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Sample records for acid suppression predict

  1. Molecular Mechanisms for Sweet-suppressing Effect of Gymnemic Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kusakabe, Yuko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Seiji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2014-01-01

    Gymnemic acids are triterpene glycosides that selectively suppress taste responses to various sweet substances in humans but not in mice. This sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids is diminished by rinsing the tongue with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids and the interaction between gymnemic acids versus sweet taste receptor and/or γ-CD. To investigate whether gymnemic acids directly interact with human (h) sweet receptor hT1R2 + hT1R3, we used the sweet receptor T1R2 + T1R3 assay in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Similar to previous studies in humans and mice, gymnemic acids (100 μg/ml) inhibited the [Ca2+]i responses to sweet compounds in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing hT1R2 + hT1R3 but not in those expressing the mouse (m) sweet receptor mT1R2 + mT1R3. The effect of gymnemic acids rapidly disappeared after rinsing the HEK293 cells with γ-CD. Using mixed species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits and chimeras, we determined that the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 was mainly required for the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids. Directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 revealed that the interaction site for gymnemic acids shared the amino acid residues that determined the sensitivity to another sweet antagonist, lactisole. Glucuronic acid, which is the common structure of gymnemic acids, also reduced sensitivity to sweet compounds. In our models, gymnemic acids were predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane domain of hT1R3. PMID:25056955

  2. Can predictive coding explain repetition suppression?

    PubMed

    Grotheer, Mareike; Kovács, Gyula

    2016-07-01

    While in earlier work various local or bottom-up neural mechanisms were proposed to give rise to repetition suppression (RS), current theories suggest that top-down processes play a role in determining the repetition related reduction of the neural responses. In the current review we summarise those results, which support the role of these top-down processes, concentrating on the Bayesian models of predictive coding (PC). Such models assume that RS is related to the statistical probabilities of prior stimulus occurrences and to the future predictability of these stimuli. Here we review the current results that support or argue against this explanation. We point out that the heterogeneity of experimental manipulations that are thought to reflect predictive processes are likely to measure different processing steps, making their direct comparison difficult. In addition we emphasize the importance of identifying these sub-processes and clarifying their role in explaining RS. Finally, we propose a two-stage model for explaining the relationships of repetition and expectation phenomena in the human cortex. PMID:26861559

  3. Repetition suppression and its contextual determinants in predictive coding.

    PubMed

    Auksztulewicz, Ryszard; Friston, Karl

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a review of theoretical and empirical work on repetition suppression in the context of predictive coding. Predictive coding is a neurobiologically plausible scheme explaining how biological systems might perform perceptual inference and learning. From this perspective, repetition suppression is a manifestation of minimising prediction error through adaptive changes in predictions about the content and precision of sensory inputs. Simulations of artificial neural hierarchies provide a principled way of understanding how repetition suppression - at different time scales - can be explained in terms of inference and learning implemented under predictive coding. This formulation of repetition suppression is supported by results of numerous empirical studies of repetition suppression and its contextual determinants. PMID:26861557

  4. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  5. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  6. The use of long-term acid-suppression therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, G P; Contractor, B; Bramble, M G

    1995-01-01

    Drug therapy to suppress gastric acid secretion is commonly used in the management of dyspepsia, many patients taking such therapy over long periods of time. An audit of patients on long-term (> 12 months) acid-suppression therapy was carried out in the two practices providing primary healthcare to a town in Northeast England. Patients on continuous therapy (> 10 months' supply in the previous year) and intermittent therapy (6-10 months' supply in the previous year) were identified through computerised prescribing records. Their written and computer records were scrutinised to determine diagnosis, duration of therapy, use of NSAIDs and other features. A total of 365 patients were identified (208 men, 157 women): 132 were on intermittent and 233 on continuous therapy. Of the total, 83% were over 45 years and one-fifth were taking NSAIDs. Of the 310 patients investigated for their dyspepsia, only 250 had a positive diagnosis, of which duodenal ulcer (154) was the most common. PMID:7779658

  7. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  8. Gambogic acid inhibits multiple myeloma mediated osteoclastogenesis through suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj K; Kale, Vijay P; Song, Chunhua; Sung, Shen-shu; Sharma, Arun K; Talamo, Giampaolo; Dovat, Sinisa; Amin, Shantu G

    2014-10-01

    Bone disease, characterized by the presence of lytic lesions and osteoporosis is the hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM). Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), has been implicated as a regulator of bone resorption, suggesting that agents that can suppress SDF1α/CXCR4 signaling might inhibit osteoclastogenesis, a process closely linked to bone resorption. We, therefore, investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone, could inhibit CXCR4 signaling and suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by MM cells. Through docking studies we predicted that GA directly interacts with CXCR4. This xanthone down-regulates the expression of CXCR4 on MM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The down-regulation of CXCR4 was not due to proteolytic degradation, but rather GA suppresses CXCR4 mRNA expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) DNA binding. This was further confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, as GA inhibits p65 binding at the CXCR4 promoter. GA suppressed SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis of MM cells and downstream signaling of CXCR4 by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt, p38, and Erk1/2 in MM cells. GA abrogated the RANKL-induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, we found that MM cells induced differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts, and that GA suppressed this process. Importantly, suppression of osteoclastogenesis by GA was mediated through IL-6 inhibition. Overall, our results show that GA is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression and has a strong potential to suppress osteoclastogenesis mediated by MM cells. PMID:25034231

  9. Suppression on Your Own Terms: Internally Generated Displays of Craving Suppression Predict Rebound Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, W. Michael; Sayette, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on emotion suppression has shown a rebound effect, in which expression of the targeted emotion increases following a suppression attempt. In prior investigations, participants have been explicitly instructed to suppress their responses, which has drawn the act of suppression into metaconsciousness. Yet emerging research emphasizes the importance of nonconscious approaches to emotion regulation. This study is the first in which a craving rebound effect was evaluated without simultaneously raising awareness about suppression. We aimed to link spontaneously occurring attempts to suppress cigarette craving to increased smoking motivation assessed immediately thereafter. Smokers (n = 66) received a robust cued smoking-craving manipulation while their facial responses were videotaped and coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Following smoking-cue exposure, participants completed a behavioral choice task previously found to index smoking motivation. Participants evincing suppression-related facial expressions during cue exposure subsequently valued smoking more than did those not displaying these expressions, which suggests that internally generated suppression can exert powerful rebound effects. PMID:23842957

  10. Lipoic acid suppression of neutrophil respiratory burst: effect of NADPH.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Heidi C; Rancourt, Raymond C; White, Carl W

    2008-02-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) and its reduced product dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) are potent antioxidants with capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and recycle endogenous antioxidants. LA may increase cellular glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant lacking in the lung's epithelial lining fluid in lung disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Neutrophils (PMN) are key innate responders and are pivotal in clearing bacterial infection, therefore it is crucial to understand the impact LA may have on their function. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and pretreated with LA or diluent. Cells were subsequently activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 100 ng/ml) to induce ROS production. SOD-inhibitable reduction of acetylated cytochrome c demonstrated the PMA-dependent respiratory burst was suppressed by LA. Oxygen consumption also was diminished when PMA-stimulated cells were pretreated with LA. PMN respiratory burst was partially restored by addition of NADPH but not other pyridine nucleotides. LA did not inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity of PMN. These data together suggest that the reduction of LA to DHLA using cellular NADPH may limit the capacity of the PMN NADPH oxidase to produce superoxide. Further studies will be required to determine if LA can diminish excessive superoxide produced by PMN and/or alveolar macrophages in IPF or relevant disease models in vivo. PMID:18158760

  11. Suppression of Autophagic Flux by Bile Acids in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bo; Guo, Grace; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Retention of bile acids (BAs) in the liver during cholestasis plays an important role in the development of cholestatic liver injury. Several studies have reported that high concentrations of certain BAs induce cell death and inflammatory response in the liver, and BAs may promote liver tumorigenesis. Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a lysosomal degradation process that regulates organelle and protein homeostasis and serves as a cell survival mechanism under a variety of stress conditions. However, it is not known if BAs modulate autophagy in hepatocytes. In the present study, we determined autophagic flux in livers of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) knockout (KO) mice that have increased concentrations of hepatic BAs and in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes treated with BAs. The results showed that autophagic flux was impaired in livers of FXR KO mice and in BA-treated primary mouse hepatocytes. Mechanistically, BAs did not affect the activities of cathepsin or the proteasome, but impaired autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion likely due to reduction of Rab7 protein expression and targeting to autophagosomes. In conclusion, BAs suppress autophagic flux in hepatocytes by impairing autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, which may be implicated in bile acid-induced liver tumor promotion observed in FXR KO mice. PMID:24189133

  12. Risk of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Associated With Gastric Acid Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shy-Shin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Meng-tse Gabriel; Lee, Yu-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between the use of gastric acid suppressants (GAS) and the risk of developing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis (LC). A case–control study nested within a cohort of 480,000 representatives of Taiwan National Health Insurance beneficiaries was carried out. A case was matched with 100 controls on age, gender, and index date of SBP diagnosis. GAS use was identified from the 1-year period before the index date. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for various unbalanced covariates between users and nonusers of GAS. A total of 947 cases of SBP were identified among the 86,418 patients with advanced LC. A significant increased risk of developing SBP was found to be associated with current (within 30 days), and recent (within 30–90 day) use of 2 different classes of GAS: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs). The confounder adjusted rate ratio (aRR) for the current use of PPIs was 2.77 (95%CI: 1.90–4.04) and H2RAs was 2.62 (95%CI: 2.00–3.42). The risk of SBP attenuated for the recent use of PPIs (aRR: 2.20, 95%CI: 1.60–3.02) or H2RAs (aRR: 1.72, 95%CI: 1.25–2.37). In addition, sensitivity analysis using hospitalized SBP as the primary outcome showed a similar risk for the current use of PPIs (aRR, 3.24; 95%CI: 2.08–5.05) and H2RAs (aRR 2.43; 95%CI 1.71–3.46). Furthermore, higher cumulative days of gastric acid suppression were associated with a higher risk of SBP (trend P < 0.0001). To conclude, exposure to GAS was associated with an increased risk of SBP in patients with advanced LC. The association was more pronounced in current PPI users compared with nonusers. PMID:26039135

  13. Dietary eritadenine suppresses guanidinoacetic Acid-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Shin-ichiro; Setoue, Minoru; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2006-11-01

    We assessed the effect of eritadenine, a hypocholesterolemic factor isolated from the edible mushroom Lentinus edodes, on plasma homocysteine concentration using methyl-group acceptor-induced hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet or diets supplemented with a methyl-group acceptor or a precursor of methyl-group acceptor. Diets were supplemented with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 g/kg, nicotinic acid (NiA) or ethanolamine (EA) at 5 and 10 g/kg, or glycine at 25 and 50 g/kg, and the rats were fed for 10 d (Expt. 1). Plasma total homocysteine concentration was increased 255 and 421% by 5 and 10 g/kg GAA, respectively, and 39 and 58% by 5 and 10 g/kg NiA, respectively, but not by EA or glycine. GAA supplementation dose-dependently decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentration and the activity of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and increased the hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and homocysteine concentrations. In another study in which rats were fed 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet for 1-10 d, plasma homocysteine and the other variables affected in Expt. 1 were affected in rats fed the GAA-supplemented diet (Expt. 2). We investigated the effect of supplementation of 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet with eritadenine (50 mg/kg) on plasma homocysteine concentration (Expt. 3). Eritadenine supplementation significantly suppressed the GAA-induced increase in plasma homocysteine concentration. Eritadenine also restored the decreased SAM concentration and CBS activity in the liver, whereas it further increased hepatic SAH concentration, suggesting that eritadenine might elicit its effect by both slowing homocysteine production and increasing cystathionine formation. The results confirm that GAA is a useful compound to induce experimental hyperhomocysteinemia and indicate that eritadenine can effectively counteract the hyperhomocysteinemic effect of GAA. PMID:17056803

  14. Weight Suppression Predicts Maintenance and Onset of Bulimic Syndromes at 10-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Keel, Pamela K.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2010-01-01

    Conflicting results have emerged regarding the prognostic significance of weight suppression for maintenance of bulimic symptoms. This study examined whether the magnitude of weight suppression would predict bulimic syndrome maintenance and onset in college-based samples of men (n=369) and women (n=968) at 10-year follow-up. Data come from a longitudinal study of body weight and disordered eating with high retention (80%). Among those with a bulimic syndrome at baseline, greater weight suppression significantly predicted maintenance of the syndrome, and, among those without a bulimic syndrome at baseline, greater weight suppression predicted onset of a bulimic syndrome at 10-year follow-up in multivariate models that included baseline body mass index, diet frequency, and weight perception. Future research should address mechanisms that could account for the effects of weight suppression over a long duration of follow-up. PMID:20455599

  15. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  16. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  17. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088

  18. Prediction suppression in monkey inferotemporal cortex depends on the conditional probability between images.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Suchitra; Meyer, Travis; Olson, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    When monkeys view two images in fixed sequence repeatedly over days and weeks, neurons in area TE of the inferotemporal cortex come to exhibit prediction suppression. The trailing image elicits only a weak response when presented following the leading image that preceded it during training. Induction of prediction suppression might depend either on the contiguity of the images, as determined by their co-occurrence and captured in the measure of joint probability P(A,B), or on their contingency, as determined by their correlation and as captured in the measures of conditional probability P(A|B) and P(B|A). To distinguish between these possibilities, we measured prediction suppression after imposing training regimens that held P(A,B) constant but varied P(A|B) and P(B|A). We found that reducing either P(A|B) or P(B|A) during training attenuated prediction suppression as measured during subsequent testing. We conclude that prediction suppression depends on contingency, as embodied in the predictive relations between the images, and not just on contiguity, as embodied in their co-occurrence. PMID:26581864

  19. Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Satsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukaya, M; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-03-01

    To understand how blood glucose level is lowered by oral administration of vinegar, we examined effects of acetic acid on glucose transport and disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells. Cells were cultured for 15 d in a medium containing 5 mmol/L of acetic acid. This chronic treatment did not affect cell growth or viability, and furthermore, apoptotic cell death was not observed. Glucose transport, evaluated with a nonmetabolizable substrate, 3-O-methyl glucose, also was not affected. However, the increase of sucrase activity observed in control cells (no acetic acid) was significantly suppressed by acetic acid (P < 0.01). Acetic acid suppressed sucrase activity in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Similar treatments (5 mmol/L and 15 d) with other organic acids such as citric, succinic, L-maric, L-lactic, L-tartaric and itaconic acids, did not suppress the increase in sucrase activity. Acetic acid treatment (5 mmol/L and 15 d) significantly decreased the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, maltase, trehalase and lactase) and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, whereas the activities of other hydrolases (alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase-N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase) were not affected. To understand mechanisms underlying the suppression of disaccharidase activity by acetic acid, Northern and Western analyses of the sucrase-isomaltase complex were performed. Acetic acid did not affect the de novo synthesis of this complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels. The antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid may be partially due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity. This suppression seems to occur during the post-translational processing. PMID:10702577

  20. Ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.; Simpson, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to induce a transient defect in epidermal antigen presentation which leads to the generation of antigen-specific suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. The putative receptor in skin for the primary event in UV-suppression is urocanic acid (UCA) which may then interact locally, or systemically, with antigen presenting cells or initiate a cascade of events resulting in suppression. We present the first direct evidence that UCA, when irradiated with a dose (96 mJ/cm2) of UVB radiation known to suppress the DTH response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1) in mice, can induce suppression following epidermal application or s.c. injection of the irradiated substance. This suppression is transferable with nylon wool-passed spleen cells.

  1. Prediction, Measurement, and Suppression of High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Bhat, T. R. S.; Jansen, Bernard J.

    1999-01-01

    The photograph in figure 1 displays a water cooled round convergent-divergent supersonic nozzle operating slightly overexpanded near 2460 F. The nozzle is designed to produce shock free flow near this temperature at Mach 2. The exit diameter of this nozzle is 3.5 inches. This nozzle is used in the present study to establish properties of the sound field associated with high temperature supersonic jets operating fully pressure balanced (i.e. shock free) and to evaluate capability of the compressible Rayleigh model to account for principle physical features of the observed sound emission. The experiment is conducted statically (i.e. M(sub f) = 0.) in the NASA/LaRC Jet Noise Laboratory. Both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements are obtained in this study along with numerical plume simulation and theoretical prediction of jet noise. Detailed results from this study are reported previously by Seiner, Ponton, Jansen, and Lagen.

  2. Suppression of adipose lipolysis by long-chain fatty acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Bella; Azazmeh, Narmen; Azulay, Nili; Vissler, Noam; Valitsky, Michael; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Agonist-induced lipolysis of adipose fat is robustly inhibited by insulin or by feedback inhibition by the long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) produced during lipolysis. However, the mode of action of LCFA in suppressing adipose lipolysis is not clear. β,β'-Tetramethyl hexadecanedioic acid (Mββ/ EDICA16) is a synthetic LCFA that is neither esterified into lipids nor β-oxidized, and therefore, it was exploited for suppressing agonist-induced lipolysis in analogy to natural LCFA. Mββ is shown here to suppress isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in the rat in vivo as well as in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Inhibition of isoproterenol-induced lipolysis is due to decrease in isoproterenol-induced cAMP with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipin by protein kinase A. Suppression of cellular cAMP levels is accounted for by inhibition of the adenylate cyclase due to suppression of Raf1 expression by Mββ-activated AMPK. Suppression of Raf1 is further complemented by induction of components of the unfolded-protein-response by Mββ. Our findings imply genuine inhibition of agonist-induced adipose lipolysis by LCFA, independent of their β-oxidation or reesterification. Mββ suppression of agonist-induced lipolysis and cellular cAMP levels independent of the insulin transduction pathway may indicate that synthetic LCFA could serve as insulin mimetics in the lipolysis context under conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:22338010

  3. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation and tube formation in mouse brain endothelial cells, respectively. In addition, gallic acid decreased U87 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis showed that expression of ADAM17, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in both U87 and U251n cell lines. These data suggest that suppression of ADAM17 and downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to gallic acid-induced decrease of invasiveness. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for treatment of brain tumor. PMID:20553913

  4. DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS BY ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH NON-SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND OPTICAL DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of carboxylic acids using non-suppressed conductivity and UV detections is described. The background conductance of 1-octanesulfonic acid, hexane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid at varying concentrations was determined. Using 0.2 mM 1-octanesulfonic acid as a mobile...

  5. DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS BY ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH NON-SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND OPTICAL DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of carboxylic acids using non-suppressed conductivity and UV detections is described. he background conductance of I-octanesulfonic acid, hexane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid at varying concentrations was determined. sing 0.2 MM I-octanesulfonic acid as a mobile p...

  6. Suppression of the primary IgM response by environmental teichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Oldfather, J W; Chorpenning, F W

    1981-05-01

    It has been shown previously that ingestion of glycerol teichoic acid (GTA) in the conventional laboratory diet (8 mg/kg) is the stimulus for natural background responses to GTA in rats. Since injected GTA suppresses responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), it was suspected that dietary GTA also might be acting suppressively. A comparison of rats fed the conventional diet with rats fed a GTA-free diet showed that ingested GTA markedly suppressed immune and background direct plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to SRBC. It appeared that a direct causal relationship existed between the degree of suppression and the amount of GTA exposure. When GTA-deprived rats were force-fed varying doses of GTA or when conventional animals were injected (i.p.) with GTA, increasing the total GTA dose resulted in decreased direct PFC responses to SRBC. Suppression was also observed when GTA-deprived rats were force-fed GTA-containing Bacillus sp. ATCC 29726. The phenomenon of suppression by dietary GTA was not restricted to responses to SRBC, as similar results were obtained with chicken erythrocytes. When IgG PFC were measured, no difference between conventional and GTA-deprived groups was observed. Thus, an IgM-IgG shift does not seem to play a role in the mechanism of suppression by GTA. PMID:7021168

  7. Saturated fatty-acids regulate retinoic acid signaling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty-acid-binding protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L.; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes, and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5 which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  8. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  9. Hyaluronic acid reagent suppressed endometriotic lesion formation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiko; Yoshino, Osamu; Osuga, Yutaka; Kodama, Ako; Takamura, Masashi; Nishii, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2010-05-15

    In an animal endometriosis model, the administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) reagent significantly suppressed the formation of endometriotic lesions in both number and weight. This effect was found when HA treatment was conducted at the time of endometrial fragment inoculation. PMID:20356589

  10. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  11. TORC1 Suppression Predicts Responsiveness to RAF and MEK Inhibition in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Ryan B.; Rothenberg, Stephen Michael; Hata, Aaron N.; Faber, Anthony C.; Piris, Adriano; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Brown, Ronald D.; Godfrey, Jason T.; Winokur, Daniel; Walsh, John; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Settleman, Jeffrey; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Haber, Daniel A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    RAF and MEK (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitors are effective in treating patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, most responses are partial and short-lived, and many patients fail to respond at all. We found that suppression of TORC1 activity in response to RAF or MEK inhibitors, as measured by decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6), effectively predicted induction of cell death by the inhibitor in BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines. In resistant melanomas, TORC1 activity was maintained after treatment with RAF or MEK inhibitors, in some cases despite robust suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. In in vivo mouse models, suppression of TORC1 after MAPK inhibition was necessary for induction of apoptosis and tumor response. Finally, in paired biopsies obtained from patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma before treatment and after initiation of RAF inhibitor therapy, P-S6 suppression predicted significantly improved progression-free survival. Such a change in P-S6 could be readily monitored in real time by serial fine-needle aspiration biopsies, making quantitation of P-S6 a valuable biomarker to guide treatment in BRAF-mutant melanoma. PMID:23903755

  12. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid orally administered suppresses P-selectin expression on mouse platelets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caffeic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid are a naturally occurring phenolic acid and its ester found in human diets. In this paper, potential effects of caffeic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid found in coffee and other plant sources on platelet activation were studied via investigating P-selectin expre...

  13. Long-term suppression of wetland methane flux following a pulse of simulated acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy; Blake, Stephen

    2005-06-01

    Wetlands are a potent source of the radiatively important gas methane (CH4). Recent findings have demonstrated that sulfate (SO42-) deposition via acid rain suppresses CH4 emissions by stimulating competitive exclusion of methanogens by sulfate-reducing microbial populations. Here we report data from a field experiment showing that a finite pulse of simulated acid rain SO42- deposition, as would be expected from a large Icelandic volcanic eruption, continues to suppress CH4 emissions from wetlands long after the pollution event has ceased. Our analysis of the stoichiometries suggests that 5 years is a minimum CH4 emission recovery period, with 10 years being a reasonable upper limit. Our findings highlight the long-term impact of acid rain on biospheric output of CH4 which, for discrete polluting events such as volcanic eruptions, outlives the relatively short-term SO42- aerosol radiative cooling effect.

  14. Suppression of Acid Diffusion in Chemical Amplification Resists by Molecular Control of Base Matrix Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshiyuki; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shinji

    1995-12-01

    Suppression of acid diffusion during post-exposure baking (PEB) of chemical amplification resists is investigated from the standpoint of molecular control of base matrix polymers. Negative-type chemical amplification resists composed of cresol novolak-based matrix polymers, acid-catalyzed crosslinkers of melamine resins, and acid generators of onium salts are prepared. The molecular weight distributions of the base matrix polymers are controlled by means of a precipitation method. The resists are exposed with electron beams in isolated lines to evaluate the acid diffusion characteristics. Dependence of pattern sizes on the PEB time clearly shows that acid diffusion determines the resist pattern sizes based on Fick's law. The diffusion coefficients of resists with base matrix polymers with small polydispersities are smaller than those of resists with base matrix polymers with large polydispersities. Acid diffusion can still be suppressed by applying base matrix polymers with small weight-average molecular weights and small polydispersities. Diffusion coefficients can be further decreased by using base matrix polymers with more p-cresol components. A diffusion mechanism is proposed based on acid diffusion channels composed of active OH-groups and vacancies in the base matrix polymers.

  15. Improved NASA-ANOPP Noise Prediction Computer Code for Advanced Subsonic Propulsion Systems. Volume 2; Fan Suppression Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen B.; Kraft, Robert E.; Gliebe, Philip R.

    1996-01-01

    The Aircraft Noise Predication Program (ANOPP) is an industry-wide tool used to predict turbofan engine flyover noise in system noise optimization studies. Its goal is to provide the best currently available methods for source noise prediction. As part of a program to improve the Heidmann fan noise model, models for fan inlet and fan exhaust noise suppression estimation that are based on simple engine and acoustic geometry inputs have been developed. The models can be used to predict sound power level suppression and sound pressure level suppression at a position specified relative to the engine inlet.

  16. Irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced elevation of bile acids potentiates suppression of IL-10 expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Dunfang; Cao, Yun-Feng; Xie, Cen; Lu, Dan; Sun, Dong-Xue; Tanaka, Naoki; Jiang, Changtao; Chen, Qianming; Chen, Yu; Wang, Haina; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2016-01-15

    Irinotecan (CPT-11) is a first-line anti-colon cancer drug, however; CPT-11-induced toxicity remains a key factor limiting its clinical application. To search for clues to the mechanism of CPT-11-induced toxicity, metabolomics was applied using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg of CPT-11 induced loss of body weight, and intestine toxicity. Changes in gallbladder morphology suggested alterations in bile acid metabolism, as revealed at the molecular level by analysis of the liver, bile, and ileum metabolomes between the vehicle-treated control group and the CPT-11-treated group. Analysis of immune cell populations further showed that CPT-11 treatment significantly decreased the IL-10-producing CD4 T cell frequency in intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes, but not in spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes. In vitro cell culture studies showed that the addition of bile acids deoxycholic acid and taurodeoxycholic acid accelerated the CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 secretion by activated CD4(+) naive T cells isolated from mouse splenocytes. These results showed that CPT-11 treatment caused metabolic changes in the composition of bile acids that altered CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 expression. PMID:26706406

  17. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O.; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  18. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B

    2015-11-15

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  19. Does adolescent alcohol and marijuana use predict suppressed growth in psychosocial maturity among male juvenile offenders?

    PubMed

    Chassin, Laurie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Modecki, Kathryn; Steinberg, Laurence; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Piquero, Alex R; Knight, George P; Losoya, Sandra H

    2010-03-01

    Multiple theories suggest mechanisms by which the use of alcohol and drugs during adolescence could dampen growth in psychosocial maturity. However, scant empirical evidence exists to support this proposition. The current study tested whether alcohol and marijuana use predicted suppressed growth in psychosocial maturity among a sample of male serious juvenile offenders (n = 1,170) who were followed from ages 15 to 21 years. Alcohol and marijuana use prospectively predicted lower maturity 6 months later. Moreover, boys with the greatest increases in marijuana use showed the smallest increases in psychosocial maturity. Finally, heterogeneity in the form of age-related alcohol and marijuana trajectories was related to growth in maturity, such that only boys who decreased their alcohol and marijuana use significantly increased in psychosocial maturity. Taken together, these findings suggest that patterns of elevated alcohol and marijuana use in adolescence may suppress age-typical growth in psychosocial maturity from adolescence to young adulthood, but that effects are not necessarily permanent, because decreasing use is associated with increases in maturity. PMID:20307112

  20. Does adolescent alcohol and marijuana use predict suppressed growth in psychosocial maturity among male juvenile offenders?

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Laurie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Modecki, Kathryn; Steinberg, Laurence; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Piquero, Alex R.; Knight, George P.; Losoya, Sandra H.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple theories suggest mechanisms by which the use of alcohol and drugs during adolescence could dampen growth in psychosocial maturity. However, scant empirical evidence exists to support this proposition. The current study tested whether alcohol and marijuana use predicted suppressed growth in psychosocial maturity among a sample of male serious juvenile offenders (n = 1,170) who were followed from ages 15 to 21. Alcohol and marijuana use prospectively predicted lower maturity six months later. Moreover, boys with the greatest increases in marijuana use showed the smallest increases in psychosocial maturity. Finally, heterogeneity in the form of age-related alcohol and marijuana trajectories was related to growth in maturity, such that only boys who decreased their alcohol and marijuana use significantly increased in psychosocial maturity. Taken together, these findings suggest that patterns of elevated alcohol and marijuana use in adolescence may suppress age-typical growth in psychosocial maturity from adolescence to young adulthood, but that effects are not necessarily permanent, because decreasing use is associated with increases in maturity. PMID:20307112

  1. Mechanism of Shope Fibroma Virus-Induced Suppression of Host Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, James C.; Hodes, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of treatment with live or inactivated Shope fibroma virus on host cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis were determined. The incorporation of 3H-thymidine into nuclear DNA was suppressed by both active and inactivated virus, although live virus was more effective. During the early phase of infection, stimulation of host nuclear DNA synthesis of up to 240% of control value was observed in cells infected with active virus. Inhibition of DNA synthesis began at about the 8th h and was maximal by 12 h postinfection. Virus inactivated by ultraviolet-irradiation or heat treatment did not induce viral DNA synthesis but was, nevertheless, able to suppress host DNA synthesis. PMID:4202660

  2. Propionic acid and its esterified derivative suppress the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Dai, A; Huang, S; Kuo, S; Shu, M; Tapia, C P; Yu, J; Two, A; Zhang, H; Gallo, R L; Huang, C-M

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Propionibacterium acnes, a human skin commensal bacterium, ferments glycerol into short-chain fatty acids, including propionic acid. Propionic acid suppressed the growth of Staphylococcus aureus USA300, a community-acquired methicillin-resistant bacterium, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, it is demonstrated that the anti-USA300 activity of propionic acid persisted after buffering the acid with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1- piperazineethanesulfonic acid. This suggests that the growth suppression of USA300 mainly resulted from the antimicrobial activity of propionic acid per se and not from the acidity of the medium. In addition, proprionic acid significantly reduced the intracellular pH of USA300 and exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. P. acnes showed a higher tolerance to propionic acid. Next, an esterified derivative of propionic acid was synthesised. Propionic acid and the esterified derivative were equivalent in their efficacy to suppress the growth of USA300 in vitro. The esterified derivative thus provides an alternative to propionic acid as an antimicrobial agent against S. aureus. PMID:24686580

  3. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  4. Effect of gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics on peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Eun; Koh, Seong-Joon; Chun, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics on peritonitis development in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. METHODS: This was a single-center, retrospective study. The medical records of 398 PD patients were collected from January 2000 to September 2012 and analyzed to compare patients with at least one episode of peritonitis (peritonitis group, group A) to patients who never had peritonitis (no peritonitis group, group B). All peritonitis episodes were analyzed to compare peritonitis caused by enteric organisms and peritonitis caused by non-enteric organisms. RESULTS: Among the 120 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 61 patients had at least one episode of peritonitis and 59 patients never experienced peritonitis. Twenty-four of 61 patients (39.3%) in group A and 15 of 59 patients (25.4%) in group B used gastric acid suppressants. Only the use of H2-blocker (H2B) was associated with an increased risk of PD-related peritonitis; the use of proton pump inhibitors, other antacids, and prokinetics was not found to be a significant risk factor for PD-related peritonitis. A total of 81 episodes of peritonitis were divided into enteric peritonitis (EP) or non-enteric peritonitis, depending on the causative organism, and gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics did not increase the risk of EP in PD patients. CONCLUSION: The use of H2B showed a trend for an increased risk of overall PD-related peritonitis, although further studies are required to clarify the effects of drugs on PD-related peritonitis. PMID:25057226

  5. Thermodynamic prediction of hydrogen production from mixed-acid fermentations.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Andrea K; Wales, Melinda E; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-10-01

    The MixAlco™ process biologically converts biomass to carboxylate salts that may be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The process utilizes lignocellulosic biomass as feedstock (e.g., municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and agricultural residues), creating an economic basis for sustainable biofuels. This study provides a thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen yield from mixed-acid fermentations from two feedstocks: paper and bagasse. During batch fermentations, hydrogen production, acid production, and sugar digestion were analyzed to determine the energy selectivity of each system. To predict hydrogen production during continuous operation, this energy selectivity was then applied to countercurrent fermentations of the same systems. The analysis successfully predicted hydrogen production from the paper fermentation to within 11% and the bagasse fermentation to within 21% of the actual production. The analysis was able to faithfully represent hydrogen production and represents a step forward in understanding and predicting hydrogen production from mixed-acid fermentations. PMID:21875794

  6. DEPTOR suppresses the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and predicts poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiang; Li, Sheng-Bao; Wei, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ping; Song, Kuncheng; Tan, Tao; Zhu, Hua; Guo, Jia-Long

    2016-01-01

    As a naturally occurring inhibitor of mTOR, accumulated evidence has suggested that DEPTOR plays a pivotal role in suppressing the progression of human malignances. However, the function of DEPTOR in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still unclear. Here we report that the expression of DEPTOR is significantly reduced in tumor tissues derived from human patients with ESCC, and the downregulation of DEPTOR predicts a poor prognosis of ESCC patients. In addition, we found that the expression of DEPTOR negatively regulates the tumorigenic activities of ESCC cell lines (KYSE150, KYSE510 and KYSE190). Furthermore, ectopic DEPTOR expression caused a significant suppression of the cellular proliferation, migration and invasion of KYSE150 cells, which has the lowest expression level of DEPTOR in the three cell lines. Meanwhile, CRISPR/Cas9 mediated knockout of DEPTOR in KYSE-510 cells significantly promoted cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, in vivo assays further revealed that tumor growth was significantly inhibited in xenografts with ectopic DEPTOR expression as compared to untreated KYSE150 cells, and was markedly enhanced in DEPTOR knockout KYSE-510 cells. Biochemical studies revealed that overexpression of DEPTOR led to the suppression of AKT/mTOR pathway as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR and downstream SGK1, indicating DEPTOR might control the progression of ESCC through AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, these findings, for the first time, demonstrated that DEPTOR inhibits the tumorigenesis of ESCC cells and might serve as a potential therapeutic target or prognostic marker for human patients with ESCC. PMID:26893358

  7. SNR Loss: A new objective measure for predicting speech intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianfen; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the existing intelligibility measures do not account for the distortions present in processed speech, such as those introduced by speech-enhancement algorithms. In the present study, we propose three new objective measures that can be used for prediction of intelligibility of processed (e.g., via an enhancement algorithm) speech in noisy conditions. All three measures use a critical-band spectral representation of the clean and noise-suppressed signals and are based on the measurement of the SNR loss incurred in each critical band after the corrupted signal goes through a speech enhancement algorithm. The proposed measures are flexible in that they can provide different weights to the two types of spectral distortions introduced by enhancement algorithms, namely spectral attenuation and spectral amplification distortions. The proposed measures were evaluated with intelligibility scores obtained by normal-hearing listeners in 72 noisy conditions involving noise-suppressed speech (consonants and sentences) corrupted by four different maskers (car, babble, train and street interferences). Highest correlation (r=−0.85) with sentence recognition scores was obtained using a variant of the SNR loss measure that only included vowel/consonant transitions and weak consonant information. High correlation was maintained for all noise types, with a maximum correlation (r=−0.88) achieved in street noise conditions. PMID:21503274

  8. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy B.; Howell, Graham; Jenkins, Meaghan E.

    2008-09-01

    Sulfate in acid rain is known to suppress methane (CH4) emissions from natural freshwater wetlands. Here we examine the possibility that CH4 emissions from rice agriculture may be similarly affected by acid rain, a major and increasing pollution problem in Asia. Our findings suggest that acid rain rates of SO42- deposition may help to reduce CH4 emissions from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants treated with simulated acid rain at levels of SO42- consistent with the range of deposition in Asia were reduced by 24% during the grain filling and ripening stage of the rice season which accounts for 50% of the overall CH4 that is normally emitted in a rice season. A single application of SO42- at a comparable level reduced CH4 emission by 43%. We hypothesize that the reduction in CH4 emission may be due to a combination of effects. The first mechanism is that the low rates of SO42- may be sufficient to boost yields of rice and, in so doing, may cause a reduction in root exudates to the rhizosphere, a key substrate source for methanogenesis. Decreasing a major substrate source for methanogens is also likely to intensify competition with sulfate-reducing microorganisms for whom prior SO42- limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition.

