red wines with regard to the total polyphenols and flavonoids content, the phenolics profile and the antioxidant activity. PMID:25722174

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of autoxidation of calcium sulfite slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Pasluk-Bronlkowska, W.; Bronlkowski, T.; Ulejczyk, M. )

    1992-10-01

    The kinetics of Co-catalyzed autoxidation of calcium sulfite was studied to deepen knowledge of the mechanism of this chain reaction. Laboratory experiments were performed under heterogeneous conditions using two different reactors: a stirred tank with a plane gas-liquid (slurry) interface and an impinger. The reaction course was followed by monitoring the conductivity of the reacting solution and by quenching with iodine solution, respectively. Mechanistic judgments were derived from the influence of sulfite and catalyst concentrations, and the solid CaSO[sub 3] load on the kinetics of oxygen absorption. Appropriate reaction orders and rate constants were determined. Phenomena related to the solubility product law that imposed autoxidation rate limitations were analyzed. A soluble sulfate was shown to be a dual-action additive markedly accelerating the autoxidation due to increased sulfite and catalyst solubilities. The results are useful for designers of air pollution control processes. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Determination of total sulfite in wine. Zone electrophoresis-isotachophoresis quantitation of sulfate on a chip after an in-sample oxidation of total sulfite.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Danková, Mariana; Olvecká, Eva; Stachurová, Adela; Kaniansky, Dusan; Stanislawski, Bernd

    2005-08-19

    This work deals with the determination of total sulfite in wine. The determination combines an in-sample hydrogen peroxide oxidation of total sulfite in alkalized wine to sulfate with the separation and quantitation of the latter anion by zone electrophoresis (ZE) on-line coupled with isotachophoresis (ITP) on a column-coupling chip. Sample clean up, integrated into the ITP-ZE separation, eliminated wine matrix in an extent comparable to that provided by a highly selective distillation isolation of sulfite. At the same time, conductivity detection, employed to the detection of sulfate in the ZE stage of the ITP-ZE combination, provided for sulfate the concentration limit of detection corresponding to a 90 microg/l concentration of sulfite in the loaded sample (0.9 microl). Such a detectability allowed a reproducible quantitation of total sulfite when its concentration in wine was 15 mg/l. Formaldehyde binding of free sulfite in wine, included into the pre-column sample preparation, prevented an uncontrolled oxidation of this sulfite form. This step contributed to an unbiased determination of sulfate present in the original wine sample (this determination corrected for the concentration of sulfate determined in the sample after the peroxide oxidation of sulfite to the value equivalent to the total sulfite). The 99-101% recoveries of sulfite, determined for appropriately spiked wine samples, indicate a very good accuracy of the present method. Such a statement also supports excellent agreements of the results of quantitation based on the in-sample peroxide oxidation of the total sulfite (bound sulfite released at a high pH) with those in which this analyte was isolated from wine by distillation (bound sulfite released at a very low pH). PMID:16114242

  13. 40 CFR 430.50 - Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... papergrade sulfite subcategory. 430.50 Section 430.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.50 Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges resulting from the:...

  14. 40 CFR 430.50 - Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... papergrade sulfite subcategory. 430.50 Section 430.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.50 Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges resulting from the:...

  15. 40 CFR 415.200 - Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sodium sulfite production subcategory. 415.200 Section 415.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Sulfite Production Subcategory § 415.200 Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  16. 40 CFR 415.200 - Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sodium sulfite production subcategory. 415.200 Section 415.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Sulfite Production Subcategory § 415.200 Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  17. 40 CFR 415.200 - Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sodium sulfite production subcategory. 415.200 Section 415.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Sulfite Production Subcategory § 415.200 Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  18. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  19. 40 CFR 415.200 - Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sodium sulfite production subcategory. 415.200 Section 415.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Sulfite Production Subcategory § 415.200 Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  20. 40 CFR 415.200 - Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sodium sulfite production subcategory. 415.200 Section 415.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Sulfite Production Subcategory § 415.200 Applicability; description of the sodium sulfite production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  1. 40 CFR 430.50 - Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... papergrade sulfite subcategory. 430.50 Section 430.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.50 Applicability; description of the papergrade sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges resulting from the:...

  2. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  3. 40 CFR 430.40 - Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dissolving sulfite subcategory. 430.40 Section 430.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Dissolving Sulfite Subcategory § 430.40 Applicability; description of the dissolving sulfite subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  4. Photoreactions of cyclic sulfite esters: Evidence for diradical intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Arney, Benny E; Ihmels, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Summary The photochemistry of a phenyl and 1,2-diphenyl substituted sulfite ester is reported. The performance of photoreactions under relatively mild reaction conditions enables the detection of products that have not been observed in previous studies. It is concluded that, complementary to the initially proposed carbene intermediates, diradicals may also be considered. PMID:23019449

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBIDE LIME TO IDENTIFY SULFITE OXIDATION INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of carbide lime--a by-product of acetylene manufacture, primarily calcium hydroxide--used in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system at Louisville Gas and Electric (LGE). The study was undertaken to: identify sulfite ion oxidation inhibitors in...

  6. Copper(I) in fogwater: Determination and interactions with sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Hanbin Xue; Reutlinger, M.; Sigg, L.; Stumm, W. ); Lurdes S. Goncalves, M. de )

    1991-10-01

    The copper(I)/(II) redox system was examined in fogwater with respect to the occurrence of Cu(I), the role of sulfite as a reductant of Cu(II) and as a complexing ligand, and the speciation of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Copper(I) was measured in fogwater by the bathocuproine method, which was evaluated for the conditions typically encountered in atmospheric water droplets. Concentrations of Cu(I) in the range 0.1-1 {mu}M were found, which represented between 4 and > 90% of the total copper in these samples. In experiments using concentration ranges of copper and S(IV) close to that of fogwater, the reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) by sulfite was shown to be pH-dependent and to occur rapidly at pH > 6. Calculations of the equilibrium complexation of Cu(I) and Cu(II) under fogwater conditions show that complexes of Cu(I) with sulfite predominate, while for Cu(II) oxalato complexes are important. Sulfite plays an important role as a ligand for Cu(I) in fogwater; Cu(I) may be produced by various reduction reactions, e.g., by organic compounds, and appears to be oxidized only slowly in the presence of S(IV).

  7. Mechanism of the Ferrocyanide-Iodate-Sulfite Oscillatory Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor; Epstein, Irving R; Kustin, Kenneth

    2016-03-31

    Existing models of the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite (FIS) reaction seek to replicate the oscillatory pH behavior that occurs in open systems. These models exhibit significant differences in the amplitudes and waveforms of the concentration oscillations of such intermediates as I(-), I3(-), and Fe(CN)6(3-) under identical conditions and do not include several experimentally found intermediates. Here we report measurements of sulfite concentrations during an oscillatory cycle. Knowing the correct concentration of sulfite over the course of a period is important because sulfite is the main component that determines the buffer capacity, the pH extrema, and the amount of oxidizer (iodate) required for the transition to low pH. On the basis of this new result and recent experimental findings on the rate laws and intermediates of component processes taken from the literature, we propose a mass action kinetics model that attempts to faithfully represent the chemistry of the FIS reaction. This new comprehensive mechanism reproduces the pH oscillations and the periodic behavior in [Fe(CN)6(3-)], [I3(-)], [I(-)], and [SO3(2-)]T with characteristics similar to those seen in experiments in both CSTR and semibatch arrangements. The parameter ranges at which stationary and oscillatory behavior is exhibited also show good agreement with those of the experiments. PMID:26949219

  8. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  9. Preparation, Characterization, and Selectivity Study of Mixed-Valence Sulfites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Luciana A.; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2010-01-01

    A project involving the synthesis of an isomorphic double sulfite series and characterization by classical inorganic chemical analyses is described. The project is performed by upper-level undergraduate students in the laboratory. This compound series is suitable for examining several chemical concepts and analytical techniques in inorganic…

  10. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51, and the refinements of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  11. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51, and the refinements of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  12. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51, and the refinements of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  13. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51, and the refinements of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  14. Domain Evolution and Functional Diversification of Sulfite Reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  15. Sulfite triggers sustained calcium overload in cultured cortical neurons via a redox-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Hui; Guan, Xin-Lei; Long, Li-Hong; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wu, Peng-Fei

    2016-09-01

    Sulfite is a compound commonly used as preservative in foods and pharmaceuticals. Many studies have examined the neurotoxicity of sulfite, but its effect on neuronal calcium homeostasis has not yet been reported. Here, we observed the effect of sulfite on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured cortical neurons using Fura-2/AM based calcium imaging technique. Sulfite (250-1000μM) caused a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)]i in the neurons via a dose-dependent manner. In Ca(2+)-free solution, sulfite failed to increase [Ca(2+)]i. After the depletion of the intracellular calcium store, the effect of sulfite on the [Ca(2+)]i was largely abolished. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC)-inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) signaling pathway blocked sulfite-induced increase of [Ca(2+)]i. Interestingly, antioxidants such as trolox and dithiothreitol, abolished the increase of [Ca(2+)]i induced by sulfite. Exposure to sulfite triggered generation of sulfur- and oxygen-centered free radicals in neurons and increased oxidative stress both in the cultured cortical neurons and the prefrontal cortex of rats. Furthemore, sulfite decreased cell viability in cultured cortical neurons via a calcium-dependent manner. Thus, our current study suggests that the redox-dependent calcium overload triggered by sulfite in cortical neuronsmay be involved in its neurotoxicity. PMID:27313092

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome Shuffling through Recursive Population Mating Leads to Improved Tolerance to Spent Sulfite Liquor▿†

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Dominic; D'Aoust, Frédéric; del Cardayre, Stephen B.; Bajwa, Paramjit K.; Lee, Hung; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Spent sulfite liquor (SSL) is a waste effluent from sulfite pulping that contains monomeric sugars which can be fermented to ethanol. However, fermentative yeasts used for the fermentation of the sugars in SSL are adversely affected by the inhibitory substances in this complex feedstock. To overcome this limitation, evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was carried out using genome-shuffling technology based on large-scale population cross mating. Populations of UV-light-induced yeast mutants more tolerant than the wild type to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HWSSL) were first isolated and then recursively mated and enriched for more-tolerant populations. After five rounds of genome shuffling, three strains were isolated that were able to grow on undiluted HWSSL and to support efficient ethanol production from the sugars therein for prolonged fermentation of HWSSL. Analyses showed that greater HWSSL tolerance is associated with improved viability in the presence of salt, sorbitol, peroxide, and acetic acid. Our results showed that evolutionary engineering through genome shuffling will yield robust yeasts capable of fermenting the sugars present in HWSSL, which is a complex substrate containing multiple sources of inhibitors. These strains may not be obtainable through classical evolutionary engineering and can serve as a model for further understanding of the mechanism behind simultaneous tolerance to multiple inhibitors. PMID:21622800

  17. Use of Phase Transition Curves for Testing Models of the pH-Oscillatory Hydrogen Peroxide-Thiosulfate-Sulfite Reaction.

    PubMed

    Veber, Tomáš; Schreiberová, Lenka; Schreiber, Igor

    2016-03-24

    The reaction system hydrogen peroxide-thiosulfate-sulfite in diluted sulfuric acid (HPTS) displays strongly nonlinear dynamics when operated in a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor. Due to a crucial role of hydrogen ion during the reaction, this system is a prime example of an inorganic pH-oscillator. Under specific external conditions the system exhibits multiple steady states, periodic oscillations and chaotic behavior. We focus on evaluating alternative kinetic models by exploring phase resetting of the periodic oscillatory regime caused by a single-pulse perturbation with various reacting species. Phase transition curve (PTC), the plot of phase after the resetting against the phase of perturbation, is a convenient characteristic of the oscillatory dynamics adopted as a major tool in this work. Experimental results for hydrogen ions, hydroxide ions, thiosulfate ions, sulfite ions, and hydrogen sulfite ions used as perturbants are systematically compared with calculations under corresponding conditions using two available reaction mechanisms. In addition, we use the stoichiometric network analysis to identify possible core oscillatory subnetworks in the models and choose the one that corresponds best to the measured PTCs. PMID:26900770

  18. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    PubMed Central

    Vally, H; Thompson, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites.
METHODS—In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine.
RESULTS—Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV1 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV1, peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory

  19. Novel photo-sulfite system: toward simultaneous transformations of inorganic and organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yaoguang; Lou, Xiaoyi; Fang, Changling; Xiao, Dongxue; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2013-10-01

    An efficient and green advanced oxidation process (i.e., photo-sulfite reaction) for the simultaneous oxidation of sulfite and organic pollutants in water is reported. The photo-sulfite system (UV-Fe(III)-sulfite) is based on the Fe-catalyzed sulfite oxidation and photochemistry of Fe(III) species. SO4(•-) and (•)OH radicals were identified in the photo-sulfite system with radical scavenging experiments using specific alcohols. This novel technology was consistently proven to be more favorable than the alternative Fe(III)-sulfite systems for the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) and other organic pollutants at all conditions tested. The reactivity of photo-sulfite system was sustained due to the spontaneous switch of photoactive species from Fe(III)-sulfito to Fe(III)-hydroxo complexes with the depletion of sulfite and the decrease in pH. In contrast, in the absence of light the performance of the Fe(III)-sulfite system was greatly diminished after the consumption of sulfite. The formation of the Fe(III)-sulfito complex is a necessary step for initiating the photo-sulfite reaction. Inhibition of the oxidation of 2,4,6-TCP and methyl orange (MO) was observed in the presence of ligands that can stabilize one or more of the reactants: Fe(III), Fe(II), or sulfite. Our study provides a new facile route for the generation of SO4(•-) and simultaneous removal of organic and inorganic pollutants. PMID:24015851

  20. Methods for the recovery of sulfur components from flue gas and recycle sodium sulfite by reduction-smelting and carbonating to strip hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farin, W.G.

    1980-12-23

    An improved method for recovering sulfur from flue gas which contains sulfur dioxide formed from burning sulfur containing fuels is disclosed. The method first involves the reduction burning of auxilary fuel in the presence of sodium sulfite to convert it to smelt containing sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate. The smelt is dissolved, and the solution reacted with carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and water vapor forming sodium hydrosulfide. The sodium hydrosulfide is reacted with a high concentration of recycled sodium bicarbonate and stripped with carbon dioxide to form sodium carbonate and release the sulfides as hydrogen sulfide from the stripper. The hydrogen sulfide released is then converted to sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur. Pressurized carbon dioxide is used for pressure carbonation of recycled solution from the stripper to convert the sodium carbonate to the high concentration of recycled sodium bicarbonate used for stripping. The sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate from the stripper are reacted under pressure with sodium bisulfite in a decarbonator to form sodium sulfite and release carbon dioxide under pressure for use in the pressure carbonation. A portion of the sodium sulfite formed by decarbonation is then reduced in the smelter. The balance of the sodium sulfite is then used for absorption of the sulfur dioxide from the flue gas forming the sodium bisulfite used for decarbonation.

  1. A simple levulinate-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for sulfite with a large emission shift.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Huifang; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    A simple 4-hydroxynaphthalimide-derived colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe (1) containing a receptor of levulinate moiety was designed and synthesized to monitor sulfite. Probe 1 could quantificationally detect sulfite by a ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy method with high selectivity and sensitivity. Specially, probe 1 exhibited a 100 nm red-shifted absorption spectrum along with the color changes from colorless to yellow, and 103 nm red-shifted emission spectra upon the addition of sulfite. Thus, 1 can serve as a "naked-eye" probe for sulfite. Further, the recognition mechanism of probe 1 for sulfite was confirmed using nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Also, the preliminary practical application demonstrated that our proposed probe provided a promising method for the determination of sulfite. PMID:24813958

  2. Different mechanisms of resistance modulate sulfite tolerance in wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Nadai, Chiara; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    From a technological point of view, yeast resistance to sulfite is of great interest and represents an important technological character for winemaking. Several mechanisms are involved, and strain-dependent strategies to obtain SO2 resistance can deeply influence wine quality, although this choice is less relevant in determining the technological performance of the strain during fermentation. In this study, to better understand the strain-specific mechanisms of resistance, 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, whose genomes have been previously sequenced, were selected. Their attitude towards sulfites, in terms of resistance and production, was evaluated, and RNA-sequencing of four selected strains was performed during fermentation process in synthetic grape must in the presence of SO2. Results demonstrated that at molecular level, the physical effect of SO2 triggered multiple stress responses in the cell and high tolerance to general enological stressing condition increased SO2 resistance. Adaptation mechanism due to high basal gene expression level rather than specific gene induction in the presence of sulfite seemed to be responsible in modulating strain resistance. This mechanism involved higher basal gene expression level of specific cell wall proteins, enzymes for lipid biosynthesis, and enzymes directly involved in SO2 assimilation pathway and efflux. PMID:26615396

  3. Fermentation to ethanol of pentose-containing spent sulfite liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of spent sulfite liquor with ordinary bakers' yeast is incomplete because of this yeast cannot ferment the pentose sugars in the liquor. This results in poor alcohol yields, and a residual effluent problem. By using the yeast Candida shehatae (R) for fermentation of the spent sulfite liquor from a large Canadian alcohol-producing sulfite pulp and paper mill, pentoses as well as hexoses were fermented nearly completely, alcohol yields were raised by 33%, and sugar removal increased by 46%. Inhibitors were removed prior to fermentation by steam stripping. Major benefits were obtained by careful recycling of this yeast, which was shown to be tolerant both of high sugar concentrations and high alcohol concentrations. When sugar concentrations over 250 g/L (glucose:xylose 70:30) were fermented, ethanol became an inhibitor when its concentration reached over 90 g/L. However, when the ethanol was removed by low-temperature vacuum distillation, fermentation continued and resulted in a yield of 0.50 g ethanol/g sugar consumed. Further improvement was achieved by combining enzyme saccharification of sugar oligomers with fermentation. This yeast is able to ferment both hexoses and pentoses simultaneously, efficiently, and rapidly.

  4. Fluorometric determination of sulfite in wine by N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, K; Matsuda, H; Ohrui, H; Meguro, H; Suzuki, T

    1990-01-01

    A highly sensitive fluorometric method for determining sulfite in wine is reported. N-(9-Aciridinyl)maleimide (NAM) reacted with the sulfite in wine quantitatively and gave strong fluorescent derivatives. The determinations were conducted by batch and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. Sulfite contents in wine by NAM methods and the conventional methods showed good accordance. The sample size could be reduced to less than 1/10,000 by the NAM methods. PMID:19130675

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a putative sulfite oxidase (SO) ortholog from Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Su, Xinhong; Wu, Jianyu; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Hua

    2012-03-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate and thus has important roles in diverse metabolic processes. However, systematic molecular and functional investigations on the putative SO from tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) have hitherto not been reported. In this work, a full-length cDNA encoding putative sulfite oxidase from N. benthamiana (NbSO) was isolated. The deduced NbSO protein shares high homology and typical structural features with other species SOs. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that NbSO cDNA clone encodes a tobacco SO isoform. Southern blot analysis suggests that NbSO is a single-copy gene in the N. benthamiana genome. The NbSO transcript levels were higher in aerial tissues and were up-regulated in N. benthamiana during sulfite stress. Reducing the SO expression levels through virus-induced gene silencing caused a substantial accumulation in sulfite content and less sulfate accumulation in N. benthamiana leaves when exposed to sulfite stress, and thus resulted in decreased tolerance to sulfite stress. Taken together, this study improves our understanding on the molecular and functional properties of plant SO and provides genetic evidence on the involvement of SO in sulfite detoxification in a sulfite-oxidizing manner in N. benthamiana plants. PMID:21667106

  6. Influence of soil pH and application rate on the oxidation of calcium sulfite derived from flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.B.; Bigham, J.M.; Dick, W.A.; Jones, E.S.; Ramsier, C.

    2007-01-15

    Calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O), a common byproduct of coal-fired utilities, is fairly insoluble and can decompose to release toxic SO{sub 2} under highly acidic soil conditions; however, it can also oxidize to form gypsum. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of application rate and soil pH on the oxidation of calcium sulfite under laboratory conditions. Oxidation rates measured by release of SO{sub 4}-S to solution decreased with increasing application rate. Leachate SO{sub 4}-S from soils amended with 1.0 to 3.0 g kg{sup -1} CaSO{sub 3} increased over a 21 to 28 d period before reaching a plateau. At 4 g kg{sup -1}, maximum SO{sub 4}-S release was delayed until Week 7. Oxidation and release of SO{sub 4}-S from soil amended with 3.0 g kg{sup -1} calcium sulfite increased markedly with decreasing soil pH. After only 3 d incubation, the concentrations of SO{sub 4}-S in aqueous leachates were 77, 122, 1709 220, and 229 mg L{sup -1} for initial soil pH values of 7.8, 6.5, 5.5, 5.1, and 4.0, respectively. At an initial soil pH value of 4.0, oxidation/dissolution did not increase much after 3 d. At higher pH values, oxidation was maximized after 21 d. These results suggest that autumn surface applications of calcium sulfite in no-till systems should permit ample time for oxidation/dissolution reactions to occur without introducing biocidal effects related to oxygen scavenging. Soil and annual crops can thus benefit from additions of soluble Ca and SO{sub 4} if calcium sulfite is applied in advance of spring planting.

  7. New insights into an ancient antibrowning agent: formation of sulfophenolics in sodium hydrogen sulfite-treated potato extracts.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; Kuijpers, Tomas F M; Vincken, Jean-Paul; de Waard, Pieter; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-09-28

    The effect of sodium hydrogen sulfite (S), used as antibrowning agent, on the phenolic profile of potato extracts was investigated. This extract was compared to one obtained in the presence of ascorbic acid (A). In the presence of A, two major compounds were obtained, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoyl quinic acid. With S, their 2'-sulfo-adducts were found instead, the structures of which were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Also, for minor caffeoyl derivatives and quercetin glycosides, the corresponding sulfo-adducts were observed. Feruloyl and sinapoyl derivatives were not chemically affected by the presence of S. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was thought to be responsible for the formation of the sulfo-adducts. This was confirmed by preparing 2'-sulfo-5-O-caffeoyl quinic acid in a model system using 5-CQA, sodium hydrogen sulfite, and PPO. This sulfo-adduct exhibited a small bathochromic shift (λmax 329 nm) as compared to 5-CQA (λmax 325 nm) and a strong hypochromic shift with an extinction coefficient of 9357±395 M(-1) cm(-1) as compared to 18494±196 M(-1) cm(-1), respectively. The results suggest that whenever S is used as an antibrowning agent, the O-quinone formed with PPO reacts with S to produce sulfo-O-diphenol, which does not participate in browning reactions. PMID:21854040

  8. Effect of heat treatment on the performance of tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, M H; Ciebin, B W

    1979-05-01

    Dissolving dehydrated tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar by only boiling or microwaving was found to inhibit Clostridium perfringens colony development in pour plates when compared with C. perfringens recovery in tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar prepared by autoclaving. PMID:225988

  9. Spectrophotometric Determination of Total Sulfite in White Wine Samples Using Crude Extracts from Flowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora Barbosa Soares, Márlon Herbert; Ramos, Luiz Antonio; Tadeu Gomes Cavalheiro, Éder

    2002-09-01

    A didactic spectrophotometric method for determining the sulfite content in white wine samples is proposed. It is based upon a discoloring reaction between flower anthocyanins and the sulfite in basic media. Students' results obtained from iodometric data agreed well with results obtained by the proposed procedure. The use of natural dyes attracted students' interest, enhancing the learning process.

  10. Colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent detection of sulfite in water via cationic surfactant-promoted addition of sulfite to α,β-unsaturated ketone.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haiyu; Qian, Junhong; Sun, Qian; Bai, Hongyan; Zhang, Weibing

    2013-07-25

    Three fluorescent probes were constructed by incorporating an α,β-unsaturated ketone to a coumarin fluorophore. The selective addition of sulfite to the alkene of TSP assisted by cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) micelle can be visualized by dramatic color and ratiometric fluorescence changes. In CTAB-PBS system, the fluorescence intensity ratio at 465 nm and 592 nm (I465/I592) and the absorbance ratio at 390 nm and 470 nm (A390/A470) were linearly proportional to sulfite concentration in the range of 0.5-150 μM, and the detection limit was 0.2 μM. Good selectivity and competition of TSP1 towards sulfite over several anions and biological thiols were acquired. Probe TSP1 was used to detect sulfite in three realistic samples (mineral water, sugar and white wine) with good recovery. PMID:23845496

  11. Interaction of silicic acid with sulfurous acid scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The solubility of amorphous silica and the inhibition of silica polymerization in the presence of sulfurous acid and sulfite salts has been investigated to 260{degrees}C. Investigations of inhibition of silica scaling from geothermal brines by sulfurous acid have produced unusual results. Bisulfite/sulfite increases amorphous silica solubility by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} effects resulting from apparent complexation. Silica-sulfite complexes are postulated to form via hydrogen bonding, and appear to be much stronger than silica-sulfate complexes. Treatment of brines with sulfurous acid inhibits silica scaling by (1) retarding the kinetics of silicic acid polymerization, and (2) forming soluble sulfito-silicate complexes. Sulfurous acid offers several advantages over sulfuric acid in controlling scale deposition-reduced corrosion potential, reduced by-product scale formation potential, oxygen scavenging and inhibition of certain metal silicate scales.

  12. A real-time colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe for sulfite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Yu; He, Ting; Li, Kun; Wu, Ming-Bo; Huang, Zheng; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2013-05-21

    A real-time colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe based on modulating the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) of the coumarin platform for selective detection of sulfite is presented. This reaction based probe utilized the Michael addition to the dicyano-vinyl group with the detection limit of 5.8 × 10(-5) M. The probe displayed a high selectivity for sulfite over other anions and reactive sulfur especially for biothiols including cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH), with about 100 nm blue shift and more than 230 times intensity ratios change of the emission spectrum. Meanwhile, it could be easily observed that the probe for sulfite changes from red to pale yellow by the naked eye, and from red to blue under UV lamp immediately after the sulfite is added. To the best of our knowledge, it is the fastest response probe for sulfite ever reported, which could give a colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent response instantly. PMID:23563108

  13. A new diketopyrrolopyrrole-based probe for sensitive and selective detection of sulfite in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Cui, Yu; Li, Yexin; Zheng, Luyi; Xie, Lijun; Ning, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Lu, Junling; Zhang, Gege; Liu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Guangyou

    2015-02-01

    A new probe was synthesized by incorporating an α,β -unsaturated ketone to a diketopyrrolopyrrole fluorophore. The probe had exhibited a selective and sensitive response to the sulfite against other thirteen anions and biothiols (Cys, Hcy and GSH), through the nucleophilic addition of sulfite to the alkene of probe with the detection limit of 0.1 μM in HEPES (10 mM, pH 7.4) THF/H2O (1:1, v/v). Meanwhile, it could be easily observed that the probe for sulfite changed from pink to colorless by the naked eye, and from pink to blue under UV lamp after the sulfite was added for 20 min. The NMR and Mass spectral analysis demonstrated the expected addition of sulfite to the Cdbnd C bonds.

  14. Reevaluation of Monier-Williams method for determining sulfite in food.

    PubMed

    Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Joe, F L; Fazio, T

    1986-01-01

    The Monier-Williams distillation procedure has a long history of successful use for determining sulfite in fruit products and wine; however, a systematic evaluation of its accuracy and precision with other food matrices has not been undertaken. We found that the Monier-Williams distillation yielded greater than 90% recovery of sulfite added to foods such as table grapes, hominy, dried mangoes, and lemon juice. Less than 85% recovery was obtained with broccoli, soda crackers, cheese-peanut butter crackers, mushrooms, and potato chips. These results may, in fact, accurately reflect the residual levels of sulfite if a portion of the sulfite undergoes irreversible reaction with some food components. Analysis of commercial food products gave sulfite levels ranging from 1400 ppm in dried apple slices to 25 ppm in cream sherry. PMID:3949694

  15. Oxidative Half-reaction of Arabidopsis thaliana Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert S.; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R.; Hille, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate forms of the molybdenum-containing enzyme sulfite oxidase possess a b-type cytochrome prosthetic group that accepts reducing equivalents from the molybdenum center and passes them on to cytochrome c. The plant form of the enzyme, on the other hand, lacks a prosthetic group other than its molybdenum center and utilizes molecular oxygen as the physiological oxidant. Hydrogen peroxide is the ultimate product of the reaction. Here, we present data demonstrating that superoxide is produced essentially quantitatively both in the course of the reaction of reduced enzyme with O2 and during steady-state turnover and only subsequently decays (presumably noncatalytically) to form hydrogen peroxide. Rapid-reaction kinetic studies directly following the reoxidation of reduced enzyme demonstrate a linear dependence of the rate constant for the reaction on [O2] with a second-order rate constant of kox = 8.7 × 104 ± 0.5 × 104 m−1s−1. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of cytochrome c to follow superoxide generation, biphasic time courses are observed, indicating that a first equivalent of superoxide is generated in the oxidation of the fully reduced Mo(IV) state of the enzyme to Mo(V), followed by a slower oxidation of the Mo(V) state to Mo(VI). The physiological implications of plant sulfite oxidase as a copious generator of superoxide are discussed. PMID:19875441

  16. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  17. Removal of sulfide, sulfate and sulfite ions by electro coagulation.