  9. Suppression of fat deposition in broiler chickens by (-)-hydroxycitric acid supplementation: A proteomics perspective

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mengling; Han, Jing; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA) suppresses fatty acid synthesis in animals, but its biochemical mechanism in poultry is unclear. This study identified the key proteins associated with fat metabolism and elucidated the biochemical mechanism of (-)-HCA in broiler chickens. Four groups (n = 30 each) received a diet supplemented with 0, 1000, 2000 or 3000 mg/kg (-)-HCA for 4 weeks. Of the differentially expressed liver proteins, 40 and 26 were identified in the mitochondrial and cytoplasm respectively. Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 components (PDHA1 and PDHB), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), aconitase (ACO2), a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (DLST), enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS1) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) were upregulated, while NADP-dependent malic enzyme (ME1) was downregulated. Biological network analysis showed that the identified proteins were involved in glycometabolism and lipid metabolism, whereas PDHA1, PDHB, ECHS1, and ME1 were identified in the canonical pathway by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The data indicated that (-)-HCA inhibited fatty acid synthesis by reducing the acetyl-CoA supply, via promotion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (upregulation of PDHA1, PDHB, ACO2, and DLST expression) and inhibition of ME1 expression. Moreover, (-)-HCA promoted fatty acid beta-oxidation by upregulating ECHS1 expression. These results reflect a biochemically relevant mechanism of fat reduction by (-)-HCA in broiler chickens. PMID:27586962

  10. Suppression of fat deposition in broiler chickens by (-)-hydroxycitric acid supplementation: A proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengling; Han, Jing; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA) suppresses fatty acid synthesis in animals, but its biochemical mechanism in poultry is unclear. This study identified the key proteins associated with fat metabolism and elucidated the biochemical mechanism of (-)-HCA in broiler chickens. Four groups (n = 30 each) received a diet supplemented with 0, 1000, 2000 or 3000 mg/kg (-)-HCA for 4 weeks. Of the differentially expressed liver proteins, 40 and 26 were identified in the mitochondrial and cytoplasm respectively. Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 components (PDHA1 and PDHB), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), aconitase (ACO2), a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (DLST), enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS1) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) were upregulated, while NADP-dependent malic enzyme (ME1) was downregulated. Biological network analysis showed that the identified proteins were involved in glycometabolism and lipid metabolism, whereas PDHA1, PDHB, ECHS1, and ME1 were identified in the canonical pathway by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The data indicated that (-)-HCA inhibited fatty acid synthesis by reducing the acetyl-CoA supply, via promotion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (upregulation of PDHA1, PDHB, ACO2, and DLST expression) and inhibition of ME1 expression. Moreover, (-)-HCA promoted fatty acid beta-oxidation by upregulating ECHS1 expression. These results reflect a biochemically relevant mechanism of fat reduction by (-)-HCA in broiler chickens. PMID:27586962

  11. Prenylated quinolinecarboxylic acid derivative suppresses immune response through inhibition of PAK2.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Masato; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yamaki, Junko; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2016-04-01

    Development of new immunosuppressing agents is necessary in organ transplantation or immune diseases. Because Ppc-1 exhibits a suppressing effect on interleukin-2 (IL2) production in Jurkat cells, we synthesized and screened Ppc-1 derivatives that preserve prenylated quinolinecarboxylic acid (PQA) structure, and identified compound 18 (PQA-18) as a novel molecule with immunosuppressing effect. PQA-18 suppressed not only IL2 but also IL4, IL6, and tumor necrosis factor-α production in human peripheral lymphocytes without affecting cell viability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis and in vitro kinase assay revealed that PQA-18 inhibits kinase activity of p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2). Administration of PQA-18 by intraperitoneal injection suppressed the population of a subset of regulatory T cells and the immunoglobulin (Ig) production against T cell-dependent antigens in mice. Treatment with the PQA-18 ointment on Nc/Nga mice, a model of human atopic dermatitis, improved skin lesions and serum IgE levels. These results suggest that PQA-18 is a unique PAK2 inhibitor with potent immunosuppressing effects in vitro and in vivo. PQA-18 may be a valuable lead for the development of novel immunosuppressants. PMID:26827943

  12. Characterization of bacteria that suppress rhizoctonia damping-off in bark compost media by analysis of Fatty Acid biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tunlid, A; Hoitink, H A; Low, C; White, D C

    1989-06-01

    Examination of cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in bark compost media and of the surrounding edaphic substrate showed profiles of polar lipid fatty acids commonly found in bacteria. The composition of fatty acids in these profiles differed significantly between roots grown in a medium naturally suppressive to Rhizoctonia damping-off and roots from a conducive medium. Cucumber roots from the suppressive medium had higher proportions of cis-vaccenic acid (18:1 omega 7c) and the iso-branched monoenoic fatty acid i17:1 omega 8 but lower proportions of several iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids compared with roots from the conducive medium. The concentrations of the bacterial fatty acids were significantly lower in the surrounding media. However, the suppressive and conducive growth substrates had differences in the composition of the bacterial fatty acids similar to those found between the cucumber roots proper. These results suggest major differences in bacterial community composition between suppressive and conducive systems. Fatty acid analyses were also utilized to examine the effects on bacterial community composition of root colonization by Flavobacterium balustinum 299, a biocontrol agent. The concentration of the most prominent fatty acid in this bacterium, i17:1 omega 8, was increased on roots produced from inoculated seeds in a medium rendered suppressive by the treatment. This change was concomitant with a significant increase in the concentration of 18:1 omega 7c, not present in the lipids of the antagonist, indicating a shift in the microflora from a conducive to a suppressive bacterial community. PMID:16347930

  13. Phytic acid suppresses ischemia-induced hydroxyl radical generation in rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio; Nakashima, Michiko

    2016-03-01

    The present study examined whether ischemia-reperfusion-induced hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation was attenuated by myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid (phytic acid). A flexibly mounted microdialysis technique was used to detect the generation of ·OH in in vivo rat hearts. To measure the level of ·OH, sodium salicylate in Ringer's solution (0.5mM or 0.5 nmol/μl/min) was infused directly through a microdialysis probe to detect the generation of ·OH as reflected by the nonenzymatic formation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA). To confirm the generation of ·OH by Fenton-type reaction, iron(II) was infused through a microdialysis probe. A positive linear correlation between iron(II) and the formation of 2,3-DHBA (R(2)=0.983) was observed. However, the level of 2,3-DHBA in norepinephrine (100 μM) plus phytic acid (100 μM) treated group were significantly lower than those observed in norepinephrine-only-treated group (n=6, *p<0.05). To examine the effect of phytic acid on ischemia-reperfusion-induced ·OH generation, the heart was subjected to myocardial ischemia for 15 min by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). When the heart was reperfused, the normal elevation of 2,3-DHBA in the heart dialysate was not observed in animals pretreated with phytic acid. These results suggest that phytic acid is associated with antioxidant effect due to the suppression of iron-induced ·OH generation. PMID:26724394

  14. Suppression of ricinoleic acid toxicity by ptl2 overexpression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Hisashi; Ogiso, Masayo; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Uemura, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We previously succeeded to obtain a high content of ricinoleic acid (RA), a hydroxylated fatty acid with great values as a petrochemical replacement, in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by introducing Claviceps purpurea oleate Δ12-hydroxylase gene (CpFAH12). Although the production was toxic to S. pombe cells, we identified plg7, encoding phospholipase A2, as a multicopy suppressor that restored the growth defect by removing RA from phospholipids and induced secretion of a part of the released free RA into culture media. In this study, we extended our analysis and examined the effect of triglyceride (TG) lipase overexpression on the tolerance to RA toxicity and RA productivity. S. pombe has three TG lipase genes, ptl1, ptl2, and ptl3, which have high protein sequence similarities to each other and to Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterparts TGL3, TGL4, and TGL5, but only ptl2 overexpression suppressed the growth defect induced by RA production, and the culture grown at 20 °C secreted free RA into media like plg7 overexpression. Suppression by ptl2 was independent of plg7, and a large amount of free RA was accumulated in the cells concomitant with the decrease in RA moieties in phospholipids. Furthermore, the suppression by ptl2 was attenuated by bromoenol lactone (BEL), a phospholipase A2 specific inhibitor, suggesting that Ptl2p may have phospholipase activity. Simultaneous overexpression of ptl2 and plg7 in the FAH12 integrant increased secretion and intracellular accumulation of RA 1.2- and 1.3-fold, respectively, compared to those with single overexpression of plg7 on day 10 at 20 °C. PMID:25109267

  15. Dietary histidine increases mouse skin urocanic acid levels and enhances UVB-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S K; De Fabo, E C

    1991-04-01

    Urocanic Acid (UCA) exists in mammalian skin primarily as the trans isomer and is photoisomerized to cis UCA upon UVB absorption. Our previous studies indicated that the photoisomerization of UCA is the initiating event in UBV-induced suppression of cell-mediated immunity (tUCA----cUCA----immune suppression). The purpose of this study was to verify the role of UCA in UV-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in BALB/c mice. Since UCA is a metabolite of the amino acid L-histidine, we reasoned that increased dietary levels of histidine should raise skin tUCA levels. If skin tUCA is the UVB photoreceptor for immune suppression, this increase should enhance UV-induced suppression of CHS. HPLC analysis of skin from BALB/c mice given a histidine-rich diet (10%) showed that the total amount of UCA is significantly higher in these animals than in mice fed a normal diet. Further, levels of suppression of CHS of 3% and 49% in control fed mice, induced by 4.8 and 7.2 kJ/m2 UVB were significantly increased to 21% and 71% respectively in histidine-fed animals at these same UVB doses. These findings provide additional support for the UCA model for immune suppression, and provide the first evidence that UV-induced immune suppression can be enhanced by a dietary component, L-histidine. PMID:1857737

  16. Amino acids suppress apoptosis induced by sodium laurate, an absorption enhancer.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Chie; Mukaizawa, Fuyuki; Fujita, Takuya; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2009-12-01

    The formulation containing sodium laurate (C12), an absorption enhancer, and several amino acids such as taurine (Tau) and L-glutamine (L-Gln) is a promising preparation that can safely improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs. The safety for intestinal mucosa is achieved because the amino acids prevent C12 from causing mucosal damages via several mechanisms. In the present study, the possible involvement of apoptosis, programmed cell death, in mucosal damages caused by C12 and cytoprotection by amino acids was examined. C12 induced DNA fragmentation, a typical phenomenon of apoptosis, in rat large-intestinal epithelial cells while the addition of amino acids significantly attenuated it. C12 alone significantly increased the release of cytochrome C, an apoptosis-inducing factor, from mitochondria, which could be via the decrease in the level of Bcl-2, an inhibiting factor of cytochrome C release. The enhancement of cytochrome C release by C12 led to the activation of caspase 9, an initiator enzyme, and the subsequent activation of caspase 3, an effector enzyme. On the other hand, Tau or L-Gln significantly suppressed the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and attenuated the activities of both caspases, which could be attributed to the maintenance of Bcl-2 expression. PMID:19630065

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation reverses cystic fibrosis-related fatty acid abnormalities in CFTR-/- mice by suppressing fatty acid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Sarah W; Laposata, Michael; Boyd, Kelli L; Seegmiller, Adam C

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and model systems exhibit consistent abnormalities in metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids that appear to play a role in disease pathophysiology. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that these changes are due to overexpression of fatty acid desaturases that can be reversed by supplementation with the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoate and eicosapentaenoate. However, these findings have not been tested in vivo. The current study aimed to test these results in an in vivo model system, the CFTR(-/-) knockout mouse. When compared with wild-type mice, the knockout mice exhibited fatty acid abnormalities similar to those seen in cystic fibrosis patients and other model systems. The abnormalities were confined to lung, ileum and pancreas, tissues that are affected by the disease. Similar to in vitro models, these fatty acid changes correlated with increased expression of Δ5- and Δ6-desaturases and elongase 5. Dietary supplementation with high-dose free docosahexaenoate or a combination of lower-dose docosahexaenoate and eicosapentaenoate in triglyceride form corrected the fatty acid abnormalities and reduced expression of the desaturase and elongase genes in the ileum and liver of knockout mice. Only the high-dose docosahexaenoate reduced histologic evidence of disease, reducing mucus accumulation in ileal sections. These results provide in vivo support for the hypothesis that fatty acid abnormalities in cystic fibrosis result from abnormal expression and activity of metabolic enzymes in affected cell types. They further demonstrate that these changes can be reversed by dietary n-3 fatty acid supplementation, highlighting the potential therapeutic benefit for cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25448610

  18. Inhibition of Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporters Suppresses Kynurenic Acid Production Via Inhibition of Kynurenine Uptake in Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Kuroki, Yusuke; Urata, Tomomi; Mori, Noriyuki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increases of brain KYNA levels are involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and regulation of KYNA production has become a new target for treatment of these diseases. Kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is transported into astrocytes via large neutral amino acid transporters (LATs). In the present study, the effect of LATs regulation on KYN uptake and KYNA production was investigated in vitro and in vivo using an LATs inhibitor, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). In the in vitro study, cortical slices of rat brain were incubated with a physiological concentration of KYN and 3 µmol/L-3 mmol/L BCH. BCH inhibited KYNA production and KYN uptake in a dose-dependent manner, and their IC50 values were 90.7 and 97.4 µmol/L, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were administered KYN (50 mg/kg BW) orally and BCH (200 mg/kg BW) intravenously. Administration of KYN increased brain KYN and KYNA levels compared with the mice treated with vehicle, whereas additional administration of BCH suppressed KYN-induced elevations in KYN and KYNA levels to 50 and 70 % in the brain. These results suggest that inhibition of LATs prevented the increase of KYNA production via blockade of KYN uptake in the brain in vitro and in vivo. LATs can be a target to modulate brain function by regulation of KYNA production in the brain. PMID:27161376

  19. Effective gastric acid suppression after oral administration of enteric-coated omeprazole granules.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, M A; Pursnani, K G; Katzka, D A; Gideon, R M; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-04-01

    Omeprazole is inactivated by exposure to gastric acid and is formulated as a gelatin capsule containing enteric-coated granules that release the drug in alkaline medium. In clinical situations where patients are unable to take the capsule orally, the optimum means of administration is uncertain. Eleven normal volunteers were given omeprazole 20 mg every day for one week before breakfast in random order as either a 20-mg capsule with water or free enteric-coated granules with either 8 oz of orange juice, 8 oz of water with 2 Alka-Seltzer antacid tablets (aspirin free), or 1 teaspoon of apple sauce. On day 7 of each regimen, an 8-hr intragastric pH study was performed following omeprazole 20 mg and standard breakfast. The median percentage of time of gastric acid pH > 4 after an omeprazole capsule was 68.5 (25-100); after granules with orange juice 59 (43-100); after granules in Alka-Seltzer solution 63 (31-100), and after granules in apple sauce 65 (30-99), with no significant differences (ANOVA). The time for the gastric pH to reach <4' after having been above was also similar for all four regimens (ANOVA). Omeprazole granules administered orally in a variety of ways achieve gastric acid suppression as effectively as the intact capsule. PMID:9125637

  20. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  1. Ingestion of theanine, an amino acid in tea, suppresses psychosocial stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Unno, Keiko; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Tanida, Naoki; Fujitani, Keisuke; Takamori, Nina; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Naoto; Nagano, Hiroko; Nagashima, Takashi; Hara, Ayane; Shimoi, Kayoko; Hoshino, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    The antistress effect of theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide), an amino acid in tea, was investigated using mice that were psychosocially stressed from a conflict among male mice in conditions of confrontational housing. Two male mice were housed in the same cage separated by a partition to establish a territorial imperative. When the partition was removed, the mice were co-housed confrontationally. As a marker for the stress response, changes in the adrenal gland were studied in comparison to group-housed control mice (six mice in a cage). Significant adrenal hypertrophy was observed in mice during confrontational housing, which was developed within 24 h and persisted for at least 1 week. The size of cells in the zona fasciculata of the adrenal gland, from which glucocorticoid is mainly secreted, increased (∼1.11-fold) in mice during confrontational housing, which was accompanied by a flattened diurnal rhythm of corticosterone and ACTH in blood. The ingestion of theanine (>5 μg ml(-1)) prior to confrontational housing significantly suppressed adrenal hypertrophy. An antidepressant, paroxetin, suppressed adrenal hypertrophy in a similar manner in mice during confrontational housing. In mice that ingested theanine, behavioural depression was also suppressed, and a diurnal rhythm of corticosterone and ACTH was observed, even in mice that were undergoing confrontational housing. Furthermore, the daily dose of theanine (40 μg ml(-1)) blocked the counteracting effects of caffeine (30 μg ml(-1)) and catechin (200 μg ml(-1)). The present study demonstrated that theanine prevents and relieves psychosocial stress through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. PMID:22707502

  2. Hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid is effectively suppressed by choline and betaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Setoue, Minoru; Ohuchi, Seiya; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2008-07-01

    Rats were fed 25% casein (25C) diets differing in choline levels (0-0.5%) with and without 0.5% guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) or 0.75% L-methionine for 7 d to determine the effects of dietary choline level on experimental hyperhomocysteinemia. The effects of dietary choline (0.30%) and betaine (0.34%) on GAA- and methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia were also compared. Dietary choline suppressed hyperhomocysteinemia induced by GAA, but not by methionine, in a dose-dependent manner. GAA-induced enhancement of the plasma homocysteine concentration was suppressed by choline and betaine to the same degree, but the effects of these compounds were relatively small on methionine-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Dietary supplementation with choline and betaine significantly increased the hepatic betaine concentration in rats fed a GAA diet, but not in rats fed a methionine diet. These results indicate that choline and betaine are effective at relatively low levels in reducing plasma homocysteine, especially under the condition of betaine deficiency without a loading of homocysteine precursor. PMID:18603787

  3. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS. PMID:26940236

  4. Interactions between cranberries and fungi: the proposed function of organic acids in virulence suppression of fruit rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Tadych, Mariusz; Vorsa, Nicholi; Wang, Yifei; Bergen, Marshall S; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Polashock, James J; White, James F

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry fruit are a rich source of bioactive compounds that may function as constitutive or inducible barriers against rot-inducing fungi. The content and composition of these compounds change as the season progresses. Several necrotrophic fungi cause cranberry fruit rot disease complex. These fungi remain mostly asymptomatic until the fruit begins to mature in late August. Temporal fluctuations and quantitative differences in selected organic acid profiles between fruit of six cranberry genotypes during the growing season were observed. The concentration of benzoic acid in fruit increased while quinic acid decreased throughout fruit development. In general, more rot-resistant genotypes (RR) showed higher levels of benzoic acid early in fruit development and more gradual decline in quinic acid levels than that observed in the more rot-susceptible genotypes. We evaluated antifungal activities of selected cranberry constituents and found that most bioactive compounds either had no effects or stimulated growth or reactive oxygen species (ROS) secretion of four tested cranberry fruit rot fungi, while benzoic acid and quinic acid reduced growth and suppressed secretion of ROS by these fungi. We propose that variation in the levels of ROS suppressive compounds, such as benzoic and quinic acids, may influence virulence by the fruit rot fungi. Selection for crops that maintain high levels of virulence suppressive compounds could yield new disease resistant varieties. This could represent a new strategy for control of disease caused by necrotrophic pathogens that exhibit a latent or endophytic phase. PMID:26322038

  5. Interactions between cranberries and fungi: the proposed function of organic acids in virulence suppression of fruit rot fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tadych, Mariusz; Vorsa, Nicholi; Wang, Yifei; Bergen, Marshall S.; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Polashock, James J.; White, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry fruit are a rich source of bioactive compounds that may function as constitutive or inducible barriers against rot-inducing fungi. The content and composition of these compounds change as the season progresses. Several necrotrophic fungi cause cranberry fruit rot disease complex. These fungi remain mostly asymptomatic until the fruit begins to mature in late August. Temporal fluctuations and quantitative differences in selected organic acid profiles between fruit of six cranberry genotypes during the growing season were observed. The concentration of benzoic acid in fruit increased while quinic acid decreased throughout fruit development. In general, more rot-resistant genotypes (RR) showed higher levels of benzoic acid early in fruit development and more gradual decline in quinic acid levels than that observed in the more rot-susceptible genotypes. We evaluated antifungal activities of selected cranberry constituents and found that most bioactive compounds either had no effects or stimulated growth or reactive oxygen species (ROS) secretion of four tested cranberry fruit rot fungi, while benzoic acid and quinic acid reduced growth and suppressed secretion of ROS by these fungi. We propose that variation in the levels of ROS suppressive compounds, such as benzoic and quinic acids, may influence virulence by the fruit rot fungi. Selection for crops that maintain high levels of virulence suppressive compounds could yield new disease resistant varieties. This could represent a new strategy for control of disease caused by necrotrophic pathogens that exhibit a latent or endophytic phase. PMID:26322038

  6. Might the use of acid-suppressive medications predispose to the development of eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Merwat, Shehzad Nawaz; Spechler, Stuart Jon

    2009-08-01

    The prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis, a manifestation of food allergy, has increased in recent years for reasons that are not clear. The gastrointestinal mucosa is regularly exposed to food antigens with the potential to evoke immunological reactions. Studies have shown that some food allergens that ordinarily would be degraded by peptic digestion are not degraded when the pH of gastric fluid is raised to levels commonly found in the stomachs of patients treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Other studies have shown that PPIs increase gastrointestinal mucosal permeability, which might facilitate the uptake of undegraded peptide allergens. Mice treated with antisecretory medications while being fed a diet of caviar have been found to develop caviar-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, T-cell reactivity, and gastric eosinophilia. Adult patients treated with antisecretory medications for 3 months have been found to develop a rise in their IgE antibody levels and new, food-specific IgE antibodies. These data establish a plausible mechanism whereby acid-suppressive medications, by interfering with the peptic digestion of food allergens and increasing mucosal permeability, might lead to the development of food allergy. The time course of the introduction and subsequent widespread usage of PPIs with the emergence of eosinophilic esophagitis fits well with the hypothesis that PPIs may play an etiological role. Although the mere demonstration of a plausible association does not establish cause and effect, further studies on the role of acid suppression in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis clearly are warranted. PMID:19661930

  7. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  8. Compost-induced suppression of Pythium damping-off is mediated by fatty-acid-metabolizing seed-colonizing microbial communities.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Mary E; Nelson, Eric B

    2003-01-01

    Leaf composts were studied for their suppressive effects on Pythium ultimum sporangium germination, cottonseed colonization, and the severity of Pythium damping-off of cotton. A focus of the work was to assess the role of fatty-acid-metabolizing microbial communities in disease suppression. Suppressiveness was expressed within the first few hours of seed germination as revealed by reduced P. ultimum sporangium germination, reduced seed colonization, and reduced damping-off in transplant experiments. These reductions were not observed when cottonseeds were sown in a conducive leaf compost. Microbial consortia recovered from the surface of cottonseeds during the first few hours of germination in suppressive compost (suppressive consortia) induced significant levels of damping-off suppression, whereas no suppression was induced by microbial consortia recovered from cottonseeds germinated in conducive compost (conducive consortia). Suppressive consortia rapidly metabolized linoleic acid, whereas conducive consortia did not. Furthermore, populations of fatty-acid-metabolizing bacteria and actinobacteria were higher in suppressive consortia than in conducive consortia. Individual bacterial isolates varied in their ability to metabolize linoleic acid and protect seedlings from damping-off. Results indicate that communities of compost-inhabiting microorganisms colonizing cottonseeds within the first few hours after sowing in a Pythium-suppressive compost play a major role in the suppression of P. ultimum sporangium germination, seed colonization, and damping-off. Results further indicate that fatty acid metabolism by these seed-colonizing bacterial consortia can explain the Pythium suppression observed. PMID:12514027

  9. Fatty acid competition as a mechanism by which Enterobacter cloacae suppresses Pythium ultimum sporangium germination and damping-off.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, K; Nelson, E B

    2000-12-01

    Interactions between plant-associated microorganisms play important roles in suppressing plant diseases and enhancing plant growth and development. While competition between plant-associated bacteria and plant pathogens has long been thought to be an important means of suppressing plant diseases microbiologically, unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism has been lacking. We present evidence here that competition for plant-derived unsaturated long-chain fatty acids between the biological control bacterium Enterobacter cloacae and the seed-rotting oomycete, Pythium ultimum, results in disease suppression. Since fatty acids from seeds and roots are required to elicit germination responses of P. ultimum, we generated mutants of E. cloacae to evaluate the role of E. cloacae fatty acid metabolism on the suppression of Pythium sporangium germination and subsequent plant infection. Two mutants of E. cloacae EcCT-501R3, Ec31 (fadB) and EcL1 (fadL), were reduced in beta-oxidation and fatty acid uptake, respectively. Both strains failed to metabolize linoleic acid, to inactivate the germination-stimulating activity of cottonseed exudate and linoleic acid, and to suppress Pythium seed rot in cotton seedling bioassays. Subclones containing fadBA or fadL complemented each of these phenotypes in Ec31 and EcL1, respectively. These data provide strong evidence for a competitive exclusion mechanism for the biological control of P. ultimum-incited seed infections by E. cloacae where E. cloacae prevents the germination of P. ultimum sporangia by the efficient metabolism of fatty acid components of seed exudate and thus prevents seed infections. PMID:11097912

  10. Chronic retinoic acid treatment suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in close correlation with depressive-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ji; Meng, Fan-Tao; Qi, Xin-Rui; Chen, Lin; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies have highlighted an association between retinoid treatment and depressive symptoms. As we had shown before that chronic application of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) potently activated the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, we here questioned whether RA also induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a form of structural plasticity sensitive to stress and implicated in aspects of depression and hippocampal function. RA was applied intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) to adult rats for 19 days after which animals were subjected to tests for depressive-like behavior (sucrose preference) and spatial learning and memory (water maze) performance. On day 27, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and astrogliosis was quantified using BrdU (newborn cell survival), PCNA (proliferation), doublecortin (DCX; neuronal differentiation), and GFAP (astrocytes) as markers. RA was found to increase retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) protein expression in the hippocampus, suggesting an activation of RA-induced signaling mechanisms. RA further potently suppressed cell proliferation, newborn cell survival as well as neurogenesis, but not astrogliosis. These structural plasticity changes were significantly correlated with scores for anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, but not with water maze performance. Our results suggest that RA-induced impairments in hippocampal neurogenesis correlate with depression-like symptoms but not with spatial learning and memory in this design. Thus, manipulations aimed to enhance neurogenesis may help ameliorate emotional aspects of RA-associated mood disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26860546

  11. Predator evasion in zooplankton is suppressed by polyunsaturated fatty acid limitation.

    PubMed

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; von Elert, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Herbivorous zooplankton avoid size-selective predation by vertical migration to a deep, cold water refuge. Adaptation to low temperatures in planktonic poikilotherms depends on essential dietary lipids; the availability of these lipids often limits growth and reproduction of zooplankton. We hypothesized that limitation by essential lipids may affect habitat preferences and predator avoidance behavior in planktonic poikilotherms. We used a liposome supplementation technique to enrich the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the cyanobacterium Synecchococcus elongatus with the essential lipids, cholesterol and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and an indoor system with a stratified water-column (plankton organ) to test whether the absence of these selected dietary lipids constrains predator avoidance (habitat preferences) in four species of the key-stone pelagic freshwater grazer Daphnia. We found that the capability of avoiding fish predation through habitat shift to the deeper and colder environment was suppressed in Daphnia unless the diet was supplemented with EPA; however, the availability of cholesterol did not affect habitat preferences of the tested taxa. Thus, their ability to access a predator-free refuge and the outcome of predator-prey interactions depends upon food quality (i.e. the availability of an essential fatty acid). Our results suggest that biochemical food quality limitation, a bottom-up factor, may affect the top-down control of herbivorous zooplankton. PMID:26232092

  12. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-08-28

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  13. Zoledronic acid suppresses transforming growth factor-β-induced fibrogenesis by human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, YUKO; IBI, MIHO; CHOSA, NAOYUKI; KYAKUMOTO, SEIKO; KAMO, MASAHARU; SHIBATA, TOSHIYUKI; SUGIYAMA, YOSHIKI; ISHISAKI, AKIRA

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are analogues of pyro-phosphate that are known to prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Nitrogen-containing BPs, such as zoledronic acid (ZA), are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastasis. However, despite having benefits, ZA has been reported to induce BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in cancer patients. The molecular pathological mechanisms responsible for the development of BRONJ, including necrotic bone exposure after tooth extraction, remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of ZA on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced myofibroblast (MF) differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) and the migratory activity of hGFs, which are important for wound closure by fibrous tissue formation. The ZA maximum concentration in serum (Cmax) was found to be approximately 1.47 µM, which clinically, is found after the intravenous administration of 4 mg ZA, and ZA at this dose is considered appropriate for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis or bone diseases, such as Erdheim-Chester disease. At Cmax, ZA significantly suppressed i) the TGF-β-induced promotion of cell viability, ii) the TGF-β-induced expression of MF markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen, iii) the TGF-β-induced migratory activity of hGFs and iv) the expression level of TGF-β type I receptor on the surfaces of hGFs, as well as the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Thus, ZA suppresses TGF-β-induced fibrous tissue formation by hGFs, possibly through the inhibition of Smad-dependent signal transduction. Our findings partly elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying BRONJ and may prove to be beneficial to the identification of drug targets for the treatment of this symptom at the molecular level. PMID:27176567

  14. Tolfenamic Acid Suppresses Inflammatory Stimuli-Mediated Activation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hong Jun; Lou, Zhiyuan; Jeong, Jin Boo; Kim, Kui Jin; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Tolfenamic acid (TA) is a traditional non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and has been broadly used for the treatment of migraines. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a sequence-specific transcription factor and plays a key role in the development and progression of inflammation and cancer. We performed the current study to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which TA suppresses inflammation focusing on NF-κB pathway in TNF-α stimulated human normal and cancer cell lines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophages. Different types of human cells (HCT116, HT-29 and HEK293) and mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) were pre-treated with different concentrations of TA and then exposed to inflammatory stimuli such as TNF-α and LPS. Transcriptional activity of NF-κB, IκB-α-degradation, p65 translocation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activations were measured using luciferase assay and Western blots. Pre-treatment of TA repressed TNF-α- or LPS-stimulated NF-κB transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. TA treatment reduced degradation of IκB-α and subsequent translocation of p65 into nucleus. TA significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, TA had no effect on NF-κB signaling and JNK phosphorylation in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. TA possesses anti-inflammatory activities through suppression of JNK/NF-κB pathway in different types of cells. PMID:25593642

  15. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    OMORI, AKINA; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; DEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; SUZUKI, KUNIAKI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1. PMID:26171153

  16. Thought suppression predicts task switching deficits in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Amara; Ahmad, Hira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between task switching and thought suppression in connection with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Methods: This experimental study included 30 patients with FLE admitted to the Services and Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan between February and November 2013, and 30 healthy individuals from the local community. Participants performed a task switching experiment where they switched between emotion and age categorizations among faces. In addition, they completed a thought suppression questionnaire. Results: There were 3 important results: (i) Patients with FLE showed weaker task switching abilities than healthy individuals. This result is attributed toward executive dysfunctions in patients with FLE. (ii) Contrary to the control group, patients with FLE showed larger switch cost for the age than the emotion categorization. This result can be seen in the context of social cognition deficits and poor inhibitory control in patients with FLE. In addition, larger switch costs reflected a binding effect with facial emotion as compared to age. The integration might represent emotion as an intrusive facial dimension that interrupted task switching performance. (iii) Patients with FLE had more recurrent suppression of thoughts than controls. Thought suppression was a significant predictor for switch costs. High scores on thought suppression were correlated with task switching deficits. Conclusion: The results suggest that thought suppression causes significant cognitive decline. PMID:25864068

  17. CYP2J2-Derived Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Suppress Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxu; Ni, Li; Yang, Lei; Duan, Quanlu; Chen, Chen; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes apoptosis and is associated with heart failure. Whether CYP2J2 and its arachidonic acid metabolites [epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs)] have a protective influence on ER stress and heart failure has not been studied. Assays of myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure showed evidence of ER stress. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) or angiotensin II (AngII) by osmotic mini-pump induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in mice as evaluated by hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography. Interestingly, transgenic (Tr) mice with cardiomyocyte-specific CYP2J2 expression were protected against heart failure compared with wild-type mice. ISO or AngII administration induced ER stress and apoptosis, and increased levels of intracellular Ca2+. These phenotypes were abolished by CYP2J2 overexpression in vivo or exogenous EETs treatment of cardiomyocytes in vitro. ISO or AngII reduced sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) expression in hearts or isolated cardiomyocytes; however, loss of SERCA2a expression was prevented in CYP2J2 Tr hearts in vivo or in cardiomyocytes treated with EETs in vitro. The reduction of SERCA2a activity was concomitant with increased oxidation of SERCA2a. EETs reversed SERCA2a oxidation through increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and reduced reactive oxygen species levels. Tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, similarly decreased oxidized SERCA2a levels, restored SERCA2a activity, and markedly reduced ER stress response in the mice treated with ISO. In conclusion, CYP2J2-derived EETs suppress ER stress response in the heart and protect against cardiac failure by maintaining intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and SERCA2a expression and activity. PMID:24145329

  18. CYP2J2-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids suppress endoplasmic reticulum stress in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingxu; Ni, Li; Yang, Lei; Duan, Quanlu; Chen, Chen; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wang, Dao Wen

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes apoptosis and is associated with heart failure. Whether CYP2J2 and its arachidonic acid metabolites [epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs)] have a protective influence on ER stress and heart failure has not been studied. Assays of myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure showed evidence of ER stress. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) or angiotensin II (AngII) by osmotic mini-pump induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in mice as evaluated by hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography. Interestingly, transgenic (Tr) mice with cardiomyocyte-specific CYP2J2 expression were protected against heart failure compared with wild-type mice. ISO or AngII administration induced ER stress and apoptosis, and increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+). These phenotypes were abolished by CYP2J2 overexpression in vivo or exogenous EETs treatment of cardiomyocytes in vitro. ISO or AngII reduced sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) expression in hearts or isolated cardiomyocytes; however, loss of SERCA2a expression was prevented in CYP2J2 Tr hearts in vivo or in cardiomyocytes treated with EETs in vitro. The reduction of SERCA2a activity was concomitant with increased oxidation of SERCA2a. EETs reversed SERCA2a oxidation through increased expression of antioxidant enzymes and reduced reactive oxygen species levels. Tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, similarly decreased oxidized SERCA2a levels, restored SERCA2a activity, and markedly reduced ER stress response in the mice treated with ISO. In conclusion, CYP2J2-derived EETs suppress ER stress response in the heart and protect against cardiac failure by maintaining intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and SERCA2a expression and activity. PMID:24145329

  19. Resistance training suppresses intra-abdominal fatty acid synthesis in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Stotzer, U S; Rodrigues, M F C; Domingos, M M; Silva, G H G; Duarte, F O; Gatto, C V G; Duarte, A C G O; Shiguemoto, G E; Perez, S E A; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2015-03-01

    Ovarian hormone loss is associated with a shift in fat distribution to intra-abdomin al adipose tissue (intra-AAT) depots and with lipid metabolism disorders, which predisposes individuals to developing insulin resistance. Resistance training (RT) prevents increases in intra-AAT after ovarian hormone loss. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes remain unclear. We investigated the effects of ovariectomy and RT on gene expression related to lipogenesis and fat oxidation in the intra-AAT of ovariectomized rats. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6/group) were divided into the groups: sham-sedentary, ovariectomized-sedentary, sham-RT and ovariectomized-RT. RT groups performed a 10-week climbing program on a ladder with progressive overload. Intra-AAT was subjected to morphometric and mRNA analysis. Ovariectomized-sedentary group had larger adipocytes and higher expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and lower expression of the oxidative carnitinepalmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-1). RT counteracted OVX-induced increases in PPAR-γ and SCD-1 and decreased SREBP-1c. ACC and HSL were downregulated in ovariectomized-RT compared with the ovariectomized-sedentary group. Ovariectomized-RT group had the highest CPT-1 gene expression. Adipocyte size decreased in ovariectomized-RT group. Results suggest that RT reduces intra-AAT adipocyte size in ovariectomized rats by suppressing intra-AAT fatty acid synthesis and enhancing fatty acid β-oxidation. PMID:25415388

  20. Potentiated suppression of Dickkopf-1 in breast cancer by combined administration of the mevalonate pathway inhibitors zoledronic acid and statins.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Andy; Browne, Andrew J; Thiele, Stefanie; Rauner, Martina; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-12-01

    The Wnt-inhibitor dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) promotes cancer-induced osteolytic bone lesions by direct inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and indirect activation of osteoclasts. DKK-1 is highly expressed in human breast cancer cells and can be suppressed by inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway such as statins and amino-bisphosphonates. However, supraphysiological concentrations are required to suppress DKK-1. We show that a sequential mevalonate pathway blockade using statins and amino-bisphosphonates suppresses DKK-1 more significantly than the individual agents alone. Thus, the reduction of the DKK-1 expression and secretion in the human osteotropic tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MET, and MDA-BONE by zoledronic acid was potentiated by the combination with low concentrations of statins (atorvastatin, simvastatin, and rosuvastatin) by up to 75% (p < 0.05). The specific rescue of prenylation using farnesyl pyrophosphate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate revealed that these effects were mediated by suppressed geranylgeranylation rather than by suppressed farnesylation. Moreover, combining low concentrations of statins (1 µM atorvastatin or 0.25 µM simvastatin) and zoledronic acid at low concentrations resulted in an at least 50% reversal of breast cancer-derived DKK-1-mediated inhibition of osteogenic markers in C2C12 cells (p < 0.05). Finally, the intratumoral injection of atorvastatin and zoledronic acid in as subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 mouse model reduced the serum level of human DKK-1 by 25% compared to untreated mice. Hence our study reveals that a sequential mevalonate pathway blockade allows for the combined use of low concentration of statins and amino-bisphosphonates. This combination still significantly suppresses breast cancer-derived DKK-1 to levels where it can no longer inhibit Wnt-mediated osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26515701

  1. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intervention Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Weight Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Hua; Li, Xiang-Yong; Chen, Chih-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Man; Kang, Jing X.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis is a critical medical condition, characterized by a severe systemic inflammation and rapid loss of muscle mass. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for this complex disease are still lacking. Here, we evaluated the effect of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intervention on LPS-challenged mice with respect to inflammation, body weight and the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway components. LPS administration induced a dramatic loss of body weight within two days. Treatment with n-3 PUFA not only stopped loss of body weight but also gradually reversed it back to baseline levels within one week. Accordingly, the animals treated with n-3 PUFA exhibited markedly lower levels of inflammatory cytokines or markers in plasma and tissues, as well as down-regulation of TLR4 pathway components compared to animals without n-3 PUFA treatment or those treated with omega-6 PUFA. Our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFA intervention can suppress LPS-induced inflammation and weight loss via, at least in part, down-regulation of pro-inflammatory targets of the TLR4 signaling pathway, and highlight the therapeutic potential of n-3 PUFA in the management of sepsis. PMID:25689565

  3. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products. PMID:24891974

  4. Valproic acid suppresses the self-renewal and proliferation of head and neck cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyuk; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Hyun Jung; Samuels, Tina L; Johnston, Nikki; Lim, Young Chang

    2015-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells present profound epigenetic alterations in addition to featuring classic genetic mutations. Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, can potently inhibit tumor growth and induce differentiation. However, the effect and underlying mechanism of VPA on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain unclear. In the present study we investigated the effects of VPA on the characteristics of HNSCC CSCs in vitro and in vivo. As a result, VPA inhibited the self-renewal abilities of HNSCC CSCs during two serial passages and decreased the expression of stem cell markers, such as Oct4, Sox2 and CD44. VPA also potentiated the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin by suppressing the ABCC2 and ABCC6 transporters as well as by inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis. In addition, the combination of VPA and cisplatin attenuated tumor growth and induced apoptosis in a xenograft model. Our results suggest that VPA might be a potential therapeutic strategy in combination with conventional cisplatin for HNSCC patients by elimination of CSC traits. PMID:26239260

  5. Suppression of Adult Neurogenesis Increases the Acute Effects of Kainic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Sloka S.; LaFrancois, John J.; Friedman, Daniel; Drew, Liam J.; Denny, Christine A.; Burghardt, Nesha S.; Wu, Melody V.; Hsieh, Jenny; Hen, René; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons in the adult brain, occurs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb (OB) of all mammals, but the functions of these new neurons are not entirely clear. Originally, adult-born neurons were considered to have excitatory effects on the DG network, but recent studies suggest a net inhibitory effect. Therefore, we hypothesized that selective removal of newborn neurons would lead to increased susceptibility to the effects of a convulsant. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating the response to the chemoconvulsant kainic acid (KA) in mice with reduced adult neurogenesis, produced either by focal X-irradiation of the DG, or by pharmacogenetic deletion of dividing radial glial precursors. In the first 4 hrs after KA administration, when mice have the most robust seizures, mice with reduced adult neurogenesis had more severe convulsive seizures, exhibited either as a decreased latency to the first convulsive seizure, greater number of convulsive seizures, or longer convulsive seizures. Nonconvulsive seizures did not appear to change or they decreased. Four-21 hrs after KA injection, mice with reduced adult neurogenesis showed more interictal spikes (IIS) and delayed seizures than controls. Effects were greater when the anticonvulsant ethosuximide was injected 30 min prior to KA administration; ethosuximide allows forebrain seizure activity to be more easily examined in mice by suppressing seizures dominated by the brainstem. These data support the hypothesis that reduction of adult-born neurons increases the susceptibility of the brain to effects of KA. PMID:25476494

  6. Viral protein suppresses oxidative burst and salicylic acid-dependent autophagy and facilitates bacterial growth on virus-infected plants.

    PubMed

    Zvereva, Anna S; Golyaev, Victor; Turco, Silvia; Gubaeva, Ekaterina G; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail V; Srour, Ola; Ryabova, Lyubov A; Boller, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-08-01

    Virus interactions with plant silencing and innate immunity pathways can potentially alter the susceptibility of virus-infected plants to secondary infections with nonviral pathogens. We found that Arabidopsis plants infected with Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or transgenic for CaMV silencing suppressor P6 exhibit increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and allow robust growth of the Pst mutant hrcC-, which cannot deploy effectors to suppress innate immunity. The impaired antibacterial defense correlated with the suppressed oxidative burst, reduced accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) and diminished SA-dependent autophagy. The viral protein domain required for suppression of these plant defense responses is dispensable for silencing suppression but essential for binding and activation of the plant target-of-rapamycin (TOR) kinase which, in its active state, blocks cellular autophagy and promotes CaMV translation. Our findings imply that CaMV P6 is a versatile viral effector suppressing both silencing and innate immunity. P6-mediated suppression of oxidative burst and SA-dependent autophagy may predispose CaMV-infected plants to bacterial infection. PMID:27120694

  7. The quantitative prediction of bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners on the bitterness of famotidine by sweetness-responsive sensor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshimi; Matsunaga, Chiharu; Tokuyama, Emi; Tsuji, Eriko; Uchida, Takahiro; Okada, Hiroaki

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was the quantitative prediction of the bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners (sucrose or sugar alcohols) on the bitterness of famotidine (or quinine sulfate as control) solutions using an artificial taste sensor. Firstly, we examined the response characteristics of the sensor response to sweetness. The sensor membrane is charged negatively in the presence of sweeteners, which tend to receive protons from one of the components of the sensor membrane. The magnitude of the sensor response was shown to increase in direct proportion to the concentration of the sweetener. Secondly, we used direct or indirect methods to evaluate and predict the bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners on 1 mg/ml famotidine and 81.4 microM quinine sulfate solutions. In direct method, a regression between the sensor output of the sweetness-responsive sensor and the bitterness intensity obtained in human gustatory tests of famotidine solutions containing sweeteners at various concentrations, was performed. As a result, we were able to predict directly the bitterness intensity of the mixed solution. Finally, we also evaluated the bitterness intensity of the dissolution media of commercially available, orally disintegrating tablets containing famotidine by the combined usage of bitterness- and sweetness-responsive sensor. We found that the sugar alcohols in the tablet seem to be effective in the bitterness-suppression of famotidine from these tablets, especially in the initial phase (within 30 s) of the disintegration process. PMID:17473460

  8. Predictions of diagenetic reactions in the presence of organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Wendy J.; Thyne, Geoffrey D.

    1992-02-01

    Stability constants have been estimated for cation complexes with anions of monofunctional and difunctional acids (combinations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, Sr, Mn, U, Th, Pb, Cu, Zn with formate, acetate, propionate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, and salicylate) between 0 and 200°C. Difunctional acid anions form much more stable complexes than monofunctional acid anions with aluminum; the importance of the aluminum-acetate complex is relatively minor in comparison to aluminum oxalate and malonate complexes. Divalent metal cations such as Mg, Ca, and Fe form more stable complexes with acetate than with difunctional acid anions. Aluminum-oxalate can dominate the species distribution of aluminum under acidic pH conditions, whereas the divalent cation-acetate and oxalate complexes rarely account for more than 60% of the total dissolved cation, and then only in more alkaline waters. Mineral thermodynamic affinities were calculated using the reaction path model EQ3/6 for waters having variable organic acid anion (OAA) contents under conditions representative of those found during normal burial diagenesis. The following scenarios are possible: 1) K-feldspar and albite are stable, anorthite dissolves 2) All feldpars are stable 3) Carbonates can be very unstable to slightly unstable, but never increase in stability. Organic acid anions are ineffective at neutral to alkaline pH in modifying stabilities of aluminosilicate minerals whereas the anions are variably effective under a wide range of pH in modifying carbonate mineral stabilities. Reaction path calculations demonstrate that the sequence of mineral reactions occurring in an arkosic sandstone-fluid system is only slightly modified by the presence of OAA. A spectrum of possible sandstone alteration mineralogies can be obtained depending on the selected boundary conditions: EQ3/6 predictions include quartz overgrowth, calcite replacement of plagioclase, albitization of plagioclase, and the formation of porosity-occluding calcite

  9. Zoledronic acid suppresses transforming growth factor-β-induced fibrogenesis by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yuko; Ibi, Miho; Chosa, Naoyuki; Kyakumoto, Seiko; Kamo, Masaharu; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Ishisaki, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are analogues of pyrophosphate that are known to prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Nitrogen-containing BPs, such as zoledronic acid (ZA), are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastasis. However, despite having benefits, ZA has been reported to induce BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in cancer patients. The molecular pathological mechanisms responsible for the development of BRONJ, including necrotic bone exposure after tooth extraction, remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of ZA on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF‑β)-induced myofibroblast (MF) differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) and the migratory activity of hGFs, which are important for wound closure by fibrous tissue formation. The ZA maximum concentration in serum (Cmax) was found to be approximately 1.47 µM, which clinically, is found after the intravenous administration of 4 mg ZA, and ZA at this dose is considered appropriate for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis or bone diseases, such as Erdheim-Chester disease. At Cmax, ZA significantly suppressed i) the TGF‑β-induced promotion of cell viability, ii) the TGF‑β-induced expression of MF markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen, iii) the TGF‑β-induced migratory activity of hGFs and iv) the expression level of TGF‑β type I receptor on the surfaces of hGFs, as well as the TGF‑β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Thus, ZA suppresses TGF‑β-induced fibrous tissue formation by hGFs, possibly through the inhibition of Smad‑dependent signal transduction. Our findings partly elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying BRONJ and may prove to be beneficial to the identification of drug targets for the treatment of this symptom at the molecular level. PMID:27176567

  10. Suppressed alpha oscillations predict intelligibility of speech and its acoustic details.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas; Weisz, Nathan

    2012-11-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time-frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  11. Repetition Suppression in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus Predicts Tone Learning Performance.