    PubMed

    Murugananthan, M; Raju, G Bhaskar; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-18

    The removal of various species of sulfur from beamhouse of tannery wastewater and also from synthetic samples was studied by electro-flotation technique. Consumable anodes of iron and aluminum and insoluble anode of titanium were tested as anodes. It was found that iron and aluminum anodes were effective for the removal of suspended solids, sulfide, sulfite and sulfate. Progress of simultaneous coagulation of suspended solids during electro-flotation was measured using particle size analysis. Coagulation was found to be essential for effective flotation of suspended solids. Metal ions generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of anode were found to react with dissolved sulfide ions. Metal sulfides thus formed as colloidal suspension were coagulated and floated simultaneously by hydrogen bubbles generated from cathode. Simultaneous occurrence of precipitation, coagulation and flotation was observed during electro-flotation. X-ray diffraction studies were conducted to identify the nature of sulfide phase formed during electrolytic precipitation. The effect of pH, current density and initial concentration of pollutants was studied and the results are discussed. The removal of sulfite and sulfate ions is explained by zeta-potential measurements. PMID:15177743

  18. Determination of sulfite in foods by headspace liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F; Chadha, R K

    1988-01-01

    Sulfite was determined in a variety of foods by liquid chromatography (LC) after the samples were mixed with a solution containing mannitol, FeSO4, and Na2HPO4, adjusted to pH 11, and left to stand for 15 min at room temperature. An aliquot of the mixture was placed in a headspace vial and mixed with 50% H3PO4. After 15 min, a portion of the headspace was removed with a syringe containing LC mobile phase without acetonitrile. The syringe was shaken and an aliquot of the solution was analyzed on an anion exchange column with a mobile phase of 0.03M methane sulfonate (pH 10.8) containing 5% acetonitrile. Sulfite was detected amperometrically (glassy carbon electrode) at +0.7 V. The method was successfully compared to the FDA-modified Monier-Williams procedure for a variety of foods. Minimum detectable levels were about 1 microgram/g, based on a 15 g sample. PMID:3235411

  19. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Hanson, Graeme R; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. PMID:26687009

  20. Characterization of a New Type of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase Present in Thermodesulfobacterium commune

    PubMed Central

    Hatchikian, E. C.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A new type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase, desulfofuscidin, was isolated from the nonsporeforming thermophilic sulfate-reducing microorganism Thermodesulfobacterium commune. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated at 167,000 by sedimentation equilibrium, and the protein was pure by both disc electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The bisulfite reductase was a tetramer and had two types of subunits with an α2β2 structure and an individual molecular weight of 47,000. The enzyme exhibited absorption maxima at 576, 389, and 279 nm, with a weak band at 693 nm. Upon the addition of dithionite, the absorption maxima at 576 and 693 nm were weakened, and a new band appeared at 605 nm. The protein reacted with CO in the presence of dithionite to give a complex with absorption peaks at 593, 548, and 395 nm. The extinction coefficients of the purified enzyme at 576, 389, and 279 nm were 89,000, 310,000, and 663,000 M−1 cm−1, respectively. Siroheme was detected as the prosthetic group. The protein contains 20 to 21 nonheme iron atoms and 16 to 17 acid-labile sulfur groups per molecule. The data suggest the presence of four sirohemes and probably four (4Fe-4S) centers per molecule by comparison with desulfoviridin, the dissimilatory sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio species. The protein contains 36 cysteine residues and is high in acidic and aromatic amino acids. The N-terminal amino acids of the α and β subunits were threonine and serine, respectively. With reduced methyl viologen as electron donor, the major product of sulfite reduction was trithionate, and the pH optimum for activity was 6.0. The enzyme was stable to 70°C and denatured rapidly above this temperature. The dependence of T. commune bisulfite reductase activity on temperature was linear between 35 and 65°C, and the Q10 values observed were above 3. The presence of this new type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase in T. commune is discussed in terms of taxonomic significance. PMID

  1. Dissolution rate of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, P.C.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1986-02-01

    The rate of calcium sulfite dissolution in slurry scrubbers and hold tanks for flue gas desulfurization affects SO/sub 2/ absorption, limestone utilization and sulfite oxidation. The dissolution rates of calcium sulfite were measured by the pH-state method. A mass transfer model was developed assuming that calcium sulfite particles behave as spheres in an infinite stagnant solution. The model combined with the Bechtel-modified Radian solution equilibrium program successfully predicts calcium sulfite dissolution rates at pH 3.5 - 5.5, 23 and 55 /sup 0/C, 0.001 - 0.3 M Ca/sup + +/ and 2 - 25 mM dissolved sulfite. The effects of sulfate content in solids and liquids and particle size/shape were also studied. At conditions typical of flue gas desulfurization processes calcium sulfite dissolution was controlled by mass transfer, not surface reaction kinetics. Dissolution was fast at low pH and slowed near the equilibrium pH determined by dissolved Ca/sup + +/ and SO/sub 3/ concentrations in the aqueous solutions, K/sub SP/ of the CaSO/sub 3/ . 1/2H/sub 2/O solids, and temperature. The presence of dissolved Mg/sup + +/ increased the equilibrium pH and enhanced the disolution rate. The presence of dissolved sulfate reduced the dissolution rate and the equilibrium pH. The effect of sulfate was not adequately described by the mass transfer model.

  2. Two divergent MET10 genes, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, encode the alpha subunit of sulfite reductase and specify potential binding sites for FAD and NADPH.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J; Cherest, H; Kielland-Brandt, M C

    1994-01-01

    The yeast assimilatory sulfate reductase is a complex enzyme that is responsible for conversion of sulfite into sulfide. To obtain information on the nature of this enzyme, we isolated and sequenced the MET10 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a divergent MET10 allele from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. The polypeptides deduced from the identically sized open reading frames (1,035 amino acids) of both MET10 genes have molecular masses of around 115 kDa and are 88% identical to each other. The transcript of S. cerevisiae MET10 has a size comparable to that of the open reading frame and is transcriptionally repressed by methionine in a way similar to that seen for other MET genes of S. cerevisiae. Distinct homology was found between the putative MET10-encoded polypeptide and flavin-interacting parts of the sulfite reductase flavoprotein subunit (encoded by cysJ) from Escherichia coli and several other flavoproteins. A significant N-terminal homology to pyruvate flavodoxin oxidoreductase (encoded by nifJ) from Klebsiella pneumoniae, together with a lack of obvious flavin mononucleotide-binding motifs in the MET10 deduced amino acid sequence, suggests that the yeast assimilatory sulfite reductase is a distinct type of sulfite reductase. Images PMID:7928966

  3. Isolation and characterization of sulfite oxidase from Alligator mississipiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, A.; Neame, P.J.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Sulfite oxidase has been isolated from fresh alligator liver using ammonium sulfate and acetone fractionation, DEAE chromatography and FPLC on Mono Q. The enzyme is dimeric and exhibits a subunit M. Wt. of approximately 58 kDa, larger than that of chicken SO. EPR spectroscopy of the partially-reduced enzyme revealed a single Mo(V) species while visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b{sub 557}. Maximal activities were obtained at pH 8 and 9, respectively. K{sub m}'s for SO{sub 3}{sup 2 {minus}}, cyt. c and Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3 {minus}} were 23.5 uM, 2.9 uM and 8.0 uM, respectively. Sequencing of peptides obtained by endoprotease K digestion indicated regions of extensive sequence similarity to chicken and rat enzymes in both heme and Mo-pterin domains. Regions of sequence dissimilarity were also found.

  4. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... are added to certain drug products to inhibit the oxidation of the active drug ingredient. Oxidation.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite,...

  5. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... are added to certain drug products to inhibit the oxidation of the active drug ingredient. Oxidation.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite,...

  6. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... are added to certain drug products to inhibit the oxidation of the active drug ingredient. Oxidation.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite,...

  7. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... are added to certain drug products to inhibit the oxidation of the active drug ingredient. Oxidation.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite,...

  8. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... are added to certain drug products to inhibit the oxidation of the active drug ingredient. Oxidation.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite,...

  9. Impairment in Sulfite Reductase Leads to Early Leaf Senescence in Tomato Plants1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Kurmanbayeva, Assylay; Bekturova, Aizat; Ventura, Yvonne; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Eppel, Amir; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Sulfite reductase (SiR) is an essential enzyme of the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, which catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Here, we show that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants with impaired SiR expression due to RNA interference (SIR Ri) developed early leaf senescence. The visual chlorophyll degradation in leaves of SIR Ri mutants was accompanied by a reduction of maximal quantum yield, as well as accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation. Interestingly, messenger RNA transcripts and proteins involved in chlorophyll breakdown in the chloroplasts were found to be enhanced in the mutants, while transcripts and their plastidic proteins, functioning in photosystem II, were reduced in these mutants compared with wild-type leaves. As a consequence of SiR impairment, the levels of sulfite, sulfate, and thiosulfate were higher and glutathione levels were lower compared with the wild type. Unexpectedly, in a futile attempt to compensate for the low glutathione, the activity of adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase was enhanced, leading to further sulfite accumulation in SIR Ri plants. Increased sulfite oxidation to sulfate and incorporation of sulfite into sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerols were not sufficient to maintain low basal sulfite levels, resulting in accumulative leaf damage in mutant leaves. Our results indicate that, in addition to its biosynthetic role, SiR plays an important role in prevention of premature senescence. The higher sulfite is likely the main reason for the initiation of chlorophyll degradation, while the lower glutathione as well as the higher hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde additionally contribute to premature senescence in mutant leaves. PMID:24987017

  10. The Structures of the C185S and C185A Mutants of Sulfite Oxidase Reveal Rearrangement of the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Pushie, M. Jake; Kisker, Caroline; George, Graham N.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2010-11-03

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the physiologically critical conversion of sulfite to sulfate. Enzymatic activity is dependent on the presence of the metal molybdenum complexed with a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor termed molybdopterin. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of SOs from a variety of sources has identified a single conserved Cys residue essential for catalytic activity. The crystal structure of chicken liver sulfite oxidase indicated that this residue, Cys185 in chicken SO, coordinates the Mo atom in the active site. To improve our understanding of the role of this residue in the catalytic mechanism of sulfite oxidase, serine and alanine variants at position 185 of recombinant chicken SO were generated. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies indicate that neither variant is capable of sulfite oxidation. The crystal structure of the C185S variant was determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of sulfite, and the C185A variant to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structures of the C185S and C185A variants revealed that neither the Ser or Ala side chains appeared to closely interact with the Mo atom and that a third oxo group replaced the usual cysteine sulfur ligand at the Mo center, confirming earlier extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) work on the human C207S mutant. An unexpected result was that in the C185S variant, in the absence of sulfite, the active site residue Tyr322 became disordered as did the loop region flanking it. In the C185S variant crystallized in the presence of sulfite, the Tyr322 residue relocalized to the active site. The C185A variant structure also indicated the presence of a third oxygen ligand; however, Tyr322 remained in the active site. EXAFS studies of the Mo coordination environment indicate the Mo atom is in the oxidized Mo{sup VI} state in both the C185S and C185A variants of chicken SO and show the expected trioxodithiolene active site. Density

  11. Sulfite oxidase controls sulfur metabolism under SO2 exposure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Randewig, Dörte; Hamisch, Domenica; Herschbach, Cornelia; Eiblmeier, Monika; Gehl, Christian; Jurgeleit, Jens; Skerra, Jessica; Mendel, Ralf R; Rennenberg, Heinz; Hänsch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the significance of sulfite oxidase (SO) for sulfite detoxification and sulfur assimilation was investigated. In response to sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) exposure, a remarkable expansion of sulfate and a significant increase of GSH pool were observed in wild-type and SO-overexpressing Arabidopsis. These metabolic changes were connected with a negative feedback inhibition of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), but no alterations in gas exchange parameters or visible symptoms of injury. However, Arabidopsis SO-KO mutants were consistently negatively affected upon 600 nL L(-1) SO(2) exposure for 60 h and showed phenotypical symptoms of injury with small necrotic spots on the leaves. The mean g(H2O) was reduced by about 60% over the fumigation period, accompanied by a reduction of net CO(2) assimilation and SO(2) uptake of about 50 and 35%. Moreover, sulfur metabolism was completely distorted. Whereas sulfate pool was kept constant, thiol-levels strongly increased. This demonstrates that SO should be the only protagonist for back-oxidizing and detoxification of sulfite. Based on these results, it is suggested that co-regulation of SO and APR controls sulfate assimilation pathway and stabilizes sulfite distribution into organic sulfur compounds. In conclusion, a sulfate-sulfite cycle driven by APR and SO can be postulated for fine-tuning of sulfur distribution that is additionally used for sulfite detoxification, when plants are exposed to atmospheric SO(2). PMID:21895698

  12. Effects of low concentrations of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite on microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wodzinski, R S; Labeda, D P; Alexander, M

    1978-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms was tested to determine their sensitivity to low concentrations of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite, solubility products of SO2 and NO2, respectively. Photosynthesis by blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) was more strongly inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite and 1 mM nitrite at pH 6.0 than photosynthesis by eucaryotic algae and respiration of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. At pH 7.7, blue-green algae were still more sensitive to bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite than eucaryotic algae, but the toxicity of bisulfite-sulfite and nitrite decreased as the pH increased. Photosynthesis by Anabaena flos-aquae at pH 6.0 was inhibited 25% by a bisulfite-sulfite concentration of 10 micrometer and 15% by a nitrite concentration of 50 micrometer. Photosynthesis by the blue-green alga, Lyngbya sp., was not exceptionally sensitive to chlorate and thiosulfate. Acetylene-reducing activity of Beijerinckia indica was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM bisulfite-sulfite at pH 4.0, the suppression being decreased with increasing pH. PMID:646357

  13. Molecular characterization of tobacco sulfite reductase: enzyme purification, gene cloning, and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T a; Hase, T

    1998-09-01

    A cDNA clone, NtSiR1, that encodes the precursor of ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase (Fd-SiR) has been isolated from a cDNA library of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. SR1). The identity of the cDNA was established by comparison of the purified protein and the predicted structure with the nucleotide sequence. The amino terminus of the purified enzyme was Thr62 of the precursor protein, and the mature region of NtSiR1 consisted of 632 amino acids. Tobacco Fd-SiR is 82, 77, and 48% identical with Fd-SiRs from Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana, and a cyanobacterium, respectively. Significant similarity was also found with Escherichia coli NADPH-SiR in the region involved in ligation of siroheme and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. On Northern blot analysis, a transcript of NtSiR1 was detected in leaves, stems, roots, and petals in similar amounts. We also isolated a genomic SiR clone named gNtSiR1. It consists of 8 exons and 7 introns. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two SiR genes are present in the tobacco genome. PMID:9722674

  14. Effect of gel network on pattern formation in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite reaction.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomonaga; Yoshida, Ryo

    2011-06-01

    Stationary patterns have been researched experimentally since the discovery of the Turing pattern in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reaction and the self-replicating spot pattern in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite (FIS) reaction. In this study, we reproduced the pattern formation in the FIS reaction by using poly(acrylamide) gels. Gels with different swelling ratios were prepared to use as a medium. The effect of the swelling ratio was compared with the effect of thickness. It was found that the swelling ratio greatly influenced pattern formation. Oscillating spot patterns appeared at high swelling ratios, and lamellar patterns appeared at a low swelling ratio. Self-replicating spot patterns appeared in between the two areas. The front velocities, which were observed in the initial stage of pattern formation, depended on the swelling ratio. Furthermore, this dependence obeys the free volume theory of diffusion. These results provide evidence that the change in front velocities is caused by a change in diffusion. Pattern formation can be controlled not only by thickness but also by swelling ratio, which may be useful for creating novel pattern templates. PMID:21557556

  15. Using a combined hydrolysis factor to optimize high titer ethanol production from sulfite-pretreated poplar without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhi; Gu, Feng; Zhu, J Y; Zalesny, Ronald S

    2015-06-01

    Sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) was applied to poplar NE222 chips in a range of chemical loadings, temperatures, and times. The combined hydrolysis factor (CHF) as a pretreatment severity accurately predicted xylan dissolution by SPORL. Good correlations between CHF and pretreated solids enzymatic digestibility, sugar yield, and the formations of furfural and acetic acid were obtained. Therefore, CHF was used to balance sugar yield with the formation of fermentation inhibitors for high titer ethanol production without detoxification. The results indicated that optimal sugar yield can be achieved at CHF=3.1, however, fermentation using un-detoxified whole slurries of NE222 pretreated at different severities by SPORL indicated CHF≈2 produced best results. An ethanol titer of 41 g/L was achieved at total solids of approximately 20 wt% without detoxification with a low cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g glucan (27 mL/kg untreated wood). PMID:25817033

  16. Amperometric sulfite sensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes/ferrocene-branched chitosan composites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Yang, Weiwei; Sun, Changqing

    2008-10-19

    A novel amperometric sensor for the determination of sulfite was fabricated based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/ferrocene-branched chitosan (CHIT-Fc) composites-covered glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was investigated in detail by cyclic voltammetry. The apparent surface electron transfer rate constant (K(s)) and charge transfer coefficient (alpha) of the CHIT-Fc/MWCNTs/GCE were also determined by cyclic voltammetry, which were about 1.93 cm s(-1) and 0.42, respectively. The sensor displayed good electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of sulfite. The peak potential for the oxidation of sulfite was lowered by at least 330 mV compared with that obtained at CHIT/MWCNTs/GCE. In optimal conditions, linear range spans the concentration of sulfite from 5 microM to 1.5mM and the detection limit was 2.8 microM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The proposed method was used for the determination of sulfite in boiler water. In addition, the sensor has good stability and reproducibility. PMID:18804647

  17. Dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. Report for Sep 84-Aug 86

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue-gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO{sub 2} absorption, sulfite oxidation, and limestone utilization. The dissolution and crystallization rates of platelet shaped calcium sulfite crystals were measured in the pH stat apparatus. The solution pH was varied from 3.0 to 6.0. The effects of sulfate content in the solids and solution were also investigated. The measured rates for the platelets were compared to the rates previously determined for agglomerates. It was determined that there are subtle differences between platelet and agglomerated calcium sulfite. The platelet sample with low solid sulfate content dissolved and crystallized slower than the sample with a high solid sulfate content and the agglomerated samples. The inhibiting effect of dissolved sulfate was also greater for the low solid sulfate sample. The sample with a high solid sulfate content dissolved and crystallized at approximately the same rate as the agglomerates.

  18. Avoiding total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from sodium sulfite pulping recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.C.; Sell, N.J. ); Ciriacks, J.C. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports that one of the current trends in paper-making with cellulose pulping is the use of high-yield processes. With yields greater than 65%, these processes include mechanical pulps (groundwood and thermomechanical pulps or TMP), and semichemical types (chemi-TMP or CTMP). Groundwood and TMP make up about 10% of North American pulp production. Semichemical pulp makes up about 7% and is mostly used for corrugating medium. High-yield pulping for linerboard, particularly using the alkaline sulfite process, is also likely to be used in the future. High-yield pulping is based primarily on the sulfite process using mostly sodium-based chemicals. A disadvantage of this process is the unavailability of a recovery system for the inorganic pulping chemicals. Generally, mills have not accepted any particular recovery system for this process. For this and other reasons, sulfite processes constitute only 3-4% of the total North American pulp production. If high-yield processes continue to increase in popularity, a sodium sulfite chemical recovery system will be needed. A number of chemical recovery systems have been developed in the past 30 years for sodium-based sulfite pulping processes, with most of the mills successfully using this process located in Scandinavia.

  19. Sulfite determination by a biosensor based on bay leaf tissue homogenate: very simple and economical method.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mustafa; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal; Dinçkaya, Erhan

    2009-01-01

    Of all the food additives for which the FDA has received adverse reaction reports, the ones that most closely resemble true allergens are sulfur-based preservatives. Sulfites are used primarily as antioxidants to prevent or reduce discoloration of light-colored fruits and vegetables, such as dried apples and potatoes, and to inhibit the growth of microorganisms in fermented foods such as wine. This work aims to prepare an electrochemical biosensor based on bay leaf tissue homogenate that contains polyphenol oxidase enzyme abundantly for sulfite detection in foods. The principle of the biosensor is based on the inhibition effect of sulfites on polyphenol oxidase in the bioactive layer. Optimum conditions for the biosensor, such as temperature and pH, were investigated. Some stability parameters of the biosensor were also identified. The biosensor showed a linear calibration graph in the range of 25-100 microM sulfite. The biosensor presents a very simple, economical, reliable, and feasible method for sulfite detection in foods. PMID:19418312

  20. Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak Malhotra

    2010-01-31

    According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

  1. Determination of sulfite in foods and beverages by ion exclusion chromatography with electrochemical detection: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J

    1990-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method for determination of total sulfite in foods and beverages by alkali extraction followed by ion exclusion chromatographic separation and electrochemical detection (IEC-EC) was collaboratively studied by 9 laboratories. Blind duplicate samples of starch, diluted lemon juice, wine cooler, dehydrated seafood, and instant mashed potatoes were analyzed without spiking and with added sulfite at 2 levels. The initial sulfite levels varied from 0 to 384 ppm SO2, and the levels added varied from 10 to 400 ppm. The initial sulfite levels determined by the IEC-EC method and the Monier-Williams method were in good agreement. Recovery of added sulfite by the IEC-EC method was generally higher than that by the Monier-Williams method. Within-laboratory repeatability (RSDr) for the IEC-EC method varied from 4.4 to 26.0%, and overall reproducibility (RSDR) varied from 8.5 to 39.3%. The collaborators found the method to be fast, sensitive, and easy to use, which makes it a useful alternative to the Monier-Williams method. The method has been adopted official first action. PMID:2324032

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhhh... - Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with sodium sulfite to form the sulfite addition products and liberate sodium hydroxide (NaOH); however... degrees Celsius (( °deg;C) to minimize the reaction of the methanol groups. 2.1Apparatus Required....

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the performance of tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, M H; Ciebin, B W

    1979-01-01

    Dissolving dehydrated tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar by only boiling or microwaving was found to inhibit Clostridium perfringens colony development in pour plates when compared with C. perfringens recovery in tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar prepared by autoclaving. Images PMID:225988

  4. Formation of Reactive Sulfite-Derived Free Radicals by the Activation of Human Neutrophils: An ESR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Garantziotis, Stavros; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) on human neutrophils and the ability of these immune cells to produce reactive free radicals due to (bi)sulfite oxidation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant heme protein in neutrophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma and inflammatory disorders. In the present study sulfite (•SO3−) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals are characterized with the ESR spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in the reaction of (bi)sulfite oxidation by human MPO and human neutrophils via sulfite radical chain reaction chemistry. After treatment with (bi)sulfite, PMA-stimulated neutrophils produced DMPO-sulfite anion radical, -superoxide, and -hydroxyl radical adducts. The latter adduct probably resulted, in part, from the conversion of DMPO-sulfate to DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of the radical adduct. This anion radical (SO4•−) is highly reactive and, presumably, can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. Therefore, we propose that the potential toxicity of (bi)sulfite during pulmonary inflammation or lung-associated diseases such as asthma may be related to free radical formation. PMID:22326772

  5. Sodium sulfite-formaldehyde pretreatment of mixed hardwoods and its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongcan; Yang, Linfeng; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Phillips, Richard

    2013-05-01

    In this work, mixed hardwoods were pretreated by sodium sulfite-formaldehyde (SF). The effects of SF pretreatment on the chemical compositions and enzymatic hydrolysis of mixed hardwoods were investigated. SF pretreatment temperature had a significant effect on pulp yield and delignification, resulting in an increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. After 96 h of enzymatic hydrolysis at the cellulase loading of 40 FPU/g substrate, the yields of glucan and xylan on the basis of original wood were 37% and 11% for the pulp produced with 12% sulfite charge at 170 °C for 2 h. The total sugar recovery based on the sugar in original wood was 74%. These results indicate that sulfite-formaldehyde cooking is of great potential to be a pretreatment method for a greenfield mill to produce fuel ethanol from hardwood. PMID:23127844

  6. Characterization of two dissimilatory sulfite reductases from sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, B. H.; Moura, I.; Lino, A. R.; Moura, J. J. G.; Legall, J.

    1988-02-01

    Mössbauer, EPR, and biochemical techniques were used to characterize two dissimilatory sulfite reductases: desulforubidin from Desulfovibrio baculatus strain DSM 1743 and desulfoviridin from Desulfovibrio gigas. For each molecule of desulforubidin, there are two sirohemes and four [4Fe-4S] clusters. The [4Fe-4S] clusters are in the diamagnetic 2+ oxidation state. The sirohemes are high-spin ferric (S=5/2) and each siroheme is exchanged-coupled to a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster. Such an exchange-coupled siroheme-[4Fe-4S] unit has also been found in the assimilatory sulfite reductase from Escherichia coli/1/ and in a low-molecular weight sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris/2/. For each molecule of defulfoviridin, there are two tetrahydroporphyrin groups and four [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters. To our surprise, we discovered that about 80% of the tetrahydroporphyrin groups, however, do not bind iron.

  7. The influence of oxygen exchange between sulfite and water on the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, I. A.; Brunner, B.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate does not exchange oxygen with the water under most environmental conditions. Therefore, its oxygen isotope composition serves as an archive of past oxidative sulfur cycling. Studies on the oxygen isotope signature of sulfate produced from reduced sulfur compounds show varying relative contributions of two possible oxygen sources; molecular oxygen and water, and variable isotope fractionations relative to these two compounds. These discrepancies could be due to differences in the production and consumption of sulfuroxy intermediates which exchange oxygen with water. Thereby, the rate of oxygen exchange as well as the rate of oxidation depends on the pH. Studies on the oxygen isotope exchange effects between sulfuroxy intermediates and water and on the oxygen isotope effects during the oxidation of sulfuroxy intermediates are scarce, severely limiting the interpretability of oxygen isotope signatures in sulfate. Sulfite is often considered to be the last/final sulfuroxy intermediate in the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to sulfate and may, therefore, be pivotal in shaping the oxygen isotope signature of sulfate. We determined the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water and used the obtained equilibrium value to determine the oxygen isotope effects in abiotic sulfite oxidation experiments. Our results demonstrate that natural variations in the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate produced by oxidative processes can be explained by differences in the interplay of the sulfite oxidation rate and oxygen isotope exchange rate between sulfite and water which both depend on pH conditions and availability of oxidizing agents (e.g. molecular oxygen or ferric iron). Our findings contribute to a more detailed mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and underline the importance of sulfite as the final sulfuroxy intermediate in oxidative sulfur cycling.

  8. Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial reduction and disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Habicht, K.S.; Canfield, D.E.; Rethmeier, J.

    1998-08-01

    In bacterial cultures the authors measured sulfur isotope fractionation during transformations of thiosulfate and sulfite, pathways which may be of considerable importance in the cycling of sulfur in marine sediments and euxinic waters. They documented isotope fractionations during the reduction and disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite by bacterial enrichments and pure bacterial cultures from marine and freshwater environments. They also measured the isotope fractionation associated with the anoxygenic phototrophic oxidation of H{sub 2}S to thiosulfate by cyanobacteria. Except for sulfite reduction, isotope fractionations for these processes have not been previously reported. During the dissimilatory reduction of sulfite, H{sub 2}S was depleted in {sup 34}S by 6%, and during the reduction of thiosulfate to H{sub 2}S, depletions were between 7% and 11%. The largest observed isotope fractionation was associated with the bacterial disproportionation of sulfite which caused a {sup 34}S depletion in H{sub 2}S of 20--37% and a {sup 34}S enrichment in sulfate of 7--12%. During the bacterial disproportionation of thiosulfate, isotope fractionations between the outer sulfane sulfur and H{sub 2}S and between the inner sulfonate sulfur and sulfate were <4%. The authors observed isotope exchange between the two sulfur atoms of thiosulfate leading to a depletion of {sup 34}S in H{sub 2}S by up to 12% with a comparable enrichment of {sup 34}S in sulfate. No isotope fractionation was associated with the anoxygenic phototrophic oxidation of H{sub 2}S to thiosulfate. The depletion of {sup 34}S into H{sub 2}S during the bacterial reduction and disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite may, in addition to sulfate reduction and the bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur, contribute to the generation of {sup 34}S-depleted sedimentary sulfides.

  9. Sulfite exposure-induced hepatocyte death is not associated with alterations in p53 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jianying; Lei, Peiyu; Zhang, Jidong; Zhao, Chunyan; Liang, Ruifeng

    2013-10-01

    Although sulfite (SO3(2-)) is commonly used as an antimicrobial agent and preservative in foods, medicines and wine, it has also been listed as an important risk factor for the initiation and progression of liver diseases due to oxidative damage. In general, apoptosis that is induced by oxidative stress is triggered by increases in p53 and alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2. However, the level of involvement of the p53 signaling pathway, which has been shown to be upregulated in some animal studies, in hepatocyte death remains unclear. To examine the response of the p53 signaling pathway to stimulation with different concentrations of sulfite, a time course study of p53, Mdm2, and Bcl-2 expression was conducted in an immortalized hepatic cell line, HL-7702. When the HL-7702 cells were cultured in the presence of Na2SO3, the cell viability was significantly decreased after 24h compared to that of the control group (0mmol/L) (p<0.05). Meanwhile, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in the supernatants of HL-7702 cells were significantly increased following Na2SO3 administration. Interestingly, the expression of p53 and p-p53 (Ser15) remained unchanged. In addition, no obvious alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2 expression were observed in HL-7702 cells that had been stimulated with various concentrations of sulfite. To further investigate the detailed mechanism underlying sulfite toxicity, caspase-3, PCNA and RIP1 expression in HL-7702 cells was studied. The expression levels of caspase-3 and PCNA were unchanged, but RIP1 expression was increased significantly after 24h of exposure. In light of this evidence, we propose that sulfite is cytotoxic to hepatocytes, but this cytotoxicity is not achieved by direct interruption of the p53 signaling pathway. In addition, we propose that an alternative necrotic process underlies hepatocellular death following sulfite exposure. PMID:23973939

  10. Structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens with sulfite and cyanide.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Anton A; Polyakov, Konstantin M; Boyko, Konstantin M; Tikhonova, Tamara V; Safonova, Tatyana N; Tikhonov, Alexey V; Popov, Alexandre N; Popov, Vladimir O

    2010-10-01

    The structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) with the substrate sulfite (1.4 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.126) and the inhibitor cyanide (1.55 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.148) have been established. The complex with sulfite was prepared by the reduction of the protein crystal with sodium dithionite. The sulfite ion is bound to the iron ion of the catalytic haem through the S atom. The Fe-S distance is 2.24 Å. The structure of the cyanide complex with full occupancy of the ligand site was established for the first time for cytochrome c nitrite reductases. The cyanide ion is bound to the catalytic haem iron through the C atom. The Fe-C distance is 1.91 Å and the Fe-C-N angle is 171°. The sulfite reductase activity of TvNiR was measured at different pH values. The activity is 0.02 µmol of HS(-) per minute per milligram at pH 7.0; it decreases with increasing pH and is absent at pH 9.0. PMID:20944237

  11. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  12. Decreased immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to cashew allergens following sodium sulfite treatment and heating.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Christopher P; Desormeaux, Wendy A; Wasserman, Richard L; Yoshioka-Tarver, Megumi; Condon, Brian; Grimm, Casey C

    2014-07-16

    Cashew nut and other nut allergies can result in serious and sometimes life-threatening reactions. Linear and conformational epitopes within food allergens are important for immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding. Methods that disrupt allergen structure can lower IgE binding and lessen the likelihood of food allergy reactions. Previous structural and biochemical data have indicated that 2S albumins from tree nuts and peanuts are potent allergens, and that their structures are sensitive to strong reducing agents such as dithiothreitol. This study demonstrates that the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) compound sodium sulfite effectively disrupted the structure of the cashew 2S albumin, Ana o 3, in a temperature-dependent manner. This study also showed that sulfite is effective at disrupting the disulfide bond within the cashew legumin, Ana o 2. Immunoblotting and ELISA demonstrated that the binding of cashew proteins by rabbit IgG or IgE from cashew-allergic patients was markedly lowered following treatment with sodium sulfite and heating. The results indicate that incorporation of sodium sulfite, or other food grade reagents with similar redox potential, may be useful processing methods to lower or eliminate IgE binding to food allergens. PMID:24926808

  13. Capillary electrophoretic determination of sulfite using the zone-passing technique of in-capillary derivatization.

    PubMed

    Jankovskiene, G; Daunoravicius, Z; Padarauskas, A

    2001-11-16

    A new capillary electrophoretic (CE) method was developed for the simple and selective determination of sulfite. The proposed method is based on the in-capillary derivatization of sulfite with iodine using the zone-passing technique and direct UV detection of iodide formed. The optimal conditions for the separation and derivatization reaction were established by varying concentration of iodine, electrolyte pH and applied voltage. The optimised separations were carried out in 20 mmol l(-1) Tris-HCl electrolyte (pH 8.5) using direct UV detection at 214 nm. Experimental results showed that the injection of the iodine zone from anodic end of the capillary gives significantly better precision. Common UV absorbing anions such as Br-, l-, S2O3(2-), NO3-, NO2-, SCN- did not give any interferences. Valid calibration (r2=0.998) is demonstrated in the range 1 x 10(-5) - 8 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) of sulfite. The detection limit (SIN=3) was 2 x 10(-6) mol l(-1). The proposed system was applied to the determination of free sulfite in wines. The recovery tests established for wine samples were within the range 92-103%. The CE results were compared with those obtained by iodometric titration technique. PMID:11762765

  14. Existence of a new type of sulfite oxidase which utilizes ferric ions as an electron acceptor in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Sugio, T.; Katagiri, T.; Moriyama, M.; Zhen, Y.L.; Inagaki, K.; Tano, T.