    PubMed

    Asaridou, Salomi S; Takashima, Atsuko; Dediu, Dan; Hagoort, Peter; McQueen, James M

    2016-06-01

    Do individuals differ in how efficiently they process non-native sounds? To what extent do these differences relate to individual variability in sound-learning aptitude? We addressed these questions by assessing the sound-learning abilities of Dutch native speakers as they were trained on non-native tone contrasts. We used fMRI repetition suppression to the non-native tones to measure participants' neuronal processing efficiency before and after training. Although all participants improved in tone identification with training, there was large individual variability in learning performance. A repetition suppression effect to tone was found in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFGs) before training. No whole-brain effect was found after training; a region-of-interest analysis, however, showed that, after training, repetition suppression to tone in the left IFG correlated positively with learning. That is, individuals who were better in learning the non-native tones showed larger repetition suppression in this area. Crucially, this was true even before training. These findings add to existing evidence that the left IFG plays an important role in sound learning and indicate that individual differences in learning aptitude stem from differences in the neuronal efficiency with which non-native sounds are processed. PMID:26113631

  12. Suppressed Alpha Oscillations Predict Intelligibility of Speech and its Acoustic Details

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time–frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  13. G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids suppresses colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yakun; Jiang, Hongmei; Robbins, Gregory T; Nie, Daotai

    2011-02-15

    GPR43 is a G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Expression of GPR43 is detected in hematopoietic tissues and the large intestine. SCFAs are derived from bacterial fermentation and metabolism of undigested dietary fibers and have been recognized for their cancer prevention activities in the colon. The role of SCFAs, particularly butyrate, in colon cancer therapy has been extensively studied, and its tumor suppressive functions are believed to be due to their intracellular actions, notably inhibition of histone deacetylase. In our study, we show that SCFAs also exert their antitumor effects via receptor GPR43 and that GPR43 is frequently lost in colon cancer cells. Immunohistostaining revealed that GPR43 immunoreactivity was high in normal colon tissues (N = 31) but was markedly reduced or completely lost in most colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues (N = 70) and their corresponding lymph node metastatic adenocarcinomas (N = 38). RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of full length GPR43 mRNA in only one (HT-29) of nine established human colon cancer cell lines. Restoration of GPR43 expression in HCT8 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and activated caspases, leading to increased apoptotic cell death after propionate/butyrate treatment. Restored GPR43 expression, coupled with propionate treatment, induced an upregulation of p21 and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 1 and 2, while the CDK4 and CDK6 levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that GPR43 functions as a tumor suppressor by mediating SCFA-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptotic cell death in colon cancer. PMID:20979106

  14. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  15. NFX1-LIKE2 (NFXL2) Suppresses Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lisso, Janina; Schröder, Florian; Fisahn, Joachim; Müssig, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The NFX1-LIKE1 (NFXL1) and NFXL2 genes were identified as regulators of salt stress responses. The NFXL1 protein is a nuclear factor that positively affects adaptation to salt stress. The nfxl1-1 loss-of-function mutant displayed reduced survival rates under salt and high light stress. In contrast, the nfxl2-1 mutant, defective in the NFXL2 gene, and NFXL2-antisense plants exhibited enhanced survival under these conditions. We show here that the loss of NFXL2 function results in abscisic acid (ABA) overaccumulation, reduced stomatal conductance, and enhanced survival under drought stress. The nfxl2-1 mutant displayed reduced stomatal aperture under all conditions tested. Fusicoccin treatment, exposition to increasing light intensities, and supply of decreasing CO2 concentrations demonstrated full opening capacity of nfxl2-1 stomata. Reduced stomatal opening presumably is a consequence of elevated ABA levels. Furthermore, seedling growth, root growth, and stomatal closure were hypersensitive to exogenous ABA. The enhanced ABA responses may contribute to the improved drought stress resistance of the mutant. Three NFXL2 splice variants were cloned and named NFXL2-78, NFXL2-97, and NFXL2-100 according to the molecular weight of the putative proteins. Translational fusions to the green fluorescent protein suggest nuclear localisation of the NFXL2 proteins. Stable expression of the NFXL2-78 splice variant in nfxl2-1 plants largely complemented the mutant phenotype. Our data show that NFXL2 controls ABA levels and suppresses ABA responses. NFXL2 may prevent unnecessary and costly stress adaptation under favourable conditions. PMID:22073231

  16. Structured triacylglycerol containing behenic and oleic acids suppresses triacylglycerol absorption and prevents obesity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary 1(3)-behenoyl-2,3(1)-dioleoyl-rac-glycerol (BOO) has been reported to inhibit pancreatic lipase activity in vitro and suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in humans. In the present study, the anti-obesity activities of BOO and its inhibitory effects on lymphatic triacylglycerol (TAG) absorption were investigated in rats. Methods In Experiment 1, rats were fed either BOO or soybean oil (SO) diet for 6 weeks. In the BOO diet, 20% of SO was replaced with an experimental oil rich in BOO. In Experiments 2 and 3, rats cannulated in the thoracic duct were administered an emulsions containing trioleoylglycerol (OOO) or an oil mixture (OOO:BOO, 9:1). Tri[1-14C]oleoylglycerol (14C-OOO) was added to the emulsions administered in Experiment 3. Results No observable differences were detected in food intake or body weight gain between the BOO and SO groups in Experiment 1. Plasma and liver TAG concentrations and visceral fat weights were significantly lower in the BOO group than in the SO group. The apparent absorption rate of fat was significantly lower in the BOO group than in the SO group. In Experiment 2, the lymphatic recovery of oleic and behenic acids was significantly lower at 5 and 6 h after BOO administration than after OOO administration. In Experiment 3, the lymphatic recovery of 14C-OOO was significantly lower at 5 and 6 h after BOO administration than after OOO administration. Conclusions These results suggest that BOO prevents deposition of visceral fat and hepatic TAG by lowering and delaying intestinal absorption of TAG. PMID:20653972

  17. Alpha-linolenic acid suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shashikumar, S; Pradeep, H; Chinnu, Salim; Rajini, P S; Rajanikant, G K

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the specific and massive loss of dopamine (DA) containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and aggregation of protein α-synuclein. There are a few animal studies, which indirectly implicate the neuroprotective action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we exposed Caenorhabditis elegans (both wild type N2, and transgenic strain, UA44) to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, the model neurotoxicant) and evaluated the extent of protection offered by alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Larval stage worms (L1/L2) of N2 and transgenic strains were exposed to 6-OHDA (25 mM) with or without ALA (10, 50 and 100 μM) for 48 h at 20 °C. After 48 h, while the N2 worms were assessed for their responses in terms of locomotion, pharyngeal pumping, lifespan and AChE activity, the transgenic worms were monitored for dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. Worms exposed to 6-OHDA exhibited a significant reduction (48%) in the locomotion rate. Interestingly, supplementation with ALA increased the locomotion rate in 6-OHDA treated worms. A marked decrease (45%) in thrashing was evident in worms exposed to 6-OHDA while thrashing was slightly improved in worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA and higher concentrations of ALA. Interestingly, worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA with ALA (100 μM) exhibited a significant increase in thrashing (66 ± 1.80 thrashes/30s). The pharyngeal pumping rate declined significantly in the case of worms exposed to 6-OHDA (35%). However, the worms co-treated with ALA exhibited significant recovery in pharyngeal pumping. The mean survival for the control worms was 26 days, while the worms exposed to 6-OHDA, showed a marked reduction in survival (21 days). Worms co-exposed to 6-OHDA and ALA showed a concentration-dependent increase in lifespan compared to those exposed to 6-OHDA alone (23, 25 and 26 days respectively). Transgenic worms

  18. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  19. Myristoleic acid inhibits osteoclast formation and bone resorption by suppressing the RANKL activation of Src and Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in osteoclasts such as formation of actin ring is required for bone-resorbing activity. The tyrosine kinase Src is a key player in massive cytoskeletal change of osteoclasts, thereby in bone destruction. In order for Src to be activated, trafficking to the inner plasma membrane via myristoylation is of importance. A previous study reported that myristoleic acid derived from myristic acid, inhibited N-myristoyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for myristoylation process. This prompted us to investigate whether myristoleic acid could affect osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, we observed that myristoleic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in vitro, especially, at later stages of differentiation. Myristoleic acid attenuated the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and Pyk2, which associates with Src, by RANKL. When myristoleic acid was co-administered with soluble RANKL into mice, RANKL-induced bone loss was substantially prevented. Bone dissection clearly revealed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly diminished by myristoleic acid. On the other hand, myristoleic acid treatment had little or no influence on early osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos and NFATc1, and proteins related to cytoskeletal rearrangement, including DC-STAMP, integrin αv and integrin β3 in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that myristoleic acid is capable of blocking the formation of large multinucleated osteoclasts and bone resorption likely through suppressing activation of Src and Pyk2. PMID:26528796

  20. Branched-chain amino acids suppress the cumulative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma under conditions of insulin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIJI, HITOSHI; NOGUCHI, RYUICHI; NAMISAKI, TADASHI; MORIYA, KEI; KITADE, MITSUTERU; AIHARA, YOSUKE; DOUHARA, AKITOSHI; YAMAO, JUNICHI; FUJIMOTO, MASAO; TOYOHARA, MASAHISA; MITORO, AKIRA; SAWAI, MASAYOSHI; YOSHIDA, MOTOYUKI; MORIOKA, CHIE; UEJIMA, MASAKAZU; UEMURA, MASAHITO; FUKUI, HIROSHI

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) reportedly inhibit the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and obesity that is frequently associated with insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that BCAAs exert a chemopreventive effect against HCC under IR conditions in rats. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BCAAs on the cumulative recurrence of HCC under IR conditions in the clinical practice. BCAA granules (Livact®, 12 g/day) were administered for 60 months following the local curative therapy for HCC, and several indices were determined. Treatment with BCAAs markedly inhibited the cumulative recurrence of HCC in patients with a high IR index [homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR >2.5], but not in patients with HOMA-IR of ≤2.5. BCAA also improved the HOMA-IR, and the inhibitory effect was observed regardless of the serum albumin (Alb) levels. Similarly, BCAA treatment revealed a marked suppressive effect in patients with high fasting insulin [immune reactive insulin (IRI) >15 U/ml], but not with IRI of ≤15. BCAA treatment did not result in differences in HCC recurrence in patients with high and low glucose levels [fasting blood sugar (FBS) >110 and ≤110, respectively]. Furthermore, serum levels of the soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2) were significantly inhibited along with these clinical effects. Our findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of BCAAs was achieved, at least partly, by coordinated effects of anti-angiogenesis and IR improvement. Since BCAAs are widely and safely used in clinical practice to treat patients with chronic liver diseases, BCAAs may represent a new strategy for secondary chemoprevention for HCC patients with IR. Moreover, our findings suggest that sVEGFR2 may be a useful clinical predictive marker for BCAA treatment under IR conditions. PMID:23708326

  1. Branched-chain amino acids suppress the cumulative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma under conditions of insulin-resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Namisaki, Tadashi; Moriya, Kei; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Aihara, Yosuke; Douhara, Akitoshi; Yamao, Junichi; Fujimoto, Masao; Toyohara, Masahisa; Mitoro, Akira; Sawai, Masayoshi; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Morioka, Chie; Uejima, Masakazu; Uemura, Masahito; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) reportedly inhibit the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and obesity that is frequently associated with insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that BCAAs exert a chemopreventive effect against HCC under IR conditions in rats. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BCAAs on the cumulative recurrence of HCC under IR conditions in the clinical practice. BCAA granules (Livact®, 12 g/day) were administered for 60 months following the local curative therapy for HCC, and several indices were determined. Treatment with BCAAs markedly inhibited the cumulative recurrence of HCC in patients with a high IR index [homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR >2.5], but not in patients with HOMA-IR of ≤2.5. BCAA also improved the HOMA-IR, and the inhibitory effect was observed regardless of the serum albumin (Alb) levels. Similarly, BCAA treatment revealed a marked suppressive effect in patients with high fasting insulin [immune reactive insulin (IRI)>15 U/ml], but not with IRI of ≤15. BCAA treatment did not result in differences in HCC recurrence in patients with high and low glucose levels [fasting blood sugar (FBS)>110 and ≤110, respectively]. Furthermore, serum levels of the soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2) were significantly inhibited along with these clinical effects. Our findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of BCAAs was achieved, at least partly, by coordinated effects of anti-angiogenesis and IR improvement. Since BCAAs are widely and safely used in clinical practice to treat patients with chronic liver diseases, BCAAs may represent a new strategy for secondary chemoprevention for HCC patients with IR. Moreover, our findings suggest that sVEGFR2 may be a useful clinical predictive marker for BCAA treatment under IR conditions. PMID:23708326

  2. Plasma long-chain free fatty acids predict mammalian longevity

    PubMed Central

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Aledo, Juan Carlos; Cabré, Rosanna; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition is an important correlate of the rate of aging of animals and, therefore, the determination of their longevity. In the present work, the use of high-throughput technologies allowed us to determine the plasma lipidomic profile of 11 mammalian species ranging in maximum longevity from 3.5 to 120 years. The non-targeted approach revealed a specie-specific lipidomic profile that accurately predicts the animal longevity. The regression analysis between lipid species and longevity demonstrated that the longer the longevity of a species, the lower is its plasma long-chain free fatty acid (LC-FFA) concentrations, peroxidizability index, and lipid peroxidation-derived products content. The inverse association between longevity and LC-FFA persisted after correction for body mass and phylogenetic interdependence. These results indicate that the lipidomic signature is an optimized feature associated with animal longevity, emerging LC-FFA as a potential biomarker of longevity. PMID:24284984

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the induction of pluripotency in mouse fibroblasts by suppressing reprogramming-induced senescence stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yingying; Chen, Xi; Yu, Dehai; Li, Tao; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2015-09-10

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) has been used to increase the reprogramming efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) from somatic cells, yet the specific molecular mechanisms underlying this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming with lentiviruses carrying the iPSC-inducing factors (Oct4-Sox2-Klf4-cMyc, OSKM) caused senescence in mouse fibroblasts, establishing a stress barrier for cell reprogramming. Administration of VPA protected cells from reprogramming-induced senescent stress. Using an in vitro pre-mature senescence model, we found that VPA treatment increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis through the suppression of the p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also inhibited the G2/M phase blockage derived from the senescence stress. These findings highlight the role of VPA in breaking the cell senescence barrier required for the induction of pluripotency. - Highlights: • Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances iPSC induction. • Valproic acid suppresses reprogramming-induced senescence stress. • Valproic acid downregulates the p16/p21 pathway in reprogramming. • This study demonstrates a new mechanistic role of valproic acid in enhancing reprogramming.

  4. Innovations in host and microbial sialic acid biosynthesis revealed by phylogenomic prediction of nonulosonic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Desa, Nolan; Hansen, Elizabeth E.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Gagneux, Pascal; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are nonulosonic acid (NulO) sugars prominently displayed on vertebrate cells and occasionally mimicked by bacterial pathogens using homologous biosynthetic pathways. It has been suggested that Sias were an animal innovation and later emerged in pathogens by convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. To better illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying the phenomenon of Sia molecular mimicry, we performed phylogenomic analyses of biosynthetic pathways for Sias and related higher sugars derived from 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxynon-2-ulosonic acids. Examination of ≈1,000 sequenced microbial genomes indicated that such biosynthetic pathways are far more widely distributed than previously realized. Phylogenetic analysis, validated by targeted biochemistry, was used to predict NulO types (i.e., neuraminic, legionaminic, or pseudaminic acids) expressed by various organisms. This approach uncovered previously unreported occurrences of Sia pathways in pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria and identified at least one instance in which a human archaeal symbiont tentatively reported to express Sias in fact expressed the related pseudaminic acid structure. Evaluation of targeted phylogenies and protein domain organization revealed that the “unique” Sia biosynthetic pathway of animals was instead a much more ancient innovation. Pathway phylogenies suggest that bacterial pathogens may have acquired Sia expression via adaptation of pathways for legionaminic acid biosynthesis, one of at least 3 evolutionary paths for de novo Sia synthesis. Together, these data indicate that some of the long-standing paradigms in Sia biology should be reconsidered in a wider evolutionary context of the extended family of NulO sugars. PMID:19666579

  5. Inhibition of Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis Suppresses Angiogenesis in Developing Endometriotic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Carla N.; Alaniz, Laura D.; Menger, Michael D.; Barañao, Rosa I.; Laschke, Matthias W.; Meresman, Gabriela F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development and long-term survival of endometriotic lesions is crucially dependent on an adequate vascularization. Hyaluronic acid (HA) through its receptor CD44 has been described to be involved in the process of angiogenesis. Objective To study the effect of HA synthesis inhibition using non-toxic doses of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) on endometriosis-related angiogenesis. Materials and Methods The cytotoxicity of different in vitro doses of 4-MU on endothelial cells was firstly tested by means of a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The anti-angiogenic action of non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU was then assessed by a rat aortic ring assay. In addition, endometriotic lesions were induced in dorsal skinfold chambers of female BALB/c mice, which were daily treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% NaCl (vehicle group; n = 6), 20mg/kg 4-MU (n = 8) or 80mg/kg 4-MU (n = 7) throughout an observation period of 14 days. The effect of 4-MU on their vascularization, survival and growth were studied by intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry. Main Results Non-cytotoxic doses of 4-MU effectively inhibited vascular sprout formation in the rat aortic ring assay. Endometriotic lesions in dorsal skinfold chambers of 4-MU-treated mice dose-dependently exhibited a significantly smaller vascularized area and lower functional microvessel density when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Histological analyses revealed a downregulation of HA expression in 4-MU-treated lesions. This was associated with a reduced density of CD31-positive microvessels within the lesions. In contrast, numbers of PCNA-positive proliferating and cleaved caspase-3-positive apoptotic cells did not differ between 4-MU-treated and control lesions. Conclusions The present study demonstrates for the first time that targeting the synthesis of HA suppresses angiogenesis in developing endometriotic lesions. Further studies have to clarify now whether in the future this

  6. An analytical technique for predicting the characteristics of a flexible wing equipped with an active flutter-suppression system and comparison with wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical technique for predicting the performance of an active flutter-suppression system is presented. This technique is based on the use of an interpolating function to approximate the unsteady aerodynamics. The resulting equations are formulated in terms of linear, ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. This technique is then applied to an aeroelastic model wing equipped with an active flutter-suppression system. Comparisons between wind-tunnel data and analysis are presented for the wing both with and without active flutter suppression. Results indicate that the wing flutter characteristics without flutter suppression can be predicted very well but that a more adequate model of wind-tunnel turbulence is required when the active flutter-suppression system is used.

  7. Suppression effects of betaine-enriched spinach on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid and choline deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25 C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  8. Suppression Effects of Betaine-Enriched Spinach on Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced by Guanidinoacetic Acid and Choline Deficiency in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Qun; Jia, Zheng; Han, Feng; Inakuma, Takahiro; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio; Sun, Li-Cui; Xiang, Xue-Song; Huang, Zhen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Betaine is an important natural component of rich food sources, especially spinach. Rats were fed diets with betaine or spinach powder at the same level of betaine for 10 days to investigate the dose-dependent effects of spinach powder supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) addition and choline deprivation. The GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats fed 25% casein diet (25C) was significantly suppressed by supplementation with betaine or spinach, and it was completely suppressed by taking 11.0% spinach supplementation. The choline deprivation-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed 25% soybean protein diet (25S) was markedly suppressed by 3.82% spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach partially prevented the effects of GAA on hepatic concentrations of methionine metabolites. The decrease in activity of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was recovered by supplementation with betaine or spinach. Supplementation with betaine or spinach did not affect BHMT activity, whereas it partially restored CBS activity in choline-deprived 25S. The results indicated that betaine or spinach could completely suppress the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency resulting from stimulating the homocysteine removal by both remethylation and cystathionine formation. PMID:25250392

  9. Negotiators' profit predicted by cognitive reappraisal, suppression of emotions, misrepresentation of information, and tolerance of ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Gülçimen

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between negative emotions and variables that affect negotiators' profit. Based on a simulated negotiation, this study induced emotions by providing negative feedback on how negotiating partners perceived and evaluated each other's behavior. Then relationships were examined between negative emotions and emotional regulation strategies, misrepresentation of information, tolerance of ambiguity, and negotiators' profit. A total of 228 undergraduate students enrolled in an economics course in the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Management at a university in Ankara participated. There were 130 students in the experimental group and 98 students in the control group; 102 were men and 126 were women, ages 17 to 35 years (M =22.6 yr., SD = 2.3). A simulated negotiation process was used. Regression coefficients suggested positive relation between Emotional Reaction and the use of a Suppression strategy and Misrepresentation of Information. Negative coefficients were obtained from scores between Emotional Reaction and Cognitive Reappraisal and Tolerance of Ambiguity. The regression also suggested there were negative regression coefficients linking Misrepresentation of Information and Suppression strategies to Negotiators' Profit. Positive regression coefficients linked Tolerance of Ambiguity to Negotiators' Profit. Mediating variables explained 55% of variance in Negotiators' Profit; the majority (43%) was explained by Cognitive Reappraisal. PMID:18556912

  10. GALNT2 suppresses malignant phenotypes through IGF-1 receptor and predicts favorable prognosis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens such as Tn antigen is associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), one of the enzymes that mediate the initial step of mucin-type O-glycosylation, is responsible for forming Tn antigen. GALNT2 is expressed differentially in nervous tissues during mouse embryogenesis; however, the role of GALNT2 in neuroblastoma (NB) remains unclear. Here we showed that increased GALNT2 expression evaluated using immunohistochemistry in NB tumor tissues correlated well with the histological grade of differentiation as well as younger age at diagnosis, early clinical stage, primary tumor originated from the extra-adrenal site, favorable INPC histology, and MYCN non-amplification. Multivariate analysis showed that GALNT2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for better survival for NB patients. GALNT2 overexpression suppressed IGF-1-induced cell growth, migration, and invasion of NB cells, whereas GALNT2 knockdown enhanced these NB phenotypes. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that GALNT2 overexpression modified O-glycans on IGF-1R, which suppressed IGF-1-triggered IGF-1R dimerization and subsequent downstream signaling events. Conversely, these properties were reversed by GALNT2 knockdown in NB cells. Our findings suggest that GALNT2 regulates malignant phenotypes of NB cells through the IGF-1R signaling pathway, suggesting a critical role for GALNT2 in the pathogenesis of NB. PMID:25362349

  11. GALNT2 suppresses malignant phenotypes through IGF-1 receptor and predicts favorable prognosis in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Chou, Chih-Hsing; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-12-15

    Aberrant expression of the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens such as Tn antigen is associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), one of the enzymes that mediate the initial step of mucin-type O-glycosylation, is responsible for forming Tn antigen. GALNT2 is expressed differentially in nervous tissues during mouse embryogenesis; however, the role of GALNT2 in neuroblastoma (NB) remains unclear. Here we showed that increased GALNT2 expression evaluated using immunohistochemistry in NB tumor tissues correlated well with the histological grade of differentiation as well as younger age at diagnosis, early clinical stage, primary tumor originated from the extra-adrenal site, favorable INPC histology, and MYCN non-amplification. Multivariate analysis showed that GALNT2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for better survival for NB patients. GALNT2 overexpression suppressed IGF-1-induced cell growth, migration, and invasion of NB cells, whereas GALNT2 knockdown enhanced these NB phenotypes. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that GALNT2 overexpression modified O-glycans on IGF-1R, which suppressed IGF-1-triggered IGF-1R dimerization and subsequent downstream signaling events. Conversely, these properties were reversed by GALNT2 knockdown in NB cells. Our findings suggest that GALNT2 regulates malignant phenotypes of NB cells through the IGF-1R signaling pathway, suggesting a critical role for GALNT2 in the pathogenesis of NB. PMID:25362349

  12. Dynamic vortex interactions with flexible fibers and edges for prediction of owl noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korykora, Sarah; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    The compliant trailing-edge fringe of owls and the soft downy material on their upper wing surfaces are thought to enable their silent flight by weakening the interaction of boundary layer turbulence with these flexible structures. Previous analysis of turbulence noise generation by wave-bearing elastic edges have shown that the far-field acoustic power scaling can be weakened by up to the square of the Mach number relative to a rigid edge. However, it is unclear whether or not the wave-bearing feature or simply the flexible nature of the edge scatterer produces this noise suppression. To assess this distinction, a dynamic vortex interaction model is developed whereby the motion of a line vortex round a rigid but elastically-restrained wall-mounted fiber or trailing edge is determined numerically. Special attention is paid to the dynamic interaction between the flexible structure and vortex, which is accomplished via a conformal mapping relationship determined in closed form. Results from this analysis seek to develop a vortex sound model to discern the effect of flexible versus wave-bearing scatterers on turbulence noise suppression and help explain the mechanisms of silent owl flight.

  13. Mfold web server for nucleic acid folding and hybridization prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zuker, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The abbreviated name, ‘mfold web server’, describes a number of closely related software applications available on the World Wide Web (WWW) for the prediction of the secondary structure of single stranded nucleic acids. The objective of this web server is to provide easy access to RNA and DNA folding and hybridization software to the scientific community at large. By making use of universally available web GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces), the server circumvents the problem of portability of this software. Detailed output, in the form of structure plots with or without reliability information, single strand frequency plots and ‘energy dot plots’, are available for the folding of single sequences. A variety of ‘bulk’ servers give less information, but in a shorter time and for up to hundreds of sequences at once. The portal for the mfold web server is http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/mfold. This URL will be referred to as ‘MFOLDROOT’. PMID:12824337

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Suppresses the Expression of Metalloproteinases in Osteoarthritic Cartilage Stimulated Simultaneously by Interleukin 1β and Mechanical Load

    PubMed Central

    Pohlig, Florian; Guell, Florian; Lenze, Ulrich; Lenze, Florian W.; Mühlhofer, Heinrich M. L.; Schauwecker, Johannes; Toepfer, Andreas; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Burgkart, Rainer; Salzmann, Gian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) frequently results in reduced pain and improved function for prolonged periods of time, i.e. more than 6 months. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Our underlying hypothesis is that HA modifies the enzymatic breakdown of joint tissues. Methods To test this hypothesis, we examined osteochondral cylinders from 12 OA patients. In a bioreactor, these samples were stimulated by interleukin 1β (Il1ß) (2 ng/ml) plus mechanical load (2.0 Mpa at 0.5 Hz horizontal and 0.1 Hz vertical rotation), thus the experimental setup recapitulated both catabolic and anabolic clues of the OA joint. Results Upon addition of HA at either 1 or 3 mg/ml, we observed a significant suppression of expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-13. A more detailed analysis based on the Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) OA grade, showed a much greater degree of suppression of MMP-13 expression in grade IV as compared to grade II OA. In contrast to the observed MMP-13 suppression, treatment with HA resulted in a suppression of MMP-1 expression only at 1 mg/ml HA, while MMP-2 expression was not significantly affected by either HA concentration. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that under concurrent catabolic and anabolic stimulation, HA exhibits a pronounced suppressive effect on MMP-13. In the long-run these findings may benefit the development of treatment strategies aimed at blocking tissue degradation in OA patients. PMID:26934732

  15. Disruption of a Nuclear NFATc2 Protein Stabilization Loop Confers Breast and Pancreatic Cancer Growth Suppression by Zoledronic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shiv K.; Baumgart, Sandra; Singh, Garima; König, Alexander O.; Reutlinger, Kristina; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Barth, Peter; Gress, Thomas M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Ellenrieder, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid has elicited significant attention due to its remarkable anti-tumoral activity, although its detailed mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclear GSK-3β-NFATc2 stabilization pathway that promotes breast and pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo and serves as a bona fide target of zoledronic acid. Specifically, the serine/threonine kinase GSK-3β stabilizes nuclear NFATc2 through phosphorylation of the serine-rich SP2 domain, thus protecting the transcription factor from E3-ubiquitin ligase HDM2-mediated proteolysis. Zoledronic acid disrupts this NFATc2 stabilization pathway through two mechanisms, namely GSK-3β inhibition and induction of HDM2 activity. Upon nuclear accumulation, HDM2 targets unphosphorylated NFATc2 for ubiquitination at acceptor lysine residues Lys-684/Lys-897 and hence labels the factor for subsequent proteasomal degradation. Conversely, mutagenesis-induced constitutive serine phosphorylation (Ser-215, Ser-219, and Ser-223) of the SP2 domain prevents NFATc2 from HDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation and consequently rescues cancer cells from growth suppression by zoledronic acid. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a critical role of the GSK-3β-HDM2 signaling loop in the regulation of NFATc2 protein stability and growth promotion and suggests that double targeting of this pathway is responsible, at least to a significant part, for the potent and reliable anti-tumoral effects of zoledronic acid. PMID:21628454

  16. Kupffer cells suppress perfluorononanoic acid-induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression by releasing cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Zou, Shanshan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2012-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) have been demonstrated to play a role in the regulation of intra-hepatic lipid metabolism through the synthesis and secretion of biologically active products. The involvement of KCs in the disturbance of lipid metabolism that induced by perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a known agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), was investigated in this study. Rats were exposed to PFNA or PFNA combined with gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of KCs, for 14 days. PFNA exposure dose-dependently increased absolute and relative liver weights, induced triglyceride accumulation, up-regulated the expression of both SERBP-1c and PPARα, and stimulated the release of TNFα and IL-1β. Inactivation of KCs markedly lowered TNFα and IL-1β level, enhanced PFNA-induced expression of PPARα and its target genes, and reduced liver triglyceride levels. In vitro, PFNA-induced expression of PPARα in primary cultured hepatocytes was suppressed by recombinant rat TNFα and IL-1β. However, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway prevented this. Transient transfection and promoter analysis further revealed that these two cytokines and NF-κB were coordinately involved in the suppression of PPARα promoter activity. Our data demonstrate that TNFα and IL-1β released from KCs following PFNA exposure can suppress the expression of PPARα via NF-κB pathway, which partially contribute to the evident accumulation of triglycerides in rat liver. PMID:22648072

  17. 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through inhibition of microglia activation and promotion of remyelination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jieru; Cai, Wei; Jin, Min; Xu, Jingwei; Wang, Yanan; Xiao, Yichuan; Hao, Li; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Yanyun; Han, Jie; Huang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are intrinsic immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS). The under controlled microglia activation plays important roles in inflammatory demyelination diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the means to modulate microglia activation as a therapeutic modality and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we show that administration of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), by using both preventive and therapeutic treatment protocols, significantly suppresses disease severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. The treatment effect of GRA on EAE is attributed to its regulatory effect on microglia. GRA-modulated microglia significantly decreased pro-inflammatory profile in the CNS through suppression of MAPK signal pathway. The ameliorated CNS pro-inflammatory profile prevented the recruitment of encephalitogenic T cells into the CNS, which alleviated inflammation-induced demyelination. In addition, GRA treatment promoted remyelination in the CNS of EAE mice. The induced remyelination can be mediated by the overcome of inflammation-induced blockade of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in microglia, as well as enhancing oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that GRA-modulated microglia suppresses EAE through inhibiting microglia activation-mediated CNS inflammation, and promoting neuroprotective effect of microglia, which represents a potential therapeutic strategy for MS and maybe other neuroinflammatory diseases associated with microglia activation. PMID:26329786

  18. Controls on suppression of methane flux from a peat bog subjected to simulated acid rain sulfate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy; Fowler, David

    2002-01-01

    The effect of acid rain SO42- deposition on peatland CH4 emissions was examined by manipulating SO42- inputs to a pristine raised peat bog in northern Scotland. Weekly pulses of dissolved Na2SO4 were applied to the bog over two years in doses of 25, 50, and 100 kg S ha-1 yr-1, reflecting the range of pollutant S deposition loads experienced in acid rain-impacted regions of the world. CH4 fluxes were measured at regular intervals using a static chamber/gas chromatographic flame ionization detector method. Total emissions of CH4 were reduced by between 21 and 42% relative to controls, although no significant differences were observed between treatments. Estimated total annual fluxes during the second year of the experiment were 16.6 g m-2 from the controls and (in order of increasing SO42- dose size) 10.7, 13.2, and 9.8 g m-2 from the three SO42- treatments, respectively. The relative extent of CH4 flux suppression varied with changes in both peat temperature and peat water table with the largest suppression during cool periods and episodes of falling water table. Our findings suggest that low doses of SO42- at deposition rates commonly experienced in areas impacted by acid rain, may significantly affect CH4 emissions from wetlands in affected areas. We propose that SO42- from acid rain can stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria into a population capable of outcompeting methanogens for substrates. We further propose that this microbially mediated interaction may have a significant current and future effect on the contribution of northern peatlands to the global methane budget.

  19. Abscisic Acid Determines Basal Susceptibility of Tomato to Botrytis cinerea and Suppresses Salicylic Acid-Dependent Signaling Mechanisms1

    PubMed Central

    Audenaert, Kris; De Meyer, Geert B.; Höfte, Monica M.

    2002-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the plant hormones involved in the interaction between plants and pathogens. In this work, we show that tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Moneymaker) mutants with reduced ABA levels (sitiens plants) are much more resistant to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea than wild-type (WT) plants. Exogenous application of ABA restored susceptibility to B. cinerea in sitiens plants and increased susceptibility in WT plants. These results indicate that ABA plays a major role in the susceptibility of tomato to B. cinerea. ABA appeared to interact with a functional plant defense response against B. cinerea. Experiments with transgenic NahG tomato plants and benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid demonstrated the importance of salicylic acid in the tomato-B. cinerea interaction. In addition, upon infection with B. cinerea, sitiens plants showed a clear increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, which was not observed in infected WT plants, indicating that the ABA levels in healthy WT tomato plants partly repress phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity. In addition, sitiens plants became more sensitive to benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid root treatment. The threshold values for PR1a gene expression declined with a factor 10 to 100 in sitiens compared with WT plants. Thus, ABA appears to negatively modulate the salicylic acid-dependent defense pathway in tomato, which may be one of the mechanisms by which ABA levels determine susceptibility to B. cinerea. PMID:11842153

  20. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  1. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  2. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen. PMID:24920251

  3. Lovastatin suppresses the aberrant tau phosphorylation from FTDP-17 mutation and okadaic acid-induction in rat primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Xu, D-E; Ma, T

    2015-05-21

    Statins are a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs and have been suggested therapeutic use for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent studies revealed a neuronal protective effect of lovastatin (LOV) from N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) excitotoxicity. The neuroprotective mechanism of statins, however, is far unknown. Here we demonstrated that LOV suppressed the aberrant tau phosphorylation both from frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) mutation and okadaic acid (OA) induction in cultured rat primary neurons. The protective effect of LOV occurred at multiple pathological sites of tau protein, including Tyr181, Tyr231 Ser202/Tyr205, Tyr212/Ser214 and Ser396/Ser404. Further analysis revealed that the potential mechanism of the suppressive effect of LOV resulted from two aspects, activating OA-inhibited protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity and attenuating OA-induced activity of tau kinases CDK5/P25 and CDK2/4, but not glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). These findings give new insights into the molecular mechanism of LOV-mediated neuroprotective effect and provide experimental evidence for its therapeutic use in AD. PMID:25770969

  4. Enhancing the performance of LC-MS for intact protein analysis by counteracting the signal suppression effects of trifluoroacetic acid during electrospray.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Mao, Jiawei; Zhou, Ye; Liu, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-10-11

    We develop an acidic vapor assisted electrospray ionization strategy within an enclosed electrospray ionization source to counteract the ion suppression effects caused by trifluoroacetic acid. The mass spectrometry signal intensity of intact proteins was improved 10 times and the number of valid signals for E. coli intact protein samples was improved 96% by using this strategy. PMID:26295950

  5. Influence of disease-suppressive strains of Streptomyces on the native Streptomyces community in soil as determined by the analysis of cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J H; Kinkel, L L; Jones, R K

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles was used to distinguish among introduced pathogen- suppressive strains and indigenous strains of Streptomyces spp. isolated from soil of field plots established to test the efficacy of Streptomyces strains PonSSII and PonR in the biological control of potato scab. Reference libraries of fatty acid profiles were developed for a collection of known pathogenic strains and the introduced suppressive strains. Population densities of pathogen-related, suppressive, and saprophytic Streptomyces strains were determined from the relationship of field isolates to mean library profiles using cluster analysis and the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages. Community diversity was similarly determined. Streptomyces strains PonSSII and PonR were distinguished from each other and from the pathogen group (which clustered together) based on fatty acid profiles. The introduced, suppressive strains successfully colonized the soil and represented 2-19% of the isolates sampled over 2 years. The introduction of the suppressive strains inhibited the population of strains related to the pathogen library at each sample date; the pathogen population was substantially lower in soil from treatments where the suppressive strains were introduced compared with the nonamended control. At harvest, the pathogen-related population was suppressed 85-93 and 36-44% in 1991 and 1992, respectively, in treatments with the suppressive strains compared with the nonamended control. Diversity of the community was not affected by the introduced strains, and diversity and equitability indices were similar among treatments at any sample time. The inhibition of the pathogen-related population was correlated with a reduction of scab symptoms observed in the field plots into which the suppressive strains were introduced. Implications of a fundamental shift in the pathogen-related population in response to the introduction of the suppressive strains for long

  6. Amphipathic β2,2-Amino Acid Derivatives Suppress Infectivity and Disrupt the Intracellular Replication Cycle of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Tiirola, Terttu M.; Strøm, Morten B.; Vuorela, Pia M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate in the current work that small cationic antimicrobial β2,2-amino acid derivatives (Mw < 500 Da) are highly potent against Chlamydia pneumoniae at clinical relevant concentrations (< 5 μM, i.e. < 3.4 μg/mL). C. pneumoniae is an atypical respiratory pathogen associated with frequent treatment failures and persistent infections. This gram-negative bacterium has a biphasic life cycle as infectious elementary bodies and proliferating reticulate bodies, and efficient treatment is challenging because of its long and obligate intracellular replication cycle within specialized inclusion vacuoles. Chlamydicidal effect of the β2,2-amino acid derivatives in infected human epithelial cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Images of infected host cells treated with our lead derivative A2 revealed affected chlamydial inclusion vacuoles 24 hours post infection. Only remnants of elementary and reticulate bodies were detected at later time points. Neither the EM studies nor resazurin-based cell viability assays showed toxic effects on uninfected host cells or cell organelles after A2 treatment. Besides the effects on early intracellular inclusion vacuoles, the ability of these β2,2-amino acid derivatives to suppress Chlamydia pneumoniae infectivity upon treatment of elementary bodies suggested also a direct interaction with bacterial membranes. Synthetic β2,2-amino acid derivatives that target C. pneumoniae represent promising lead molecules for development of antimicrobial agents against this hard-to-treat intracellular pathogen. PMID:27280777

  7. Salicylic Acid Suppresses Jasmonic Acid Signaling Downstream of SCFCOI1-JAZ by Targeting GCC Promoter Motifs via Transcription Factor ORA59[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Koornneef, Annemart; Van Verk, Marcel C.; Rodenburg, Nicole; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain; Körbes, Ana P.; Memelink, Johan; Ritsema, Tita; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism between the defense hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in the modulation of the plant immune signaling network, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that suppression of the JA pathway by SA functions downstream of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Skip-Cullin-F-box complex SCFCOI1, which targets JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressor proteins (JAZs) for proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, neither the stability nor the JA-induced degradation of JAZs was affected by SA. In silico promoter analysis of the SA/JA crosstalk transcriptome revealed that the 1-kb promoter regions of JA-responsive genes that are suppressed by SA are significantly enriched in the JA-responsive GCC-box motifs. Using GCC:GUS lines carrying four copies of the GCC-box fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene, we showed that the GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Using plants overexpressing the GCC-box binding APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factors ERF1 or ORA59, we found that SA strongly reduces the accumulation of ORA59 but not that of ERF1. Collectively, these data indicate that the SA pathway inhibits JA signaling downstream of the SCFCOI1-JAZ complex by targeting GCC-box motifs in JA-responsive promoters via a negative effect on the transcriptional activator ORA59. PMID:23435661

  8. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Swan, David A; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of median effective concentration (EC50) are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. Although pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be used to optimize dose selection in clinical practice. PMID:26843190

  9. Role of acid suppressants in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maton, P N

    1991-01-01

    Virtually all symptoms in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome are due to acid hypersecretion, thus the control of acid secretion is the first and most important step in the management of patients with this syndrome. Antisecretory medication is prescribed as soon as the diagnosis of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is made, as patients may bleed or perforate with little warning. Acid output is reduced to less than 10 mmol/h to heal mucosal lesions, but in patients with a Billroth I or II gastrectomy and those with severe oesophagitis and stricture formation, acid output is reduced to less than 5 or less than 1 mmol/h. Acid output and not symptomatic response is a reliable guide of the adequacy of therapy. In sufficient doses, all H2-receptor antagonists are useful; however, side effects associated with cimetidine therapy limit its use. The ratio of potencies of cimetidine:ranitidine:famotidine is 1:4:32. Ranitidine given as a 50-mg intravenous bolus, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.5 mg.kg/h, controls acid hypersecretion acutely in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Acid output is checked after 4 h, and the dose increased until acid output is less than 10 mmol/h. In 70% of patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, 1 mg.kg/h reduces acid output to less than 10 mmol/h; however, doses up to 4 mg.kg/h have been used. When patients are switched to oral ranitidine, a useful dosage conversion is to administer 1.5 times the total daily intravenous dose in four equal doses every 6 h. Four doses of oral drug are given before the infusion is stopped. Six hours after the first/last oral dose, acid output is checked. In our patients, the mean dose of ranitidine was 2100 mg/day (range, 450-9200 mg/day). No serious toxicity was observed. Omeprazole, which has a long duration of action and is a potent inhibitor of gastric acid secretion, has simplified management. Once-daily dosing is sufficient in most patients, and a reasonable starting dose is 60 mg daily. The dose