    1988-01-01

    A new type of sulfite oxidase which utilizes ferric ion (Fe/sup 3 +/) as an electron acceptor was found in iron-grown Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. It was localized in the plasma membrane of the bacterium and had a pH optimum at 6.0. Under aerobic conditions, 1 mol of sulfite was oxidized by the enzyme to produce 1 mol of sulfate. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of Fe/sup 3 +/, sulfite was oxidized by the enzyme as rapidly as it was under aerobic conditions. In the presence of o-phenanthroline or a chelator for Fe/sup 2 +/, the production of Fe/sup 2 +/ was observed during sulfite oxidation by this enzyme under not only anaerobic conditions but also aerobic conditions. No Fe/sup 2 +/ production was observed in the absence of o-phenanthroline, suggesting that the Fe/sup 2 +/ produced was rapidly reoxidized by molecular oxygen. Neither cytochrome c nor ferricyanide, both of which are electron acceptors for other sulfite oxidases, served as an electron acceptor for the sulfite oxidase of T. ferrooxidans. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by chelating agents for Fe/sup 3 +/. The physiological role of sulfite oxidase in sulfur oxidation of T. ferrooxidans is discussed.

  15. Mercury displacement detection for the determination of picogram amounts of sulfite ion or sulfur dioxide by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.; Midgley, D.

    1981-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed that can determine picogram amounts of sulfite in aqueous solution or sulfur dioxide in solution. The technique is based on the reaction of sulfite ion in solution with mercury(I) ion to promote its disproportionation to metallic mercury and mercury(II) ions. By monitoring the Hg/sup 0/ released it is possible to determine the concentration of sulfite added. The method gives a linear calibration over the range tested (0 to 5 ng of sulfite) and the within-batch cefficients of variation for the determination of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 ng of sulfite are 4, 3, 2.5, and 1.8%, respectively. Fifteen analyses can be carried out each hour. The limit of detection is 30 pg of sulfite, which is several orders of magnitude lower than can be obtained by other manual methods of sulfite determination. The method is very selective. Sulfate ion does not interfere, which is especially important in the determination of atmospheric sulfur dioxide.

  16. Survey of sulfites in wine and various Turkish food and food products intended for export, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Ulca, P; Öztürk, Y; Senyuva, H Z

    2011-01-01

    Surveys were carried out between 2007 and 2010 to determine the total levels of sulfites in 1245 samples of wines, dried apricots, dried vegetables, nuts, juices and purees, frozen foods and cereals containing dried fruit supplied by food inspectors and by food producers for testing or for export certification. Sulfite analysis of wine was carried out using the Ripper method with an LOQ of 5 mg l(-1) and for dried and other foods the Monier-Williams distillation procedure was employed with an LOQ of 10 mg kg(-1). In the survey all wines contained measurable sulfites, but with the exception of one sample of white wine they were otherwise below Turkish Food Codex limits of 160 mg kg(-1) for red wine, 210 mg kg(-1) to white wine and 235 mg kg(-1) for sparkling wine. None of the cereal products, frozen foods, juices or purees contained sulfites above 10 mg kg(-1). However, all dried apricot samples contained significant levels of sulfite with around 40% having levels exceeding the Turkish limit of 2000 mg kg(-1). Significant levels of sulfite were found in other samples of dried fruit with even a fruit and nut bar containing 1395 mg kg(-1) of sulfite, suggesting the dried fruit ingredients contained levels above regulatory limits. PMID:24786011

  17. Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak M. Malhotra

    2006-09-30

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

  18. Development of an amperometric sulfite biosensor based on SO(x)/PBNPs/PPY modified ITO electrode.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Rachna; Pundir, C S

    2012-11-01

    A sulfite oxidase (SO(x)) (EC 1.8.3.1) purified from Syzygium cumini leaves was immobilized onto prussian blue nanoparticles/polypyrrole composite (PBNPs/PPY) electrodeposited onto the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. An amperometric sulfite biosensor was fabricated using SO(x)/PBNPs/PPY/ITO electrode as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as standard and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The working electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) before and after immobilization of SO(x). The biosensor showed optimum response within 2s, when operated at 20 mV s⁻¹ in 0.1M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 8.5 and at 35 °C. Linear range and minimum detection limit were 0.5-1000 μM and 0.12 μM (S/N=3) respectively. There was good correlation (r=0.99) between red wine samples sulfite value by standard DTNB method and the present method. The sensor was evaluated with 97% recovery of added sulfite in red wine samples and 2.2% and 4.3% within and between batch coefficients of variation respectively. The sensor was employed for determination of sulfite level in red and white wine samples. The enzyme electrode was used 200 times over a period of 3 months when stored at 4 °C. PMID:22705572

  19. Isolation of Assimilatory- and Dissimilatory-Type Sulfite Reductases from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Po; LeGall, Jean; Peck, Harry D.

    1973-01-01

    Bisulfite reductase (desulfoviridin) and an assimilatory sulfite reductase have been purified from extracts of Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The bisulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 628, 580, 408, 390, and 279 nm, and a molecular weight of 226,000 by sedimentation equilibrium, and was judged to be free of other proteins by disk electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. On gels, purified bisulfite reductase exhibited two green bands which coincided with activity and protein. The enzyme appears to be a tetramer but was shown to have two different types of subunits having molecular weights of 42,000 and 50,000. The chromophore did not form an alkaline ferrohemochromogen, was not reduced with dithionite or borohydride, and did not form a spectrally visible complex with CO. The assimilatory sulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 590, 545, 405 and 275 nm and a molecular weight of 26,800, and appears to consist of a single polypeptide chain as it is not dissociated into subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate. By disk electrophoresis, purified sulfite reductase exhibited a single greenish-brown band which coincided with activity and protein. The sole product of the reduction was sulfide, and the chromophore was reduced by borohydride in the presence of sulfite. Carbon monoxide reacted with the reduced chromophore but it did not form a typical pyridine ferrohemochromogen. Thiosulfate, trithionate, and tetrathionate were not reduced by either enzyme preparation. In the presence of 8 M urea, the spectrum of bisulfite reductase resembles that of the sulfite reductase, thus suggesting a chemical relationship between the two chromophores. Images PMID:4725615

  20. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular

  1. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun; Wang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Jingtang; Wu, Mingbo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO4(-) and OH, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO6(2-) can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant. PMID:26610099

  2. Rapid flow injection method for the determination of sulfite in wine using the permanganate-luminol luminescence system.

    PubMed

    Navarrro, Mercedes Villar; Payán, María Ramos; López, Miguel Angel Bello; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Mochón, Manuel Callejón

    2010-10-15

    A simple, rapid and sensitive chemiluminescence method for the determination of sulfite has been developed by combining flow-injection analysis and its sensitizing effect on the known chemiluminescence emission produced by the oxidation of luminol in alkaline medium; in this work permanganate has been proposed as oxidizing reactive. The optimum conditions for the chemiluminescence emission were established. The chemiluminescence was proportional to the sulfite concentration over the range 1.6 × 10(-5) and 4.0 × 10(-4)mol L(-1). The detection limit was 4.7 × 10(-6)mol L(-1) of sulfite. The method has been satisfactorily used for the determination of free and bound sulfite in wines. PMID:20875609

  3. Spectrophotometric study and potentiometric titration between sulfite and nitrite ions using acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y.Z.; Abd-Elmottalb, M.

    1985-11-01

    A complex between sodium nitroprusside (NP) and acetaldehyde of 1:1 in aqueous solution of pH 10 has been prepared and used as an analytical reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of sulfite and nitrite ions. Nitrite ion can be titrated against sulfite ion and vise versa in equivalent amounts with high accuracy in the presence of the acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier using a potentiometric titration technique. 9 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Combined effects of sulfites, temperature, and agitation time on production of glycerol in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, N; Rodrigue, N; Champagne, C P

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the simultaneous effects of strain, incubation temperature (15 to 25 degrees C), agitation time (0 to 24 h), and initial sulfite concentration (100 to 300 ppm) on glycerol production in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fourteen strains were studied to determine their growth patterns in the presence of sulfites and ethanol. Baker's yeast strains were more sensitive to sulfite than wine strains, and little growth occurred at initial sulfite levels greater than 150 ppm. Sensitivity to sulfite increased with increasing levels of ethanol. Three strains exhibiting the best growth in the presence of sulfites and ethanol were selected for interaction studies. Fermentations were carried out until the solids content had decreased to less than 6 degrees Brix, which was the point that glycerol content became stable. For the three strains used, the greatest level of glycerol production was observed in the presence of 300 ppm of sulfite for most incubation temperatures and agitation times. There was significant interaction between the strain, incubation temperature, and agitation time parameters for glycerol synthesis, and a response surface method was used to predict the optimal conditions for glycerol production. Under static conditions, the highest level of glycerol production was observed at 20 degrees C, while incubation at 25 degrees C gave the best results when the cultures were agitated for 24 h. Response surface equations were used to predict that the optimum conditions for glycerol production by S. cerevisiae Y11 were a temperature of 22 degrees C, an initial sulfite concentration of 300 ppm, and no agitation, which yielded 0.68 g of glycerol per 100 ml. PMID:8357243

  5. Combined effects of sulfites, temperature, and agitation time on production of glycerol in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gardner, N; Rodrigue, N; Champagne, C P

    1993-07-01

    Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the simultaneous effects of strain, incubation temperature (15 to 25 degrees C), agitation time (0 to 24 h), and initial sulfite concentration (100 to 300 ppm) on glycerol production in grape juice by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fourteen strains were studied to determine their growth patterns in the presence of sulfites and ethanol. Baker's yeast strains were more sensitive to sulfite than wine strains, and little growth occurred at initial sulfite levels greater than 150 ppm. Sensitivity to sulfite increased with increasing levels of ethanol. Three strains exhibiting the best growth in the presence of sulfites and ethanol were selected for interaction studies. Fermentations were carried out until the solids content had decreased to less than 6 degrees Brix, which was the point that glycerol content became stable. For the three strains used, the greatest level of glycerol production was observed in the presence of 300 ppm of sulfite for most incubation temperatures and agitation times. There was significant interaction between the strain, incubation temperature, and agitation time parameters for glycerol synthesis, and a response surface method was used to predict the optimal conditions for glycerol production. Under static conditions, the highest level of glycerol production was observed at 20 degrees C, while incubation at 25 degrees C gave the best results when the cultures were agitated for 24 h. Response surface equations were used to predict that the optimum conditions for glycerol production by S. cerevisiae Y11 were a temperature of 22 degrees C, an initial sulfite concentration of 300 ppm, and no agitation, which yielded 0.68 g of glycerol per 100 ml. PMID:8357243

  6. Mechanism of the electro-oxidation of sulfite catalyzed by copper ion

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, A.; Arai, H.; Takehara, Z.

    1995-09-01

    The oxidation of sulfite in aqueous solution is an important reaction in some industrial processes such as metal refining and flue gas desulfurization. Electro-oxidation of sulfite to dithionate, which is catalyzed by copper ion, has been studied by potential step chronoamperometry and potentiometry. The following mechanism has been proposed: Cu{sup I}(SO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5{minus}} is oxidized to Cu{sup II}(SO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}}, and the latter dimerizes to Cu{sub 2}{sup II}(SO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 8{minus}}, which then decomposes to S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} and Cu{sup I}(SO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 3{minus}} in the rate-determining step. Formation constants of sulfito-copper(I) and -copper(II) complexes have been reported.

  7. Pattern formation in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite system: Spatial bistability, waves, and stationary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Judit; Szalai, István; De Kepper, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the reaction-diffusion patterns observed in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite (TuIS) reaction, operated in open one-side-fed reactors. Besides spatial bistability and spatio-temporal oscillatory dynamics, this proton autoactivated reaction shows stationary patterns, as a result of two back-to-back Turing bifurcations, in the presence of a low-mobility proton binding agent (sodium polyacrylate). This is the third aqueous solution system to produce stationary patterns and the second to do this through a Turing bifurcation. The stationary pattern forming capacities of the reaction are explored through a systematic design method, which is applicable to other bistable and oscillatory reactions. The spatio-temporal dynamics of this reaction is compared with that of the previous ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite mixed Landolt system.

  8. Enumeration of fecal Clostridium perfringens spores in egg yolk-free tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, A H; Hilsheimer, R; Griffith, D W

    1974-03-01

    The Shahidi-Ferguson perfringens, tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC), and egg yolk-free TSC agars have been tested for their suitability to enumerate fecal spores of Clostridium perfringens. When these spores comprised at least 20% of the total anaerobe spores, equally accurate counts were obtained in the three media. With lower ratios of C. perfringens spores, the most accurate counts were obtained in egg yolk-free TSC agar. The median C. perfringens spore count of 60 normal fecal specimens was log 3.4/g. A nonmotile, sulfite- and nitrate-reducing Clostridium, not identifiable with any known clostridial species, was isolated from 14 out of 60 fecal specimans. It was not differentiated from C. perfringens in the nitrite motility test, but could be distinguished by its inability to liquefy gelatin. PMID:4363369

  9. Enumeration of Fecal Clostridium perfringens Spores in Egg Yolk-Free Tryptose-Sulfite-Cycloserine Agar

    PubMed Central

    Hauschild, A. H. W.; Hilsheimer, R.; Griffith, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Shahidi-Ferguson perfringens, tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC), and egg yolk-free TSC agars have been tested for their suitability to enumerate fecal spores of Clostridium perfringens. When these spores comprised at least 20% of the total anaerobe spores, equally accurate counts were obtained in the three media. With lower ratios of C. perfringens spores, the most accurate counts were obtained in egg yolk-free TSC agar. The median C. perfringens spore count of 60 normal fecal specimens was log 3.4/g. A nonmotile, sulfite- and nitrate-reducing Clostridium, not identifiable with any known clostridial species, was isolated from 14 out of 60 fecal specimans. It was not differentiated from C. perfringens in the nitrite motility test, but could be distinguished by its inability to liquefy gelatin. PMID:4363369

  10. Multicomponent Convection Induced by Fronts in the Chlorate-Sulfite Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Istvan P.; Pojman, John A.

    1993-01-01

    An application of a new method is presented for the measurement of the temperature profiles of chemical waves propagating through a solution. Using solutions of thermocolor materials, the temperature distribution caused by the heat released in the propagating chlorate oxidation of sulfite was visualized and recorded using digital image processing methods. After calibration, the temperature gradient was calculated from the gray scale value in a digitized image. Extensive multicomponent convection ('fingering') was induced by descending fronts. Only ascending fingers were observed because of the large thermal gradient that suppressed descending ones. The characteristics of the temperature profile were determined as a function of initial sulfite and chlorate concentration, and tube diameter. Unusual behavior was observed when the fronts propagated under conditions of continuously changing diameter in a conical vessel. Fingering occurred periodically in a front descending in a flask with an increasing diameter. However, when a front propagated down in flask whose diameter decreased, no multicomponent convection was observed.

  11. Effects of inhaled acids on lung biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    Effects of respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, and ammonium persulfate on lungs of rats are reviewed. The literature regarding interactions between ozone or nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols (ammonium sulfate, sulfuric acid) is discussed. An unexpected interaction between nitrogen dioxide and sodium chloride aerosol is also discussed. An attempt is made to identify bases for prediction of how and when acid aerosols might potentiate effects of inhaled gases.

  12. Effective Electrochemistry of Human Sulfite Oxidase Immobilized on Quantum-Dots-Modified Indium Tin Oxide Electrode.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ting; Leimkühler, Silke; Koetz, Joachim; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2015-09-30

    The bioelectrocatalytic sulfite oxidation by human sulfite oxidase (hSO) on indium tin oxide (ITO) is reported, which is facilitated by functionalizing of the electrode surface with polyethylenimine (PEI)-entrapped CdS nanoparticles and enzyme. hSO was assembled onto the electrode with a high surface loading of electroactive enzyme. In the presence of sulfite but without additional mediators, a high bioelectrocatalytic current was generated. Reference experiments with only PEI showed direct electron transfer and catalytic activity of hSO, but these were less pronounced. The application of the polyelectrolyte-entrapped quantum dots (QDs) on ITO electrodes provides a compatible surface for enzyme binding with promotion of electron transfer. Variations of the buffer solution conditions, e.g., ionic strength, pH, viscosity, and the effect of oxygen, were studied in order to understand intramolecular and heterogeneous electron transfer from hSO to the electrode. The results are consistent with a model derived for the enzyme by using flash photolysis in solution and spectroelectrochemistry and molecular dynamic simulations of hSO on monolayer-modified gold electrodes. Moreover, for the first time a photoelectrochemical electrode involving immobilized hSO is demonstrated where photoexcitation of the CdS/hSO-modified electrode lead to an enhanced generation of bioelectrocatalytic currents upon sulfite addition. Oxidation starts already at the redox potential of the electron transfer domain of hSO and is greatly increased by application of a small overpotential to the CdS/hSO-modified ITO. PMID:26357959

  13. Phylogenetic and environmental diversity of DsrAB-type dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Albert Leopold; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Rattei, Thomas; Pester, Michael; Loy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The energy metabolism of essential microbial guilds in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle is based on a DsrAB-type dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase that either catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide during anaerobic respiration of sulfate, sulfite and organosulfonates, or acts in reverse during sulfur oxidation. Common use of dsrAB as a functional marker showed that dsrAB richness in many environments is dominated by novel sequence variants and collectively represents an extensive, largely uncharted sequence assemblage. Here, we established a comprehensive, manually curated dsrAB/DsrAB database and used it to categorize the known dsrAB diversity, reanalyze the evolutionary history of dsrAB and evaluate the coverage of published dsrAB-targeted primers. Based on a DsrAB consensus phylogeny, we introduce an operational classification system for environmental dsrAB sequences that integrates established taxonomic groups with operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at multiple phylogenetic levels, ranging from DsrAB enzyme families that reflect reductive or oxidative DsrAB types of bacterial or archaeal origin, superclusters, uncultured family-level lineages to species-level OTUs. Environmental dsrAB sequences constituted at least 13 stable family-level lineages without any cultivated representatives, suggesting that major taxa of sulfite/sulfate-reducing microorganisms have not yet been identified. Three of these uncultured lineages occur mainly in marine environments, while specific habitat preferences are not evident for members of the other 10 uncultured lineages. In summary, our publically available dsrAB/DsrAB database, the phylogenetic framework, the multilevel classification system and a set of recommended primers provide a necessary foundation for large-scale dsrAB ecology studies with next-generation sequencing methods. PMID:25343514

  14. Comparison of a new, bismuth-iron-sulfite-cycloserine agar for isolation of Clostridium perfringens with the tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine and blood agars.

    PubMed

    Gubash, S M; Ingham, L

    1997-02-01

    A new differential and selective, bismuth-iron-sulfite-cycloserine (BISC) medium, for isolation and enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from food and feces, was developed. The medium was compared with the widely-used tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) medium and blood agar (BA) in recovering actively growing cells, cold- (refrigerated and frozen) stressed, and heat-stressed C. perfringens cells, and heat-activated spores from human feces. Both selective media were satisfactory in recovering actively growing cells and heat-activated spores of C. perfringens. Both were inferior to non-inhibitory blood agar in recovering heat or cold-stressed cells. The advantages of the new BISC medium over the TSC medium were: elimination of the need to prepare pour- or overlay-agar plates, which simplified inoculation of specimens on the medium and simplified the subcultures of colonies for confirmatory identification. All colonies of C. perfringens developed on BISC were black or dark gray. This was contrary to TSC medium, which gave, on average, 39.6% of white colonies when inoculated with the pure cultures of C. perfringens. PMID:9084113

  15. Ethanol production from spent sulfite liquor fortified by hydrolysis of pulp mill primary clarifier sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, J.W.; Duff, S.J.B.

    1996-12-31

    Some low-yield sulfite pulping operations ferment spent sulfite liquor (SSL) to remove biochemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved sugars while at the same time generating ethanol as a salable product. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of primary clarifier sludge in a medium of SSL was proposed as a means of reducing the amount of sludge to be disposed of while at the same time increasing ethanol productivity. In this article, the option of fortifying existing SSL fermenting processes with the sugars produced via in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfite primary clarifier sludge (PCS) has been explored. In 100% SSL PCS hydrolysis rates as high as 3.4 g/(L{center_dot}h) were observed at an initial enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units (FPU)/g PCS. To reduce the deleterious effects of glucose inhibition, single-stage SSF was carried out using cellulose enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The production rate of ethanol in SSL was increased by as much as 25% through the SSF process. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Chemical and physical properties of high-yield alkaline sulfite green liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. . Natural and Applied Sciences)

    1993-11-01

    The majority of sodium sulfite pulping liquor recovery systems are based on the reductive burning of the spent liquor, followed by acidification of the resulting smelt solution by CO[sub 2]. This study investigated a number of the physical and chemical properties of the resulting green liquor which might be relevant to the optimum design of this type of sulfite and carbonate recovery system for an alkaline sulfite high-yield process. CO[sub 2] gas does generate H[sub 2]S when bubbled through green liquor; however, a large amount of solid soon is formed. Continuing the flow leads to increased amounts of H[sub 2]S, but the ratio of H[sub 2]S to CO[sub 2] remains less than 1.0. Solutions more highly concentrated in Na[sub 2]S absorb relatively more CO[sub 2], regardless of the ratios of H[sub 2]S to CO[sub 2] in the initial gas stream. The percentage of H[sub 2]S released increases with increasing Na[sub 2]S concentration. Stripping the green liquor with inert gas, steam, or vacuum does not improve the H[sub 2]S removal efficiency. The maximum CO[sub 2] pressure can be generated by decomposing pure 6 M NaHCO[sub 3]. If the starting material is a bicarbonate/carbonate mixture, conversion is incomplete and a portion of the NaHCO[sub 3] forms a dead load.

  17. Influence of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase on stable isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalo, Muna; Einsiedl, Florian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald

    2008-03-01

    The stable isotopes of sulfate are often used as a tool to assess bacterial sulfate reduction on the macro scale. However, the mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen at the enzymatic level are not yet fully understood. In batch experiments with water enriched in 18O we investigated the effect of different nitrite concentrations on sulfur isotope fractionation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. With increasing nitrite concentrations, we found sulfur isotope enrichment factors ranging from -11.2 ± 1.8‰ to -22.5 ± 3.2‰. Furthermore, the δ18O values in the remaining sulfate increased from approximately 50-120‰ when 18O-enriched water was supplied. Since 18O-exchange with ambient water does not take place in sulfate, but rather in intermediates of the sulfate reduction pathway (e.g. SO32-), we suggest that nitrite affects the steady-state concentration and the extent of reoxidation of the metabolic intermediate sulfite to sulfate during sulfate reduction. Given that nitrite is known to inhibit the production of the enzyme dissimilatory sulfite reductase, our results suggest that the activity of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase regulates the kinetic isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen during bacterial sulfate reduction. Our novel results also imply that isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction strongly depends on the cell internal enzymatic regulation rather than on the physico-chemical features of the individual enzymes.

  18. Techno-economic evaluation of conditioning with sodium sulfite for bioethanol production from softwood.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Martín, Carlos; Alriksson, Björn; Mörtsell, Marlene; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-11-01

    Conditioning with reducing agents allows alleviation of inhibition of biocatalytic processes by toxic by-products generated during biomass pretreatment, without necessitating the introduction of a separate process step. In this work, conditioning of steam-pretreated spruce with sodium sulfite made it possible to lower the yeast and enzyme dosages in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to 1g/L and 5FPU/g WIS, respectively. Techno-economic evaluation indicates that the cost of sodium sulfite can be offset by benefits resulting from a reduction of either the yeast load by 0.68g/L or the enzyme load by 1FPU/g WIS. As those thresholds were surpassed, inclusion of conditioning can be justified. Another potential benefit results from shortening the SSF time, which would allow reducing the bioreactor volume and result in capital savings. Sodium sulfite conditioning emerges as an opportunity to lower the financial uncertainty and compensate the overall investment risk for commercializing a softwood-to-ethanol process. PMID:26232771

  19. Usefulness of ytterbium(III) as analytical reagent for total sulfite determination in white wine samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Rafael Carlos; Aguilar-Caballos, Maria Paz; Gómez-Hens, Agustina

    2004-12-29

    Ytterbium(III) is used as reagent for the determination of sulfite by measuring the formation of the Yb(III)-sulfite complex through the variation of the light scattering intensity with time. The low solubility of this complex causes an efficient dispersion of the radiation at 490 nm, which is measured at 980 nm. Each kinetic datum is automatically obtained in only 0.5 s by stopped-flow mixing technique. The application of the initial rate method using a long emission wavelength minimizes the potential interference of fluorescent background signals from the sample matrix. The dynamic range of the calibration graph is 1-250 microg/mL, and the calculated detection limit is 0.35 microg/mL. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, is <6%. The method has been applied to the determination of total sulfites in white wine samples, which requires only the sample dilution and the use of two aliquots to improve selectivity. However, the matrix effect found for red wines precludes the application of the method to the direct analysis of these samples. Analytical recoveries ranged from 96.0 to 106.7%. The results obtained with the proposed method agreed with those provided by the p-rosaniline method. Unlike this method, in which toxic reagents are required, the use of ytterbium(III) as analytical reagent shows the advantage of its low acute toxic rating. PMID:15612754

  20. [Determination of total sulfite in wine by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) with fluorescence detection].

    PubMed

    Wei, F; Chen, M S; Yu, L; Chang, L; Li, D M

    1999-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorometric method for the determination of total sulfite in wine is reported. The strong fluorescent derivatives formed by the quantitative reaction of sulfite in wine and N-(9-acridinyl) maleimide(NAM) in aqueous solution under mild conditions was injected into the HPLC. Separation was performed on an ODS column(200 mm x 5 mm) with a mobile phase of V(CH3CN):V(0.1 mo/L NH4AC) = 25:75 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and detected by fluorometry at 455 nm(excitation at 365 nm). There was a good linear calibration curve in the range from 0.25-4 mg/L(r = 0.9998), The limit of detection was 1 ng. Sulfite mass concentration in wine has been determined by this method with good results and recoveries. This method is simple, rapid and reliable, and a sample size of only 1 mL is required to complete an analysis. PMID:12552699

  1. FEASIBILITY OF PRODUCING ELEMENTAL SULFUR FROM MAGNESIUM SULFITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to extend potential applications of MgO flue gas desulfurization processes by allowing the sulfur to be recovered as elemental sulfur as well as sulfuric acid. The study considered the feasibility of combining the exothermic SO2 reduction react...

  2. Determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J J; Hollingworth, T A; Wekell, M M; Meo, V A; Saba, H H; Etemad-Moghadam, A; Eklund, C; Phillips, J G; Gump, B H

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis (FIA) was collaboratively studied by 8 laboratories. In the method, the sample solution is reacted with sodium hydroxide to liberate aldehyde-bound sulfite. The sample stream is acidified to produce SO2 gas, which diffuses across a Teflon membrane in the gas diffusion cell into a flowing stream of malachite green. The degree of discoloration of the malachite green is proportional to the amount of sulfite in the sample solution. Red wine was included in the study but interlaboratory precision for these samples was not satisfactory and correlation with Monier-Williams results was poor. The present method is not recommended for use with these samples. For shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine, average reproducibility (RSDR) of results was 25% for samples at 10 ppm SO2 and 10% for samples at greater than 50 ppm. Overall average reproducibility was 14%. Recoveries of sulfite added to samples averaged 80%. Comparison of FIA with the Monier-Williams method indicated comparable results by the 2 methods. The FIA method has been adopted official first action for determination of greater than or equal to 5 ppm total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine. PMID:2312511

  3. Effects of the methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on phenolic and miscanthus composites containing calcium sulfite scrubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sean

    The purpose of this research is to test the effects of methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on composite material containing calcium sulfite obtained from the Southern Illinois Power Co-operative. This scrubber material and the miscanthus plant are of interest due to their use in coal burning power plants to reduce toxic emission. When calcium sulfate is passed through coal fire gas emissions it absorbs mercury and sulfur. In these composites it is used as filler to reduce cost. Miscanthus is a source of both cellulose reinforcement and some natural resin. This plant has low care requirements, little mineral content, useful energy return, and positive environmental effects. Under investigation is whether a post-cure procedure or a silane coupling agent will positively impact the composite. Hot pressing alone may not be enough to fully cure the phenolic. It is hoped that the silane will increase the strength characteristics of the composite by enhancing adhesion between the calcium sulfite and phenolic resin. Possible effects on the miscanthus by the silane will also be tested. Phenolic is being utilized because of its recycling and biodegradable properties along with cost effectiveness in mass production. Composite mechanical performance was measured through 3-point bending to measure flexural strength and strain at breakage. A dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) was used to find thermomechanical properties. The post-cure was found to be effective, particularly on the final composite containing silane. When methyltrimethoxysilane was added to the miscanthus prior to fabrication, it was found to reduce flexural strength and density. However the addition of methyltrimethoxysilane to the calcium sulfite altered thermo-mechanical properties to a state more like pure phenolic, with added flexibility and thermal stability.