  10. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  11. Aminocarbonyloxymethyl ester prodrugs of flufenamic acid and diclofenac: suppressing the rearrangement pathway in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lina; Silva, Nuno; Iley, Jim; Rautio, Jarkko; Järvinen, Tomi; Mota-Filipe, Hélder; Moreira, Rui; Mendes, Eduarda

    2007-01-01

    Aminocarbonyloxymethyl ester prodrugs are known to undergo rearrangement in aqueous solutions to form the corresponding N-acylamine side product via an O-->N intramolecular acyl transfer from the carbamate conjugate base. Novel aminocarbonyloxymethyl esters of diclofenac and flufenamic acid containing amino acid amide carriers were synthesized and evaluated as potential prodrugs displaying less ability to undergo rearrangement. These compounds were prepared in reasonable yield by a four-step synthetic method that uses the appropriate N-Boc-protected amino acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and secondary amine and chloromethyl chloroformate as key reactants. Their reactivity in pH 7.4 buffer and 80% human plasma at 37 degrees C was assessed by RP-HPLC. The aminocarbonyloxymethyl esters containing a secondary carbamate group derived from amino acids such as glycine or phenylalanine were hydrolyzed quantitatively to the parent drug both in non-enzymatic and enzymatic conditions, with no rearrangement product being detected. The oral bioavailability in rats was determined for selected diclofenac derivatives. These derivatives displayed a bioavailability of 25 to 68% relative to that of diclofenac, probably due to their poor aqueous solubility and lipophilicity. These results suggest that further optimization of aminocarbonyloxymethyl esters as potential prodrugs for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs require the use of amino acid carriers with ionizable groups to improve aqueous solubility. PMID:17206608

  12. Suppression of tricarboxylic acid cycle in Escherichia coli exposed to sub-MICs of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallero, A; Eftimiadi, C; Radin, L; Schito, G C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic activity of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 challenged with sub-MICs of aminoglycosides was analyzed with a batch calorimeter. High-performance and gas-liquid chromatographic techniques were utilized to evaluate the concentrations of metabolic reactants, intermediates, and end products. The data reported indicate that aminoglycosides inhibit or delay bacterial catabolism of carboxylic acids, with the following relative degrees of activity: amikacin greater than gentamicin greater than sisomicin greater than netilmicin greater than kanamycin. The decrease in total biomass production was proportional to the degree of tricarboxylic acid cycle inhibition. PMID:2183717

  13. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  14. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2014-12-16

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3-0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r(2)) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  15. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  16. The gut microbiota suppresses insulin-mediated fat accumulation via the short-chain fatty acid receptor GPR43.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ikuo; Ozawa, Kentaro; Inoue, Daisuke; Imamura, Takeshi; Kimura, Kumi; Maeda, Takeshi; Terasawa, Kazuya; Kashihara, Daiji; Hirano, Kanako; Tani, Taeko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Shioi, Go; Inoue, Hiroshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota affects nutrient acquisition and energy regulation of the host, and can influence the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. During feeding, gut microbes produce short-chain fatty acids, which are important energy sources for the host. Here we show that the short-chain fatty acid receptor GPR43 links the metabolic activity of the gut microbiota with host body energy homoeostasis. We demonstrate that GPR43-deficient mice are obese on a normal diet, whereas mice overexpressing GPR43 specifically in adipose tissue remain lean even when fed a high-fat diet. Raised under germ-free conditions or after treatment with antibiotics, both types of mice have a normal phenotype. We further show that short-chain fatty acid-mediated activation of GPR43 suppresses insulin signalling in adipocytes, which inhibits fat accumulation in adipose tissue and promotes the metabolism of unincorporated lipids and glucose in other tissues. These findings establish GPR43 as a sensor for excessive dietary energy, thereby controlling body energy utilization while maintaining metabolic homoeostasis. PMID:23652017

  17. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  18. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Sara L; Väremo, Leif; Gabrielsson, Britt G; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  19. Suppression of IL-12p40-related regulatory cytokines by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid an inhibitor of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Dobreva, Zlatka Georgieva; Grigorov, Boncho Grigorov; Stanilova, Spaska Angelova

    2016-08-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a new class drugs used in clinical trials for the treatment of various malignancies. Emerging evidence suggest that HDAC inhibitors may also have anti-inflammatory properties, although the molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. Our study investigates the effect of the HDACs inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the expression of IL-12p40-related cytokines. For this purpose, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with LPS and C3bgp with or without SAHA. IL-12p40, IL-12p35 and IL-23p19 mRNA was determined at 6 h by qRT-PCR. Cytokine levels were determined in culture supernatants at 6 and 24 h, by ELISA. SAHA significantly inhibited IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 mRNA synthesis and did not change IL-12p35 mRNA transcription. Early at 6 h, we detected significantly decreased IL-12p40 and IL-23, but not IL-12p70 protein production in cultures treated with SAHA. Results also showed that the suppression of IL-12p40-related cytokines was clearly defined at 24 h. However, this suppression was less pronounced regarding IL-12p70. The present study showed that SAHA suppressed the gene expression of IL-23p19 stronger than the expression of IL-12p35, as well as the synthesis of IL-23 compared to that of IL-12p70. We suggest that this inhibitory effect of SAHA may be beneficial during treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases mediated by Th17 immune response. PMID:27240992

  20. Valproic acid induces autophagy by suppressing the Akt/mTOR pathway in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qinghua; Zheng, Yi; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Zhongxian; Wang, Muwen; Rodriguez, Ronald; Jin, Xunbo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the chronic administration of valproic acid (VPA) suppresses angiogenesis in vivo; however, the mechanisms implicated in VPA-induced autophagy remain unclear. The current study aimed to assess VPA-induced autophagy in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145 and LNCaP), in addition to analyzing the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal pathway. Prostate cancer cell lines were cultured with various doses of VPA. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry, and autophagy markers [1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II and Beclin-1] were examined using transmission electron microscopy, fluorescent microscopy and western blotting. Activation of the Akt/mTOR signal pathway was also assessed by western blotting. The results demonstrated that VPA induced autophagosomes and suppressed the Akt/mTOR signal pathway. This was confirmed by detection of increased LC3-II and Beclin-1 in VPA-treated cells compared with untreated controls. Phosphorylated forms of Akt (PC3, P=0.048; DU145, P=0.045; LNCaP, P=0.039) and mTOR (PC3, P=0.012; DU145, P=0.41; LNCaP, P=0.35) were significantly reduced following VPA treatment. These results suggest that VPA may function as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suppressing the growth of prostate cancer cells by modulating autophagy pathways, including inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway. Further experiments are required to determine the significance of all involved pathways regarding VPA-induced growth inhibition. PMID:27588130

  1. High-casein diet suppresses guanidinoacetic acid-induced hyperhomocysteinemia and potentiates the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Seiya; Matsumoto, Yuko; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2008-12-01

    To determine the effect of dietary protein level on experimental hyperhomocysteinemia, rats were fed 10% casein (10C) and 40% casein (40C) diets with or without 0.5% guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) for 14 d. In addition, rats were fed 10C + 0.75% methionine (10CM) and 40C + 0.75% methionine (40CM) diets with or without 2.5% serine for 14 d to determine the relationship between the dietary protein level and intensity of the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine. GAA supplementation markedly increased the plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed with the 10C diet, whereas it did not increase the plasma homocysteine concentration in rats fed with the 40C diet. Although serine supplementation significantly suppressed the methionine-induced enhancement of plasma homocysteine concentration, the decreased plasma homocysteine concentration was significantly lower in rats fed with the 40CM diet than in rats fed with the 10CM diet. The hepatic cystathionine beta-synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase activities were significantly higher in rats fed with the 40C or 40CM diet than in rats fed with the 10C or 10CM diet, irrespective of supplementation with GAA and serine. These results indicate that the high-casein diet was effective for both suppressing GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia and potentiating the hypohomocysteinemic effect of serine, probably through the enhanced activity of homocysteine-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:19060401

  2. Oleanolic acid inhibits colorectal cancer angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro via suppression of STAT3 and Hedgehog pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Jiumao; Sun, Guodong; Wei, Lihui; Shen, Aling; Zhang, Mingyue; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of cancer progression and is regulated by multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and sonic hedgehog (SHH). Thus, these pathways have become a promising target for anti‑cancer therapeutic strategies. Oleanolic acid (OA) is an active compound present in various herbal medicines, which have been used historically for the clinical treatment of various types of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study used a CRC mouse xenograft model and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to evaluate the effect of OA on tumor angiogenesis and on the activation of the STAT3 and SHH signaling pathways. It was determined that OA treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth and reduced intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) in CRC mice. In addition, OA treatment inhibited the proliferation, migration and tube formation in HUVECs, in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, OA markedly suppressed the activation of the STAT3 and SHH signaling pathways and inhibited the expression of the pro‑angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor A and basic fibroblast growth factor, two important target genes of the aforementioned signaling pathways. Therefore it is suggested that inhibition of tumor angiogenesis via the suppression of multiple signaling pathways may be one of the underlying mechanisms by which OA exerts its anti-cancer effect. PMID:27108756

  3. Gambogenic acid inhibits LPS-simulated inflammatory response by suppressing NF-κB and MAPK in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Haiwei; Fan, Cunxian; Zhang, Xixi; Xie, Qun; Xu, Chengxian; Liu, Yongbo; Wu, Xiaoxia; Han, Quanbin; Zhang, Haibing

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a response of body tissues to injury and infection. Compounds that can inhibit inflammation have been shown to have potential therapeutic clinical application. Gambogenic acid (GEA) has potent antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities. Herein, the molecular mechanisms of GEA's anti-inflammatory effect were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cells. The results showed that pretreatment with GEA could markedly inhibit interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IFN-β, IL-12b, and IL-23a production in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-induced model. Furthermore, this drug significantly reduced the release of nitric oxide (NO), and impaired the protein level of inducible NO synthase and the cyclooxygenase 2. The finding also showed that the effect of GEA may be related to the suppression of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. These results indicate that GEA could suppress LPS-simulated inflammatory response partially by attenuating NO synthesis and NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that it may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025602

  4. Acetyl Eburicoic Acid from Laetiporus sulphureus var. miniatus Suppresses Inflammation in Murine Macrophage RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Evelyn; Son, Youngmin; Jeon, Bo Ra; Kim, Seong-Eun; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Laetiporus sulphureus var. miniatus belongs to the Aphyllophorales, Polyporaceae, and grows on the needleleaf tree. The fruiting bodies of Laetiporus species are known to produce N-methylated tyramine derivatives, polysaccharides, and various lanostane triterpenoids. As part of our ongoing effort to discover biologically active compounds from wood-rotting fungi, an anti-inflammatory triterpene, LSM-H7, has been isolated from the fruiting body of L. sulphureus var. miniatus and identified as acetyl eburicoic acid. LSM-H7 dose-dependently inhibited the NO production in RAW 264.7 cells without any cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Furthermore it suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α, when compared with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. These data suggest that LSM-H7 is a crucial component for the anti-inflammatory activity of L. sulphureus var. miniatus. PMID:26190920

  5. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Seki, Ekihiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi; Adachi, Masayuki; Ito, Hiroyasu; Shiratori, Yoshimune; Banno, Yoshiko; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Nagaki, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Brenner, David A.; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Because sphingolipids regulate AKT activation, we investigated the role of ASM in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. Initially, we overexpressed ASM in the livers of wild-type and diabetic db/db mice by adenovirus vector (Ad5ASM). In these mice, glucose tolerance was improved, and glycogen and lipid accumulation in the liver were increased. Using primary cultured hepatocytes, we confirmed that ASM increased glucose uptake, glycogen deposition, and lipid accumulation through activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In addition, ASM induced up-regulation of glucose transporter 2 accompanied by suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Loss of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) diminished ASM-mediated AKT phosphorylation, but exogenous S1P induced AKT activation in hepatocytes. In contrast, SphK1 deficiency did not affect AMPK activation. These results suggest that the SphK/S1P pathway is required for ASM-mediated AKT activation but not for AMPK inactivation. Finally, we found that treatment with high-dose glucose increased glycogen deposition and lipid accumulation in wild-type hepatocytes but not in ASM−/− cells. This result is consistent with glucose intolerance in ASM−/− mice. In conclusion, ASM modulates AKT activation and AMPK inactivation, thus regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver.—Osawa, Y., Seki, E., Kodama, Y., Suetsugu, A., Miura, K., Adachi, M., Ito, H., Shiratori, Y., Banno, Y., Olefsky, J. M., Nagaki, M., Moriwaki, H., Brenner, D. A., Seishima, M. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression. PMID:21163859

  6. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  7. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  8. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress in the chondrocytes of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Cao, Yongping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Pengcheng; Liu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The main pathogenic events in osteoarthritis (OA) include loss and abnormal remodeling of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Articular cartilage tissues were collected from 18 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and were analyzed histologically. Subsequently, chondrocyte apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were employed to evaluate gene and protein expression, respectively, of ER stress markers, including glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA‑damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase‑12 along with type II collagen. Chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritis patients at different stages were cultured in three conditions including: No treatment (CON group), tunicamycin treatment to induce ER stress (ERS group) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment after 4 h of tunicamycin (TDA group); and cell proliferation, apoptosis, function and ER stress level were assessed. Degradation of cartilage resulted in histological damage with more apoptotic cartilage cells observed. Of note, GRP78, GADD153 and caspase‑12 mRNA and protein expression increased gradually from grade I to III cartilage tissue, while type II collagen expression decreased. Tunicamycin induced ER stress, as shown by a high expression of ER stress markers, reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased synthesis of type II collagen. Notably, tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment resulted in the improvement of tunicamycin‑induced ER stress. These results indicated that ER stress is highly involved in the tunicamycin‑induced apoptosis in chondrocytes, which can be prevented by tauroursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:26238983

  9. Corosolic acid suppresses the expression of inflammatory marker genes in CCL4-induced-hepatotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Aristatile; Al-Assaf, Abdullah Hassan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to asses the anti-inflammatory effects of corosolic acid on the carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) toxicity in rats. Liver toxicity was induced by administered CCL4 (single dose (1:1 in liquid paraffin) orally at 1.25 ml/kg. Rats were pretreated with CRA for 7 days before made CCL(4) toxicity at 20 mg/kg BW. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and NF-kB were assayed by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis. The mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and the inflammatory markers such as iNOS, COX-2 and NF-kB were significantly up regulated in CCl(4) induced rats and treatment with corosolic acid significantly reduced the expression of the above indicators. Our results suggest that the inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and NF-κB by corosolic acid, a potential candidate could possess anti-inflammatory activity besides its hepatoprotective effect in CCl4 liver toxicity in rats. PMID:27393448

  10. Mechanism of Tissue-specific Farnesoid X Receptor in Suppressing the Expression of Genes in Bile-acid Synthesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bo; Wang, Li; Chiang, John Y. L.; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Guo, Grace L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of farnesoid X receptor (Fxr, Nr1h4) is a major mechanism in suppressing bile-acid synthesis by reducing the expression levels of genes encoding key bile-acid synthetic enzymes, CYP7A1/Cyp7a1 and CYP8B1/Cyp8b1. FXR-mediated induction of hepatic small heterodimer partner (SHP/Shp, Nr0b2) and intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (Fgf15, FGF19 in human) has been shown to be responsible for this suppression. However, the exact contribution of Shp/Fgf15 to this suppression and the associated cell signaling pathway is unclear. By using novel genetically modified mice, the current study showed that the intestinal Fxr/Fgf15 pathway was critical for suppressing both Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 gene expression, but the liver Fxr/Shp pathway was important for suppressing Cyp8b1 gene expression and had a minor role in suppressing Cyp7a1 gene expression. Furthermore, in vivo administration of Fgf15 protein to mice led to a strong activation of ERK, and to a smaller degree, JNK, in the liver. In addition, deficiency of either the ERK or JNK pathway in mouse livers reduced the basal, but not the Fgf15-mediated suppression, of Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 gene expression. However, deficiency of both ERK and JNK pathways prevented Fgf15-mediated suppression of Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 gene expression. Conclusion the current study clearly elucidates the underlying molecular mechanism of hepatic vs. intestinal Fxr in regulating the expression of genes critical for bile-acid synthesis and hydrophobicity in the liver. PMID:22467244

  11. The antagonistic regulation of abscisic acid-inhibited root growth by brassinosteroids is partially mediated via direct suppression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 expression by BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaorui; Bai, Yang; Shang, Jianxiu; Xin, Ruijiao; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) and abscisic acid (ABA) are plant hormones that antagonistically regulate many aspects of plant growth and development; however, the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk of these two hormones are still not well understood. BRs regulate plant growth and development by activating BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1 (BZR1) family transcription factors. Here we show that the crosstalk between BRs and ABA signalling is partially mediated by BZR1 regulated gene expression. bzr1-1D is a dominant mutant with enhanced BR signalling; our results showed that bzr1-1D mutant is less sensitive to ABA-inhibited primary root growth. By RNA sequencing, a subset of BZR1 regulated ABA-responsive root genes were identified. Of these genes, the expression of a major ABA signalling component ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) was found to be suppressed by BR and by BZR1. Additional evidences showed that BZR1 could bind strongly with several G-box cis-elements in the promoter of ABI5, suppress the expression of ABI5 and make plants less sensitive to ABA. Our study demonstrated that ABI5 is a direct target gene of BZR1, and modulating the expression of ABI5 by BZR1 plays important roles in regulating the crosstalk between the BR and ABA signalling pathways. PMID:27149247

  12. Abscisic Acid Promotes Susceptibility to the Rice Leaf Blight Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae by Suppressing Salicylic Acid-Mediated Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Audenaert, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in a wide variety of plant processes, including the initiation of stress-adaptive responses to various environmental cues. Recently, ABA also emerged as a central factor in the regulation and integration of plant immune responses, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Aiming to advance our understanding of ABA-modulated disease resistance, we have analyzed the impact, dynamics and interrelationship of ABA and the classic defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) during progression of rice infection by the leaf blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Consistent with ABA negatively regulating resistance to Xoo, we found that exogenously administered ABA renders rice hypersusceptible to infection, whereas chemical and genetic disruption of ABA biosynthesis and signaling, respectively, led to enhanced Xoo resistance. In addition, we found successful Xoo infection to be associated with extensive reprogramming of ABA biosynthesis and response genes, suggesting that ABA functions as a virulence factor for Xoo. Interestingly, several lines of evidence indicate that this immune-suppressive effect of ABA is due at least in part to suppression of SA-mediated defenses that normally serve to limit pathogen growth. Resistance induced by the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone, however, appears to operate in a SA-independent manner and is likely due to induction of non-specific physiological stress. Collectively, our findings favor a scenario whereby virulent Xoo hijacks the rice ABA machinery to cause disease and highlight the importance of ABA and its crosstalk with SA in shaping the outcome of rice-Xoo interactions. PMID:23826294

  13. Oleanolic acid suppresses the proliferation of human bladder cancer by Akt/mTOR/S6K and ERK1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Da-Wei; Guo, He-Qing; Zhou, Gao-Biao; Li, Jian-Ye; Su, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic acid has significant pharmacological activities, such as anti-tumor, regulating blood sugar level and liver protection, which are more effective compared with free aglyconeoleanolic acid. However, it is still unknown if oleanolic acid affects the proliferation of human bladder cancer. We utilized T24 cells to study the effect of oleanolic acid on the proliferation and apoptosis of human bladder cancer. In this study, we found that the anti-cancer effect of oleanolic acid significantly suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis and caspase-3 activity of T24 cells. Furthermore, Akt, mTOR and S6K protein expression was greatly inhibited in T24 cells under oleanolic acid treatment. Meanwhile, ERK1/2 of phosphorylation protein expression was significantly promoted by oleanolic acid treatment. Taken together, we provided evidences that oleanolic acid was Akt/mTOR/S6K and ERK1/2 signaling-targeting anti-tumor agent. These findings represent new evidences that oleanolic acid suppresses the proliferation of human bladder cancer by Akt/mTOR/S6K and ERK1/2 signaling, and oleanolic acid may be used to prevent human bladder cancer. PMID:26823699

  14. The Lactic Acid Bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici Suppresses Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Inducing IL-10-Producing Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kazushiro; Kinoshita, Makoto; Okuno, Tatsusada; Moriya, Masayuki; Kohda, Tohru; Honorat, Josephe A.; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Sakoda, Saburo; Nakatsuji, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Background Certain intestinal microflora are thought to regulate the systemic immune response. Lactic acid bacteria are one of the most studied bacteria in terms of their beneficial effects on health and autoimmune diseases; one of which is Multiple sclerosis (MS) which affects the central nervous system. We investigated whether the lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici, which comprises human commensal bacteria, has beneficial effects on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Methodology/Principal Findings P. acidilactici R037 was orally administered to EAE mice to investigate the effects of R037. R037 treatment suppressed clinical EAE severity as prophylaxis and therapy. The antigen-specific production of inflammatory cytokines was inhibited in R037-treated mice. A significant increase in the number of CD4+ Interleukin (IL)-10-producing cells was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and spleens isolated from R037-treated naive mice, while no increase was observed in the number of these cells in the lamina propria. Because only a slight increase in the CD4+Foxp3+ cells was observed in MLNs, R037 may primarily induce Foxp3− IL10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells in MLNs, which contribute to the beneficial effect of R037 on EAE. Conclusions/Significance An orally administered single strain of P. acidilactici R037 ameliorates EAE by inducing IL10-producing Tr1 cells. Our findings indicate the therapeutic potential of the oral administration of R037 for treating multiple sclerosis. PMID:22110705

  15. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  16. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  17. Auxin promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae via a mechanism independent of suppression of salicylic acid-mediated defenses.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Andrew M; Fawley, Stephen; Tsao, Tiffany; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2013-06-01

    Auxin is a key plant growth regulator that also impacts plant-pathogen interactions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae manipulates auxin physiology in Arabidopsis thaliana to promote pathogenesis. Pseudomonas syringae strategies to alter host auxin biology include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and production of virulence factors that alter auxin responses in host cells. The application of exogenous auxin enhances disease caused by P. syringae strain DC3000. This is hypothesized to result from antagonism between auxin and salicylic acid (SA), a major regulator of plant defenses, but this hypothesis has not been tested in the context of infected plants. We further investigated the role of auxin during pathogenesis by examining the interaction of auxin and SA in the context of infection in plants with elevated endogenous levels of auxin. We demonstrated that elevated IAA biosynthesis in transgenic plants overexpressing the YUCCA 1 (YUC1) auxin biosynthesis gene led to enhanced susceptibility to DC3000. Elevated IAA levels did not interfere significantly with host defenses, as effector-triggered immunity was active in YUC1-overexpressing plants, and we observed only minor effects on SA levels and SA-mediated responses. Furthermore, a plant line carrying both the YUC1-overexpression transgene and the salicylic acid induction deficient 2 (sid2) mutation, which impairs SA synthesis, exhibited additive effects of enhanced susceptibility from both elevated auxin levels and impaired SA-mediated defenses. Thus, in IAA overproducing plants, the promotion of pathogen growth occurs independently of suppression of SA-mediated defenses. PMID:23521356

  18. 18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid suppresses cell proliferation through inhibiting thromboxane synthase in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Run-Yue; Chu, Yong-Liang; Huang, Qing-Chun; Chen, Xiu-Min; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhang, Xian; Zeng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) is a bioactive component of licorice. The anti-cancer activity of 18β-GA has been studied in many cancer types, whereas its effects in lung cancer remain largely unknown. We first showed that 18β-GA effectively suppressed cell proliferation and inhibited expression as well as activity of thromboxane synthase (TxAS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells A549 and NCI-H460. In addition, the administration of 18β-GA did not have any additional inhibitory effect on the decrease of cell proliferation induced by transfection with TxAS small interference RNA (siRNA). Moreover, 18β-GA failed to inhibit cell proliferation in the immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells 16HBE-T and another NSCLC cell line NCI-H23, both of which expressed minimal level of TxAS as compared to A549 and NCI-H460. However, 18β-GA abolished the enhancement of cell proliferation induced by transfection of NCI-H23 with pCMV6-TxAS plasmid. Further study found that the activation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) induced by TxAS cDNA transfection could be totally blocked by 18β-GA. Altogether, we have delineated that, through inhibiting TxAS and its initiated ERK/CREB signaling, 18β-GA suppresses NSCLC cell proliferation. Our study has highlighted the significance of 18β-GA with respect to prevention and treatment of NSCLC. PMID:24695790

  19. Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes homologous recombinational repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Timiri Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan; Nair, Renjith Parameshwaran; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Caldito, Gloria; Abreo, Fleurette; Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan

    2016-04-01

    Accidental or medical radiation exposure of the salivary glands can gravely impact oral health. Previous studies have shown the importance of Tousled-like kinase 1 (TLK1) and its alternate start variant TLK1B in cell survival against genotoxic stresses. Through a high-throughput library screening of natural compounds, the phenolic phytochemical, gallic acid (GA), was identified as a modulator of TLK1/1B. This small molecule possesses anti-oxidant and free radical scavenging properties, but in this study, we report that in vitro it promotes survival of human salivary acinar cells, NS-SV-AC, through repair of ionizing radiation damage. Irradiated cells treated with GA show improved clonogenic survival compared to untreated controls. And, analyses of DNA repair kinetics by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence indicate rapid resolution of DNA breaks in drug-treated cells. Study of DR-GFP transgene repair indicates GA facilitates homologous recombinational repair to establish a functional GFP gene. In contrast, inactivation of TLK1 or its shRNA knockdown suppressed resolution of radiation-induced DNA tails in NS-SV-AC, and homology directed repair in DR-GFP cells. Consistent with our results in culture, animals treated with GA after exposure to fractionated radiation showed better preservation of salivary function compared to saline-treated animals. Our results suggest that GA-mediated transient modulation of TLK1 activity promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytoxicity in salivary gland cells. PMID:26855419

  20. Multipolar Electrostatic Energy Prediction for all 20 Natural Amino Acids Using Kriging Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Timothy L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-06-14

    A machine learning method called kriging is applied to the set of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Kriging models are built that predict electrostatic multipole moments for all topological atoms in any amino acid based on molecular geometry only. These models then predict molecular electrostatic interaction energies. On the basis of 200 unseen test geometries for each amino acid, no amino acid shows a mean prediction error above 5.3 kJ mol(-1), while the lowest error observed is 2.8 kJ mol(-1). The mean error across the entire set is only 4.2 kJ mol(-1) (or 1 kcal mol(-1)). Charged systems are created by protonating or deprotonating selected amino acids, and these show no significant deviation in prediction error over their neutral counterparts. Similarly, the proposed methodology can also handle amino acids with aromatic side chains, without the need for modification. Thus, we present a generic method capable of accurately capturing multipolar polarizable electrostatics in amino acids. PMID:27224739

  1. Pyridoxine supplementation protects mice from suppression of contact hypersensitivity induced by 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), ultraviolet B radiation (280-320 nm), or cis-urocanic acid.

    PubMed

    Reeve, V E; Bosnic, M; Boehm-Wilcox, C; Cope, R B

    1995-03-01

    Evidence exists implicating the epidermal ultraviolet B (UVB) photoproduct cis-urocanic acid as an immunogenic mediator of the systemic suppression of T cell-mediated immunity by UVB exposure. Cis-urocanic acid appears to act via histamine receptor pathways, and histamine receptor antagonists and other imidazole ring compounds may modify its immune suppressing action. A component of the food coloring substance ammonia caramel, 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), which is known to cause lymphopenia in rats, appears to suppress immunity by a similar pathway when the contact hypersensitivity reaction has been the immune function assay in mice. The induction of lymphopenia in rats by THI is inhibited by the vitamin pyridoxine. This study demonstrates that the suppression of contact hypersensitivity in mice by UVB radiation, cis-urocanic acid, or THI is strongly inhibited by supplemental pyridoxine, fed at 30 mg/kg diet, in comparison with the normal diet, which supplies 7 mg pyridoxine/kg diet. These results suggest that pyridoxine competes with cis-urocanic acid and THI for the same binding site or receptor, which we postulate to be a histamine-like T lymphocyte receptor, and that a role may exist for the control of photoimmunosuppression by this vitamin. PMID:7872221

  2. DISRUPTION IN RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO A SUPPRESSION ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption in Rat Estrous Cyclicity by the Drinking Water Disinfectant By-Product Dibromoacetic Acid: Relationship to A Suppression on Estradiol Metabolism?

    Ashley S. Murr and Jerome M. Goldman, Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division National Health and En...

  3. MODERATING INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON A DITHIOCARBAMATE-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been found in female rats to increase circulating concentrations of both estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). This effect is apparently due, at least in part, to a suppression in hepatic catabolism. The present study investigat...

  4. Folic acid supplementation of pregnant mice suppresses heat-induced neural tube defects in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Shiota, K

    1999-11-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are a group of malformations that result from the failure of the neural tube to close early in embryonic development and among the most common congenital malformations in humans. It has been reported that a substantial proportion of NTD in humans can be prevented by folic acid (FA) supplementation prior to conception and during the first months of pregnancy, and myo-inositol (MI) was shown to reduce the incidence of NTD in curly tail mice which are not prevented by FA. Brief maternal hyperthermia (HT) early in pregnancy has been implicated in NTD both in humans and laboratory animals, and anterior NTD including exencephaly and anencephaly are induced frequently when pregnant mice are exposed to HT. We examined the effect of FA or MI supplementation of pregnant mice on the occurrence of heat-induced NTD in the offspring. When pregnant mice were treated with FA (3 mg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD) 0.5 through GD 9.5 and heated at GD 8.5, the prevalence of NTD in the fetuses (26.6%) was significantly lower than the corresponding figure in the HT alone group (38.6%; P < 0.05). However we failed to detect the preventive effect of MI (500 mg/kg). The results of this study suggest that prenatal FA supplementation decreases HT-induced NTD in mice and sufficient FA intake during early pregnancy may be recommended to avoid the birth of malformed children. PMID:10539786

  5. Suppression of Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli on Bean by Aluminum in Acid Soils.

    PubMed

    Furuya, H; Takahashi, T; Matsumoto, T

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT The severity of bean root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli in vitro was studied with regard to exchangeable soil aluminum for 25 soil samples collected from northeastern Honshyu island, Japan. Of these, 24 were Andosols, typically acidic and of volcanic ash origin. Disease severity was assessed based on the number of lesions produced by the pathogen on a 6-cm section of bean stem buried and incubated for 8 days at 25 degrees C in artificially infested soil samples. The number of lesions differed considerably among soil samples. In all soils in which disease incidence was very low, macroconidial germination was strongly inhibited. The inhibition was observed in all soil samples with exchangeable aluminum contents of at least 0.4 meq/100 g of soil, although it is unclear if this concentration is the lowest limit for inhibition. When soil pH was 5.6 or lower, higher amounts of exchangeable aluminum were detected from soils in which the major clay mineralogy was chloritized 2:1 minerals, while no or limited amounts of aluminum were detected from soils in which the major clay mineralogy was allophane/imogolite. Macroconidial germination and disease incidence are thus closely related to clay mineralogy, which regulates the behavior of exchangeable aluminum. PMID:18944802

  6. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  7. Epigenetic suppression of the antitumor cytotoxicity of NK cells by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiumin; Li, Min; Cui, Meizi; Niu, Chao; Xu, Jianting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Wei; Gao, Yushun; Kong, Weisheng; Cui, Jiuwei; Hu, Jifan; Jin, Haofan

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. The therapeutic use of autologous NK cells has been exploited to treat human malignancies, yet only limited antitumor activity is observed in cancer patients. In this study, we sought to augment the antitumor activity of NK cells using epigenetic approaches. Four small molecules that have been known to promote epigenetic reprogramming were tested for their ability to enhance the activity of NK cells. Using a tumor cell lysis assay, we found that the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine and vitamin C did not significantly affect the tumor killing ability of NK cells. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) slightly increased the activity of NK cells. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), however, inhibited NK cell lytic activity against leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment using VPA reduced IFNγ secretion, impaired CD107a degranulation, and induced apoptosis by activating the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. VPA downregulated the expression of the activating receptor NKG2D (natural-killer group 2, member D) by inducing histone K9 hypermethylation and DNA methylation in the gene promoter. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been developed as anticancer agents for use as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Our data suggest that the activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors on NK cell activity should be considered in drug development. PMID:27152238

  8. TSH/TSHR Signaling Suppresses Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) Expression in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jicui; Ren, Jianmin; Jing, Qingping; Lu, Sumei; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Yuantao; Yu, Cong; Gao, Peng; Zong, Chen; Li, Xia; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-01

    TSH/TSHR signaling plays a role in the regulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes. However, the precise mechanisms are not known. In the present study, we determined the effect of TSH on fatty acid synthase (FASN) expression, and explored the underlying mechanisms. In vitro, TSH reduced FASN expression in both mRNA and protein levels in mature adipocytes and was accompanied by protein kinase A (PKA) activation, cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase (JNK) activation. TSH-induced downregulation of FASN was partially abolished by inhibition of PKA and ERK, but not JNK. TSHR and FASN expression in visceral tissue was significantly increased in C57BL/6 mice with diet-induced obesity compared with control animals, whereas thyroid TSHR expression was normal. These findings suggest that activation of TSHR directly inhibits FASN expression in mature adipocytes, possibly mediated by PKA and ERK. In obese animals, this function of TSHR seems to be counteracted. The precise mechanisms need further investigation. PMID:25655684

  9. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-05-30

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  10. Lipoic acid suppresses compound 48/80-induced anaphylaxis-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Ho; Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Choi, Su-Young; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), a naturally occurring dithiol compound, is an essential cofactor in metabolic reactions involved in energy utilization. LA improves glycemic control, reduces diabetic polyneuropathies, atherosclerosis, and allergic inflammation. The effects of LA on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions, however, are unknown. LA dose-dependently inhibited systemic and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reactions in mice induced by compound 48/80, a condensation product of N-methyl-p-methoxyphenethylamine and formaldehyde. Pretreatment with LA, prior to induction of the systemic anaphylaxis-like reaction with compound 48/80, reduced plasma histamine levels in a dose-dependent manner. In our in vitro study, LA decreased histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) triggered by compound 48/80. Moreover, an increase in calcium uptake activated by compound 48/80 was inhibited by LA. LA also significantly elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine-3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) levels in RPMCs. This inhibition of mediator release from RPMCs may be due to inhibition of calcium uptake and augmentation of intracellular cAMP levels. Based on these results, we suggest that LA may be a potential remedy for allergy-related diseases. PMID:21267406

  11. Salvianolic acid B ameliorates CNS autoimmunity by suppressing Th1 responses.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhihui; Ma, Dihui; Gong, Ye; Yu, Tingmin; Yao, Gang

    2016-04-21

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), is a Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease. Therefore, immune regulation is a key target for therapy. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a major water-soluble bioactive component of the famous traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza, which is notable for its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus Sal B, by impairing Th1 or Th17 responses in EAE/MS, might ameliorate the crippling symptoms. Here we show that the intraperitoneal administration of 30mg/kg Sal B daily for 14 days after the onset of MOG-induced EAE in mice effectively reduced its severity. Additionally, Sal B treatment downgraded the infiltration of inflammatory cells, limited astrogliosis and blocked Th1 responses other than that of Th17. These results indicated that Sal B may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for MS/EAE by inhibiting Th1 cell responses. PMID:26777627

  12. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  13. Subchronic exposure to ellagic acid impairs cytotoxic T-cell function and suppresses humoral immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, C T; Peden-Adams, M M; EuDaly, J; Keil, D E

    2003-08-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) is present in a variety of foods such as grapes, strawberries, raspberries, and nuts. It is a dietary plant phenol that has been shown to inhibit oxidative stress and chemical carcinogenesis. Although several studies have examined the protective mechanisms of dietary EA including the induction of detoxifying enzymes, regulation of cell cycle, chelation of nickel, and prevention of DNA methylation, none have addressed the role of EA in immunological surveillance. This study investigates the status of immune function in B6C3F1 mice exposed continuously to EA in drinking water at 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Although this range of exposure is above the estimated human daily intake (approximately 940 microg/day for 70 kg person or 13.4 microg/kg/day), these levels would not be unreasonable if EA were used as a dietary supplement or as a chemotherapeutic agent. Previous reports have demonstrated the anticarcinogenic effects of EA at levels 10- to 250-fold greater than those applied in this study. Immunological parameters assessed included natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity, IgM antibody plaque forming cell (PFC) response, thymus, spleen, kidney, and liver mass, and total cellularity for the thymus and spleen. Subchronic exposure to EA for 28 days in drinking water caused significant suppression of specific IgM antibody responses in the 2.0 mg/kg EA treatment group and suppressed cytotoxic T-cell function in the 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg EA treatment groups. All other immunological parameters were within normal ranges. Kidney and liver mass were not altered after treatment with EA. The results from this study indicate that EA suppressed both IgM antibody responses and CTLs. These observations suggest important implications on human health should EA be prescribed as a chemotherapeutic agent or a preventative dietary supplement for cancer. PMID:19180803

  14. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Tilea, Anca M; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2015-07-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine-Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population. PMID:25677388

  15. Insulin Resistance, Defective Insulin-Mediated Fatty Acid Suppression, and Coronary Artery Calcification in Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Irene E.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Bergman, Bryan C.; Maahs, David M.; Kretowski, Adam; Eckel, Robert H.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess insulin action on peripheral glucose utilization and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) suppression as a predictor of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin action was measured by a three-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (4, 8, and 40 mU/m2/min) in 87 subjects from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes cohort (40 diabetic, 47 nondiabetic; mean age 45 ± 8 years; 55% female). RESULTS Peripheral glucose utilization was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic controls: glucose infusion rate (mg/kg FFM/min) = 6.19 ± 0.72 vs. 12.71 ± 0.66, mean ± SE, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and final clamp glucose and insulin. Insulin-induced NEFA suppression was also lower in type 1 diabetic compared with nondiabetic subjects: NEFA levels (μM) during 8 mU/m2/min insulin infusion = 370 ± 27 vs. 185 ± 25, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and time point insulin. Lower glucose utilization and higher NEFA levels, correlated with CAC volume (r = −0.42, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.41, P < 0.0001, respectively) and predicted the presence of CAC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03; OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.08–5.32, P = 0.032, respectively). Insulin resistance did not correlate with GHb or continuous glucose monitoring parameters. CONCLUSIONS Type 1 diabetic patients are insulin resistant compared with nondiabetic subjects, and the degree of resistance is not related to current glycemic control. Insulin resistance predicts the extent of coronary artery calcification and may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes as well as subjects without diabetes. PMID:20978091

  16. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  17. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05). However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05). The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders. PMID:26618358

  18. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05). However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05). The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders. PMID:26618358

  19. Zoledronic acid suppresses metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through upregulating the tight junction protein occludin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Canfeng; Xin, Shubo; Qin, Xin; Li, Haijun; Lin, Lianxing; You, Yanjie

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated the radio-sensitizing effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL), a third generation bisphosphonate, on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Here we show that ZOL suppresses metastatic progression of ESCC cells mainly through up-regulating the tight junction protein occludin. Exposure to ZOL at lower concentrations dramatically reduced migration and invasion of ESCC cells. In addition, ZOL treatment decreased the expression of mesenchymal markers, vimentin and N-cadherin, while increased the expression of the tight junction protein occludin. Moreover, ectopic expression of Slug, a well-known transcriptional repressor of occludin, partially but significantly abrogated the effect of ZOL on occludin expression and subsequently rescued the malignant metastatic phenotype, suggesting that Slug is one of the mediators underlying the anti-metastatic effect of ZOL. The present study is the first to report the significance of ZOL on ESCC metastasis. These data are promising for the future application of this drug regimen in patients with ESCC. PMID:26204820

  20. Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Mediated Defense by Viral-Inducible MicroRNA319 Facilitates Virus Infection in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ding, Zuomei; Wu, Kangcheng; Yang, Liang; Li, Yang; Yang, Zhen; Shi, Shan; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Shanshan; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Luping; Wei, Juan; Du, Zhenguo; Zhang, Aihong; Miao, Hongqin; Li, Yi; Wu, Zujian; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pivotal modulators of plant development and host-virus interactions. However, the roles and action modes of specific miRNAs involved in viral infection and host susceptibility remain largely unclear. In this study, we show that Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) infection caused increased accumulation of miR319 but decreased expression of miR319-regulated TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED/CYCLOIDEA/PCF) genes, especially TCP21, in rice plants. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing miR319 or downregulating TCP21 exhibited disease-like phenotypes and showed significantly higher susceptibility to RRSV in comparison with the wild-type plants. In contrast, only mild disease symptoms were observed in RRSV-infected lines overexpressing TCP21 and especially in the transgenic plants overexpressing miR319-resistant TCP21. Both RRSV infection and overexpression of miR319 caused the decreased endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) levels along with downregulated expression of JA biosynthesis and signaling-related genes in rice. However, treatment of rice plants with methyl jasmonate alleviated disease symptoms caused by RRSV and reduced virus accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that the induction of miR319 by RRSV infection in rice suppresses JA-mediated defense to facilitate virus infection and symptom development. PMID:27381440

  1. Pomolic Acid Inhibits Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells Through the Suppression of CXC Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Buyun; Kim, Ji-Hun; Park, Byoungduck

    2016-06-01

    High mortality of cancer-mediated deaths is due to metastasis. CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) signaling has been demonstrated to be involved in migration of breast cancer. Thus, identification of CXCR4 inhibitor has been challenged constantly as an anticancer drug. This study is aimed to investigate the CXCR4 inhibitor that could inhibit tumor metastasis from natural products. We demonstrated that pomolic acid (PA), a component of Euscaphis japonica, could downregulate CXCR4 expression in breast cancer cells. Treatment with proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors did not show significant effects on PA's ability. When we further explored the molecular mechanism, suppression of CXCR4 occurred at transcriptional level and was correlated with inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation. Downregulation of CXCR4 by PA was accompanied by the inhibition of CXC motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12)-induced invasion of breast cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that PA, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, can be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1296-1307, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26495998

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells through inhibition of AMPK and Akt signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chuu, Chih-Pin; Lin, Hui-Ping; Ciaccio, Mark F.; Kokontis, John M.; Hause, Ronald J.; Hiipakka, Richard A.; Liao, Shutsung; Jones, Richard Baker

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a bioactive component derived from honeybee hive propolis. CAPE has been shown to have anti-mitogenic, anti-carcinogenic, and other beneficial medicinal properties. Many of its effects have been shown to be mediated through its inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways. We took a systematic approach to uncover CAPE’s effects from hours to days on the signaling networks in human prostate cancer cells. We observed that CAPE dosage-dependently suppressed the proliferation of LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Administration of CAPE by gavage significantly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP xenografts in nude mice. Using LNCaP cells as a model system, we examined CAPE’s effect on gene expression, protein signaling, and transcriptional regulatory networks using Micro-Western Arrays and PCR arrays. We built a model of CAPE’s impact on cell signaling which suggested that it acted through inhibition of Akt-related protein signaling networks. Over-expression of Akt1 or cMyc, a downstream target of Akt signaling, significantly blocked the anti-proliferative effects of CAPE. In summary, our results suggest that CAPE administration may be useful as an adjuvant therapy for prostate and potentially other types of cancers that are driven by the AMPK and Akt signaling networks. PMID:22562408

  3. Glycyrrhizic acid pretreatment prevents sepsis-induced acute kidney injury via suppressing inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Zhenning; Shen, Haitao; Jin, Shuai; Zhang, Shun

    2016-06-15

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. The aim of our study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the protective effects of GA in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated rat mesangial cells (HBZY-1) and septic rats. Sepsis model was established by injection of 5mg/kg LPS in rats or incubation with 1μg/ml LPS for 24h in HBZY-1 cells. A variety of molecular biological experiments were carried out to assess the effects of GA on inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. First we found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced kidney injury in vivo. Furthermore, GA suppressed inflammatory response in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, GA inhibited cell apoptosis and the changes in expressions of apoptosis related proteins induced by LPS. Moreover, GA markedly inhibited oxidative stress induced by LPS via activation of ERK signaling pathway. Finally GA could inhibit the activation of NF-κ B induced by LPS. Our present study indicates that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced inflammatory response, apoptosis, and oxidative stress damage, which provides a molecular basis for a new medical treatment of septic acute kidney injury. PMID:27063444

  4. Apoptotic effect of gambogic acid in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells via suppression of the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEN-YUE; WU, XU; LIAO, CHENG-QUAN; SHEN, JIE; LI, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive investigations of therapeutic improvements for surgical techniques, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, and the prognosis for patients with advanced ESCC remains poor. Therefore, effective therapies are urgently required in order to improve the prognosis of patients with ESCC. TE-1 cells were treated with gambogic acid (GA), and then subjected to western blot analysis, TUNEL assay and caspase activity analysis. GA significantly induced apoptosis in ESCC TE-1 cells. In addition, the antitumor activity of GA was accompanied by the decreased expression of phosphorylated-protein kinase B (p-AKT) and nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NF-κB). The inhibition of protein kinase B (AKT) and NF-κB activation by chemical inhibitors augmented the apoptotic effect responses to GA in the TE-1 cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk (zVAD) decreased GA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, zVAD attenuated GA-induced growth inhibition in TE-1 cells. GA induced apoptosis in ESCC TE-1 via suppression of NF-κB pathway. The findings of the present study may provide a novel insight into ESCC treatment. PMID:27284372

  5. Methionine and serine synergistically suppress hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deficiency, but not by guanidinoacetic acid, in rats fed a low casein diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-qun; Liu, Ying; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation with 0.5% methionine, 2.5% serine, or both on hyperhomocysteinemia induced by deprivation of dietary choline or by dietary addition of 0.5% guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) were investigated in rats fed a 10% casein diet. Hyperhomocysteinemia induced by choline deprivation was not suppressed by methionine alone and was only partially suppressed by serine alone, whereas it was completely suppressed by a combination of methionine and serine, suggesting a synergistic effect of methionine and serine. Fatty liver was also completely prevented by the combination of methionine and serine. Compared with methionine alone, the combination of methionine and serine decreased hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine and homocysteine concentrations and increased hepatic betaine and serine concentrations and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase activity. GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia was partially suppressed by methionine alone, but no interacting effect of methionine and serine was detected. In contrast, GAA-induced fatty liver was completely prevented by the combination of methionine and serine. These results indicate that a combination of methionine and serine is effective in suppressing both hyperhomocysteinemia and fatty liver induced by choline deprivation, and that methionine alone is effective in suppressing GAA-induced hyperhomocysteinemia partially. PMID:22146711

  6. Linoelaidic acid enhances adipogenic differentiation in adipose tissue-derived stromal cells through suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jihui; Liang, Yuan; Jian, Luyang; Zhang, Jingwei; Liang, Shuai; Xiao, Shan; Liu, Bingnan; Wang, Han

    2016-07-01

    Obesity has become a major health problem which is related with high-trans fatty acids diet. Adipogenic differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) plays an important role in the development of adipose tissue. In order to determine the effect of trans fatty acids on adipogenic differentiation in ADSCs, cells were treated with linoelaidic acid, as well as linoleic acid and linolenic acid. We found that linoelaidic acid significantly increased the lipid droplet formation and triglyceride content compared with linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Linoelaidic acid also down-regulated the levels of β-catenin in cells and inhibited the accumulation of β-catenin in cell nuclei. Lithium chloride, an activator of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, antagonized the enhancement of linoelaidic acid on adipogenesis and up-regulated the levels of β-catenin in ADSCs. These results indicated that linoelaidic acid could enhance the adipogenic differentiation in ADSCs in vitro, which is partly due to the suppression of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27255637

  7. Calibration and prediction of amino acids in stevia leaf powder using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan; Wang, Ruiguo; Quampah, Alfred Julius; Rong, Zhengqin; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-28

    The use of stevia as animal feed additive has been researched over the years, but how to rapidly predict its amino acid contents has not been studied yet by using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. In the present study, 301 samples of stevia leaf powder were defined as the calibration set from which calibration models were optimized, and the performance of prediction was evaluated. Compared with other mathematical treatments, the models developed with the "1, 12, 12, 1" treatment, combined with modified partial least-squares regression and standard normal variance with de-trending, had a significant potential in predicting amino acid contents, such as threonine, serine, etc. Six spectral regions were found to possess large spectrum variation and show high contribution to calibration models. From the present study, the calibration models of amino acids in stevia were successfully developed and could be applied to quality control in feed processing, breeding selection and mutant screening. PMID:22066716

  8. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  9. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  10. Prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E.; Monnerat, S.; Stragevitch, L.; Pina, C.G.; Goncalves, C.B.; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    1999-12-01

    Group interaction parameters for the UNIFAC and ASOG models were specially adjusted for predicting liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol at temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 C. Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for systems of triolein, oleic acid, and ethanol and of triolein, stearic acid, and ethanol were measured and utilized in the adjustment. The average percent deviation between experimental and calculated compositions was 0.79% and 0.52% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively. The prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol was quite successful, with an average deviation of 1.31% and 1.32% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively.

  11. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povak, Nicholas A.; Hessburg, Paul F.; Reynolds, Keith M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Salter, R. Brion

    2013-06-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially affected biota, and create resource protection strategies. In this study, we developed correlative models to predict the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of streams across the southern Appalachian Mountain region, USA. Models were developed using stream water chemistry data from 933 sampled locations and continuous maps of pertinent environmental and climatic predictors. Environmental predictors were averaged across the upslope contributing area for each sampled stream location and submitted to both statistical and machine-learning regression models. Predictor variables represented key aspects of the contributing geology, soils, climate, topography, and acidic deposition. To reduce model error rates, we employed hurdle modeling to screen out well-buffered sites and predict continuous ANC for the remainder of the stream network. Models predicted acid-sensitive streams in forested watersheds with small contributing areas, siliceous lithologies, cool and moist environments, low clay content soils, and moderate or higher dry sulfur deposition. Our results confirmed findings from other studies and further identified several influential climatic variables and variable interactions. Model predictions indicated that one quarter of the total stream network was sensitive to additional sulfur inputs (i.e., ANC < 100 µeq L-1), while <10% displayed much lower ANC (<50 µeq L-1). These methods may be readily adapted in other regions to assess stream water quality and potential biotic sensitivity to acidic inputs.

  12. MAZ-binding G4-decoy with locked nucleic acid and twisted intercalating nucleic acid modifications suppresses KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells and delays tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Zorzet, Sonia; Rapozzi, Valentina; Géci, Imrich; Pedersen, Erik B.; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2013-01-01

    KRAS mutations are primary genetic lesions leading to pancreatic cancer. The promoter of human KRAS contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) that can fold in G4-DNA structures binding to nuclear proteins, including MAZ (myc-associated zinc-finger). Here, we report that MAZ activates KRAS transcription. To knockdown oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells, we designed oligonucleotides that mimic one of the G-quadruplexes formed by NHE (G4-decoys). To increase their nuclease resistance, two locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications were introduced at the 3′-end, whereas to enhance the folding and stability, two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon units (TINA or AMANY) were inserted internally, to cap the quadruplex. The most active G4-decoy (2998), which had two para-TINAs, strongly suppressed KRAS expression in Panc-1 cells. It also repressed their metabolic activity (IC50 = 520 nM), and it inhibited cell growth and colony formation by activating apoptosis. We finally injected 2998 and control oligonucleotides 5153, 5154 (2 nmol/mouse) intratumorally in SCID mice bearing a Panc-1 xenograft. After three treatments, 2998 reduced tumor xenograft growth by 64% compared with control and increased the Kaplan–Meier median survival time by 70%. Together, our data show that MAZ-specific G4-decoys mimicking a KRAS quadruplex are promising for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:23471001

  13. Removing perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid from solid matrices, paper, fabrics, and sand by mineral acid suppression and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Liao, Weisheng; Wu, Ben-Zen; Nian, Hungchi; Chiu, KongHwa; Yak, Hwa-Kwang

    2012-09-01

    The removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from solid matrices has received considerable attention because of the environmental persistence, bioaccumulation, and potential toxicity of these compounds. This study presents a simple method using concentrated HNO(3) as a suppression agent, and methanol-modified supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO(2)) extraction for removing PFOS and PFOA from solid matrices. The optimal conditions were 16 M HNO(3) and 20% (v/v) methanol containing Sc-CO(2), under a pressure of 20.3 MPa and a temperature of 50 °C. Extraction time was set at 70 min (40 min for static and 30 min for dynamic extraction). PFOA and PFOS were identified and quantitated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The extraction efficiencies (with double extractions) were close to 100% for PFOA and 80% for PFOS for both paper and fabric matrices. The extraction efficiencies for sand were approximately 77% for PFOA and 59% for PFOS. The results show that this method is accurate, and effective, and that it provides a promising and convenient approach to remediate the environment of hazardous PFOA and PFOS contamination. PMID:22748389

  14. New layers in understanding and predicting α-linolenic acid content in plants using amino acid characteristics of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase.

    PubMed

    Zinati, Zahra; Zamansani, Fatemeh; Hossein KayvanJoo, Amir; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Mohammadi Dehcheshmeh, Manijeh

    2014-11-01

    α-linolenic acid (ALA) is the most frequent omega-3 in plants. The content of ALA is highly variable, ranging from 0 to 1% in rice and corn to >50% in perilla and flax. ALA production is strongly correlated with the enzymatic activity of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase. To unravel the underlying mechanisms of omega-3 diversity, 895 protein features of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase were compared between plants with high and low omega-3. Attribute weighting showed that this enzyme in plants with high omega-3 content has higher amounts of Lys, Lys-Phe, and Pro-Asn but lower Aliphatic index, Gly-His, and Pro-Leu. The Random Forest model with Accuracy criterion when run on the dataset pre-filtered with Info Gain algorithm was the best model in distinguishing high omega-3 content based on the frequency of Lys-Lys in the structure of fatty acid desaturase. Interestingly, the discriminant function algorithm could predict the level of omega-3 only based on the six important selected attributes (out of 895 protein attributes) of fatty acid desaturase with 75% accuracy. We developed "Plant omega3 predictor" to predict the content of α-linolenic acid based on structural features of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase. The software calculates the 6 key structural protein features from imported Fasta sequence of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase or utilizes the imported features and predicts the ALA content using discriminant function formula. This work unravels an underpinning mechanism of omega-3 diversity via discovery of the key protein attributes in the structure of omega-3 desaturase offering a new approach to obtain higher omega-3 content. PMID:25199845

  15. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Sheu, Jer-Jia

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF.

  16. Prediction and suppression of HIFU-induced vessel rupture using passive cavitation detection in an ex vivo model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    emission amplitude. Time to rupture was compared between these feedback-controlled trials and paired controller-inactive trials using a paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Subharmonic emissions were found to be the most predictive of vessel rupture (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) = 0.757, p < 10-16) compared to low-frequency (AUROC = 0.657, p < 10-11) and broadband (AUROC = 0.729, p < 10-16) emissions. An independent-sample t test comparing pre-rupture to intact-vessel emissions revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups for broadband and subharmonic emissions (p < 10-3), but not for low-frequency emissions (p = 0.058). In a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test, activation of the control module was shown to increase the time to vessel rupture (T- = 8, p = 0.0244, N = 10). In one-sided paired t tests, activation of the control module was shown to cause no significant difference in time-averaged focal intensity (t = 0.362, p = 0.363, N = 10), but was shown to cause delivery of significantly greater total acoustic energy (t = 2.037, p = 0.0361, N = 10). Conclusions These results suggest that acoustic cavitation plays an important role in HIFU-induced vessel rupture. In HIFU treatments for vessel occlusion, passive monitoring of acoustic emissions may be useful in avoiding hemorrhage due to vessel rupture, as shown in the rupture suppression experiments. PMID:25232483

  17. Prediction of Coal ash leaching behavior in acid mine water, comparison of laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    ANNA, KNOX

    2005-01-10

    Strongly alkaline fluidized bed combustion ash is commonly used to control acid mine drainage in West Virginia coal mines. Objectives include acid neutralization and immobilization of the primary AMD pollutants: iron, aluminum and manganese. The process has been successful in controlling AMD though doubts remain regarding mobilization of other toxic elements present in the ash. In addition, AMD contains many toxic elements in low concentrations. And, each mine produces AMD of widely varying quality. So, predicting the effect of a particular ash on a given coal mine's drainage quality is of particular interest. In this chapter we compare the results of a site-specific ash leaching procedure with two large-scale field applications of FBC ash. The results suggested a high degree of predictability for roughly half of the 25 chemical parameters and poor predictability for the remainder. Of these, seven parameters were successfully predicted on both sites: acidity, Al, B, Ba, Fe, Ni and Zn while electrical conductivity, Ca, Cd, SO4, Pb and Sb were not successfully predicted on either site. Trends for the remaining elements: As, Ag, Be, Cu, Cr, Hg, Mg, Mn, pH, Se Tl and V were successfully predicted on one but not both mine sites.

  18. Predictive Value of 8 Genetic Loci for Serum Uric Acid Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Gunjača, Grgo; Boban, Mladen; Pehlić, Marina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Budimir, Danijela; Kolčić, Ivana; Lauc, Gordan; Rudan, Igor; Polašek, Ozren

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate the value of genomic information in prediction of individual serum uric acid concentrations. Methods Three population samples were investigated: from isolated Adriatic island communities of Vis (n = 980) and Korčula (n = 944), and from general population of the city of Split (n = 507). Serum uric acid concentration was correlated with the genetic risk score based on 8 previously described genes: PDZK1, GCKR, SLC2A9, ABCG2, LRRC16A, SLC17A3, SLC16A9, and SLC22A12, represented by a total of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The data were analyzed using classification and regression tree (CART) and general linear modeling. Results The most important variables for uric acid prediction with CART were genetic risk score in men and age in women. The percent of variance for any single SNP in predicting serum uric acid concentration varied from 0.0%-2.0%. The use of genetic risk score explained 0.1%-2.5% of uric acid variance in men and 3.9%-4.9% in women. The highest percent of variance was obtained when age, sex, and genetic risk score were used as predictors, with a total of 30.9% of variance in pooled analysis. Conclusion Despite overall low percent of explained variance, uric acid seems to be among the most predictive human quantitative traits based on the currently available SNP information. The use of genetic risk scores is a valuable approach in genetic epidemiology and increases the predictability of human quantitative traits based on genomic information compared with single SNP approach. PMID:20162742

  19. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M. PMID:25840438

  20. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  1. Identification of differentially expressed genes in SHSY5Y cells exposed to okadaic acid by suppression subtractive hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Okadaic acid (OA), a toxin produced by several dinoflagellate species is responsible for frequent food poisonings associated to shellfish consumption. Although several studies have documented the OA effects on different processes such as cell transformation, apoptosis, DNA repair or embryogenesis, the molecular mechanistic basis for these and other effects is not completely understood and the number of controversial data on OA is increasing in the literature. Results In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization in SHSY5Y cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed after OA exposure for different times (3, 24 and 48 h). A total of 247 subtracted clones which shared high homology with known genes were isolated. Among these, 5 specific genes associated with cytoskeleton and neurotransmission processes (NEFM, TUBB, SEPT7, SYT4 and NPY) were selected to confirm their expression levels by real-time PCR. Significant down-regulation of these genes was obtained at the short term (3 and 24 h OA exposure), excepting for NEFM, but their expression was similar to the controls at 48 h. Conclusions From all the obtained genes, 114 genes were up-regulated and 133 were down-regulated. Based on the NCBI GenBank and Gene Ontology databases, most of these genes are involved in relevant cell functions such as metabolism, transport, translation, signal transduction and cell cycle. After quantitative PCR analysis, the observed underexpression of the selected genes could underlie the previously reported OA-induced cytoskeleton disruption, neurotransmission alterations and in vivo neurotoxic effects. The basal expression levels obtained at 48 h suggested that surviving cells were able to recover from OA-caused gene expression alterations. PMID:22284234

  2. Viability of the antigen determines whether DNA or urocanic acid act as initiator molecules for UV-induced suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hueng; Moodycliffe, Angus M; Yarosh, Daniel B; Norval, Mary; Kripke, Margaret L; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2003-09-01

    UV radiation suppresses the immune response, and UV-induced immune suppression contributes to UV-induced photocarcinogenesis. For UV-induced immune suppression to occur, electromagnetic energy (i.e. UV radiation) must be converted to a biological signal. Two photoreceptors have been identified in the skin that serves this purpose, epidermal DNA and trans-urocanic acid (UCA). Although compelling evidence exists to support a role for each pathway (UV-induced DNA damage or photoisomerization of UCA) in UV-induced immune suppression, it is not clear what determines which photoreceptor pathway is activated. To address this question, we injected UV-irradiated mice with a monoclonal antibody with specificity for cis-UCA or applied liposomes containing DNA repair enzymes to the skin of UV-irradiated mice. The effect that each had on UV-induced suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity was measured. We asked whether the light source used (FS-40 sunlamps vs solar-simulated UV radiation) altered whichever pathway of immune suppression was activated. Different doses of UV radiation and the viability of the antigen were also considered. Neither the dose of UV nor the light source had any influence on determining which pathway was activated. Rather, we found that the viability of the antigen was the critical determinant. When live antigens were used, UV-induced immune suppression was blocked with monoclonal anti-cis-UCA but not with T4 endonuclease V-containing liposomes. The reverse was observed when formalin-fixed or killed antigens were used. Our findings indicate that antigen viability dictates which photoreceptor pathway predominates after UV exposure. PMID:14556308

  3. Identification of the domains of cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 responsible for suppression of RNA silencing and salicylic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Janet; McInally, Carol; Carr, Craig; Doddiah, Sowjanya; Yates, Gary; Chrysanthou, Elina; Khattab, Ahmed; Love, Andrew J.; Geri, Chiara; Sadanandom, Ari; Smith, Brian O.; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2013-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) encodes a 520 aa polypeptide, P6, which participates in several essential activities in the virus life cycle including suppressing RNA silencing and salicylic acid-responsive defence signalling. We infected Arabidopsis with CaMV mutants containing short in-frame deletions within the P6 ORF. A deletion in the distal end of domain D-I (the N-terminal 112 aa) of P6 did not affect virus replication but compromised symptom development and curtailed the ability to restore GFP fluorescence in a GFP-silenced transgenic Arabidopsis line. A deletion in the minimum transactivator domain was defective in virus replication but retained the capacity to suppress RNA silencing locally. Symptom expression in CaMV-infected plants is apparently linked to the ability to suppress RNA silencing. When transiently co-expressed with tomato bushy stunt virus P19, an elicitor of programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum, WT P6 suppressed the hypersensitive response, but three mutants, two with deletions within the distal end of domain D-I and one involving the N-terminal nuclear export signal (NES), were unable to do so. Deleting the N-terminal 20 aa also abolished the suppression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-dependent PR1a expression following agroinfiltration. However, the two other deletions in domain D-I retained this activity, evidence that the mechanisms underlying these functions are not identical. The D-I domain of P6 when expressed alone failed to suppress either cell death or PR1a expression and is therefore necessary but not sufficient for all three defence suppression activities. Consequently, concerns about the biosafety of genetically modified crops carrying truncated ORFVI sequences appear unfounded. PMID:24088344

  4. Using electromagnetic induction technology to predict volatile fatty acid, source area differences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface sampling techniques have been adapted to measure manure accumulation on feedlot surface. Objectives of this study were to determine if sensor data could be used to predict differences in volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other volatiles produced on the feedlot surface three days following a...

  5. Near-infrared (NIR) prediction of trans-fatty acids in ground cereal foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was evaluated as a rapid method for prediction of trans-fatty acid content in ground cereal products without the need for oil extraction. NIR spectra (400-2498 nm) of ground cereal products were obtained with a dispersive NIR spectrometer and correlated ...

  6. SIFT Indel: Predictions for the Functional Effects of Amino Acid Insertions/Deletions in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Ng, Pauline C.

    2013-01-01

    Indels in the coding regions of a gene can either cause frameshifts or amino acid insertions/deletions. Frameshifting indels are indels that have a length that is not divisible by 3 and subsequently cause frameshifts. Indels that have a length divisible by 3 cause amino acid insertions/deletions or block substitutions; we call these 3n indels. The new amino acid changes resulting from 3n indels could potentially affect protein function. Therefore, we construct a SIFT Indel prediction algorithm for 3n indels which achieves 82% accuracy, 81% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% precision, 0.63 MCC, and 0.87 AUC by 10-fold cross-validation. We have previously published a prediction algorithm for frameshifting indels. The rules for the prediction of 3n indels are different from the rules for the prediction of frameshifting indels and reflect the biological differences of these two different types of variations. SIFT Indel was applied to human 3n indels from the 1000 Genomes Project and the Exome Sequencing Project. We found that common variants are less likely to be deleterious than rare variants. The SIFT indel prediction algorithm for 3n indels is available at http://sift-dna.org/ PMID:24194902

  7. Stability and effectiveness of linear polyacrylamide capillary coating to suppress EOF in acidic media in the presence of surfactants, ionic liquids and organic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Beneito-Cambra, Miriam; Anres, Philippe; Vial, Jérôme; Gareil, Pierre; Delaunay, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Because of its high hydrophilicity, linear polyacrylamide (LPA) has often been used as a coating to suppress electroosmotic flow (EOF) in capillary electrophoresis (CE); however, its stability and effectiveness in acidic media, with or without organic modifiers, surfactants or ionic liquids is not well documented. In this work, the adequacy of LPA coating to suppress EOF in those different conditions was studied. It was shown that electroosmotic mobilities (µEO) did not change for at least 70h of non-stopped operation in all the tested conditions and the coating was stable. It was also shown that LPA coating efficiently suppresses EOF in acidic media (pH 4.0, 3.1, and 2.3) with or without organic modifiers (50% methanol or acetonitrile, ACN), as measured µEO values were between 18 and 84 times lower than those obtained with bare fused-silica capillaries. In acidic media with anionic surfactant (50mM sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS), ionic liquid (25 mM dodecyldimethylimidazolium bromide) or both SDS and ACN (buffer pH 2.1/ACN (8:2, v/v)+50mM SDS) EOF was reduced to a magnitude lower than with bare fused-silica capillaries, even though slight adsorptions of these surfactants were observed. LPA showed its superiority to hydroxypropyl cellulose, for which marked adsorption occurred because of its lower hydrophilicity. PMID:26838442

  8. Regulation of osteoclastogenesis by Simon extracts composed of caffeic acid and related compounds: successful suppression of bone destruction accompanied with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Quan Yong; Kukita, Toshio; Ushijima, Yuki; Kukita, Akiko; Nagata, Kengo; Sandra, Ferry; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Toh, Kazuko; Okuma, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Sadamichi; Rasubala, Linda; Teramachi, Junpei; Miyamoto, Ichiko; Wu, Zhou; Iijima, Tadahiko

    2006-03-01

    Simon extracts are vitamin K(1)-rich food materials extracted from the leaves of the Simon sweet potato. Although vitamin K is known to stimulate bone formation, we postulated that Simon extracts also contain unknown biological compounds having the ability to regulate bone resorption. Here we prepared the vitamin K-free fraction from the Simon extracts and investigated the ability of this fraction on the differentiation of osteoclasts. A remarkable inhibitory effect of osteoclastogenesis was observed when osteoclast precursors were treated with this fraction in rat bone marrow culture systems as well as in a pure differentiation system using murine osteoclast precursor cell line. The vitamin K-free Simon extracts markedly suppressed severe bone destruction mediated by abundant osteoclasts associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the vitamin K-free Simon extracts contained three types of low molecular weight inhibitors for osteoclastogenesis; caffeic acid, chlorogenic acids and isochlorogenic acids. Among these substances, caffeic acid showed the most powerful inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Caffeic acid significantly suppressed expression of NFATc1, a key transcription factor for the induction of osteoclastogenesis. Our current study enlightened a high utility of the Simon extracts and their chemical components as effective regulators for bone resorption accompanied with inflammation and metabolic bone diseases. PMID:16205940

  9. MDI 301 suppresses myeloid leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo without the toxicity associated with all-trans retinoic acid therapy.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad N; McClintock, Shannon; Khan, Shazli P; Perone, Patricia; Allen, Ronald; Ouillette, Peter D; Dame, Michael K; Cheng, Jason X; Kunkel, Steven L; Varani, James

    2015-08-01

    MDI 301 is a novel 9-cis retinoic acid derivative in which the terminal carboxylic acid group has been replaced by a picolinate ester. MDI 301, a retinoic acid receptor-α - agonist, suppressed the growth of several human myeloid leukemia cell lines (HL60, NB4, OCI-M2, and K562) in vitro and induced cell-substrate adhesion in conjunction with upregulation of CD11b. Tumor growth in HL60-injected athymic nude mice was reduced. In vitro, MDI 301 was comparable to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) whereas in vivo, MDI 301 was slightly more efficacious than ATRA. Most importantly, unlike what was found with ATRA treatment, MDI 301 did not induce a cytokine response in the treated animals and the severe inflammatory changes and systemic toxicity seen with ATRA did not occur. A retinoid with these characteristics might be valuable in the treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, or, perhaps, other forms of myeloid leukemia. PMID:26010252

  10. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A prevents fatty acid-induced adipocyte dysfunction through suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuefei; Li, Kuai; Hui, Xiaoyan; Kong, Xiangping; Sweeney, Gary; Wang, Yu; Xu, Aimin; Teng, Maikun; Liu, Pentao; Wu, Donghai

    2011-05-01

    The adipocyte is the principal cell type for fat storage. CPT1 (carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid β-oxidation, but the physiological role of CPT1 in adipocytes remains unclear. In the present study, we focused on the specific role of CPT1A in the normal functioning of adipocytes. Three 3T3-L1 adipocyte cell lines stably expressing hCPT1A (human CPT1A) cDNA, mouse CPT1A shRNA (short-hairpin RNA) or GFP (green fluorescent protein) were generated and the biological functions of these cell lines were characterized. Alteration in CPT1 activity, either by ectopic overexpression or pharmacological inhibition using etomoxir, did not affect adipocyte differentiation. However, overexpression of hCPT1A significantly reduced the content of intracellular NEFAs (non-esterified fatty acids) compared with the control cells when adipocytes were challenged with fatty acids. The changes were accompanied by an increase in fatty acid uptake and a decrease in fatty acid release. Interestingly, CPT1A protected against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and expression of pro-inflammatory adipokines such as TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α) and IL-6 (interleukin-6) in adipocytes. Further studies demonstrated that JNK (c-Jun N terminal kinase) activity was substantially suppressed upon CPT1A overexpression, whereas knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of CPT1 caused a significant enhancement of JNK activity. The specific inhibitor of JNK SP600125 largely abolished the changes caused by the shRNA- and etomoxir-mediated decrease in CPT1 activity. Moreover, C2C12 myocytes co-cultured with adipocytes pre-treated with fatty acids displayed altered insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our findings have identified a favourable role for CPT1A in adipocytes to attenuate fatty acid-evoked insulin resistance and inflammation via suppression of JNK. PMID:21348853

  11. Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics for Absolute pK a Predictions and Amino Acid Deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J Gard; Peng, Yuxing; Silverstein, Daniel W; Swanson, Jessica M J

    2014-07-01

    Accurately calculating a weak acid's pK a from simulations remains a challenging task. We report a multiscale theoretical approach to calculate the free energy profile for acid ionization, resulting in accurate absolute pK a values in addition to insights into the underlying mechanism. Importantly, our approach minimizes empiricism by mapping electronic structure data (QM/MM forces) into a reactive molecular dynamics model capable of extensive sampling. Consequently, the bulk property of interest (the absolute pK a) is the natural consequence of the model, not a parameter used to fit it. This approach is applied to create reactive models of aspartic and glutamic acids. We show that these models predict the correct pK a values and provide ample statistics to probe the molecular mechanism of dissociation. This analysis shows changes in the solvation structure and Zundel-dominated transitions between the protonated acid, contact ion pair, and bulk solvated excess proton. PMID:25061442

  12. Computational scheme for the prediction of metal ion binding by a soil fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The dissociation and metal ion binding properties of a soil fulvic acid have been characterized. Information thus gained was used to compensate for salt and site heterogeneity effects in metal ion complexation by the fulvic acid. An earlier computational scheme has been modified by incorporating an additional step which improves the accuracy of metal ion speciation estimates. An algorithm is employed for the prediction of metal ion binding by organic acid constituents of natural waters (once the organic acid is characterized in terms of functional group identity and abundance). The approach discussed here, currently used with a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, is conceptually envisaged to be compatible with computer programs available for ion binding by inorganic ligands in natural waters.

  13. ENTPRISE: An Algorithm for Predicting Human Disease-Associated Amino Acid Substitutions from Sequence Entropy and Predicted Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The advance of next-generation sequencing technologies has made exome sequencing rapid and relatively inexpensive. A major application of exome sequencing is the identification of genetic variations likely to cause Mendelian diseases. This requires processing large amounts of sequence information and therefore computational approaches that can accurately and efficiently identify the subset of disease-associated variations are needed. The accuracy and high false positive rates of existing computational tools leave much room for improvement. Here, we develop a boosted tree regression machine-learning approach to predict human disease-associated amino acid variations by utilizing a comprehensive combination of protein sequence and structure features. On comparing our method, ENTPRISE, to the state-of-the-art methods SIFT, PolyPhen-2, MUTATIONASSESSOR, MUTATIONTASTER, FATHMM, ENTPRISE exhibits significant improvement. In particular, on a testing dataset consisting of only proteins with balanced disease-associated and neutral variations defined as having the ratio of neutral/disease-associated variations between 0.3 and 3, the Mathews Correlation Coefficient by ENTPRISE is 0.493 as compared to 0.432 by PPH2-HumVar, 0.406 by SIFT, 0.403 by MUTATIONASSESSOR, 0.402 by PPH2-HumDiv, 0.305 by MUTATIONTASTER, and 0.181 by FATHMM. ENTPRISE is then applied to nucleic acid binding proteins in the human proteome. Disease-associated predictions are shown to be highly correlated with the number of protein-protein interactions. Both these predictions and the ENTPRISE server are freely available for academic users as a web service at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/entprise/. PMID:26982818

  14. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-15

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  15. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  17. Two phenotypically distinct T cells are involved in ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid-induced suppression of the efferent delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.

    1987-09-01

    When UVB-irradiated urocanic acid, the putative photoreceptor/mediator for UVB suppression, is administered to mice it induces a dose-dependent suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1), of similar magnitude to that induced by UV irradiation of mice. In this study, the efferent suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by UV-irradiated urocanic acid is demonstrated to be due to 2 phenotypically distinct T cells, (Thy1+, L3T4-, Ly2+) and (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-). The suppression is specific for HSV-1. This situation parallels the generation of 2 distinct T-suppressor cells for HSV-1 by UV irradiation of mice and provides further evidence for the involvement of urocanic acid in the generation of UVB suppression.

  18. Effect of suppressor current intensity on the determination of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid by suppressed conductivity ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, Ioannis K; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2010-05-28

    This paper presents the application of ion chromatography with electrolytic eluent generation and mobile phase suppression for the direct conductimetric detection of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). The compounds were separated on a Dionex AS18 anion exchange column with a 12-40 mM KOH step gradient from 9 to 9.5 min. The effect of the suppressor current intensity on the electrostatic interaction of these amphoteric compounds with the suppressor cation exchange membranes was evaluated. A suppressor current gradient technique was proposed for the limitation of peak broadening and baseline noise, in order to improve method sensitivity and detectability. It was observed that residual sample carbonates co-eluted with AMPA when a large injection loop was installed for the low level determination of both compounds in natural waters. For this reason, glyphosate was isocratically eluted using 33 mM KOH in order to decrease analysis time within 10 min and a column clean up step using 100 mM KOH was used to ensure retention time reproducibility. The developed method was applied to the analysis of drinking and natural water and it was further successfully applied to orange samples with slight modifications. Instrumental LOD for glyphosate was 0.24 microg/L, while method LOD was 0.54 microg/L for spring waters and 0.01 mg/kg for oranges using a 1000 microL direct loop injection of the sample. Intra-day and inter-day precision (as %RSD) for water samples was 4.6% and 12% at a spiking level of 2 microg/L, and the recovery ranged from 64% to 88% depending on sample conductivity. For orange samples, the inter-day precision was 1.4% at a spiking level of 4.4 mg/kg, while overall recovery was 103%. The developed method is direct, fast, sensitive and relatively inexpensive, and could be used as an ideal fast screening tool for the monitoring of glyphosate residues in water and fruit samples. PMID:20399436

  19. Apigenin inhibits platelet adhesion and thrombus formation and synergizes with aspirin in the suppression of the arachidonic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Núñez, L; Lozano, M L; Palomo, M; Martínez, C; Vicente, V; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Diaz-Ricart, M; Escolar, G; Rivera, J

    2008-05-14

    Previous studies using washed platelets demonstrated that certain flavonoids inhibit platelet function through several mechanisms including blockade of TxA(2) receptors (TPs). We aimed to analyze the binding capacity of flavonoids to TPs in platelet rich plasma (PRP), investigated their effect in flowing blood, and evaluated the ability of apigenin to improve the efficacy of aspirin in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding of flavonoids to TPs in PRP was explored using binding assays and the TP antagonist [ (3)H]SQ29548. Effects of flavonoids on platelet adhesion were assessed using arterial subendothelium with annular plate perfusion chambers, and global evaluation of apigenin on high-shear-dependent platelet function was determined by the PFA-100. To evaluate the ability of apigenin to potentiate the effect of aspirin, arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was measured prior to and after consumption of subaggregatory doses of aspirin in the presence or absence of apigenin. Binding assays revealed that apigenin was an efficient competitor of [ (3)H]SQ29548 binding to PRP ( K i = 155.3 +/- 65.4 microM), and perfusion studies showed that apigenin, genistein, and catechin significantly diminished thrombus formation when compared to control (26.2 +/- 3.8, 33.1 +/- 5.2, and 26.2 +/- 5.2 vs 76.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). Apigenin, similarly to the TP antagonist SQ29548, significantly prolonged collagen epinephrine-induced PFA-100 closure time in comparison to the control and, when added to platelets that had been exposed in vivo to aspirin, potentiated its inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effect of some flavonoids in the presence of plasma, particularly apigenin, might in part rely on TxA(2) receptor antagonism. There is a clear increase in the ex vivo antiplatelet effect of aspirin in the presence of apigenin, which encourages the idea of the combined use of aspirin and certain flavonoids in patients in which

  20. BEDAM Binding Free Energy Predictions for the SAMPL4 Octa-Acid Host Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Chen, Haoyuan; Chen, He; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gao, Yang; He, Peng; Kalyanikar, Malathi; Kao, Chuan; Lu, Beidi; Niu, Yijie; Pethe, Manasi; Zhu, Jie; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) protocol has been employed as part of the SAMPL4 blind challenge to predict the binding free energies of a set of octa-acid host-guest complexes. The resulting predictions were consistently judged as some of the most accurate predictions in this category of the SAMPL4 challenge in terms of quantitative accuracy and statistical correlation relative to the experimental values, which were not known at the time the predictions were made. The work has been conducted as part of a hands-on graduate class laboratory session. Collectively the students, aided by automated setup and analysis tools, performed the bulk of the calculations and the numerical and structural analysis. The success of the experiment confirms the reliability of the BEDAM methodology and it shows that physics-based atomistic binding free energy estimation models, when properly streamlined and automated, can be successfully employed by non-specialists. PMID:25726024

  1. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rino; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Yamada, Yuko; Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses monocyte adhesion to the endothelium by inhibiting NF-κB/NOX2-derived ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Risa; Makino, Junya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the major polyphenols, exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, the progression of which is closely related to the accumulated adhesion of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium. We herein determined whether CAPE and its derivatives suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Of the four polyphenols tested, CAPE significantly suppressed the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-elicited expression of cluster for differentiation (CD) 11b, 14, and 36, and this was accompanied by the inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC. CAPE also suppressed the activation of TPA-elicited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and accumulation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS), but did not affect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that CAPE suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC through, at least in part, the NF-κB, NOX2, and ROS-derived signaling axis. PMID:27257341

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses monocyte adhesion to the endothelium by inhibiting NF-κB/NOX2-derived ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Risa; Makino, Junya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the major polyphenols, exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, the progression of which is closely related to the accumulated adhesion of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium. We herein determined whether CAPE and its derivatives suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Of the four polyphenols tested, CAPE significantly suppressed the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-elicited expression of cluster for differentiation (CD) 11b, 14, and 36, and this was accompanied by the inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC. CAPE also suppressed the activation of TPA-elicited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and accumulation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS), but did not affect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that CAPE suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC through, at least in part, the NF-κB, NOX2, and ROS-derived signaling axis. PMID:27257341

  4. 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid, a Novel Naturally Derived Agent, Suppresses Prolactin Hyperactivity and Reduces Antipsychotic-Induced Hyperprolactinemia in In Vitro and In Vivo Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Wang, Chunyue; Jia, Dongxu; Cai, Guangsheng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Di; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a novel naturally derived agent, in suppressing prolactin (PRL) hyperactivity and reducing antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia (hyperPRL) and the underlying mechanisms in in vitro and in vivo models. GA treatment for 24 h inhibited PRL synthesis and secretion in MMQ cells and cultured pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion; but this effect was not reproduced in GH3 cells that lack the expression of functional dopamine D2 receptors. GA suppressed elevated PRL level and growth hormone, and normalized several sex hormones in a rat model of hyperPRL, produced by repeated injection of the dopamine blocker metoclopramide. GA also modulated the expression 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results indicate that GA is effective in suppressing PRL hyperactivity caused by the blockade of dopamine D2 receptors. This suppressive effect of GA may be related to its modulation of the serotonergic system. This study provides additional evidence in support of GA as an adjunct for the treatment of hyperPRL. PMID:27161375

  5. Rosmarinic Acid suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells by ameliorating the mitochondrial function and activating STAT3.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiayu; Wei, Jin; Yan, Rui; Liu, Xin; Li, Qing; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Yanhe; Li, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial injury characterized by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced myocardium dysfunction. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rosmarinic Acid (RA) treatment and activating Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway have protective effects on mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyocyte, but there is little data regarding cardiomyocyte under condition of high-glucose. The present study was undertaken to determine the relationship between RA and STAT3 activation, as well as their effects on high glucose-induced mitochondrial injury and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocyte. Our results revealed that RA pretreatment suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. Moreover, the effect of RA on apoptosis was related with improved mitochondrial function, which was demonstrated by that RA attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) activation, suppressed cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3 in H9c2 cells was inhibited under condition of high-glucose, but RA improved STAT3 phosphorylation. Importantly, inhibition of STAT3 expression by using STAT3-siRNA partly suppressed the effect of RA on high glucose-induced apoptosis. Taken together, pretreatment with RA suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocyte by ameliorating mitochondrial function and activating STAT3. PMID:27402269

  6. Swfoldrate: predicting protein folding rates from amino acid sequence with sliding window method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Xuan; Wu, Zhi-cheng; Wang, Pu; Lin, Wei-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding is the process by which a protein processes from its denatured state to its specific biologically active conformation. Understanding the relationship between sequences and the folding rates of proteins remains an important challenge. Most previous methods of predicting protein folding rate require the tertiary structure of a protein as an input. In this study, the long-range and short-range contact in protein were used to derive extended version of the pseudo amino acid composition based on sliding window method. This method is capable of predicting the protein folding rates just from the amino acid sequence without the aid of any structural class information. We systematically studied the contributions of individual features to folding rate prediction. The optimal feature selection procedures are adopted by means of combining the forward feature selection and sequential backward selection method. Using the jackknife cross validation test, the method was demonstrated on the large dataset. The predictor was achieved on the basis of multitudinous physicochemical features and statistical features from protein using nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) regression model, the method obtained an excellent agreement between predicted and experimentally observed folding rates of proteins. The correlation coefficient is 0.9313 and the standard error is 2.2692. The prediction server is freely available at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/swfrate/input.jsp. PMID:22933332

  7. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein–protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/. PMID:27077847

  8. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations.