  4. Multicopy Fzf1 (Sul1) Suppresses the Sulfite Sensitivity but Not the Glucose Derepression or Aberrant Cell Morphology of a Grr1 Mutant of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Avram, D.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    1996-01-01

    An ssu2 mutation in Sacccharomyces cerevisiae, previously shown to cause sulfite sensitivity, was found to be allelic to GRR1, a gene previously implicated in glucose repression. The suppressor rgt1, which suppresses the growth defects of grr1 strains on glucose, did not fully suppress the sensitivity on glucose or nonglucose carbon sources, indicating that it is not strictly linked to a defect in glucose metabolism. Because the Cln1 protein was previously shown to be elevated in grr1 mutants, the effect of CLN1 overexpression on sulfite sensitivity was investigated. Overexpression in GRR1 cells resulted in sulfite sensitivity, suggesting a connection between CLN1 and sulfite metabolism. Multicopy FZF1, a putative transcription factor, was found to suppress the sulfite sensitive phenotype of grr1 strains, but not the glucose derepression or aberrant cell morphology. Multicopy FZF1 was also found to suppress the sensitivity of a number of other unrelated sulfite-sensitive mutants, but not that of ssu1 or met20, implying that FZF1 may act through Ssu1p and Met20p. Disruption of FZF1 resulted in sulfite sensitivity when the construct was introduced in single copy at the FZF1 locus in a GRR1 strain, providing evidence that FZF1 is involved in sulfite metabolism. PMID:8889516

  5. Ethylene sulfite as electrolyte additive for lithium-ion cells with graphitic anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wrodnigg, G.H.; Besenhard, J.O.; Winter, M.

    1999-02-01

    A liquid organic electrolyte system for lithium-ion cells with graphitic anodes containing the solvents ethylene sulfite (ES) and propylene carbonate (PC) has been studied. Even in additive amounts (5 vol %) ES is suppressing cointercalation of PC into graphite. The PC-ES electrolytes are characterized by a high oxidation stability allowing the cycling of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode with good reversibility. Moreover, the good low temperature performance compared to ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate electrolytes may favor PC-ES electrolytes for special applications.

  6. Determination and application of the equilibrium oxygen isotope effect between water and sulfite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Eldridge, Daniel L.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The information encoded by the two stable isotope systems in sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4) has been widely applied to aid reconstructions of both modern and ancient environments. Interpretation of δ18OSO4 records has been complicated by rapid oxygen isotope equilibration between sulfoxyanions and water. Specifically, the apparent relationship that develops between δ18OSO4 and δ18Owater during microbial sulfate reduction is thought to result from rapid oxygen isotope equilibrium between intracellular water and aqueous sulfite - a reactive intermediate of the sulfate reduction network that can back-react to produce sulfate. Here, we describe the oxygen equilibrium isotope effect between water and sulfite (referring to all the sum of all S(IV)-oxyanions including sulfite and both isomers and the dimer of bisulfite). Based on experiments conducted over a range of pH (4.5-9.8) and temperature (2-95 °C), where ε = 1000 * (α - 1), we find εSO3-H2O=13.61-0.299∗pH-0.081∗T °C. Thus, at a pH (7.0) and temperature (25 °C) typifying commonly used experimental conditions for sulfate reducing bacterial cultures, sulfite is enriched in 18O by 9.5‰ (±0.8‰) relative to ambient water. We examine the implication of these results in a sulfate reduction network that has been revised to reflect our understanding of the reactions involving oxygen. By evaluating previously published data within this new architecture, our results are consistent with previous suggestions of high reversibility of the sulfate reduction biochemical network. We also demonstrate that intracellular exchange rates between SO32- and water must be on average 1-3 orders of magnitude more rapid than intracellular fluxes of sulfate reduction intermediates and that kinetic isotope effects upstream of SO32- are required to explain previous laboratory and environmental studies of δ18OSO4 resulting as a consequence of sulfate reduction.

  7. Modified Active Site Coordination in a Clinical Mutant of Sulfite Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Doonan, C.J.; Wilson, H.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; Garrett, R.M.; Bennett, B.; Prince, R.C.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-02

    The molybdenum site of the Arginine 160 {yields} Glutamine clinical mutant of the physiologically vital enzyme sulfite oxidase has been investigated by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. We conclude that the mutant enzyme has a six-coordinate pseudo-octahedral active site with coordination of Glutamine O{sup {epsilon}} to molybdenum. This contrasts with the wild-type enzyme which is five-coordinate with approximately square-based pyramidal geometry. This difference in the structure of the molybdenum site explains many of the properties of the mutant enzyme which have previously been reported.

  8. Kinetic and mechanistic study of reaction between sulfide and sulfite in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, T.; Jia, C.Q.

    1999-10-01

    The reaction between sulfide and sulfite in neutral to weak alkaline aqueous solutions was studied by following thiosulfate and sulfite concentrations using ion chromatography. The thiosulfate formation rate from the reaction 2HS{sup {minus}} + 4HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {yields} 3S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} + 3H{sub 2}O at pH 8 to 9 was found to be d[S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}]/dt = k{sub A}[HS{sup {minus}}][HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]{sup 2}, where k{sub A} = 1.1 x 10{sup 12} exp({minus}48000/RT) M{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A mechanism for this reaction has been proposed with disulfite (S{sub 2}O{sub 5}{sup 2{minus}}) and HSO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} intermediates. The measured rate of sulfite disappearance was higher than that calculated from the stoichiometry of the above reaction. This phenomenon is attributed to other reactions, that consume sulfite and form other sulfur compounds such as polythionates, polysulfides, and elemental sulfur. These reactions were treated as a single reaction, whose rate was found to be ({minus}d[HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]/dt){sub B} = k{sub B}[H{sup +}]{sup {minus}0.6}[HS{sup {minus}}]{sup 0.7}[HSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]{sup 1.5}, where k{sub B} = 5 x 10{sup {minus}5} M{sup {minus}0.6} s{sup {minus}1} at 20 C. A kinetic model was established on the basis of the kinetic data obtained in this and a previous work. The experimental data at pH 7 agreed with the model prediction in a satisfactory manner. The biphasic behavior of thiosulfate is considered to be critical in developing a new sulfur-producing flue gas desulfurization (SP-FGD) process based on sulfur dioxide absorption using sodium sulfide solution.

  9. High-level expression of Escherichia coli NADPH-sulfite reductase: requirement for a cloned cysG plasmid to overcome limiting siroheme cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J Y; Siegel, L M; Kredich, N M

    1991-01-01

    The flavoprotein and hemoprotein components of Escherichia coli B NADPH-sulfite reductase are encoded by cysJ and cysI, respectively. Plasmids containing these two genes overexpressed flavoprotein catalytic activity and apohemoprotein by 13- to 35-fold, but NADPH-sulfite reductase holoenzyme activity was increased only 3-fold. Maximum overexpression of holoenzyme activity was achieved by the inclusion in such plasmids of Salmonella typhimurium cysG, which encodes a uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase required for the synthesis of siroheme, a cofactor for the hemoprotein. Thus, cofactor deficiency, in this case siroheme, can limit overexpression of a cloned enzyme. Catalytically active holoenzyme accounted for 10% of total soluble protein in a host containing cloned cysJ, cysI, and cysG. A 5.3-kb DNA fragment containing S. typhimurium cysG was sequenced, and the open reading frame corresponding to cysG was identified by subcloning and by identifying plasmid-encoded peptides in maxicells. Comparison with the sequence reported for the E. coli cysG region (J. A. Cole, unpublished data; GenBank sequence ECONIRBC) indicates a gene order of nirB-nirC-cysG in the cloned S. typhimurium fragment. In addition, two open reading frames of unknown identity were found immediately downstream of cysG. One of these contains 11 direct repeats of 33 nucleotides each, which correspond to the consensus amino acid sequence Asp-Asp-Val-Thr-Pro-Pro-Asp-Asp-Ser-Gly-Asp. Images PMID:1987123

  10. Quaternary liquid/liquid equilibria of sodium sulfate, sodium sulfite and water with two solvents: Acetone and 2-propanol

    SciTech Connect

    Schiozer, A.L.

    1994-03-01

    Aqueous solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite are produced from sodium carbonate in flue-gas scrubbers; recovery of these salts often requires multi-effect evaporators; however, a new energy-efficient unit operation called extractive crystallization has been shown to have reduced energy costs. In this process, an organic solvent is added to the aqueous salt solution to precipitate salt. Acetone is a suitable solvent for this process, better than 2-propanol. Liquid/liquid/solid equilibria for ternary systems containing a salt, water, and an organic solvent were measured. Systems investigated were sodium sulfite/water/acetone and sodium sulfite/water/2-propanol. Experiments were conducted at salt saturation covering a temperature range between the lower consolute temperature and 48.6{degrees}C. In the attempt to improve the extractive crystallization process for recovery of sodium sulfate from flue-gas scrubbers, attention was given to a feed containing a mixture of sodium sulfite and sodium sulfate. Liquid-liquid equilibria for quaternary systems containing two salts, water, and an organic solvent were experimentally determined at 35{degrees}C. The systems investigated were sodium sulfate/sodium sulfite/water/acetone and sodium sulfate/sodium sulfite/water/2propanol. The systems were studied at three salt ratios. For each salt ratio, experiments were conducted starting at saturation, water was then added until the one-phase region was reached. Mixtures of the two salts proved to have a small disadvantage relative to the 100 % sulfate feed process. Therefore, a sulfate-based extractive crystallization process is recommended.

  11. DNA-based biosensor for comparative study of catalytic effect of transition metals on autoxidation of sulfite.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Heydari-Bafrooei, Esmaeil; Rezaei, Behzad

    2013-01-15

    The transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of sulfur(IV) oxides has been known for more than 100 years. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no electrochemical quantitative study has yet been carried out to determine its nature. In view of the transition metal catalyzed oxidation of sulfur(IV) oxides, a series of radicals are involved in the overall reaction process whereby the sulfite, in the presence of transition metals, may cause damages to DNA through the generation of these highly reactive species. In the present work, {MWCNTs-PDDA/DNA}(2) layer-by-layer (LBL) films were prepared to detect DNA damage induced by radicals generated from sulfite autoxidation using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The change in the peak potential separation (ΔE(p)) and charge transfer resistance (R(p)) after incubation of the DNA biosensor in the damaging solution for a certain time was used as indicators of DNA damage. It was found that sulfite in the presence of Co(II), Cu(II), Cr(VI), Fe(III), and Mn(II) caused damage to DNA while neither sulfite alone nor metal ions alone did have the same effect. The results suggest that sulfite is rapidly autoxidized in the presence of Co(II), Cu(II), Cr(VI), Fe(III), and Mn(II), producing radicals that cause the DNA damage. These radicals can be ranked in a descending order of their ability to induce DNA damage with sulfite as follows: Fe(III) > Co(II) > Cu(II) > Cr(VI) > Mn(II). The DNA damage induced by sulfite plus Co(II), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) was inhibited by primary alcohols, but they were not when superoxide dismutase (SOD) and tert-butyl alcohol were used. Comparison of methods used to determine the minimum concentration of a transition metal for sulfite induced DNA damage revealed that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry outperformed the quantitative comparison of different reagents. PMID:23244055

  12. A novel sulfite alternative scavenger and benefits for the use of traced oxygen scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Batton, C.B.; Riede, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Dissolved oxygen in boiler systems is known to cause corrosion. Mechanical deaeration removes the majority of the dissolved oxygen while oxygen scavengers remove the remaining trace level. Sodium sulfate is a commonly used scavenger, but has several use limitations, such as high solids contribution to boiler water and decomposition products that are corrosive gases which can cause downstream equipment problems. A novel sulfite replacement oxygen scavenger has been developed which addresses the limitations of sulfite. Identification and demonstrated performance of the new scavenger is presented using both research and field data. In addition to oxygen scavenger performance, the success of a boiler water treatment program is dependent upon the correct dosage added to the feedwater. Plant managers and operators often struggle with indirect or inaccurate methods to determine what is occurring within their system. An oxygen scavenger product containing a proprietary fluorescent tracer has been developed. This technology for boilers provides a breakthrough in measurement capability for monitoring the dynamics of a boiler system. These two oxygen scavenger developments represent the result of maintaining desirable performance characteristics and significantly improving current technology. Laboratory and field data supporting these results are presented.

  13. A manganese sulfite with extended metal-oxygen-metal bonds exhibiting hydrogen uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prabhakara; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2007-12-15

    A manganese sulfite of the formula Mn{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}(SO{sub 3}){sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O, I{l_brace}a=7.5759(7) A, b=8.4749(8) A, c=10.852(1) A, {beta}=100.732(2){sup o}, Z=2, space group=P2{sub 1}/m (no. 11), R{sub 1}=0.0399 and wR{sub 2}=0.1121 [for R indexes I>2{sigma}(I)]{r_brace}, comprising Mn{sub 3}O{sub 14} units and extended Mn-O-Mn bonds along the three dimensions has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. It has narrow channels along the b-axis and exhibits hydrogen storage of 2.1 wt% at 300 K and 134 bar. - Graphical abstract: A three-dimensional manganese sulfite with one-dimensional channels showing selective hydrogen absorption has been synthesized and characterized.

  14. Detection of sewage organic chlorination products that are resistant to dechlorination with sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    MacCrehan, W.A.; Jensen, J.S.; Helz, G.R.

    1998-11-15

    Most of the 36 billion gal of treated sewage wastewater discharged daily into the environment in the United States is disinfected via chlorination. To minimize toxicity. dechlorination with sulfite or sulfur dioxide is often performed. Although dechlorination is considered instantaneous and complete, several studies have found residual toxicity of chlorinated/dechlorinated effluent to aquatic life. The authors investigated chlorination/dechlorination of the organic nitrogen components of sewage wastewater using both iodometric titration and a novel LC method. For LC, a postcolumn reaction with iodide rendered submicromolar chloramine concentrations detectable with amperometry. Using a gradient-elution LC separation, the retention and dechlorination behavior of a suite of model amines was determined, representing primary and secondary aliphatic, peptide, and protein-N. Chlorination/dechlorination experiments on freshly collected, tertiary-treated wastewater showed a fraction of the organic N-chloramines are dechlorinated slowly by sulfite with half-lives of >20 min. Chromatographic retention and kinetic behavior of the sewage N-chloramines was consistent with the behavior of the model peptides and proteins. Proteolytic hydrolysis markedly increased the peptide fraction observed upon chlorination of the wastewater. These results suggest that peptides and proteins contribute to slow dechlorination of sewage and may be a factor in the toxicity noted for chlorine-disinfected wastewater.

  15. Rapidly responsive and highly selective fluorescent probe for sulfite detection in real samples and living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongda

    2015-10-15

    Sulfites (HSO3(-) or SO3(-)) have very significant toxicity in the environment and in the system. However, developing specific identification of sulfite probes is still very important. In this paper, a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescent probe (HHC) was synthesized to detect HSO3(-) in real samples and living cells. Sensing performance and preponderance are listed as follows. First, probe HHC showed remarkable selectivity for HSO3(-) over varieties of other species, including cysteine, glutathione, S(2-), CN(-), and reactive oxygen species, mainly because of the introduction of the electron-poor C=C double bond for HSO3(-). Second, probe HHC has great molar absorptivity, allowing it to act as a visual detection of probe for HSO3(-). Third, the fluorescence intensities of HHC linearly correlate with the concentration of HSO3(-), with a detection limit of 6.8 nm. Finally, our proposed probe can be applied to the visually determination of trace HSO3(-) in real samples and living HeLa cells with high precision. We hope that our proposed probe will greatly benefit biological sciences when biological researchers survey the role of HSO3(-) in biological systems. PMID:26515011

  16. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Lígia M.; Pereira, Inês A.C.

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  17. Concentration of simple aldehydes by sulfite-containing double-layer hydroxide minerals: implications for biopoesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitsch, S.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Arrhenius, G.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Environmental conditions play an important role in conceptual studies of prebiotically relevant chemical reactions that could have led to functional biomolecules. The necessary source compounds are likely to have been present in dilute solution, raising the question of how to achieve selective concentration and to reach activation. With the assumption of an initial 'RNA World', the questions of production, concentration, and interaction of aldehydes and aldehyde phosphates, potential precursors of sugar phosphates, come into the foreground. As a possible concentration process for simple, uncharged aldehydes, we investigated their adduct formation with sulfite ion bound in the interlayer of positively charged expanding-sheet-structure double-layer hydroxide minerals. Minerals of this type, initially with chloride as interlayer counter anion, have previously been shown to induce concentration and subsequent aldolization of aldehyde phosphates to form tetrose, pentose, and hexose phosphates. The reversible uptake of the simple aldehydes formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and glyceraldehyde by adduct formation with the immobilized sulfite ions is characterized by equilibrium constants of K=1.5, 9, and 11, respectively. This translates into an observable uptake at concentrations exceeding 50 mM.

  18. Divergence of the Yeast Transcription Factor FZF1 Affects Sulfite Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fay, Justin C.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are commonly observed during evolution. However, the phenotypic consequences of expression divergence are frequently unknown and difficult to measure. Transcriptional regulators provide a mechanism by which phenotypic divergence can occur through multiple, coordinated changes in gene expression during development or in response to environmental changes. Yet, some changes in transcriptional regulators may be constrained by their pleiotropic effects on gene expression. Here, we use a genome-wide screen for promoters that are likely to have diverged in function and identify a yeast transcription factor, FZF1, that has evolved substantial differences in its ability to confer resistance to sulfites. Chimeric alleles from four Saccharomyces species show that divergence in FZF1 activity is due to changes in both its coding and upstream noncoding sequence. Between the two closest species, noncoding changes affect the expression of FZF1, whereas coding changes affect the expression of SSU1, a sulfite efflux pump activated by FZF1. Both coding and noncoding changes also affect the expression of many other genes. Our results show how divergence in the coding and promoter region of a transcription factor alters the response to an environmental stress. PMID:22719269

  19. Two alleles of the sulfite resistance genes are differentially regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Youji; Hayakawa, Masayuki; Iimura, Yuzuru

    2005-08-01

    The sulfite resistance gene, SSU1-R, is widely distributed in wine yeasts. This gene has an upstream region distinct from that of the allelic gene, SSU1 and SSU1-R is expressed at a much higher level than SSU1. We characterized the promoters of both of these genes by analysis of their activity using the LacZ gene as a reporter. FZF1, the activator gene of SSU1, was shown to regulate SSU1-R expression indirectly. SSU1-R expression was activated under microaerobic conditions, and four 76-bp repeats, present within the SSU1-R promoter region, was essential for high expression. These results indicate that SSU1-R expression is regulated in different manner from that of SSU1. By deletion analysis of the SSU1-R promoter region, we found that at least two of the 76-bp repeats are necessary for promoter activity, and that the number of 76-bp repeats influences the activity. Hence, it was suggested that the number of 76-bp repeats increases in wine yeasts that require strong sulfite resistance. PMID:16116289

  20. Phylogeny of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductases Supports an Early Origin of Sulfate Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michael; Roger, Andrew J.; Flax, Jodi L.; Brusseau, Gregory A.; Stahl, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Microorganisms that use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration play a central role in the global sulfur cycle. Here, we report the results of comparative sequence analysis of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) genes from closely and distantly related sulfate-reducing organisms to infer the evolutionary history of DSR. A 1.9-kb DNA region encoding most of the α and β subunits of DSR could be recovered only from organisms capable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction with a PCR primer set targeting highly conserved regions in these genes. All DNA sequences obtained were highly similar to one another (49 to 89% identity), and their inferred evolutionary relationships were nearly identical to those inferred on the basis of 16S rRNA. We conclude that the high similarity of bacterial and archaeal DSRs reflects their common origin from a conserved DSR. This ancestral DSR was either present before the split between the domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya or laterally transferred between Bacteria and Archaea soon after domain divergence. Thus, if the physiological role of the DSR was constant over time, then early ancestors of Bacteria and Archaea already possessed a key enzyme of sulfate and sulfite respiration. PMID:9603890

  1. Determination of free and reversibly-bound sulfite in selected foods by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen Wai Cheung; Chan, Benny T P; Chan, Andy C M

    2008-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for measuring low part-per-million levels of free and reversibly-bound sulfites in selected foods by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection was developed. Sulfites were extracted with sodium tetrachloromercurate solution and determined by HPLC-fluorescence spectrometry. During the HPLC analysis, the sample extract was reacted with sodium hydroxide to liberate the reversibly-bound sulfite and subsequently separated from other interferences by a size exclusion column. The effluent was then reacted with o-phthalaldehydelammonium chloride reagent to form a fluorescing 1-sulfonatoisoindole derivative and analyzed by a fluorescence detector. The method has been applied to a variety of foods and food products, with no significant interference encountered in matrixes such as soy products, cabbage, broccoli, brassica, ginger, fungus, mushroom, mandarin peel, potato chips, and biscuits. It was shown to have a broad linear range of 0.01 to 0.4 mg/L as SO2. The spike recoveries of sodium sulfite, sodium metabisulfite, and formaldehyde-sodium bisulfite adduct at the 5 to 10 mg/kg level in the tested food matrix were within 80-120%, and the limit of detection was 5 mg/kg. Laboratory of Government Chemist Reference Material LGC7111 (potato powder) was used to assess the accuracy of the method. The expanded measurement uncertainty of the method at 95% confidence level was estimated to be 17%. PMID:18376591

  2. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite by a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hua; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The oxidation of ammonium sulfite in the ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process was investigated in a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor in this paper. The effect of several parameters, including capacitance and peak pulse voltage of discharge system, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate on the oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite was reviewed. The oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite could reach 47.2% at the capacitance, the peak pulse voltage, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate equal to 2 nF, -24.6 k V, 35 mm and 4 L min-1 within treatment time of 40 min The experimental results indicate that the gas phase pulsed discharge system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrode can oxide the ammonium sulfite. The oxidation rate increased with the applied capacitance and peak pulse voltage and decreased with the electrode gap. As the bubbling gas flow rate increased, the oxidation rate increased first and then tended to reach a stationary value. These results would be important for the process optimization of the (NH4)2SO3 to (NH4)2SO4 oxidation.

  3. Kinetic and structural studies reveal a unique binding mode of sulfite to the nickel center in urease.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano; Bertini, Leonardo; Musiani, Francesco; Ciurli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Urease is the most efficient enzyme known to date, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea using two Ni(II) ions in the active site. Urease is a virulence factor in several human pathogens, while causing severe environmental and agronomic problems. Sporosarcina pasteurii urease has been used extensively in the structural characterization of the enzyme. Sodium sulfite has been widely used as a preservative in urease solutions to prevent oxygen-induced oxidation, but its role as an inhibitor has also been suggested. In the present study, isothermal titration microcalorimetry was used to establish sulfite as a competitive inhibitor for S. pasteurii urease, with an inhibition constant of 0.19mM at pH7. The structure of the urease-sulfite complex, determined at 1.65Å resolution, shows the inhibitor bound to the dinuclear Ni(II) center of urease in a tridentate mode involving bonds between the two Ni(II) ions in the active site and all three oxygen atoms of the inhibitor, supporting the observed competitive inhibition kinetics. This coordination mode of sulfite has never been observed, either in proteins or in small molecule complexes, and could inspire synthetic coordination chemists as well as biochemists to develop urease inhibitors based on this chemical moiety. PMID:26580226

  4. Genotypic variation in sulfur assimilation and metabolism of onion (Allium cepa L.) III. Characterization of sulfite reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic and cDNA sequences corresponding to a ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (SiR) have been cloned from bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) and the expression of the gene and activity of the enzyme characterised with respect to sulfur (S) supply. Cloning, mapping and expression studies revealed that onion ha...

  5. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption And Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Sulfur Dioxide, Sulfite, And Sulfonate Solutions And of the Substituted Sulfonate Ions X(3)CSO(3-)(X = H, Cl, F)

    SciTech Connect

    Risberg, E.Damian; Eriksson, L.; Mink, J.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Skripkin, M.Yu.; Sandstrom, M.

    2009-06-02

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra have been recorded and the S(1s) electron excitations evaluated by means of density functional theory-transition potential (DFT-TP) calculations to provide insight into the coordination, bonding, and electronic structure. The XANES spectra for the various species in sulfur dioxide and aqueous sodium sulfite solutions show considerable differences at different pH values in the environmentally important sulfite(IV) system. In strongly acidic (pH < {approx}1) aqueous sulfite solution the XANES spectra confirm that the hydrated sulfur dioxide molecule, SO{sub 2}(aq), dominates. The theoretical spectra are consistent with an OSO angle of {approx}119{sup o} in gas phase and acetonitrile solution, while in aqueous solution hydrogen bonding reduces the angle to {approx}116{sup o}. The hydration affects the XANES spectra also for the sulfite ion, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. At intermediate pH (4) the two coordination isomers, the sulfonate (HSO{sub 3{sup -}}) and hydrogen sulfite (SO{sub 3}H{sup -}) ions with the hydrogen atom coordinated to sulfur and oxygen, respectively, could be distinguished with the ratio HSO{sub 3{sup -}}:SO{sub 3}H{sup -} about 0.28:0.72 at 298 K. The relative amount of HSO{sub 3{sup -}} increased with increasing temperature in the investigated range from 275 to 343 K. XANES spectra of sulfonate, methanesulfonate, trichloromethanesulfonate, and trifluoromethanesulfonate compounds, all with closely similar S-O bond distances in tetrahedral configuration around the sulfur atom, were interpreted by DFT-TP computations. The energy of their main electronic transition from the sulfur K-shell is about 2478 eV. The additional absorption features are similar when a hydrogen atom or an electron-donating methyl group is bonded to the -SO{sub 3} group. Significant changes occur for the electronegative trichloromethyl (Cl{sub 3}C-) and trifluoromethyl (F{sub 3}C-) groups, which strongly affect the

  6. Fed-batch cultivation of the marine bacterium Sulfitobacter pontiacus using immobilized substrate and purification of sulfite oxidase by application of membrane adsorber technology.

    PubMed

    Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Sulfitobacter pontiacus, a gram-negative heterotrophic bacterium isolated from the Black Sea is well known to produce a soluble AMP-independent sulfite oxidase (sulfite: acceptor oxidoreductase) of high activity. Such an enzyme can be of great help in establishing biosensor systems for detection of sulfite in food and beverages considering the high sensitivity of biosensors and the increasing demand for such biosensor devices. For obtaining efficient amounts of the enzyme, an induction of its biosynthesis by supplementing sufficient concentrations of sodium sulfite to the fermentation broth is required. Owing to the fact that a high initial concentration of sodium sulfite decreases dramatically the enzyme expression, different fed-batch strategies can be applied to circumvent such inhibition or repression of the enzyme respectively. By the use of sulfite species immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol gels, an approach to the controlled and continuous feeding of sulfite to the cultivation media could be established to diminish inhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the purification of the enzyme is described by using membrane adsorber technology. PMID:17705251

  7. Simple flow injection for determination of sulfite by amperometric detection using glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotubes-PDDA-gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Sroysee, Wongduan; Chairam, Sanoe; Nacapricha, Duangjai

    2015-02-01

    A new approach is presented for sensitive and selective measurement of sulfite (SO3(2-)) in beverages based on a simple flow injection system with amperometric detection. In this work, the sulfite sensor was a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes-poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-gold nanoparticles composites (CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC). Electrochemical oxidation of sulfite with this electrode was first studied in 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) using cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated that the CNTs-PDDA-AuNPs/GC electrode possesses electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of sulfite with high sensitivity and selectivity. Sulfite was quantified using amperometric measurement with the new sensor at +0.4V vs Ag/AgCl in conjunction with flow injection. The linear working range for the quantitation of sulfite was 2-200 mg L(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with a detection limit of 0.03 mg L(-1) (3σ of blank) and an estimated precision of 1.5%.The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of sulfite in fruit juices and wines with a sample throughput of 23 samples per hour. PMID:25435239

  8. Determination of free sulfite in wine by zone electrophoresis with isotachophoresis sample pretreatment on a column-coupling chip.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Danková, Mariana; Olvecká, Eva; Stachurová, Adela; Kaniansky, Dusan; Stanislawski, Bernd

    2004-02-13

    This work deals with the determination of free sulfite in wine by zone electrophoresis (ZE) with on-line isotachophoresis (ITP) sample pretreatment on a column-coupling (CC) chip with conductivity detection. A rapid pre-column conversion of sulfite to hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMS), to minimize oxidation losses of the analyte, was included into the developed analytical procedure, while ITP and ZE were responsible for specific analytical tasks in the separations performed on the CC chip. ITP, for example, eliminated the sample matrix from the separation compartment and, at the same time, provided a selective concentration of HMS before its transfer to the ZE stage of the separation. On the other hand, ZE served as a final separation (destacking) method and it was used under the separating conditions favoring a sensitive conductivity detection of HMS. In this way, ITP and ZE cooperatively contributed to a 900 microg/l concentration detectability for sulfite as attained for a 60 nl load of wine (a 15-fold wine dilution and the use of a 0.9 microl sample injection channel of the chip) and, consequently, to the determination of free sulfite when this was present in wine at the concentrations as low as 3 mg/l. The separations were carried out in a closed separation compartment of the chip with suppressed hydrodynamic and electroosmotic flows. Such transport conditions, minimizing fluctuations of the migration velocities of the separated constituents, made a frame for precise migration and quantitation data as achieved for HMS in both the model and wine samples. Ninety percent recoveries, as typically obtained for free sulfite in wine samples, indicate promising potentialities of the present method as far as the accuracies of the provided analytical results are concerned. PMID:14763730

  9. Comparative Study of SPORL and Dilute Acid Pretreatments of Spruce for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two pretreatment methods, Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) and Dilute Acid (DA), was compared in pretreating softwood (spruce) for fuel ethanol production under the same conditions of temperature (180°C), time (30 min), sulfuric acid loading...

  10. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Busse, Nadine; Kerker, Steffen; Schmitz, Oliver; Hilpert, Markus; Czermak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and remove residual lignin from the effluent flow during sulfite pulp production. A comparison of the ceramic membranes in terms of separation efficiency and performance revealed that the two-stage process configuration with microfiltration followed by ultrafiltration was most suitable for the efficient treatment of the alkaline bleaching effluent tested herein, reducing the COD concentration and residual lignin levels by more than 35% and 70%, respectively. PMID:26729180