    PubMed

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein-protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/. PMID:27077847

  9. A Drug-Repositioning Screening Identifies Pentetic Acid as a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Suppressing the Elastase-Mediated Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gi, Mia; Jeong, Junhui; Lee, Keehoon; Lee, Kang-Mu; Toyofuku, Masanori; Yong, Dong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance, produces elastase as a predominant exoprotease. Here, we screened a library of chemical compounds currently used for human medication and identified diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA, pentetic acid) as an agent that suppresses the production of elastase. Elastase activity found in the prototype P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 was significantly decreased when grown with a concentration as low as 20 μM DTPA. Supplementation with Zn2+ or Mn2+ ions restored the suppressive effect of DTPA, suggesting that the DTPA-mediated decrease in elastase activity is associated with ion-chelating activity. In DTPA-treated PAO1 cells, transcription of the elastase-encoding lasB gene and levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a molecule that mediates P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS), were significantly downregulated, reflecting the potential involvement of the PQS QS system in DTPA-mediated elastase suppression. Biofilm formation was also decreased by DTPA treatment. When A549 alveolar type II-like adenocarcinoma cells were infected with PAO1 cells in the presence of DTPA, A549 cell viability was substantially increased. Furthermore, the intranasal delivery of DTPA to PAO1-infected mice alleviated the pathogenic effects of PAO1 cells in the animals. Together, our results revealed a novel function for a known molecule that may help treat P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:25246397

  10. Inhibitory effects of ursolic acid on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis are mediated primarily via suppression of NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuan; Xiao, Fei; Gu, Xinfeng; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Wang, Wengang; Tang, Tingting; Wang, You; Zhu, Zhenan; Dai, Kerong; Qin, An; Wang, Jinwu

    2015-04-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in a variety of plants, has attracted considerable attention because of its important biological and pharmacological activities. However, its effect on osteoclasts and mechanism of action require further investigation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of UA on osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast-mediated osteolysis in vitro and in vivo, and explored its possible mechanism of action. The results indicated that UA could inhibit receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis and the bone resorptive function of osteoclasts in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Further, UA effectively inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of NFATc1, primarily via the suppression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling, and partly through the suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Additionally, UA treatment downregulated the expression of NFATc1-regulated osteoclast marker genes. Likewise, UA induced dose-dependent attenuation of titanium (Ti) particle-induced mouse calvarial bone loss, and decreased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that UA protects against wear particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation and function. These effects are associated with the inhibition of the NF-κB- and JNK-related signaling pathways. PMID:25681755

  11. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  12. Abscisic Acid Suppression of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase Activity and mRNA, and Resistance of Soybeans to Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea1

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Edmund W. B.; Cahill, David M.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    1989-01-01

    Etiolated hypocotyls of the resistant soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cultivar Harosoy 63 became susceptible to Phytophthora megasperma (Drechs.) f.sp. glycinea (Hildeb.) Kuan and Erwin race 1 after treatment with abscisic acid. Susceptibility was expressed by increases in lesion size and a major decrease in accumulation of the isoflavonoid phytoalexin, glyceollin. In untreated hypocotyls, activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and accumulation of mRNA for this enzyme increased rapidly after infection, but these increases were suppressed in abscisic acid-treated hypocotyls. The results suggest the possibility that biosynthesis of glyceollin in the resistance response of soybeans may be controlled at the transcriptional level by changes in abscisic acid concentrations caused by infection. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667002

  13. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Howard Huaihan . E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  14. Induction of suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus by epidermal cells exposed to UV-irradiated urocanic acid in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA), the putative photoreceptor for ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced suppression, undergoes a UV-dependent trans to cis isomerisation. Epidermal cells from mice painted with UCA, containing a known proportion of the cis-isomer, generate suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) when transferred to naive syngeneic recipients at the same time and site as infection with HSV-1. One T suppressor cell subset, of phenotype (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-), is induced by the cis-UCA modified epidermal cell transfer. Flow cytometric analysis of the epidermal cells from skin treated with UV or cis-UCA indicates an overall reduction from normal in the number of cells expressing MHC Class II antigens, but no alteration in the number expressing I-J antigens.

  15. Prediction of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials in batch and plug flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Oscar Johnny; Gómez-García, Miguel Ángel; Fontalvo, Javier

    2013-08-01

    This study unifies contradictory conclusions reported in literature on acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, using batch and plug flow reactors, regarding the influence of the initial liquid ratio of acid aqueous solution to solid lignocellulosic material on sugar yield and concentration. The proposed model takes into account the volume change of the reaction media during the hydrolysis process. An error lower than 8% was found between predictions, using a single set of kinetic parameters for several liquid to solid ratios, and reported experimental data for batch and plug flow reactors. For low liquid-solid ratios, the poor wetting and the acid neutralization, due to the ash presented in the solid, will both reduce the sugar yield. Also, this study shows that both reactors are basically equivalent in terms of the influence of the liquid to solid ratio on xylose and glucose yield. PMID:23770535

  16. Prediction of Intramolecular Polarization of Aromatic Amino Acids Using Kriging Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Timothy L; Davie, Stuart J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-09-01

    Present computing power enables novel ways of modeling polarization. Here we show that the machine learning method kriging accurately captures the way the electron density of a topological atom responds to a change in the positions of the surrounding atoms. The success of this method is demonstrated on the four aromatic amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. A new technique of varying training set sizes to vastly reduce training times while maintaining accuracy is described and applied to each amino acid. Each amino acid has its geometry distorted via normal modes of vibration over all local energy minima in the Ramachandran map. These geometries are then used to train the kriging models. Total electrostatic energies predicted by the kriging models for previously unseen geometries are compared to the true energies, yielding mean absolute errors of 2.9, 5.1, 4.2, and 2.8 kJ mol(-1) for histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine, respectively. PMID:26588516

  17. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and availability of the prediction programs. Here we report a large-scale assessment of 19 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets including more than 5000 proteins derived from 3D structures of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Well-defined binary assessment criteria (specificity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy…) are applied. We found that i) the tools have been greatly improved over the years; ii) some of the approaches suffer from theoretical defects and there is still room for sorting out the essential mechanisms of binding; iii) RNA binding and DNA binding appear to follow similar driving forces and iv) dataset bias may exist in some methods. PMID:26681179

  18. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and availability of the prediction programs. Here we report a large-scale assessment of 19 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets including more than 5000 proteins derived from 3D structures of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Well-defined binary assessment criteria (specificity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy…) are applied. We found that i) the tools have been greatly improved over the years; ii) some of the approaches suffer from theoretical defects and there is still room for sorting out the essential mechanisms of binding; iii) RNA binding and DNA binding appear to follow similar driving forces and iv) dataset bias may exist in some methods. PMID:26681179

  19. Characterizing and predicting carboxylic acid reductase activity for diversifying bioaldehyde production.

    PubMed

    Moura, Matthew; Pertusi, Dante; Lenzini, Stephen; Bhan, Namita; Broadbelt, Linda J; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-05-01

    Chemicals with aldehyde moieties are useful in the synthesis of polymerization reagents, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, flavors, and fragrances because of their high reactivity. However, chemical synthesis of aldehydes from carboxylic acids has unfavorable thermodynamics and limited specificity. Enzymatically catalyzed reductive bioaldehyde synthesis is an attractive route that overcomes unfavorable thermodynamics by ATP hydrolysis in ambient, aqueous conditions. Carboxylic acid reductases (Cars) are particularly attractive, as only one enzyme is required. We sought to increase the knowledge base of permitted substrates for four Cars. Additionally, the Lys2 enzyme family was found to be mechanistically the same as Cars and two isozymes were also tested. Our results show that Cars prefer molecules where the carboxylic acid is the only polar/charged group. Using this data and other published data, we develop a support vector classifier (SVC) for predicting Car reactivity and make predictions on all carboxylic acid metabolites in iAF1260 and Model SEED. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 944-952. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26479709

  20. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  1. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  2. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  3. Prediction of protein-protein interactions with clustered amino acids and weighted sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein-protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  4. Prediction of Protein–Protein Interactions with Clustered Amino Acids and Weighted Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein–protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  5. 3,4-Dihydroxy-Benzohydroxamic Acid (Didox) Suppresses Pro-inflammatory Profiles and Oxidative Stress in TLR4-Activated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Matsebatlela, Thabe M.; Anderson, Amy L.; Gallicchio, Vincent S.; Elford, Howard; Rice, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Didox (3,4-dihydroxy-benzohydroxamic acid), is a synthetic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor derived from polyhydroxy-substituted benzohydroxamic acid, and originally developed as an anti-cancer agent. Some studies indicate that didox may have anti-oxidative stress-like properties, while other studies hint that didox may have anti-inflammatory properties. Using nitric oxide production in response to LPS treatment as a sensitive screening assay for anti-inflammatory compounds, we show that didox is very potent at levels as low as 6.25 μM, with maximal inhibition at 100 μM. A qRT-PCR array was then employed to screen didox for other potential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress-related properties. Didox was very potent in suppressing the expression of these arrayed mRNA in response to LPS, and in some cases didox alone suppressed expression. Using qRT-PCR as a follow up to the array, we demonstrated that didox suppresses LPS-induced mRNA levels of iNOS, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, NF-κβ (p65), and p38-α, after 24 h of treatment. Treatment with didox also suppresses the secretion of nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-10. Furthermore, oxidative stress, as quantified by intracellular ROS levels in response to macrophage activators LPS and phorbol ester (PMA), and the glutathione depleting agent BSO, is reduced by treatment with didox. Moreover, we demonstrate that nuclear translocation of NF-κβ (p65) in response to LPS is inhibited by didox. These findings were supported by qRT-PCR for oxidative stress genes SOD1 and catalase. Overall, this study supports the conclusion that didox may have a future role in managing acute and chronic inflammatory diseases and oxidative stress due to high production of ROS. PMID:25843059

  6. Eicosapentaenoic acid suppression of systemic inflammatory responses and inverse up-regulation of 15-deoxyΔ12,14 Prostaglandin J2 production

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jillian; Higgs, Warren; Rotondo, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been shown to suppress immune cell responses, such as cytokine production and downstream PG production in vitro. Studies in vivo, however, have used EPA as a minor constituent of fish oil with variable results. We investigated the effects of EPA on systemic inflammatory responses as pure EPA has not been evaluated on immune/inflammatory responses in vivo. Experimental Approach Rabbits were administered polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) i.v. before and after oral treatment with EPA for 42 days (given daily). The responses to IL-1β and TNF-α were also studied. Immediately following administration of poly I:C, body temperature was continuously monitored and blood samples were taken. Plasma levels of IL-1β, PGE2 (PGE2), and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Key Results Following EPA treatment, the fever response to poly I:C was markedly suppressed compared with pretreatment responses. This was accompanied by a parallel reduction in the poly I:C-stimulated elevation in plasma levels of IL-1β and PGE2. Paradoxically, the levels of 15d-PGJ2 were higher following EPA treatment. EPA treatment did not significantly alter the fever response or plasma levels of PGE2 in response to either IL-1β or TNF-α. Conclusion and Implications Oral treatment with EPA can suppress immune/inflammatory responses in vivo via a suppression of upstream cytokine production resulting in a decreased fever response and indirectly reducing circulating levels of PGE2. EPA also enhances the production of the cytoprotective prostanoid 15d-PGJ2 indicating the therapeutic benefit of EPA. PMID:23586396

  7. Surfactants, Aromatic and Isoprenoid Compounds, and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Suppress Staphylococcus aureus Production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Peter J.; Syverson, Rae Ellen; Milligan-Myhre, Kathy; Frolova, Olga; Schroeder, Sarah; Kidder, Joshua; Hoang, Thanh; Proctor, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness manifest through the actions of Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Previous studies have shown that tampon additives can influence staphylococcal TSST-1 production. We report here on the TSST-1-suppressing activity of 34 compounds that are commonly used additives in the pharmaceutical, food, and perfume industries. Many of the tested chemicals had a minimal impact on the growth of S. aureus and yet were potent inhibitors of TSST-1 production. The TSST-1-reducing compounds included surfactants with an ether, amide, or amine linkage to their fatty acid moiety (e.g., myreth-3-myristate, Laureth-3, disodium lauroamphodiacetate, disodium lauramido monoethanolamido, sodium lauriminodipropionic acid, and triethanolamine laureth sulfate); aromatic compounds (e.g. phenylethyl and benzyl alcohols); and several isoprenoids and related compounds (e.g., terpineol and menthol). The membrane-targeting and -altering effects of the TSST-1-suppressing compounds led us to assess the activity of molecules that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., cerulenin, triclosan, and hexachlorophene). These compounds also reduced S. aureus TSST-1 production. This study suggests that more additives than previously recognized inhibit the production of TSST-1. PMID:19223628

  8. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  9. 5-aminovaleric acid suppresses the development of severe seizures in the methionine sulfoximine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dhaher, Roni; Damisah, Eyiyemisi C; Wang, Helen; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Ong, Caroline; Zaveri, Hitten P; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Eid, Tore

    2014-07-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common forms of drug-resistant, localization-related epilepsies in humans. One potential therapeutic target is the brain glutamine-glutamate-GABA metabolic pathway, which is perturbed in patients with MTLE. Loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes may be critically involved in this perturbation, which can be modeled by infusing the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) into the entorhinal-hippocampal area in rats. Because 5-aminovaleric acid (5-AV) has been implicated in modulation of the glutamine-glutamate-GABA metabolic pathway, we hypothesized that 5-AV would alter the expression of seizures in the MSO model of MTLE. Male Sprague Dawley rats (300-330g) were implanted with an Alzet pump placed subcutaneously in the abdominal region to release either 5-AV (0.05mg/mL, n=6) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n=6) at a rate of 2.5μl/h over 28days. Five to 7days after surgery, all rats were implanted with an intracranial pump infusing MSO (2.5mg/mL; 0.25μl/h) unilaterally into the hippocampal formation. Following the second surgery, intracranial EEG was measured from the left and right hemispheres above the dorsal hippocampal formations for a continuous period of 21days. The EEG was correlated with simultaneous video recordings to determine the stage of seizures according to a modified Racine scale. Five-AV-treated rats experienced a 3.5 fold reduction in the number of seizures (6.7±1.4seizures/day) than PBS-treated rats (23.2±6.3seizures/day) during the first 2days following MSO pump placement (p<0.005). Both groups showed similar seizure frequency over days 3-21 (~1seizure/day). However, the fraction of the most severe type of seizures (Racine stages 4 and 5) increased over time in the PBS treated group, but not in the 5-AV treated group. Notably, 5-AV treated rats experienced a 2.3 and 2.6 fold lower fraction of stage 4 and 5 seizures than PBS-treated rats during the 2nd and 3rd weeks of MSO

  10. 5-Aminovaleric Acid Suppresses the Development of Severe Seizures in the Methionine Sulfoximine Model of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dhaher, Roni; Damisah, Eyiyemisi C; Wang, Helen; Gruenbaum, Shaun; Ong, Caroline; Zaveri, Hitten P; Gruenbaum, Benjamin; Eid, Tore

    2014-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common forms of drug-resistant, localization-related epilepsies in humans. One potential therapeutic target is the brain glutamine-glutamate-GABA metabolic pathway, which is perturbed in patients with MTLE. Loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes may be critically involved in this perturbation, which can be modeled by infusing the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) into the entorhinal-hippocampal area in rats. Because 5-aminovaleric acid (5-AV) has been implicated in modulation of the glutamine-glutamate-GABA metabolic pathway, we hypothesized that 5-AV would alter the expression of seizures in the MSO model of MTLE. Male Sprague Dawley rats (300-330 g) were implanted with an Alzet pump placed subcutaneously in the abdominal region to release either 5-AV (0.05 mg/mL, n = 6) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 6) at a rate of 2.5 μl/hr over 28 days. Five to 7 days after surgery, all rats were implanted with an intracranial pump infusing MSO (2.5 mg/mL; 0.25 μl/hr) unilaterally into the hippocampal formation. Following the second surgery, intracranial EEG was measured from the left and right hemispheres above the dorsal hippocampal formations for a continuous period of 21 days. The EEG was correlated with simultaneous video recordings to determine the stage of seizures according to a modified Racine scale. Five-AV-treated rats experienced a 3.5 fold reduction in the number of seizures (6.7 ± 1.4 seizures/day) than PBS-treated rats (23.2 ± 6.3 seizures/day) during the first 2 days following MSO pump placement (p < 0.005). Both groups showed similar seizure frequency over days 3-21 (~ 1 seizure/day). However, the fraction of the most severe type of seizures (Racine stage 4 and 5) increased over time in the PBS treated group, but not in the 5-AV treated group. Notably, 5-AV treated rats experienced a 2.3 and 2.6 fold lower fraction of stage 4 and 5 seizures than PBS-treated rats during the 2nd

  11. SuSPect: enhanced prediction of single amino acid variant (SAV) phenotype using network features.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher M; Filippis, Ioannis; Kelley, Lawrence A; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2014-07-15

    Whole-genome and exome sequencing studies reveal many genetic variants between individuals, some of which are linked to disease. Many of these variants lead to single amino acid variants (SAVs), and accurate prediction of their phenotypic impact is important. Incorporating sequence conservation and network-level features, we have developed a method, SuSPect (Disease-Susceptibility-based SAV Phenotype Prediction), for predicting how likely SAVs are to be associated with disease. SuSPect performs significantly better than other available batch methods on the VariBench benchmarking dataset, with a balanced accuracy of 82%. SuSPect is available at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect. The Web site has been implemented in Perl and SQLite and is compatible with modern browsers. An SQLite database of possible missense variants in the human proteome is available to download at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/suspect/download.html. PMID:24810707

  12. Differential effects of rapamycin and retinoic acid on expansion, stability and suppressive qualities of human CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T regulatory cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Scottà, Cristiano; Esposito, Marianna; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Fanelli, Giorgia; Edozie, Francis C.; Ali, Niwa; Xiao, Fang; Peakman, Mark; Afzali, Behdad; Sagoo, Pervinder; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells is a successful therapy for autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection in experimental models. In man, equivalent manipulations in bone marrow transplant recipients appear safe, but questions regarding the stability of the transferred regulatory T cells during inflammation remain unresolved. In this study, protocols for the expansion of clinically useful numbers of functionally suppressive and stable human regulatory T cells were investigated. Regulatory T cells were expanded in vitro with rapamycin and/or all-trans retinoic acid and then characterized under inflammatory conditions in vitro and in vivo in a humanized mouse model of graft-versus-host disease. Addition of rapamycin to regulatory T-cell cultures confirms the generation of high numbers of suppressive regulatory T cells. Their stability was demonstrated in vitro and substantiated in vivo. In contrast, all-trans retinoic acid treatment generates regulatory T cells that retain the capacity to secrete IL-17. However, combined use of rapamycin and all-trans retinoic acid abolishes IL-17 production and confers a specific chemokine receptor homing profile upon regulatory T cells. The use of purified regulatory T-cell subpopulations provided direct evidence that rapamycin can confer an early selective advantage to CD45RA+ regulatory T cells, while all-trans retinoic acid favors CD45RA− regulatory T-cell subset. Expansion of regulatory T cells using rapamycin and all-trans retinoic acid drug combinations provides a new and refined approach for large-scale generation of functionally potent and phenotypically stable human regulatory T cells, rendering them safe for clinical use in settings associated with inflammation. PMID:23242600

  13. Betulinic Acid Suppresses STAT3 Activation Pathway Through Induction of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 in Human Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    STAT3 activation has been associated with survival, proliferation and invasion of various human cancers. Whether betulinic acid, a pentacyclic triterpene, can modulates the STAT3 pathway, was investigated in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We found that betulinic acid inhibited constitutive activation of STAT3, Src kinase, JAK1 and JAK2. Pervanadate reversed the betulinic acid -induced down regulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Furthermore, betulinic acid induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1 and silencing of the SHP-1 gene abolished the ability of betulinic acid to inhibit STAT3 activation and rescues betulinic acid-induced cell death. Betulinic acid also downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products such as bcl-xL, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and survivin. This correlated with an increase in apoptosis as indicated by an increase in the sub-G1 cell population and an increase in caspase-3–induced PARP cleavage. Consistent with these results, over expression of constitutive active STAT3 significantly reduced the betulinic acid-induced apoptosis. Betulinic acid also enhanced the apoptosis induced by thalidomide (from 10% to 55%) and bortezomib (from 5% to 70%) in MM cells. Overall, our results suggest that betulinic acid down regulates STAT3 activation through upregulation of SHP-1 and this may have potential in sensitization of STAT3 over expressing tumors to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:19937797

  14. Predicting sorption of organic acids to a wide range of carbonized sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Many contaminants and infochemicals are organic acids that undergo dissociation under environmental conditions. The sorption of dissociated anions to biochar and other carbonized sorbents is typically lower than that of neutral species. It is driven by complex processes that are not yet fully understood. It is known that predictive approaches developed for neutral compounds are unlikely to be suitable for organic acids, due to the effects of dissociation on sorption. Previous studies on the sorption of organic acids to soils have demonstrated that log Dow, which describes the decrease in hydrophobicity of acids upon dissociation, is a useful alternative to log Kow. The aim of the present study was to adapt a log Dow based approach to describe the sorption of organic acids to carbonized sorbents. Batch experiments were performed with a series of 9 sorbents (i.e., carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, and sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon), and four acids commonly used for pesticidal and biocidal purposes (i.e., 2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB, and triclosan). Sorbents were comprehensively characterized, including by N2 and CO2 physisorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The wide range of sorbents considered allows (i) discussing the mechanisms driving the sorption of neutral and anionic species to biochar, and (ii) their dependency on sorbate and sorbent properties. Results showed that the sorption of the four acids was influenced by factors that are usually not considered for neutral compounds (i.e., pH, ionic strength). Dissociation affected the sorption of the four compounds, and sorption of the anions ranged over five orders of magnitude, thus substantially contributing to sorption in some cases. For prediction purposes, most of the variation in sorption to carbonized sorbents (89%) could be well described with a two-parameter regression equation including log Dow and sorbent specific surface area. The proposed model

  15. Suppression of asymmetric acid efflux and gravitropism in maize roots treated with auxin transport inhibitors of sodium orthovanadate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    In gravitropically stimulated roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid WF9 x 38MS), there is more acid efflux on the rapidly growing upper side than on the slowly growing lower side. In light of the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism which states that gravitropic curvature results from lateral redistribution of auxin, the effects of auxin transport inhibitors on the development of acid efflux asymmetry and curvature in gravistimulated roots were examined. All the transport inhibitors tested prevented both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots. The results indicate that auxin redistribution may cause the asymmetry of acid efflux, a finding consistent with the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism. As further evidence that auxin-induced acid efflux asymmetry may mediate gravitropic curvature, sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of auxin-induced H+ efflux was found to prevent both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots.

  16. Palmitic acid suppresses apolipoprotein M gene expression via the pathway of PPAR{sub β/δ} in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Guanghua; Shi, Yuanping; Zhang, Jun; Mu, Qinfeng; Qin, Li; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Yuehua; Berggren-Söderlund, Maria; Nilsson-Ehle, Peter; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Ning

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Palmitic acid significantly inhibited APOM gene expression in HepG2 cells. • Palmitic acid could obviously increase PPARB/D mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. • PPAR{sub β/δ} antagonist, GSK3787, had no effect on APOM expression. • GSK3787 could reverse the palmitic acid-induced down-regulation of APOM expression. • Palmitic acid induced suppression of APOM expression is mediated via the PPAR{sub β/δ} pathway. - Abstract: It has been demonstrated that apolipoprotein M (APOM) is a vasculoprotective constituent of high density lipoprotein (HDL), which could be related to the anti-atherosclerotic property of HDL. Investigation of regulation of APOM expression is of important for further exploring its pathophysiological function in vivo. Our previous studies indicated that expression of APOM could be regulated by platelet activating factor (PAF), transforming growth factors (TGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), leptin, hyperglycemia and etc., in vivo and/or in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid could significantly inhibit APOM gene expression in HepG2 cells. Further study indicated neither PI-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 nor protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GFX could abolish palmitic acid induced down-regulation of APOM expression. In contrast, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPAR{sub β/δ}) antagonist GSK3787 could totally reverse the palmitic acid-induced down-regulation of APOM expression, which clearly demonstrates that down-regulation of APOM expression induced by palmitic acid is mediated via the PPAR{sub β/δ} pathway.

  17. Carnosic acid nanoparticles suppress liver ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibition of ROS, Caspases and NF-κB signaling pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, Jian-Jun; Chen, Guo-Yong; Wang, Wei-Wei; Xie, Zhan-Tao; Tang, Gao-Feng; Wei, Si-Dong

    2016-08-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) requires ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which can lead to early graft injury. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of I/R injury remains unclear. Carnosic acid, as a phenolic diterpene with function of anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, as well as neuroprotective properties, is produced by many species from Lamiaceae family. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been known to better the bioavailability of drugs on intranasal administration compared with only drug solutions. Administration of carnosic acid nanoparticles was thought to be sufficient to lead to considerable inhibition of liver injury progression induced by ischemia/reperfusion. In our study, liver ischemia/reperfusion injury was established successfully with C57BL/6 animal model. 10 and 20mg/kg carnosic acid nanoparticles were injected to mice for five days prior to ischemia. After liver ischemia/reperfusion, the levels of serum AST, ALT and APL were increased, which was attenuated by pre-treatment with carnosic acid nanoparticles. In addition, carnosic acid nanoparticles inhibited ROS production via its related signals regulation. And carnosic acid nanoparticles also suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced up-regulation in the pro-apoptotic protein and mRNA levels of Bax, Cyto-c, Apaf-1 and Caspase-9/3 while increased ischemia/reperfusion-induced decrease of anti-apoptotic factor of Bcl-2. Further, ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation was also inhibited for carnosic acid nanoparticles administration via inactivating NF-κB signaling pathway, leading to down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines releasing. In conclusion, our study suggested that carnosic acid nanoparticles protected against liver ischemia/reperfusion injury via its role of anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory bioactivity. PMID:27470360

  18. [Prediction of lipases types by different scale pseudo-amino acid composition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangya; Li, Hongchun; Gao, Jiaqiang; Fang, Baishan

    2008-11-01

    Lipases are widely used enzymes in biotechnology. Although they catalyze the same reaction, their sequences vary. Therefore, it is highly desired to develop a fast and reliable method to identify the types of lipases according to their sequences, or even just to confirm whether they are lipases or not. By proposing two scales based pseudo amino acid composition approaches to extract the features of the sequences, a powerful predictor based on k-nearest neighbor was introduced to address the problems. The overall success rates thus obtained by the 10-fold cross-validation test were shown as below: for predicting lipases and nonlipase, the success rates were 92.8%, 91.4% and 91.3%, respectively. For lipase types, the success rates were 92.3%, 90.3% and 89.7%, respectively. Among them, the Z scales based pseudo amino acid composition was the best, T scales was the second. They outperformed significantly than 6 other frequently used sequence feature extraction methods. The high success rates yielded for such a stringent dataset indicate predicting the types of lipases is feasible and the different scales pseudo amino acid composition might be a useful tool for extracting the features of protein sequences, or at lease can play a complementary role to many of the other existing approaches. PMID:19256347

  19. Improving protein fold recognition and structural class prediction accuracies using physicochemical properties of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Raicar, Gaurav; Saini, Harsh; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Lal, Sunil; Sharma, Alok

    2016-08-01

    Predicting the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein is an important task in the field of bioinformatics and biological sciences. However, directly predicting the 3-D structure from the primary structure is hard to achieve. Therefore, predicting the fold or structural class of a protein sequence is generally used as an intermediate step in determining the protein's 3-D structure. For protein fold recognition (PFR) and structural class prediction (SCP), two steps are required - feature extraction step and classification step. Feature extraction techniques generally utilize syntactical-based information, evolutionary-based information and physicochemical-based information to extract features. In this study, we explore the importance of utilizing the physicochemical properties of amino acids for improving PFR and SCP accuracies. For this, we propose a Forward Consecutive Search (FCS) scheme which aims to strategically select physicochemical attributes that will supplement the existing feature extraction techniques for PFR and SCP. An exhaustive search is conducted on all the existing 544 physicochemical attributes using the proposed FCS scheme and a subset of physicochemical attributes is identified. Features extracted from these selected attributes are then combined with existing syntactical-based and evolutionary-based features, to show an improvement in the recognition and prediction performance on benchmark datasets. PMID:27164998

  20. Suppression by γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid of “Alcohol Deprivation Effect” in Rats: Preclinical Evidence of its anti-Relapse Properties

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Giancarlo; Carai, Mauro A. M.; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2012-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) reduces (a) alcohol intake and alcohol motivational properties in alcohol-preferring rats and (b) alcohol drinking and craving for alcohol in human alcoholics. The present study was designed to extend to relapse-like drinking the capacity of GHB to suppress different alcohol-related behaviors in alcohol-preferring rats. The “alcohol deprivation effect,” defined as the temporary increase in alcohol intake occurring in laboratory animals after a period of alcohol deprivation, was used as model of alcohol relapse. Acute administration of non-sedative doses of GHB (0, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in the complete suppression of the extra-amount of alcohol consumed by Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats during the first hour of re-access to alcohol after a 14-day period of deprivation. These data demonstrate that GHB suppressed relapse-like drinking in a rat model of excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:23133426

  1. Predicting taxonomic and functional structure of microbial communities in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jialiang; Huang, Linan; He, Zhili; Chen, Linxing; Hua, Zhengshuang; Jia, Pu; Li, Shengjin; Liu, Jun; Li, Jintian; Zhou, Jizhong; Shu, Wensheng

    2016-06-01

    Predicting the dynamics of community composition and functional attributes responding to environmental changes is an essential goal in community ecology but remains a major challenge, particularly in microbial ecology. Here, by targeting a model system with low species richness, we explore the spatial distribution of taxonomic and functional structure of 40 acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities across Southeast China profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing and a comprehensive microarray (GeoChip). Similar environmentally dependent patterns of dominant microbial lineages and key functional genes were observed regardless of the large-scale geographical isolation. Functional and phylogenetic β-diversities were significantly correlated, whereas functional metabolic potentials were strongly influenced by environmental conditions and community taxonomic structure. Using advanced modeling approaches based on artificial neural networks, we successfully predicted the taxonomic and functional dynamics with significantly higher prediction accuracies of metabolic potentials (average Bray-Curtis similarity 87.8) as compared with relative microbial abundances (similarity 66.8), implying that natural AMD microbial assemblages may be better predicted at the functional genes level rather than at taxonomic level. Furthermore, relative metabolic potentials of genes involved in many key ecological functions (for example, nitrogen and phosphate utilization, metals resistance and stress response) were extrapolated to increase under more acidic and metal-rich conditions, indicating a critical strategy of stress adaptation in these extraordinary communities. Collectively, our findings indicate that natural selection rather than geographic distance has a more crucial role in shaping the taxonomic and functional patterns of AMD microbial community that readily predicted by modeling methods and suggest that the model-based approach is essential to better understand natural

  2. Ovarian Function, Not Age, Predicts the Benefit from Ovarian Suppression or Ablation for Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Shusen; Shi, Yanxia; An, Xin; Xu, Fei; Yuan, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant ovarian suppression or ablation (OS/OA) in premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to examine which patients might benefit from the addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen. We analyzed the data of 2065 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal carcinomas who were treated at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center from 2000 to 2008. The five-year disease-free survival rate (DFSR) and overall survival rate (OSR) were compared by menstrual status and treatment. Compared with patients older than forty years of age, patients younger than forty years old had significant lower DFSRs and OSRs. The addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen increased the DFSR and OSR of patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy, regardless of their age at diagnosis. Patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy are the main beneficiaries of an adjuvant OS/OA. PMID:26866810

  3. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Escherichia coli and lactic acid bacteria in milk.

    PubMed

    Ačai, P; Valík, L'; Medved'ová, A; Rosskopf, F

    2016-09-01

    Modelling and predicting the simultaneous competitive growth of Escherichia coli and starter culture of lactic acid bacteria (Fresco 1010, Chr. Hansen, Hørsholm, Denmark) was studied in milk at different temperatures and Fresco inoculum concentrations. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were able to induce an early stationary state in E. coli The developed model described and tested the growth inhibition of E. coli (with initial inoculum concentration 10(3) CFU/mL) when LAB have reached maximum density in different conditions of temperature (ranging from 12 ℃ to 30 ℃) and for various inoculum sizes of LAB (ranging from approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/mL). The prediction ability of the microbial competition model (the Baranyi and Roberts model coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model) was first performed only with parameters estimated from individual growth of E. coli and the LAB and then with the introduced competition coefficients evaluated from co-culture growth of E. coli and LAB in milk. Both the results and their statistical indices showed that the model with incorporated average values of competition coefficients improved the prediction of E. coli behaviour in co-culture with LAB. PMID:26683482

  4. Rapid stimulus-bound suppression of intake in response to an intraduodenal nonnutritive sweetener after training with nutritive sugars predicting malaise.

    PubMed

    Schier, Lindsey A; Davidson, Terry L; Powley, Terry L

    2012-06-01

    In a previous report (Schier et al., Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 301: R1557-R1568, 2011), we demonstrated with a new behavioral procedure that rats exhibit stimulus-bound suppression of intake in response to an intraduodenal (ID) bitter tastant predicting subsequent malaise. With the use of the same modified taste aversion procedure, the present experiments evaluated whether the sweet taste properties of ID stimuli are likewise detected and encoded. Thirsty rats licked at sipper spouts for hypotonic NaCl for 30 min and received brief (first 6 min) yoked ID infusions of either the same NaCl or an isomolar lithium chloride (LiCl) solution in each session. An intestinal taste cue was mixed directly into the LiCl infusate for aversion training. Results showed that rats failed to detect intestinal sweet taste alone (20 mM Sucralose) but clearly suppressed licking in response to a nutritive sweet taste stimulus (234 mM sucrose) in the intestine that had been repeatedly paired with LiCl. Rats trained with ID sucrose in LiCl subsequently generalized responding to ID Sucralose alone at test. Replicating this, rats trained with ID Sucralose in compound with 80 mM Polycose rapidly suppressed licking to the 20 mM Sucralose alone in a later test. Furthermore, ID sweet taste signaling did not support the rapid negative feedback of sucrose or Polycose on intake when their digestion and transport were blocked. Together, these results suggest that other signaling pathways and/or transporters engaged by caloric carbohydrate stimuli potentiate detection of sweet taste signals in the intestine. PMID:22422670

  5. Combined dermal exposure to permethrin and cis-urocanic acid suppresses the contact hypersensitivity response in C57BL/6N mice in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Prater, M R; Blaylock, B L; Holladay, S D

    2005-01-14

    Cutaneous exposure to the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin significantly suppresses contact hypersensitivity (CH) response to oxazolone in C57BL/6N mice. Additionally, cis-urocanic acid (cUCA), an endogenous cutaneous chromophore isomerized to its active form following exposure to ultraviolet radiation, modulates cell-mediated cutaneous immune responses. This study describes cutaneous immune alterations following combined topical permethrin and intradermal cUCA exposure. Female C57BL/6N mice were administered 5, 50 or 100 microg cUCA daily for 5 consecutive days. CH was then evaluated by the mouse ear swelling test (MEST) response to oxazolone. Decreased responses of 52.3%, 76.3% and 76.3%, respectively, as compared to controls were observed. Then, mice were co-exposed to 5 microg cUCA daily for 5 days and 1.5, 5, 15, or 25 microL permethrin, on either day 1, 3 or 5 of the cUCA treatment to evaluate combined immunomodulatory effects of the two chemicals, or cUCA daily for 5 days followed by permethrin on day 3, 5, or 7 after the last cUCA injection to demonstrate prolonged immunosuppressive effects. Two days after final treatment, mice were sensitized with oxazolone and MEST was performed. Mice receiving five cUCA injections and permethrin topically on cUCA injection day 1 showed up to 93.3% suppression of MEST compared to vehicle control. CH was suppressed by 87.5%, 86.6% and 74.2% in mice treated with 25 muL permethrin on days 3, 5 and 7 after cUCA, respectively, compared to vehicle control. Taken together, these data indicate co-exposure to cUCA and permethrin profoundly suppresses cell-mediated cutaneous immunity. PMID:15629246

  6. Report on the analysis of common beverages spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) using NMR and the PURGE solvent-suppression technique.

    PubMed

    Lesar, Casey T; Decatur, John; Lukasiewicz, Elaan; Champeil, Elise

    2011-10-10

    In forensic evidence, the identification and quantitation of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in "spiked" beverages is challenging. In this report, we present the analysis of common alcoholic beverages found in clubs and bars spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Our analysis of the spiked beverages consisted of using (1)H NMR with a water suppression method called Presaturation Utilizing Relaxation Gradients and Echoes (PURGE). The following beverages were analyzed: water, 10% ethanol in water, vodka-cranberry juice, rum and coke, gin and tonic, whisky and diet coke, white wine, red wine, and beer. The PURGE method allowed for the direct identification and quantitation of both compounds in all beverages except red and white wine where small interferences prevented accurate quantitation. The NMR method presented in this paper utilizes PURGE water suppression. Thanks to the use of a capillary internal standard, the method is fast, non-destructive, sensitive and requires no sample preparation which could disrupt the equilibrium between GHB and GBL. PMID:21775083

  7. Conjugated linoleic acids suppress inflammatory response and ICAM-1 expression through inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chung; Tu, Rong-Syuan; Chen, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Yun; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Liou, Chian-Jiun

    2016-04-20

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) comprise a group of natural unsaturated fatty acids. CLA was reported to have anti-asthma, anti-adiposity, and anti-tumor effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the suppressive effects of cis-9, trans-11-CLA (c9,t11-CLA) on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. After treating with various doses of c9,t11-CLA (12.5-100 μg ml(-1)), BEAS-2B cells were induced into an inflamed state by adding TNF-α or TNF-α/IL-4. The presence of c9,t11-CLA significantly suppressed the secretion of cytokines IL-6, IL-8, CCL5, and MCP-1. We also found that c9,t11-CLA inhibited ICAM-1 expression, and decreased monocyte adhesion to inflamed bronchial epithelial cells. Interestingly, c9,t11-CLA attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and down-regulated the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). These results suggested that the anti-inflammatory effects of c9,t11-CLA were mediated by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and ICAM-1 expression by blocking NF-κB transcription regulation and by attenuating MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27007063

  8. Ganoderic acid C1 isolated from the anti-asthma formula, ASHMI™ suppresses TNF-α production by mouse macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changda; Yang, Nan; Song, Ying; Wang, Lixin; Zi, Jiachen; Zhang, Shuwei; Dunkin, David; Busse, Paula; Weir, David; Tversky, Jody; Miller, Rachel L; Goldfarb, Joseph; Zhan, Jixun; Li, Xiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway inflammatory disease, which is associated with Th2 cytokine-driven inflammation and non-Th2, TNF-α mediated inflammation. Unlike Th2 mediated inflammation, TNF-α mediated asthma inflammation is generally insensitive to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). ASHMITM, aqueous extract of three medicinal herbs-Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum), Sophora flavescens Ait (S. flavescens) and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer (G. uralensis), showed a high safety profile and was clinically beneficial in asthma patients. It also suppresses both Th2 and TNF-α associated inflammation in murine asthma models. We previously determined that G. uralensis flavonoids are the key active compounds responsible for ASHMITM suppression of Th2 mediated inflammation. Until now, there are limited studies on anti-TNF-α compounds presented in ASHMITM. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify TNF-α inhibitory compounds in ASHMITM. Here we report that G. lucidum, but not the other two herbal extracts, S. flavescens or G. uralensis inhibited TNF-α production by murine macrophages; and that the methylene chloride (MC)-triterpenoid-enriched fraction, but not the polysaccharide-enriched fraction, contained the inhibitory compounds. Of the 15 triterpenoids isolated from the MC fraction, only ganoderic acid C1 (GAC1) significantly reduced TNF-α production by murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from asthma patients. Inhibition was associated with down-regulation of NF-κB expression, and partial suppression of MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways. Ganoderic acid C1 may have potential for treating TNF-α mediated inflammation in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:26004313

  9. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons

    PubMed Central

    Lauretani, F.; Bandinelli, S.; Benedetta, B.; Cherubini, A.; Iorio, A. D.; Blè, A.; Giacomini, V.; Corsi, A. M.; Guralnik, J. M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24–97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  10. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, F; Bandinelli, S; Bartali, B; Benedetta, B; Cherubini, A; Iorio, A D; Blè, A; Giacomini, V; Corsi, A M; Guralnik, J M; Ferrucci, L

    2007-07-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24-97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  11. Predicting HLA Class I Non-Permissive Amino Acid Residues Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Binkowski, T. Andrew; Marino, Susana R.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of peptide binding to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is essential to a wide range of clinical entities from vaccine design to stem cell transplant compatibility. Here we present a new structure-based methodology that applies robust computational tools to model peptide-HLA (p-HLA) binding interactions. The method leverages the structural conservation observed in p-HLA complexes to significantly reduce the search space and calculate the system’s binding free energy. This approach is benchmarked against existing p-HLA complexes and the prediction performance is measured against a library of experimentally validated peptides. The effect on binding activity across a large set of high-affinity peptides is used to investigate amino acid mismatches reported as high-risk factors in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22905104

  12. ANTIFUNGAL AND SPROUT REGULATORY BIOACTIVITIES OF PHENYLACETIC ACID, INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID, AND TYROSOL ISOLATED FROM THE POTATO DRY ROT SUPPRESSIVE BACTERIUM ENTEROBACTER CLOACAE S11:T:07

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterobacter cloacae S11:T:07 (NRRL B-21050) is a promising biological control agent which has significantly reduced both fungal dry rot disease and sprouting in lab and pilot potato storages. The metabolites phenylacetic acid (PAA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and tyrosol (TSL) were isolated from ...

  13. Suppression of Growth Rate of Colony-Associated Fungi by High Fructose Corn Syrup Feeding Supplement, Formic Acid, and Oxalic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Select colony-associated fungi (bee isolates). Absidia sp., Ascosphaera apis, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp., Penicillium glabrum, Mucor sp., showed a 40% reduction in radial growth rate with formic acid, a 28% reduction with oxalic acid, and a 15% reduction with fructose and high fructose corn sy...

  14. Improving the prediction ability of FT-MIR spectroscopy to assess titratable acidity in cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Calamari, Luigi; Gobbi, Laura; Bani, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the potential application of Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) for the determination of titratable acidity (TA) in cow's milk. The prediction model was developed on 201 samples collected from cows in early and late lactation, and was successively used to predict TA on samples collected from cows in early lactation and in samples with high somatic cell count. The root mean square error of cross-validation of the model by using external validation dataset was 0.09 °Soxhlet-Henkel/50 mL. Applying the model on milk samples from cows in early lactation or with high somatic cell count, the root mean square error of prediction was 0.163 °Soxhlet-Henkel/50 mL, with a RER and RPD of 23.9 and 5.1, respectively. Our results seem to indicate that FT-MIR can be used in individual milk samples to accurately predict TA, and has the potential to be adopted to measure routinely the TA of milk. PMID:26304375

  15. The amino acid sensor GCN2 inhibits inflammatory responses to apoptotic cells promoting tolerance and suppressing systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Buvana; Liu, Haiyun; Shinde, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kapil; Xiao, Wei; Bradley, Jillian; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Madaio, Michael P; McGaha, Tracy L

    2015-08-25

    Efficient apoptotic cell clearance and induction of immunologic tolerance is a critical mechanism preventing autoimmunity and associated pathology. Our laboratory has reported that apoptotic cells induce tolerance by a mechanism dependent on the tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) in splenic macrophages (MΦ). The metabolic-stress sensing protein kinase GCN2 is a primary downstream effector of IDO1; thus, we tested its role in apoptotic cell-driven immune suppression. In vitro, expression of IDO1 in MΦs significantly enhanced apoptotic cell-driven IL-10 and suppressed IL-12 production in a GCN2-dependent mechanism. Suppression of IL-12 protein production was due to attenuation of IL-12 mRNA association with polyribosomes inhibiting translation while IL-10 mRNA association with polyribosomes was not affected. In vivo, apoptotic cell challenge drove a rapid, GCN2-dependent stress response in splenic MΦs with increased IL-10 and TGF-β production, whereas myeloid-specific deletion of GCN2 abrogated regulatory cytokine production with provocation of inflammatory T-cell responses to apoptotic cell antigens and failure of long-tolerance induction. Consistent with a role in prevention of apoptotic cell driven autoreactivity, myeloid deletion of GCN2 in lupus-prone mice resulted in increased immune cell activation, humoral autoimmunity, renal pathology, and mortality. In contrast, activation of GCN2 with an agonist significantly reduced anti-DNA autoantibodies and protected mice from disease. Thus, this study implicates a key role for GCN2 signals in regulating the tolerogenic response to apoptotic cells and limiting autoimmunity. PMID:26261340

  16. The amino acid sensor GCN2 inhibits inflammatory responses to apoptotic cells promoting tolerance and suppressing systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Buvana; Liu, Haiyun; Shinde, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kapil; Xiao, Wei; Bradley, Jillian; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Madaio, Michael P.; McGaha, Tracy L.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient apoptotic cell clearance and induction of immunologic tolerance is a critical mechanism preventing autoimmunity and associated pathology. Our laboratory has reported that apoptotic cells induce tolerance by a mechanism dependent on the tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) in splenic macrophages (MΦ). The metabolic-stress sensing protein kinase GCN2 is a primary downstream effector of IDO1; thus, we tested its role in apoptotic cell-driven immune suppression. In vitro, expression of IDO1 in MΦs significantly enhanced apoptotic cell-driven IL-10 and suppressed IL-12 production in a GCN2-dependent mechanism. Suppression of IL-12 protein production was due to attenuation of IL-12 mRNA association with polyribosomes inhibiting translation while IL-10 mRNA association with polyribosomes was not affected. In vivo, apoptotic cell challenge drove a rapid, GCN2-dependent stress response in splenic MΦs with increased IL-10 and TGF-β production, whereas myeloid-specific deletion of GCN2 abrogated regulatory cytokine production with provocation of inflammatory T-cell responses to apoptotic cell antigens and failure of long-tolerance induction. Consistent with a role in prevention of apoptotic cell driven autoreactivity, myeloid deletion of GCN2 in lupus-prone mice resulted in increased immune cell activation, humoral autoimmunity, renal pathology, and mortality. In contrast, activation of GCN2 with an agonist significantly reduced anti-DNA autoantibodies and protected mice from disease. Thus, this study implicates a key role for GCN2 signals in regulating the tolerogenic response to apoptotic cells and limiting autoimmunity. PMID:26261340

  17. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  18. Suppressed liver tumorigenesis in fat-1 mice with elevated omega-3 fatty acids is associated with increased omega-3 derived lipid mediators and reduced TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Weylandt, Karsten H.; Krause, Lena F.; Gomolka, Beate; Chiu, Cheng-Ying; Bilal, Süleyman; Nadolny, Anja; Waechter, Simon F.; Fischer, Andreas; Rothe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Liver tumors, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The development of HCC is mostly associated with chronic inflammatory liver disease of various etiologies. Previous studies have shown that omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) dampen inflammation in the liver and decrease formation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. In this study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model, which endogenously forms n-3 PUFA from n-6 PUFA to determine the effect of an increased n-3 PUFA tissue status on tumor formation in the diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver tumor model. Our results showed a decrease in tumor formation, in terms of size and number, in fat-1 mice compared with wild-type littermates. Plasma TNF-α levels and liver cyclooxygenase-2 expression were markedly lower in fat-1 mice. Furthermore, there was a decreased fibrotic activity in the livers of fat-1 mice. Lipidomics analyses of lipid mediators revealed significantly increased levels of the n-3 PUFA-derived 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (18-HEPE) and 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) in the livers of fat-1 animals treated with DEN. In vitro experiments showed that 18-HEPE and 17-HDHA could effectively suppress lipopolysacharide-triggered TNF-α formation in a murine macrophage cell line. The results of this study provide evidence that an increased tissue status of n-3 PUFA suppresses liver tumorigenesis, probably through inhibiting liver inflammation. The findings also point to a potential anticancer role for the n-3 PUFA-derived lipid mediators 18-HEPE and 17-HDHA, which can downregulate the important proinflammatory and proproliferative factor TNF-α. PMID:21421544

  19. Predictions of the physicochemical properties of amino acid side chain analogs using molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alauddin; Sandler, Stanley I

    2016-03-01

    A candidate drug compound is released for clinical trails (in vivo activity) only if its physicochemical properties meet desirable bioavailability and partitioning criteria. Amino acid side chain analogs play vital role in the functionalities of protein and peptides and as such are important in drug discovery. We demonstrate here that the predictions of solvation free energies in water, in 1-octanol, and self-solvation free energies computed using force field-based expanded ensemble molecular dynamics simulation provide good accuracy compared to existing empirical and semi-empirical methods. These solvation free energies are then, as shown here, used for the prediction of a wide range of physicochemical properties important in the assessment of bioavailability and partitioning of compounds. In particular, we consider here the vapor pressure, the solubility in both water and 1-octanol, and the air-water, air-octanol, and octanol-water partition coefficients of amino acid side chain analogs computed from the solvation free energies. The calculated solvation free energies using different force fields are compared against each other and with available experimental data. The protocol here can also be used for a newly designed drug and other molecules where force field parameters and charges are obtained from density functional theory. PMID:26864716

  20. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress CD4(+) T cell proliferation by altering phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] organization.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; Barhoumi, Rola; Fan, Yang-Yi; Rivera, Gonzalo M; Hannoush, Rami N; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), abundant in fish oil, exert their anti-inflammatory effects have not been rigorously defined. We have previously demonstrated that n-3 PUFA decrease the amount of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate, [PI(4,5)P2], in CD4(+) T cells, leading to suppressed actin remodeling upon activation. Since discrete pools of PI(4,5)P2 exist in the plasma membrane, we determined whether n-3 PUFA modulate spatial organization of PI(4,5)P2 relative to raft and non-raft domains. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to demonstrate that lipid raft mesodomains in the plasma membrane of CD4(+) T cells enriched in n-3 PUFA display increased co-clustering of Lck(N10) and LAT(ΔCP), markers of lipid rafts. CD4(+) T cells enriched in n-3 PUFA also exhibited a depleted plasma membrane non-raft PI(4,5)P2 pool as detected by decreased co-clustering of Src(N15), a non-raft marker, and PH(PLC-δ), a PI(4,5)P2 reporter. Incubation with exogenous PI(4,5)P2 rescued the effects on the non-raft PI(4,5)P2 pool, and reversed the suppression of T cell proliferation in CD4(+) T cells enriched with n-3 PUFA. Furthermore, CD4(+) T cells isolated from mice fed a 4% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched diet exhibited a decrease in the non-raft pool of PI(4,5)P2, and exogenous PI(4,5)P2 reversed the suppression of T cell proliferation. Finally, these effects were not due to changes to post-translational lipidation, since n-3 PUFA did not alter the palmitoylation status of signaling proteins. These data demonstrate that n-3 PUFA suppress T cell proliferation by altering plasma membrane topography and the spatial organization of PI(4,5)P2. PMID:26476105

  1. Availability of Amino Acids Extends Chronological Lifespan by Suppressing Hyper-Acidification of the Environment in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The chronological lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents the duration of cell survival in the postdiauxic and stationary phases. Using a prototrophic strain derived from the standard auxotrophic laboratory strain BY4742, we showed that supplementation of non-essential amino acids to a synthetic defined (SD) medium increases maximal cell growth and extends the chronological lifespan. The positive effects of amino acids can be reproduced by modulating the medium pH, indicating that amino acids contribute to chronological longevity in a cell-extrinsic manner by alleviating medium acidification. In addition, we showed that the amino acid-mediated effects on extension of chronological longevity are independent of those achieved through a reduction in the TORC1 pathway, which is mediated in a cell-intrinsic manner. Since previous studies showed that extracellular acidification causes mitochondrial dysfunction and leads to cell death, our results provide a path to premature chronological aging caused by differences in available nitrogen sources. Moreover, acidification of culture medium is generally associated with culture duration and cell density; thus, further studies are required on cell physiology of auxotrophic yeast strains during the stationary phase because an insufficient supply of essential amino acids may cause alterations in environmental conditions. PMID:26991662

  2. Trans-Fatty Acids Aggravate Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in C57BL/6 Mice, Possibly by Suppressing the IRS1 Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaona; Shen, Cheng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Cong; Liu, Xiangwei; Sun, Xiaolei; Han, Shasha; Wang, Peng; Dong, Zhen; Ma, Xin; Hu, Kai; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-fatty acid consumption has been reported as a risk factor for metabolic disorders and targeted organ damages. Nonetheless, little is known about the roles and mechanisms of trans-fatty acids in obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and hepatic steatosis. Adult C57BL/6 male mice were fed with four different diets for 20 weeks: normal diet (ND), high fat diet (HFD), low trans-fatty acids diet (LTD) and high trans-fatty acid diet (HTD). The diet-induced metabolic disorders were assessed by evaluating body weight, glucose tolerance test, hepatic steatosis and plasma lipid profiles post 20-week diet. Histological (H&E, Oil-Red-O) staining and western blot analysis were employed to assess liver steatosis and potential signaling pathways. After 20-weeks of diet, the body weights of the four groups were 29.61 ± 1.89 g (ND), 39.04 ± 4.27 g (HFD), 34.09 ± 2.62 g (LTD) and 43.78 ± 4.27 g (HTD) (p < 0.05), respectively. HFD intake significantly impaired glucose tolerance, which was impaired further in the mice consuming the HTD diet. The effect was further exacerbated by HTD diet. Moreover, the HTD group exhibited significantly more severe liver steatosis compared with HFD group possibly through regulating adipose triglyceride lipase. The group consuming the HTD also exhibited significantly reduced levels of IRS1, phosphor-PKC and phosphor-AKT. These results support our hypothesis that consumption of a diet high in trans-fatty acids induces higher rates of obesity, IR and hepatic steatosis in male C57BL/6 mice, possibly by suppressing the IRS1dependent pathway. PMID:27248994

  3. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  4. Protein inter-domain linker prediction using Random Forest and amino acid physiochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein chains are generally long and consist of multiple domains. Domains are distinct structural units of a protein that can evolve and function independently. The accurate prediction of protein domain linkers and boundaries is often regarded as the initial step of protein tertiary structure and function predictions. Such information not only enhances protein-targeted drug development but also reduces the experimental cost of protein analysis by allowing researchers to work on a set of smaller and independent units. In this study, we propose a novel and accurate domain-linker prediction approach based on protein primary structure information only. We utilize a nature-inspired machine-learning model called Random Forest along with a novel domain-linker profile that contains physiochemical and domain-linker information of amino acid sequences. Results The proposed approach was tested on two well-known benchmark protein datasets and achieved 68% sensitivity and 99% precision, which is better than any existing protein domain-linker predictor. Without applying any data balancing technique such as class weighting and data re-sampling, the proposed approach is able to accurately classify inter-domain linkers from highly imbalanced datasets. Conclusion Our experimental results prove that the proposed approach is useful for domain-linker identification in highly imbalanced single- and multi-domain proteins. PMID:25521329

  5. Allicin alleviates inflammation of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats and suppresses P38 and JNK pathways in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  6. Vaccenic acid suppresses intestinal inflammation by increasing anandamide and related N-acylethanolamines in the JCR:LA-cp rat.

    PubMed

    Jacome-Sosa, Miriam; Vacca, Claudia; Mangat, Rabban; Diane, Abdoulaye; Nelson, Randy C; Reaney, Martin J; Shen, Jianheng; Curtis, Jonathan M; Vine, Donna F; Field, Catherine J; Igarashi, Miki; Piomelli, Daniele; Banni, Sebastiano; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-04-01

    Vaccenic acid (VA), the predominant ruminant-derivedtransfat in the food chain, ameliorates hyperlipidemia, yet mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated whether VA could influence tissue endocannabinoids (ECs) by altering the availability of their biosynthetic precursor, arachidonic acid (AA), in membrane phospholipids (PLs). JCR:LA-cprats were assigned to a control diet with or without VA (1% w/w),cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (1% w/w) or VA+CLA (1% + 0.5% w/w) for 8 weeks. VA reduced the EC, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), in the liver and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) relative to control diet (P< 0.001), but did not change AA in tissue PLs. There was no additive effect of combining VA+CLA on 2-AG relative to VA alone (P> 0.05). Interestingly, VA increased jejunal concentrations of anandamide and those of the noncannabinoid signaling molecules, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide, relative to control diet (P< 0.05). This was consistent with a lower jejunal protein abundance (but not activity) of their degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, as well as the mRNA expression of TNFα and interleukin 1β (P< 0.05). The ability of VA to reduce 2-AG in the liver and VAT provides a potential mechanistic explanation to alleviate ectopic lipid accumulation. The opposing regulation of ECs and other noncannabinoid lipid signaling molecules by VA suggests an activation of benefit via the EC system in the intestine. PMID:26891736

  7. Blueberry diet derived 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (PPA) suppresses osteoblastic cell senescence to promote bone accretion in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A blueberry (BB) supplemented diet has been previously shown to significantly stimulate bone formation in rapidly growing male and female rodents. Phenolic acids (PAs) are metabolites derived from polyphenols found in fruits and vegetables as a result of the actions of gut bacteria, and the levels o...

  8. Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 suppresses formation of DNA adducts by carcinogenic aristolochic acid I in rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dračínská, Helena; Bárta, František; Levová, Kateřina; Hudecová, Alena; Moserová, Michaela; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Kopka, Klaus; Frei, Eva; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a natural plant alkaloid causing aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. One of the most efficient enzymes reductively activating AAI to species forming AAI-DNA adducts is cytosolic NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1. AAI is also either reductively activated or oxidatively detoxified to 8-hydroxyaristolochic acid (AAIa) by microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Here, we investigated which of these two opposing CYP1A1/2-catalyzed reactions prevails in AAI metabolism in vivo. The formation of AAI-DNA adducts was analyzed in liver, kidney and lung of rats treated with AAI, Sudan I, a potent inducer of CYP1A1/2, or AAI after pretreatment with Sudan I. Compared to rats treated with AAI alone, levels of AAI-DNA adducts determined by the 32P-postlabeling method were lower in liver, kidney and lung of rats treated with AAI after Sudan I. The induction of CYP1A1/2 by Sudan I increased AAI detoxification to its O-demethylated metabolite AAIa, thereby reducing the actual amount of AAI available for reductive activation. This subsequently resulted in lower AAI-DNA adduct levels in the rat in vivo. Our results demonstrate that CYP1A1/2-mediated oxidative detoxification of AAI is the predominant role of these enzymes in rats in vivo, thereby suppressing levels of AAI-DNA adducts. PMID:26845733

  9. Betulinic acid exerts anti-hepatitis C virus activity via the suppression of NF-κB- and MAPK-ERK1/2-mediated COX-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Kuang; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chen, Kai-Hsun; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the effect of betulinic acid (BA), extracted from Avicennia marina, on the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and to investigate the mechanism of this BA-mediated anti-HCV activity. Experimental Approach HCV replicon and infectious systems were used to evaluate the anti-HCV activity of BA. Exogenous COX-2 or knock-down of COX-2 expression was used to investigate the role of COX-2 in the anti-HCV activity of BA. The effects of BA on the phosphorylation of NF-κB and on kinases in the MAPK signalling pathway were determined. The anti-HCV activity of BA in combination with other HCV inhibitors was also determined to assess its use as an anti-HCV supplement. Key Results BA inhibited HCV replication in both Ava5 replicon cells and in a cell culture-derived infectious HCV particle system. Treatment with a combination of BA and IFN-α, the protease inhibitor telaprevir or the NS5B polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir resulted in the synergistic suppression of HCV RNA replication. Exogenous overexpression of COX-2 gradually attenuated the inhibitory effect of BA on HCV replication, suggesting that BA reduces HCV replication by suppressing the expression of COX-2. In particular, BA down-regulated HCV-induced COX-2 expression by reducing the phosphorylation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 of the MAPK signalling pathway. Conclusions and Implications BA inhibits HCV replication by suppressing the NF-κB- and ERK1/2-mediated COX-2 pathway and may serve as a promising compound for drug development or as a potential supplement for use in the treatment of HCV-infected patients. PMID:26102077

  10. Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein inhibits TLR4 activation and suppresses the inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ivelisse; Cabán-Hernández, Kimberly; Figueroa-Santiago, Olgary; Espino, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the innate immunity receptor for bacterial endotoxins, plays a pivotal role in the induction of inflammatory responses. There is a need to develop molecules that block either activation through TLR4 or the downstream signaling pathways to inhibit the storm of inflammation typically elicited by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a major cause of the high mortality associated with bacterial sepsis. We report here that a single intraperitoneal injection of 15μg Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein (Fh12) 1 hour before exposure to LPS suppressed significantly the expression of serum inflammatory cytokines in a model of septic shock using C57BL/6 mice. Because macrophages are good source of IL12p70 and TNFα, and critical in driving adaptive immunity, we investigated the effect of Fh12 on the function of mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (bmMΦs). Whereas Fh12 alone did not induce cytokine expression, it significantly suppressed the expression of IL12, TNFα, IL6 and IL1β cytokines as well as iNOS2 in bmMΦs, and also impaired the phagocytic capacity of bmMΦs. Fh12 had a limited effect on the expression of inflammatory cytokines induced in response to other TLR-ligands. One mechanism used by Fh12 to exert its anti-inflammatory effect is binding to the CD14 co-receptor. Moreover, it suppresses phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK. The potent anti-inflammatory properties of Fh12 demonstrated here open doors to further studies directed at exploring the potential of this molecule as a new class of drug against septic shock or other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25780044

  11. 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid Attenuated Inflammation and Edema via Suppressing HIF-1α in Seawater Aspiration-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Xi, Ronggang; Zhang, Zhiran; Li, Wangping; Liu, Yan; Jin, Faguang; Wang, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) is an active component of Chinese herb Aster tataricus which had been widely used in China for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of 4-HPA on seawater aspiration-induced lung injury. Pulmonary inflammation and edema were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) white cell count, Evans blue dye analysis, wet to dry weight ratios, and histology study. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) siRNA and permeability assay were used to study the effect of 4-HPA on the production of inflammatory cytokines and monolayer permeability in vitro. The results showed that 4-HPA reduced seawater instillation-induced mortality in rats. In lung tissues, 4-HPA attenuated hypoxia, inflammation, vascular leak, and edema, and decreased HIF-1α protein level. In primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AEC), 4-HPA decreased hypertonicity- and hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein levels through inhibiting the activations of protein translational regulators and via promoting HIF-1α protein degradation. In addition, 4-HPA lowered inflammatory cytokines levels through suppressing hypertonicity- and hypoxia-induced HIF-1α in NR8383 macrophages. Moreover, 4-HPA decreased monolayer permeability through suppressing hypertonicity and hypoxia-induced HIF-1α, which was mediated by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat lung microvascular endothelial cell line (RLMVEC). In conclusion, 4-HPA attenuated inflammation and edema through suppressing hypertonic and hypoxic induction of HIF-1α in seawater aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. PMID:25050781

  12. Using reduced amino acid composition to predict defensin family and subfamily: Integrating similarity measure and structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yong-Chun; Li, Qian-Zhong

    2009-10-01

    Defensins are essentially ancient natural antibiotics with potent activity extending from lower organisms to humans. They can inhibit the growth or virulence of micro-organisms directly or indirectly enhance the host's immune system. The successful prediction of defensin peptides will provide very useful information and insights for the basic research of defensins. In this study, by selecting the N-peptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) obtained from structural alphabet named Protein Blocks as the feature parameters, the increment of diversity (ID) is firstly developed to predict defensins family and subfamily. The jackknife test based on 2-peptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) with 13 reduced amino acids shows that the overall accuracy of prediction are 91.36% for defensin family, and 94.21% for defensin subfamily. The results indicate that ID_RAAA is a simple and efficient prediction method for defensin peptides. PMID:19591890

  13. The BH3-mimetic gossypol and noncytotoxic doses of valproic acid induce apoptosis by suppressing cyclin-A2/Akt/FOXO3a signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hao; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Huang, Mei-Yun; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that valproic acid (VPA) acts in synergy with GOS to enhance cell death in human DU145 cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we observed that such synergistic cytotoxicity of GOS and VPA could be extended to human A375, HeLa, and PC-3 cancer cells. GOS and VPA co-treatment induced robust apoptosis as evidenced by caspase-8/-9/-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and nuclear fragmentation. GOS and VPA also markedly decreased cyclin A2 protein expression. Owing to the reduction of cyclin A2, Akt signaling was suppressed, leading to dephosphorylation of FOXO3a. Consequently, FOXO3a was activated and the expression of its target genes, including pro-apoptotic FasL and Bim, was upregulated. Supporting this, FOXO3a knockdown attenuated FasL and Bim upregulation and apoptosis induction in GOS+VPA-treated cells. Furthermore, blocking proteasome activity by MG132 prevented the downregulation of cyclin A2, dephosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, and induction of apoptosis in cells co-treated with GOS and VPA. In mouse model, GOS and VPA combination significantly inhibited the growth of A375 melanoma xenografts. Our findings indicate that GOS and VPA co-treatment induces apoptosis in human cancer cells by suppressing the cyclin-A2/Akt/FOXO3a pathway. PMID:26517515

  14. Ternatin, a cyclic peptide isolated from mushroom, and its derivative suppress hyperglycemia and hepatic fatty acid synthesis in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Kawashima, Haruna; Takemori, Kumiko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Murai, Atsushi; Masuda, Shun; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke; Horio, Fumihiko

    2012-10-19

    (-)-Ternatin is a highly methylated cyclic heptapeptide isolated from mushroom Coriolus versicolor. Ternatin has an inhibitory effect on fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. [D-Leu(7)]ternatin, a ternatin derivative, also inhibited fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells, although the effectiveness of [D-Leu(7)]ternatin was lower than that of ternatin. In this study, we investigated the effects of ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin on obesity and type 2 diabetes in KK-A(y) mice, an animal model for spontaneously developed type 2 diabetes. We continuously administered ternatin (8.5 or 17 nmol/day) or [D-Leu(7)]ternatin (68 nmol/day) to mice via a subcutaneous osmotic pump. Unexpectedly, neither ternatin nor [D-Leu(7)]ternatin affected body weight or adipose tissue weight in KK-A(y) mice. In contrast, it was demonstrated that both ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin suppress the development of hyperglycemia. In liver, the SREBP-1c mRNA level tended to be lower or significantly decreased in mice treated with ternatin or [D-Leu(7)]ternatin, respectively. Moreover, we found that ternatin directly lowered the SREBP-1c mRNA level in Hepa1-6 hepatocyte cells. This study showed that ternatin and [D-Leu(7)]ternatin each had a preventive effect on hyperglycemia and a suppressive effect on fatty acid synthesis in KK-A(y) mice. PMID:23000156

  15. Mycophenolic acid inhibits inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and suppresses production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and LDH in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Charlotte A; Carlsten, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) inhibits reversibly inosine 5(')-monophosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. Previously, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the pro-drug of MPA, was shown to exert beneficial effects on the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In this study MPA's immunomodulating effects in vitro on the murine macrophage cell line IC-21 were investigated. The cells were exposed to MPA together with lipopolysaccharide and IFN-gamma. Cytokine, NO(2)(-), and lactate dehydrogenase levels in supernatants and cell lysates were analysed as well as the proliferation of IC-21 cells. MPA exposure reduced the total levels of all molecules investigated and suppressed the proliferation. All MPA-induced effects were reversed by the addition of guanosine to the cultures. Since macrophages play a role in lupus nephritis, our results indicate that modulation of macrophages may be involved in the ameliorating effects of MMF in SLE. PMID:12381354

  16. The G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor Gpbar1 (TGR5) suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration through antagonizing STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong; Su, Jia; Li, Zhijun; Xiao, Rui; Wen, Jianxun; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Xueting; Yu, Donna; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Gpbar1 (TGR5), a membrane-bound bile acid receptor, is well known for its roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we show that TGR5 is a suppressor of gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration through antagonizing STAT3 signaling pathway. We firstly show that TGR5 activation greatly inhibited proliferation and migration of human gastric cancer cells and strongly induced gastric cancer cell apoptosis. We then found that TGR5 activation antagonized STAT3 signaling pathway through suppressing the phosphorylation of STAT3 and its transcription activity induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or interleukin-6. TGR5 overexpression with ligand treatment inhibited gene expression mediated by STAT3. It suggests that TGR5 antagonizes gastric cancer proliferation and migration at least in part by inhibiting STAT3 signaling. These findings identify TGR5 as a suppressor of gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration that may serve as an attractive therapeutic tool for human gastric cancer. PMID:26417930

  17. Using electromagnetic induction technology to predict volatile fatty acid, source area differences.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, Bryan L; Eigenberg, Roger A; Varel, Vince; Lesch, Scott; Spiehs, Mindy J

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface measures have been adapted to identify manure accumulation on feedlot surfaces. Understanding where manure accumulates can be useful to develop management practices that mitigate air emissions from manure, such as odor or greenhouse gases. Objectives were to determine if electromagnetic induction could be used to predict differences in volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other volatiles produced in vitro from feedlot surface material following a simulated rain event. Twenty soil samples per pen were collected from eight pens with cattle fed two different diets using a predictive sampling approach. These samples were incubated at room temperature for 3 d to determine fermentation products formed. Fermentation products were categorized into acetate, straight-, branched-chained, and total VFAs. These data were used to develop calibration prediction models on the basis of properties measured by electromagnetic induction (EMI). Diet had no significant effect on mean volatile solids (VS) concentration of accumulated manure. However, manure from cattle fed a corn (Zea mays L.)-based diet had significantly ( P ≤ 0.1) greater mean straight-chained and total VFA generation than pens where wet distillers grain with solubles (WDGS) were fed. Alternately, pens with cattle fed a WDGS-based diet had significantly (P ≤ 0.05) greater branched-chained VFAs than pens with cattle fed a corn-based diet. Many branched-chain VFAs have a lower odor threshold than straight-chained VFAs; therefore, emissions from WDGS-based diet manure would probably have a lower odor threshold. We concluded that diets can affect the types and quantities of VFAs produced following a rain event. Understanding odorant accumulation patterns and the ability to predict generation can be used to develop precision management practices to mitigate odor emissions. PMID:21869503

  18. A Potent Systemically Active N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase Inhibitor that Suppresses Inflammation and Human Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alison; Pontis, Silvia; Mengatto, Luisa; Armirotti, Andrea; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Capurro, Valeria; Fiasella, Annalisa; Nuzzi, Andrea; Romeo, Elisa; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Maccarrone, Mauro; Reggiani, Angelo; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco; Bertozzi, Fabio; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-08-21

    Fatty acid ethanolamides such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) are lipid-derived mediators that potently inhibit pain and inflammation by ligating type-α peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-α). These bioactive substances are preferentially degraded by the cysteine hydrolase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), which is highly expressed in macrophages. Here, we describe a new class of β-lactam derivatives that are potent, selective, and systemically active inhibitors of intracellular NAAA activity. The prototype of this class deactivates NAAA by covalently binding the enzyme's catalytic cysteine and exerts profound anti-inflammatory effects in both mouse models and human macrophages. This agent may be used to probe the functions of NAAA in health and disease and as a starting point to discover better anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25874594

  19. Retigeric Acid B Exhibits Antitumor Activity through Suppression of Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Qing; Hu, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Tao; Cheng, Yan-Na; Young, Charles Y. F.; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that retigeric acid B (RB), a natural pentacyclic triterpenic acid isolated from lichen, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer (PCa) cells. However, the mechanism of action of RB remains unclear. In this study, we found that using PC3 and DU145 cells as models, RB inhibited phosphorylation levels of IκBα and p65 subunit of NF-κB in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Detailed study revealed that RB blocked the nuclear translocation of p65 and its DNA binding activity, which correlated with suppression of NF-κB-regulated proteins including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1 and survivin. NF-κB reporter assay suggested that RB was able to inhibit both constitutive activated-NF-κB and LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NF-κB. Overexpression of RelA/p65 rescued RB-induced cell death, while knockdown of RelA/p65 significantly promoted RB-mediated inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, suggesting the crucial involvement of NF-κB pathway in this event. We further analyzed antitumor activity of RB in in vivo study. In C57BL/6 mice carrying RM-1 homografts, RB inhibited tumor growth and triggered apoptosis mainly through suppressing NF-κB activity in tumor tissues. Additionally, DNA microarray data revealed global changes in the gene expression associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis in response to RB treatment. Therefore, our findings suggested that RB exerted its anti-tumor effect by targeting the NF-κB pathway in PCa cells, and this could be a general mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of RB in other types of cancers as well. PMID:22666431

  20. Group X Secreted Phospholipase A2 Releases ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Suppresses Colitis, and Promotes Sperm Fertility.

    PubMed

    Murase, Remi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Kei; Ushida, Ayako; Nishito, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto

    2016-03-25

    Within the secreted phospholipase A2(sPLA2) family, group X sPLA2(sPLA2-X) has the highest capacity to hydrolyze cellular membranes and has long been thought to promote inflammation by releasing arachidonic acid, a precursor of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. Unexpectedly, we found that transgenic mice globally overexpressing human sPLA2-X (PLA2G10-Tg) displayed striking immunosuppressive and lean phenotypes with lymphopenia and increased M2-like macrophages, accompanied by marked elevation of free ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their metabolites. Studies usingPla2g10-deficient mice revealed that endogenous sPLA2-X, which is highly expressed in the colon epithelium and spermatozoa, mobilized ω3 PUFAs or their metabolites to protect against dextran sulfate-induced colitis and to promote fertilization, respectively. In colitis, sPLA2-X deficiency increased colorectal expression of Th17 cytokines, and ω3 PUFAs attenuated their production by lamina propria cells partly through the fatty acid receptor GPR120. In comparison, cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) protects from colitis by mobilizing ω6 arachidonic acid metabolites, including prostaglandin E2 Thus, our results underscore a previously unrecognized role of sPLA2-X as an ω3 PUFA mobilizerin vivo, segregated mobilization of ω3 and ω6 PUFA metabolites by sPLA2-X and cPLA2α, respectively, in protection against colitis, and the novel role of a particular sPLA2-X-driven PUFA in fertilization. PMID:26828067

  1. Methane Suppression: The Impacts of Fe(III) and Humic Acids on Net Methane Flux from Arctic Tundra Wetlands in Alaska and Finland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Miller, K.; Lai, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic soils contain large reservoirs of carbon (C) that are vulnerable to loss from climatic warming. However the potential global impacts of this C depend on whether it is lost primarily in the form of methane (CH4) or carbon dioxide (CO2), two gases with very different greenhouse warming potentials. In anaerobic environments, the relative production of CH4 vs. CO2 may be controlled by the presence of alternative terminal electron acceptors, which allow more thermodynamically favorable anaerobic respiratory pathways to dominate over methanogenesis. This work investigated how the addition of terminal electron acceptors, ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic acids, affected net CH4 fluxes from high-latitude wetland ecosystems. We conducted two manipulative field experiments in Barrow, Alaska (71° N) and Finnish Lapland (69° N). The ecosystem in Barrow was known from previous studies to be rich in Fe(III) and to harbor a microbial community that is dominated by Fe(III)- and humic acid-reducing microorganisms. The role of these alternative electron acceptors had not previously been studied at the Finnish site. CH4 and CO2 fluxes were measured using a portable trace gas analyzer from experimental plots, before and after amendments with Fe(III) (in the chelated form, ferric nitrilotriacetic acid), humic acids, or water as a control. Both in the ecosystem with permafrost and naturally high levels of soil Fe (Barrow, AK) and in the ecosystem with no permafrost and naturally low levels of soil Fe (Petsikko, Finland), the addition of the alternative electron acceptors Fe(III) and humic acids significantly reduced net CH4 flux. CO2 fluxes were not significantly altered by the treatments. The reduction in CH4 flux persisted for at least several weeks post-treatment. There was no significant difference between the reduction caused by humic acids versus that from Fe(III). These results show that the suppression of CH4 flux by Fe(III) and humic acids is a widespread phenomenon that

  2. Prediction of positional isotopomers of the citric acid cycle: the syntactic approach.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D M; Bergman, R N

    1994-03-01

    We propose a syntactic approach to modeling of biochemical fluxes that combines a rule-based description of atomic transfer in chemical reactions with a structurally oriented, stochastic model of chemical reaction kinetics. This approach avoids the use of differential equations to describe the production and disappearance of each molecule. The computer simulation predicts the changes over time in the abundance of each positional isotopomer of every metabolic intermediate in the citric acid cycle of heart cells, subsequent to administration of [2-13C]acetate (including natural abundance of 13C). (Positional isotopomers are isomers that differ in the positions of isotopes within the molecule.) The 32 positional isotopomers of glutamate fell into four groups with similar intragroup dynamics but with very different amplitudes. From the relative abundance of each isotopomer of glutamate, we calculate the relative area of multiplets of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. PMID:7909408

  3. A Practical Guide for Predicting the Stereochemistry of Bifunctional Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Reactions of Imines.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jolene P; Simón, Luis; Goodman, Jonathan M

    2016-05-17

    Chiral phosphoric acids have become powerful catalysts for the stereocontrolled synthesis of a diverse array of organic compounds. Since the initial report, the development of phosphoric acids as catalysts has been rapid, demonstrating the tremendous generality of this catalyst system and advancing the use of phosphoric acids to catalyze a broad range of asymmetric transformations ranging from Mannich reactions to hydrogenations through complementary modes of activation. These powerful applications have been developed without a clear mechanistic understanding of the reasons for the high level of stereocontrol. This Account describes investigations into the mechanism of the phosphoric acid catalyzed addition of nucleophiles to imines, focusing on binaphthol-based systems. In many cases, the hydroxyl phosphoric acid can form a hydrogen bond to the imine while the P═O interacts with the nucleophile. The single catalyst, therefore, activates both the electrophile and the nucleophile, while holding both in the chiral pocket created by the binaphthol and constrained by substituents at the 3 and 3' positions. Detailed geometric and energetic information about the transition states can be gained from calculations using ONIOM methods that combine the advantages of DFT with some of the speed of force fields. These high-level calculations give a quantitative account of the selectivity in many cases, but require substantial computational resources. A simple qualitative model is a useful complement to this complex quantitative model. We summarize our calculations into a working model that can readily be sketched by hand and used to work out the likely sense of selectivity for each reaction. The steric demands of the different parts of the reactants determine how they fit into the chiral cavity and which of the competing pathways is favored. The preferred pathway can be found by considering the size of the substituents on the nitrogen and carbon atoms of the imine electrophile

  4. Suppressive effects of acid-forming diet against the tumorigenic potential of pioglitazone hydrochloride in the urinary bladder of male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Keiichiro; Awasaki, Yasuyuki; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tanakamaru, Zen-yo; Nagai, Hirofumi; Baron, David; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2011-03-15

    Pioglitazone hydrochloride (PIO), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, was administered orally for 85 weeks at 16 mg/kg/day to male rats fed either a diet containing 1.5% ammonium chloride (acid-forming diet) or a control diet to investigate the effects of urinary acidification induced by the acid-forming diet on the tumorigenic potential of PIO in the urinary bladder. The surviving animals at the end of the administration period were followed to the end of the 2-year study period without changes in the diet and were subjected to terminal necropsy on Week 104. The number of urinary microcrystals, evaluated by manual counting with light microscopy and by an objective method with a laser diffraction particle size analyzer, was increased by PIO on Weeks 12 and 25 and the increases were markedly suppressed by urinary acidification. Urinary citrate was decreased by PIO throughout the study period, but no changes were seen in urinary oxalate at any timepoint. The incidences of PIO-treated males bearing at least one of the advanced proliferative changes consisting of papillary hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, papilloma or carcinoma were significantly decreased from 11 of 82 males fed the control diet to 2 of 80 males fed the acid-forming diet. The acid-forming diet did not show any effects on the toxicokinetic parameters of PIO and its metabolites. Microcrystalluria appears to be involved in the development of the advanced stage proliferative lesions in bladder tumorigenesis induced by PIO in male rats.

  5. Urinary Acid Excretion Can Predict Changes in Bone Metabolism During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, Sara R.; Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitigating space flight-induced bone loss is critical for space exploration, and a dietary countermeasure would be ideal. We present here preliminary data from a study where we examined the role of dietary intake patterns as one factor that can influence bone mineral loss in astronauts during space flight. Crewmembers (n=5) were asked to consume a prescribed diet with either a low (0.3-0.6) or high (1.0-1.3) ratio of animal protein to potassium (APro:K) before and during space flight for 4-d periods. Diets were controlled for energy, total protein, calcium, and sodium. 24-h urine samples were collected on the last day of each of the 4-d controlled diet sessions. 24-h urinary acid excretion, which was predicted by dietary potential renal acid load, was correlated with urinary n-telopeptide (NTX, Pearson R = 0.99 and 0.80 for the high and low APro:K sessions, respectively, p<0.001). The amount of protein when expressed as the percentage of total energy (but not as total grams) was also correlated with urinary NTX (R = 0.66, p<0.01). These results, from healthy individuals in a unique environment, will be important to better understand diet and bone interrelationships during space flight as well as on Earth. The study was funded by the NASA Human Research Program.

  6. Computed tomography in predicting the efficacy of oral cholelitholysis with bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, X B; Liu, J Y; Liu, G N; Shao, X M; Zhou, X S

    1993-10-01

    The efficacy of oral cholelitholytic therapy with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in 137 patients with gallstones was studied in relation to their CT patterns. The best dissolving results were obtained in patients with the stones in isodensity and faint category (< 50 Hu) on CT. The stones with high density or heterogeneous calcification on CT were insoluble, and therefore, were contraindicated for oral cholelitholytic therapy. The attenuation value of stones was classified as complete dissolution ranged from -2 to 35 Hu (14 +/- 12 Hu, n = 13), and their upper limit of 95 percentiles was 33.4 Hu. CT analysis improved the predictability of dissolving gallstones in comparison with plain abdominal radiography or oral cholecystography (OCG). The complete dissolving rate increased from 9.49% (13/137) in patients selected by classic X-ray to 40.7% (11/27) in isodensity category on CT. Besides, radiolucent gallstones, which showed no obvious filling defect on OCG but distinct echo and shadow on B-type ultrasonography, were also insoluble. PMID:8033604

  7. [Computed X-ray tomography in predicting the efficacy of oral cholelithiasis with bile acids].

    PubMed

    Fu, X B

    1993-02-01

    The efficacy of oral cholelitholytic therapy with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in 137 patients with gallstones was compared with their CT patterns. The best dissolving results were obtained from patients with the stones in isodense and faint category (< 50 Hu) on CT. All the stones with high density or heterogeneous calcification on CT were insoluble, therefore, they were contraindicated for oral cholelitholytic therapy. According to the above, criteria, the rate for dissolution ranged from 27.7% (38/137) to 66.7% (38/57), and that for complete dissolution ranged from 9.49% (13/137) to 40.7% (11/27). The attenuation value classified as complete dissolution ranged from -2 to 35 Hu(14 +/- 12 Hu, n = 13). CT analysis improved the predictability of dissolving gallstones in comparison with plain abdominal radiography or oral cholecystography (OCG). Besides, gallstones, which showed no obvious filling defect on OCG but distinct echo and shadow on B-type ultrasonography, were also insoluble. PMID:8391902

  8. Prediction of acid lactic-bacteria growth in turkey ham processed by high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S.P.; Rosenthal, A.; Gaspar, A.; Aragão, G.M.F.; Slongo-Marcusi, A.

    2013-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated and industrially applied to extend shelf life of meat-based products. Traditional ham packaged under microaerophilic conditions may sometimes present high lactic acid bacteria population during refrigerated storage, which limits shelf life due to development of unpleasant odor and greenish and sticky appearance. This study aimed at evaluating the shelf life of turkey ham pressurized at 400 MPa for 15 min and stored at 4, 8 and 12 °C, in comparison to the non pressurized product. The lactic acid bacteria population up to 107 CFU/g of product was set as the criteria to determine the limiting shelf life According to such parameter the pressurized sample achieved a commercial viability within 75 days when stored at 4 °C while the control lasted only 45 days. Predictive microbiology using Gompertz and Baranyi and Roberts models fitted well both for the pressurized and control samples. The results indicated that the high hydrostatic pressure treatment greatly increased the turkey ham commercial viability in comparison to the usual length, by slowing down the growth of microorganisms in the product. PMID:24159279

  9. Uncertainty quantification and integration of machine learning techniques for predicting acid rock drainage chemistry: a probability bounds approach.

    PubMed

    Betrie, Getnet D; Sadiq, Rehan; Morin, Kevin A; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2014-08-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a major pollution problem globally that has adversely impacted the environment. Identification and quantification of uncertainties are integral parts of ARD assessment and risk mitigation, however previous studies on predicting ARD drainage chemistry have not fully addressed issues of uncertainties. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) are used for the prediction of ARD drainage chemistry and their predictive uncertainties are quantified using probability bounds analysis. Furthermore, the predictions of ANN and SVM are integrated using four aggregation methods to improve their individual predictions. The results of this study showed that ANN performed better than SVM in enveloping the observed concentrations. In addition, integrating the prediction of ANN and SVM using the aggregation methods improved the predictions of individual techniques. PMID:24852616

  10. Preoperative serum docosahexaenoic acid level predicts prognosis of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    TASAKI, SHINSUKE; HORIGUCHI, AKIO; ASANO, TAKAKO; KURODA, KENJI; SATO, AKINORI; ASAKUMA, JUNICHI; ITO, KEIICHI; ASANO, TOMOHIKO; ASAKURA, HIROTAKA

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery and clinical development of targeted agents have expanded treatment options in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, metastatic RCC remains a lethal disease. Complete response is rare and treatment with targeted agents eventually fails in the majority of the patients. Therefore, there is a need for developing a prognostic tool and a novel therapeutic agent for RCC to improve the follow-up strategy after surgical treatment. Clinical data, including patient characteristics, serum fatty acid profile, clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome, were obtained from 112 patients with RCC prior to surgical treatment. Preoperative fatty acid levels were grouped according to patient characteristics, such as performance status, body mass index or pathological parameters, and were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Cancer-specific survival in the high and low docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) level groups were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to determine the independent prognostic factors associated with shortened cancer-specific survival. The serum DHA level in patients with metastasis was significantly lower compared with that in patients without metastasis (P=0.047). Low serum DHA level, presence of metastasis and cachexia were independent predictors of shortened cancer-specific survival in a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model (P=0.033, hazard ratio = 4.43). Patients with a serum DHA level below the median value exhibited significantly shorter cancer-specific survival compared with those with a higher serum DHA level (P=0.008). Thus, according to our results, the preoperative serum DHA level may be able to predict the surgical outcome of RCC. However, this finding requires validation by large-scale prospective studies. PMID:27330769

  11. Quantifying bile acid malabsorption helps predict response and tailor sequestrant therapy.

    PubMed

    Orekoya, Oluwafikunayo; McLaughlin, John; Leitao, Eugenia; Johns, Wendy; Lal, Simon; Paine, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Although recognised as a cause of chronic diarrhoea for over forty years, diagnostic tests and treatments for bile acid malabsorption (BAM) remain controversial. Recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines highlighted the lack of evidence in the field, and called for further research. This retrospective study explores the BAM subtype and severity, the use and response to bile acid sequestrants (BAS) and the prevalence of abnormal colonic histology. 264 selenium-75-labelled homocholic acid conjugated taurine (SeHCAT)-tested patient records were reviewed and the severity and subtype of BAM, presence of colonic histopathology and response to BAS were recorded. 53% of patients tested had BAM, with type-2 BAM in 45% of patients with presumed irritable bowel syndrome. Colonic histological abnormalities were similar overall between patients with (29%) or without (23%) BAM (p = 0.46) and between BAM subtypes, with no significant presence of inflammatory changes. 63% of patients with BAM had a successful BAS response which showed a trend to decreased response with reduced severity. Colestyramine was unsuccessful in 44% (38/87) and 45% of these (17/38) were related to medication intolerance, despite a positive SeHCAT. 47% (7/15) of colestyramine failures had a successful colesevelam response. No patient reported colesevelam intolerance. Quantifying severity of BAM appears to be useful in predicting BAS response. Colesevelam was better tolerated than colestyramine and showed some efficacy in colestyramine failures. Colestyramine failure should not be used to exclude BAM. Colonic histology is of no relevance. PMID:26031975

  12. Sea Cucumber Saponin Echinoside A (EA) Stimulates Hepatic Fatty Acid β-Oxidation and Suppresses Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Coupling in a Diurnal Pattern.

    PubMed

    Wen, Min; Fu, Xueyuan; Han, Xiuqing; Hu, Xiaoqian; Dong, Ping; Xu, Jie; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control aspects of physiological events, including lipid metabolism, showing rhythmic fluctuation over 24 h. Therefore, it is not sufficient to evaluate thoroughly how dietary components regulate lipid metabolism with a single time-point assay. In the present study, a time-course study was performed to analyze the effect of sea cucumber saponin echinoside A (EA) on lipid metabolism over 24 h. Results showed that EA lowered the levels of TC and TG in both serum and liver at most time-points during the 24 h. Activities of hepatic lipogenic enzymes and lipolytic enzymes were inhibited and elevated respectively by EA to varied degrees at different time-points. Meanwhile, parallel variation trends of gene expression involved in fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation were observed accordingly. The interaction between EA and lipid metabolism showed a time-dependent effect. Overall, EA impaired fatty acid synthesis and enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in ad libitum feeding over 24 h. PMID:27465723

  13. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  14. Prediction of fatty acid profiles in cow, ewe, and goat milk by mid-infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrand-Calmels, M; Palhière, I; Brochard, M; Leray, O; Astruc, J M; Aurel, M R; Barbey, S; Bouvier, F; Brunschwig, P; Caillat, H; Douguet, M; Faucon-Lahalle, F; Gelé, M; Thomas, G; Trommenschlager, J M; Larroque, H

    2014-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry was used to estimate the fatty acid (FA) composition in cow, ewe, and goat milk. The objectives were to compare different statistical approaches with wavelength selection to predict the milk FA composition from MIR spectra, and to develop equations for FA in cow, goat, and ewe milk. In total, a set of 349 cow milk samples, 200 ewe milk samples, and 332 goat milk samples were both analyzed by MIR and by gas chromatography, the reference method. A broad FA variability was ensured by using milk from different breeds and feeding systems. The methods studied were partial least squares regression (PLS), first-derivative pretreatment + PLS, genetic algorithm + PLS, wavelets + PLS, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method (LASSO), and elastic net. The best results were obtained with PLS, genetic algorithm + PLS and first derivative + PLS. The residual standard deviation and the coefficient of determination in external validation were used to characterize the equations and to retain the best for each FA in each species. In all cases, the predictions were of better quality for FA found at medium to high concentrations (i.e., for saturated FA and some monounsaturated FA with a coefficient of determination in external validation >0.90). The conversion of the FA expressed in grams per 100mL of milk to grams per 100g of FA was possible with a small loss of accuracy for some FA. PMID:24268398

  15. Cichoric Acid Reverses Insulin Resistance and Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in the Glucosamine-Induced HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di; Wang, Yutang; Du, Qingwei; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Xuebo

    2015-12-30

    Cichoric acid, a caffeic acid derivative found in Echinacea purpurea, basil, and chicory, has been reported to have bioactive effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and preventing insulin resistance. In this study, to explore the effects of CA on regulating insulin resistance and chronic inflammatory responses, the insulin resistance model was constructed by glucosamine in HepG2 cells. CA stimulated glucosamine-mediated glucose uptake by stimulating translocation of the glucose transporter 2. Moreover, the production of reactive oxygen, the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were attenuated. Furthermore, CA was verified to promote glucosamine-mediated glucose uptake and inhibited inflammation through PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK signaling pathways in HepG2 cells. These results implied that CA could increase glucose uptake, improve insulin resistance, and attenuate glucosamine-induced inflammation, suggesting that CA is a potential natural nutraceutical with antidiabetic properties and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26592089

  16. On-line cation exchange for suppression of adduct formation in negative-ion electrospray mass spectrometry of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Buchmeiser, M R

    1998-12-15

    One major difficulty in the analysis of nucleic acids by electrospray mass spectrometry is represented by the affinity of the polyanionic sugar-phosphate backbone for nonvolatile cations, especially ubiquitous sodium and potassium ions. A simple on-line sample preparation system comprising a microflow pumping system and 45 x 0.8-mm-i.d. microcolumns packed with weak or strong cation-exchange resins is described for the efficient removal of cations from nucleic acid samples. Samples were analyzed by flow injection analysis at a 3-5 microL/min flow of 10 mM triethylamine in 50% water-50% acetonitrile. After on-line desalting, mass spectra of oligonucleotides revealed no significant sodium adduct peaks. Moreover, signal-to-noise ratios were greatly enhanced compared to direct injection of the samples. Electrospray mass spectrometry with on-line sample preparation allowed accurate molecular mass determinations of picomole amounts of crude oligonucleotide preparations ranging in size from 8 to 80 nucleotides within a few minutes. The good linearity of the calibration plot (R2 = 0.9988) over at least 2 orders of magnitude and a relative standard deviation in peak areas of less than 9% permitted the sensitive quantitative measurement of oligonucleotides in a concentration range of 0.2-20 microM with selected-ion monitoring. Finally, the on-line sample preparation system was evaluated for the mass spectrometric analysis of complex oligonucleotide mixtures. PMID:9868919

  17. Rupestonic acid derivative YZH-106 suppresses influenza virus replication by activation of heme oxygenase-1-mediated interferon response.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hui-Qiang; Wu, Ping; Hu, Jin; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Wu, Shuo; Ge, Miao; Sun, Wen-Fang; Zhao, Jiang-Yu; Aisa, Haji Akber; Li, Yu-Huan; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Given the limitation of available antiviral drugs and vaccines, there remains to be a pressing need for novel anti-influenza drugs. Rupestonic acid derivatives were reported to have an anti-influenza virus activity, but their mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we aim to evaluate the antiviral activity of YZH-106, a rupestonic acid derivative, against a broad-spectrum of influenza viruses and to dissect its antiviral mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that YZH-106 exhibited a broad-spectrum antiviral activity against influenza viruses, including drug-resistant strains in vitro. Furthermore, YZH-106 provided partial protection of the mice to Influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as judged by decreased viral load in lungs, improved lung pathology, reduced body weight loss and partial survival benefits. Mechanistically, YZH-106 induced p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which led to the activation of erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) that up-regulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in addition to other genes. HO-1 inhibited IAV replication by activation of type I IFN expression and subsequent induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), possibly in a HO-1 enzymatic activity-independent manner. These results suggest that YZH-106 inhibits IAV by up-regulating HO-1-mediated IFN response. HO-1 is thus a promising host target for antiviral therapeutics against influenza and other viral infectious diseases. PMID:27107768

  18. Structure prediction and evolution of a halo-acid dehalogenase of Burkholderia mallei

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Alok R; Singh, Raghvendra Pratap; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Dubey, Ramesh Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pollutants containing halogenated organic compounds e.g. haloacid, can cause a plethora of health problems. The structural and functional analyses of the gene responsible of their degradation are an important aspect for environmental studies and are important to human well-being. It has been shown that some haloacids are toxic and mutagenic. Microorganisms capable of degrading these haloacids can be found in the natural environment. One of these, a soil-borne Burkholderia mallei posses the ability to grow on monobromoacetate (MBA). This bacterium produces a haloacid dehalogenase that allows the cell to grow on MBA, a highly toxic and mutagenic environmental pollutant. For the structural and functional analysis, a 346 amino acid encoding protein sequence of haloacid dehalogenase is retrieve from NCBI data base. Primary and secondary structure analysis suggested that the high percentage of helices in the structure makes the protein more flexible for folding, which might increase protein interactions. The consensus protein sub-cellular localization predictions suggest that dehalogenase protein is a periplasmic protein 3D2GO server, suggesting that it is mainly employed in metabolic process followed by hydrolase activity and catalytic activity. The tertiary structure of protein was predicted by homology modeling. The result suggests that the protein is an unstable protein which is also an important characteristic of active enzyme enabling them to bind various cofactors and substrate for proper functioning. Validation of 3D structure was done using Ramachandran plot ProsA-web and RMSD score. This predicted information will help in better understanding of mechanism underlying haloacid dehalogenase encoding protein and its evolutionary relationship. PMID:23251046

  19. Quantitative prediction of 3D solution shape and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Nyun; Kilchherr, Fabian; Dietz, Hendrik; Bathe, Mark

    2012-04-01

    DNA nanotechnology enables the programmed synthesis of intricate nanometer-scale structures for diverse applications in materials and biological science. Precise control over the 3D solution shape and mechanical flexibility of target designs is important to achieve desired functionality. Because experimental validation of designed nanostructures is time-consuming and cost-intensive, predictive physical models of nanostructure shape and flexibility have the capacity to enhance dramatically the design process. Here, we significantly extend and experimentally validate a computational modeling framework for DNA origami previously presented as CanDo [Castro,C.E., Kilchherr,F., Kim,D.-N., Shiao,E.L., Wauer,T., Wortmann,P., Bathe,M., Dietz,H. (2011) A primer to scaffolded DNA origami. Nat. Meth., 8, 221-229.]. 3D solution shape and flexibility are predicted from basepair connectivity maps now accounting for nicks in the DNA double helix, entropic elasticity of single-stranded DNA, and distant crossovers required to model wireframe structures, in addition to previous modeling (Castro,C.E., et al.) that accounted only for the canonical twist, bend and stretch stiffness of double-helical DNA domains. Systematic experimental validation of nanostructure flexibility mediated by internal crossover density probed using a 32-helix DNA bundle demonstrates for the first time that our model not only predicts the 3D solution shape of complex DNA nanostructures but also their mechanical flexibility. Thus, our model represents an important advance in the quantitative understanding of DNA-based nanostructure shape and flexibility, and we anticipate that this model will increase significantly the number and variety of synthetic nanostructures designed using nucleic acids. PMID:22156372

  20. Determination and Prediction of the Amino Acid Digestibility of Sunflower Seed Meals in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J. D.; Li, Q. Y.; Zeng, Z. K.; Li, P.; Xu, X.; Wang, H. L.; Zhang, S.; Piao, X. S.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the chemical composition and amino acid (AA) digestibility of sunflower seed meal (SFSM) and to use this data to develop prediction equations for estimating AA digestibility for growing pigs. Ten SFSM were collected from five provinces in China. Twelve barrows (38.8±4.6 kg), fitted with ileal T-cannula were allotted into two 6×6 Latin square designs. Each of six experimental periods comprised a 5-d adaption period followed by a 2-d collection of ileal digesta. The ten test diets contained 50% SFSM as the sole source of AA. Another nitrogen-free diet was used to measure the basal endogenous losses of crude protein (CP) and AA. Chromic oxide (0.3%) was used as an inert marker in each diet. There was considerable variation (CV>10%) among the ten SFSM in chemical composition (dry matter [DM]). The concentration of CP and ether extract (EE) ranged from 29.33% to 39.09% and 0.88% to 11.33%, respectively. Crude fibre (CF), neutral detergent fibre and acid detergent fibre ranged from 21.46% to 36.42%, 38.15% to 55.40%, and 24.59% to 37.34%, respectively. There was variation among the ten SFSM in apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) for lysine and threonine, which ranged from 63.16 to 79.21 and 55.19% to 72.04% for AID and 67.03% to 82.07% and 61.97% to 77.01% for SID, respectively. The variation in CP and methionine ranged from 60.13% to 74.72% and 74.79% to 88.60% for AID and 66.70% to 79.31% and 77.16% to 90.27% for SID, respectively. Methionine was a good indicator to predict AA digestibility. These results indicate that conventional chemical composition of SFSM was variable (CV>10%) among the ten SFSM (DM). The results of AID, SID and prediction equations could be used to evaluate the digestibility of SFSM in growing pigs. PMID:25557679

  1. Oxidized eicosapentaenoic acids more potently reduce LXRα-induced cellular triacylglycerol via suppression of SREBP-1c, PGC-1β and GPA than its intact form

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), improve lipid metabolism and contribute to the prevention of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. However, EPA in the diet is easily oxidized at room temperature and several types of oxidized EPA (OEPA) derivatives are generated. To compare the efficiencies of OEPAs on lipid metabolism with EPA, human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) was treated with EPA or OEPAs and their effects on lipid metabolism related genes were studied. OEPAs more potently suppressed the expression of sterol-responsive element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c, a major transcription factor that activates the expression of lipogenic genes, and its downstream target genes than did EPA under conditions of lipid synthesis enhanced by T0901317, a synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. Furthermore, PGC-1β, a coactivator of both LXRα and SREBP-1, was markedly down-regulated by OEPAs compared with EPA. The treatment of OEPAs also significantly down-regulated the expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPA), the initiating enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) synthesis, more than EPA. Therefore, the advantageous effects of OEPAs on cardiovascular diseases might be due to their SREBP-1c, PGC-1β and GPA mediated ameliorating effects. PMID:23680128

  2. Efficiency of fatty acid synthesis by oleaginous yeasts: Prediction of yield and fatty acid cell content from consumed C/N ratio by a simple method.

    PubMed

    Granger, L M; Perlot, P; Goma, G; Pareilleux, A

    1993-11-20

    In nitrogen-limited media, growth and fatty acid formation by the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis, i.e., yield and fatty acid cell content, have been characterized regarding carbon and nitrogen availabilities. It was shown that the formation of fatty acid free biomass was limited by nitrogen availability, whereas the fatty acid production was directly dependent on the consumed C/N ratio. According to these observations, the fraction of substrate consumed for fatty acid synthesis was estimated by using a simple method based on the actual yields, i.e., the mass of carbon source strictly converted into fatty acids and fatty acid free biomass. From these results, relationships were established allowing to predict in a simple and performing manner the maximal attainable fatty acid cell content and yield from the available carbon and nitrogen. These relationships were validated by using experimental data obtained by various authors with different yeast strains, and the proposed method was compared to the energetic and mass balance method previously described. PMID:18609663

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and suppressed breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meilan; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jinglan; Dong, Liyan; Ge, Yinlin; Hou, Lin; Liu, Yongchao; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-02-01

    N-3 fatty acids (FAs) are essential FAs necessary for human health and are known to possess anticancer properties. However, the relationship between n-3 FAs and β-catenin, one of the key components of the Wnt signaling pathway, in mouse breast cancer remains poorly characterized. In this study, 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were exposed to a representative n-3 FA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), to investigate the relationship between n-3 FAs and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro. In vitro studies showed that DHA strongly inhibited cell growth, and induced G1 cell cycle arrest both in 4T1 mouse breast cells and MCF-7 human breast cells. DHA reduced β-catenin expression and T cell factor/lymphoid-enhancing factor reporter activity in 4T1 mouse breast cells. In addition, DHA down-regulated the expression of downstream target genes such as c-myc and cyclinD1. In vivo, therapy experiments were conducted on Babl/c mice bearing breast cancer. We found that feeding mouse the 5% fish oil-supplemented diet for 30 days significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 mouse breast cancer in vivo through inhibition of cancer cell proliferation as well as induction of apoptosis. Feeding animals a 5% fish oil diet significantly induced down-regulation of β-catenin in tumor tissues with a notable increase in apoptosis. In addition, fish oil-supplemented diet decreased lung metastases of breast cancer. These observations suggested that DHA exerted its anticancer activity through down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, our data call for further studies to assess the effectiveness of fish oil as a dietary supplement in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24290517

  4. Diferulic acids in the cell wall may contribute to the suppression of shoot growth in the first phase of salt stress in maize.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Nesar; Hanstein, Stefan; Faust, Franziska; Eitenmüller, Philipp T; Pitann, Britta; Schubert, Sven

    2014-06-01

    In the first phase of salt stress the elongation growth of maize shoots is severely affected. The fixation of shape at the end of the elongation phase in Poaceae leaves has frequently been attributed to the formation of phenolic cross-links in the cell wall. In the present work it was investigated whether this process is accelerated under salt stress in different maize hybrids. Plants were grown in nutrient solution in a growth chamber. Reduction of shoot fresh mass was 50% for two hybrids which have recently been developed for improved salt resistance (SR 03, SR 12) and 60% for their parental genotype (Pioneer 3906). For SR 12 and Pioneer 3906, the upper three leaves were divided into elongated and elongating tissue and cell walls were isolated from which phenolic substances and neutral sugars were determined. Furthermore, for the newly developed hybrids the activity of phenolic peroxidase in the cell wall was analysed in apoplastic washing fluids and after sequential extraction of cell-wall material with CaCl2 and LiCl. The concentration of ferulic acid, the predominant phenolic cross-linker in the grass cell wall, was about 5mgg(-1) dry cell wall in elongating and in elongated tissue. The concentration of diferulic acids (DFA) was 2-3mgg(-1) dry cell wall in both tissues. Salt stress increased the concentration of ferulic acid (FA) and DFA in the parental genotype Pioneer 3906, but not in SR 12. Both genotypes showed an increase in arabinose, which is the molecule at which FA and DFA are coupled to interlocking arabinoxylan polymers. In SR 12, the activity of phenolic peroxidase was not influenced by salt stress. However, in SR 03 salt stress clearly increased the phenolic peroxidase activity. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that accelerated oxidative fixation of shape contributes to growth suppression in the first phase of salt stress in a genotype-specific manner. PMID:24661612

  5. A conjugated linoleic acid-enriched beef diet attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in mice in part through PPARgamma-mediated suppression of toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Clare M; Draper, Eve; Keogh, Brian; Rahman, Arman; Moloney, Aidan P; Mills, Kingston H G; Loscher, Christine E; Roche, Helen M

    2009-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a PUFA found in beef and dairy products that has immunoregulatory properties. The level of CLA in beef can be enhanced by feeding cattle fresh grass rather than concentrates. This study determined the effect of feeding a high-CLA beef diet on inflammation in an in vivo model of septic shock. Mice were fed a high-CLA beef (4.3% total fatty acid composition) or low-CLA beef diet (0.84% total fatty acid composition) for 6 wk. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 3 microg) or sterile PBS was injected i.v. and serum was harvested 6 h after injection. Serum interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-12p70, IL-12p40, and interferon-gamma concentrations were significantly reduced in response to the LPS challenge in the high-CLA beef diet group. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) from the high-CLA beef diet group had significantly less IL-12 and more IL-10 in response to ex vivo LPS stimulation. Furthermore, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 protein and mRNA expression on BMDC was significantly attenuated in the high-CLA compared with the low-CLA beef diet group. Complimentary in vitro experiments to determine the specificity of the effect showed that synthetic cis9, trans11-CLA suppressed surface expression of CD14 and TLR4 on BMDC. Treatment with the PPARgamma inhibitor GW9662 partially reversed TLR4 expression in immature BMDC. The results of this study demonstrate that feeding a diet enriched in high-beef CLA exerts profound antiinflammatory effects in vivo within the context of LPS-induced sepsis. In addition, downregulation of BMDC TLR4 is mediated through induction of PPARgamma. PMID:19846417

  6. Hydroxamic Acid and Benzoic Acid-Based STAT3 Inhibitors Suppress Human Glioma and Breast Cancer Phenotypes In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yue, Peibin; Lopez-Tapia, Francisco; Paladino, David; Li, Yifei; Chen, Chih-Hong; Namanja, Andrew T; Hilliard, Tyvette; Chen, Yuan; Tius, Marcus A; Turkson, James

    2016-02-01

    STAT3 offers an attractive target for cancer therapy, but small-molecule inhibitors with appealing pharmacologic properties have been elusive. Here, we report hydroxamic acid-based and benzoic acid-based inhibitors (SH5-07 and SH4-54, respectively) with robust bioactivity. Both inhibitors blocked STAT3 DNA-binding activity in vitro and in human glioma, breast, and prostate cancer cells and in v-Src-transformed murine fibroblasts. STAT3-dependent gene transcription was blocked along with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, and survivin expression. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of STAT3-inhibitor complexes defined interactions with the SH2 and DNA-binding domains of STAT3. Ectopic expression of the SH2 domain in cells was sufficient to counter the STAT3-inhibitory effects of SH4-54. Neither compound appreciably affected STAT1 or STAT5 DNA-binding activities, STAT3-independent gene transcription, or activation of a panel of oncogenic kinases in malignant cells. Each compound decreased the proliferation and viability of glioma, breast, and prostate cancer cells and v-Src-transformed murine fibroblasts harboring constitutively active STAT3. Further, in mouse xenograft models of glioma and breast cancer, administration of SH5-07 or SH4-54 effectively inhibited tumor growth. Our results offer preclinical proof of concept for SH5-07 and SH4-54 as candidates for further development as cancer therapeutics. PMID:26088127

  7. An attempt to theoretically predict third-phase formation in the dimethyldibutyltetradecylmalonamide (DMDBTDMA)/dodecane/water/nitric acid extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    LeFrancois, L.; Tondre, C.; Belnet, F.; Noel, D.

    1999-03-01

    The formation of a third phase in solvent extraction (due to splitting of the organic phase into two layers) often occurs when the aqueous phase is highly concentrated in acids. This has been reported with the extraction system dimethyldibutyltetradecylmalonamide (DMDBTDMA)/n-dodecane/water/nitric acid, both in the presence and absence of metal ions. Whereas many experimental efforts have been made to investigate the effects of different parameters on third-phase formation, very few attempts have been made to predict this phenomenon on theoretical grounds. Because the part played by aggregation of the extractant molecules is recognized, the authors propose a new predictive approach based on the use of the Flory-Huggins theory of polymer solutions, which had been successfully applied for the prediction of phase separation phenomena in nonionic surfactant solutions. The authors show that this model can provide an excellent prediction of the demixing curve (in the absence of metal ions) when establishing the relation between the interaction parameter {chi}{sub 12} calculated from this theory and the nitric acid content of the aqueous phase. Apparent values of the solubility parameter {delta}{sub 2} of the diamide extractant at different acid loadings have been calculated, from which the effect of the nature of the diluent can also be very nicely predicted.

  8. Suppression of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus by 2-Phenylethanol Is Associated with Stimulated Growth and Decreased Degradation of Branched-Chain Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Hua, Sui Sheng T; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L; Li, Robert W

    2015-10-01

    branched-chain amino acid degradation. Since secondary metabolism occurs after active growth has ceased, this growth stimulation resulted in suppression of expression of aflatoxin biosynthesis genes. On the other hand, increased activities in degradation pathways for branched-chain amino acids probably are required for the activation of the aflatoxin pathway by providing building blocks and energy regeneration. Metabolic flux in primary metabolism apparently has an important role in the expression of genes of secondary metabolism. PMID:26404375

  9. Suppression of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus by 2-Phenylethanol Is Associated with Stimulated Growth and Decreased Degradation of Branched-Chain Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Hua, Sui Sheng T.; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L.; Li, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    . Since secondary metabolism occurs after active growth has ceased, this growth stimulation resulted in suppression of expression of aflatoxin biosynthesis genes. On the other hand, increased activities in degradation pathways for branched-chain amino acids probably are required for the activation of the aflatoxin pathway by providing building blocks and energy regeneration. Metabolic flux in primary metabolism apparently has an important role in the expression of genes of secondary metabolism. PMID:26404375

  10. Suppression of 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase, Which Encodes a Key Enzyme in Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis, Alters Fruit Texture in Transgenic Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Ling; Ren, Jie; Cui, Mengmeng; Wang, Yanping; Ji, Kai; Li, Ping; Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Dai, Shengjie; Duan, Chaorui; Wu, Yan; Leng, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall catabolism during fruit ripening is under complex control and is key for fruit quality and shelf life. To examine the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening, we suppressed SlNCED1, which encodes 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ABA. To suppress SlNCED1 specifically in tomato fruits, and thus avoid the pleiotropic phenotypes associated with ABA deficiency, we used an RNA interference construct driven by the fruit-specific E8 promoter. ABA accumulation and SlNCED1 transcript levels in the transgenic fruit were down-regulated to between 20% and 50% of the levels measured in the control fruit. This significant reduction in NCED activity led to a down-regulation in the transcription of genes encoding major cell wall catabolic enzymes, specifically polygalacturonase (SlPG), pectin methyl esterase (SlPME), β-galactosidase precursor mRNA (SlTBG), xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (SlXET), endo-1,4-β-cellulose (SlCels), and expansin (SlExp). This resulted in an increased accumulation of pectin during ripening. In turn, this led to a significant extension of the shelf life to 15 to 29 d compared with a shelf life of only 7 d for the control fruit and an enhancement of fruit firmness at the mature stage by 30% to 45%. In conclusion, ABA affects cell wall catabolism during tomato fruit ripening via down-regulation of the expression of major catabolic genes (SlPG, SlPME, SlTBG, SlXET, SlCels, and SlExp). PMID:22108525

  11. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Minoru; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  13. Atorvastatin induces bile acid-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1 by suppressing FXR signaling in both liver and intestine in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Statins are effective cholesterol-lowering drugs to treat CVDs. Bile acids (BAs), the end products of cholesterol metabolism in the liver, are important nutrient and energy regulators. The present study aims to investigate how statins affect BA homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with atorvastatin (100 mg/kg/day po) for 1 week, followed by BA profiling by ultra-performance LC-MS/MS. Atorvastatin decreased BA pool size, mainly due to less BA in the intestine. Surprisingly, atorvastatin did not alter total BAs in the serum or liver. Atorvastatin increased the ratio of 12α-OH/non12α-OH BAs. Atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the BA-synthetic enzymes cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) (over 10-fold) and cytochrome P450 27a1, the BA uptake transporters Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1b2, and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in the liver. Noticeably, atorvastatin suppressed the expression of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) target genes, namely small heterodimer partner (liver) and fibroblast growth factor 15 (ileum). Furthermore, atorvastatin increased the mRNAs of the organic cation uptake transporter 1 and cholesterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 in the liver. The increased expression of BA-synthetic enzymes and BA transporters appear to be a compensatory response to maintain BA homeostasis after atorvastatin treatment. The Cyp7a1 induction by atorvastatin appears to be due to suppressed FXR signaling in both the liver and intestine. PMID:25278499

  14. Apo-10’-lycopenoic acid induces Nrf2-mediated expression of phase II antioxidant genes and suppresses H2O2 induced oxidative damage in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous study has demonstrated that apo-10’-lycopenoic acid (ALA), an enzymatic metabolite of lycopene, can suppress lung carcinogenesis in an animal model. However, the potential mechanism(s) underlying this protection is not well defined. It has been suggested that lycopene or its hydrophilic...

  15. Prediction of methane emission from lactating dairy cows using milk fatty acids and mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Gastelen, Sanne; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Enteric methane (CH4 ) production is among the main targets of greenhouse gas mitigation practices for the dairy industry. A simple, robust and inexpensive measurement technique applicable on a large scale to estimate CH4 emission from dairy cattle would therefore be valuable. Milk fatty acids (MFA) are related to CH4 production because of the common biochemical pathway between CH4 and fatty acids in the rumen. A summary of studies that investigated the predictive power of MFA composition for CH4 emission indicated good potential, with predictive power ranging between 47% and 95%. Until recently, gas chromatography (GC) was the principal method used to determine the MFA profile, but GC is unsuitable for routine analysis. This has led to the application of mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. The major advantages of using MIR spectroscopy to predict CH4 emission include its simplicity and potential practical application at large scale. Disadvantages include the inability to predict important MFA for CH4 prediction, and the moderate predictive power for CH4 emission. It may not be sufficient to predict CH4 emission based on MIR alone. Integration with other factors, like feed intake, nutrient composition of the feed, parity, and lactation stage may improve the prediction of CH4 emission using MIR spectra. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26996655

  16. The parasitic plant Cuscuta australis is highly insensitive to abscisic acid-induced suppression of hypocotyl elongation and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Sun, Guiling; Zhuang, Huifu; Li, Jian-Hong; Wu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Around 1% of angiosperms are parasitic plants. Their growth and development solely or partly depend on host plants from which they extract water, nutrients, and other molecules using a parasitic plant-specific organ, the haustorium. Strong depletion of nutrients can result in serious growth retardation and in some cases, death of the hosts. The genus Cuscuta (dodder) comprises about 200 holoparasitic species occurring on all continents. Their seedlings have no roots and cotyledons but are only string-like hypocotyls. When they contact suitable host plants, haustoria are formed and thereafter seedlings rapidly develop into vigorously growing branches without roots and leaves. This highly specialized lifestyle suggests that Cuscuta plants likely have unique physiology in development and stress responses. Using germination and seedling growth assays, we show that C. australis seeds and seedlings are highly insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA). Transcriptome analysis and protein sequence alignment with Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice homologs revealed that C. australis most likely consists of only four functional ABA receptors. Given that Cuscuta plants are no longer severely challenged by drought stress, we hypothesize that the ABA-mediated drought resistance pathway in Cuscuta spp. might have had degenerated over time during evolution. PMID:26258814

  17. Hyaluronic acid reagent functional chitosan-PEI conjugate with AQP2-siRNA suppressed endometriotic lesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-Dan; Cheng, Jin-Lin; Yan, Jing-Jing; Chen, Feng-Ying; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Sun, Dong-Li; Chen, Jian; Miao, Jing; Zhang, Run-Ju; Zheng, Cai-Hong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    To identify a new drug candidate for treating endometriosis which has fewer side effects, a new polymeric nanoparticle gene delivery system consisting of polyethylenimine-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (CSO-PEI) with hyaluronic acid (HA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed. There was no obvious difference in sizes observed between (CSO-PEI/siRNA)HA and CSO-PEI/siRNA, but the fluorescence accumulation in the endometriotic lesion was more significant for (CSO-PEI/siRNA)HA compared with CSO-PEI/siRNA due to the specific binding of HA to CD44. In addition, the (CSO-PEI/siRNA)HA nanoparticle gene therapy significantly decreased the endometriotic lesion sizes with atrophy and degeneration of the ectopic endometrium. The epithelial cells of ectopic endometrium from rat models of endometriosis showed a significantly lower CD44 expression than control after treatment with (CSO-PEI/siRNA)HA. Furthermore, observation under an electron microscope showed no obvious toxic effect on the reproductive organs. Therefore, (CSO-PEI/siRNA)HA gene delivery system can be used as an effective method for the treatment of endometriosis. PMID:27099493

  18. The Parasitic Plant Cuscuta australis Is Highly Insensitive to Abscisic Acid-Induced Suppression of Hypocotyl Elongation and Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Sun, Guiling; Zhuang, Huifu; Li, Jian-Hong; Wu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Around 1% of angiosperms are parasitic plants. Their growth and development solely or partly depend on host plants from which they extract water, nutrients, and other molecules using a parasitic plant-specific organ, the haustorium. Strong depletion of nutrients can result in serious growth retardation and in some cases, death of the hosts. The genus Cuscuta (dodder) comprises about 200 holoparasitic species occurring on all continents. Their seedlings have no roots and cotyledons but are only string-like hypocotyls. When they contact suitable host plants, haustoria are formed and thereafter seedlings rapidly develop into vigorously growing branches without roots and leaves. This highly specialized lifestyle suggests that Cuscuta plants likely have unique physiology in development and stress responses. Using germination and seedling growth assays, we show that C. australis seeds and seedlings are highly insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA). Transcriptome analysis and protein sequence alignment with Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice homologs revealed that C. australis most likely consists of only four functional ABA receptors. Given that Cuscuta plants are no longer severely challenged by drought stress, we hypothesize that the ABA-mediated drought resistance pathway in Cuscuta spp. might have had degenerated over time during evolution. PMID:26258814

  19. Spatial Patterns and Temperature Predictions of Tuna Fatty Acids: Tracing Essential Nutrients and Changes in Primary Producers.

    PubMed

    Pethybridge, Heidi R; Parrish, Christopher C; Morrongiello, John; Young, Jock W; Farley, Jessica H; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M; Nichols, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are among the least understood nutrients in marine environments, despite their profile as key energy components of food webs and that they are essential to all life forms. Presented here is a novel approach to predict the spatial-temporal distributions of fatty acids in marine resources using generalized additive mixed models. Fatty acid tracers (FAT) of key primary producers, nutritional condition indices and concentrations of two essential long-chain (≥C20) omega-3 fatty acids (EFA) measured in muscle of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, sampled in the south-west Pacific Ocean were response variables. Predictive variables were: location, time, sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (Chla), and phytoplankton biomass at time of catch and curved fork length. The best model fit for all fatty acid parameters included fish length and SST. The first oceanographic contour maps of EFA and FAT (FATscapes) were produced and demonstrated clear geographical gradients in the study region. Predicted changes in all fatty acid parameters reflected shifts in the size-structure of dominant primary producers. Model projections show that the supply and availability of EFA are likely to be negatively affected by increases in SST especially in temperate waters where a 12% reduction in both total fatty acid content and EFA proportions are predicted. Such changes will have large implications for the availability of energy and associated health benefits to high-order consumers. Results convey new concerns on impacts of projected climate change on fish-derived EFA in marine systems. PMID:26135308

  20. Spatial Patterns and Temperature Predictions of Tuna Fatty Acids: Tracing Essential Nutrients and Changes in Primary Producers

    PubMed Central

    Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Parrish, Christopher C.; Morrongiello, John; Young, Jock W.; Farley, Jessica H.; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are among the least understood nutrients in marine environments, despite their profile as key energy components of food webs and that they are essential to all life forms. Presented here is a novel approach to predict the spatial-temporal distributions of fatty acids in marine resources using generalized additive mixed models. Fatty acid tracers (FAT) of key primary producers, nutritional condition indices and concentrations of two essential long-chain (≥C20) omega-3 fatty acids (EFA) measured in muscle of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, sampled in the south-west Pacific Ocean were response variables. Predictive variables were: location, time, sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (Chla), and phytoplankton biomass at time of catch and curved fork length. The best model fit for all fatty acid parameters included fish length and SST. The first oceanographic contour maps of EFA and FAT (FATscapes) were produced and demonstrated clear geographical gradients in the study region. Predicted changes in all fatty acid parameters reflected shifts in the size-structure of dominant primary producers. Model projections show that the supply and availability of EFA are likely to be negatively affected by increases in SST especially in temperate waters where a 12% reduction in both total fatty acid content and EFA proportions are predicted. Such changes will have large implications for the availability of energy and associated health benefits to high-order consumers. Results convey new concerns on impacts of projected climate change on fish-derived EFA in marine systems. PMID:26135308

  1. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Declining of Circulating Proangiogenic Mononuclear Progenitor Cells in Chronic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Alexander E.; Kremzer, Alexander A.; Samura, Tatyana A.; Berezina, Tatyana A.; Martovitskaya, Yulia V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Serum uric acid (SUA) is considered a marker for natural progression of chronic heart failure (CHF) mediated cardiovascular remodelling. CHF associates with declining of circulating mononuclear progenitor cells (MPCs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the interrelationship between SUA concentrations and proangiogenic MPCs in ischemic CHF patients. Methods: The study population was structured retrospectively after determining the coronary artery disease (CAD) by contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography angiography in 126 subjects with symptomatic ischemic mild-to-severe CHF and 128 CAD subjects without CHF. Baseline biomarkers were measured in all patients. Cox proportional multivariate hazard ratio was calculated for predictors of MPCs declining in both CHF and non-CHF patient population predictors of MPCs declining in CHF subjects were examined in stepwise logistic regression. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices (IDI) and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results: Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratio analyses for CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs by SUA has shown that the higher quartiles (Q3 and Q4) of SUA compared to the lower quartiles (Q1 and Q2) are associated with increased risks of depletion of both CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. The addition of Q4 SUA to the ABC model improved the relative IDI by 13.8% for depletion of CD14+CD309+ MPCs and by 14.5% for depletion of CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. Conclusion: Circulating levels of proangiogenic MPCs are declined progressively depending on the levels of SUA in the HF subjects with CHF. We suggest that even mild elevations of SUA might be used to predict of relative depletion of proangiogenic MPCs among chronic HF patients. PMID:25320662

  2. 5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraynoic acid suppresses CCL2/MCP-1 expression in IFN-γ-stimulated astrocytes by increasing MAPK phosphatase-1 mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α activator, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), is an arachidonic acid analog. It is reported to inhibit up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes; however, its underlying mechanism of action is largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on the inhibitory action of ETYA on the expression of the chemokine, CCL2/MCP-1, which plays a key role in the initiation and progression of inflammation. Methods To determine the effect of ETYA, primary cultured rat astrocytes and microglia were stimulated with IFN-γ in the presence of ETYA and then, expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and MAPK phosphatase (MKP-1) were determined using RT-PCR and ELISA. MKP-1 mRNA stability was evaluated by treating actinomycin D. The effect of MKP-1 and human antigen R (HuR) was analyzed by using specific siRNA transfection system. The localization of HuR was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation experiment. Results We found that ETYA suppressed CCL2/MCP-1 transcription and secretion of CCL2/MCP-1 protein through up-regulation of MKP-1mRNA levels, resulting in suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and activator protein 1 (AP1) activity in IFN-γ-stimulated brain glial cells. Moreover, these effects of ETYA were independent of PPAR-α. Experiments using actinomycin D revealed that the ETYA-induced increase in MKP-1 mRNA levels reflected an increase in transcript stability. Knockdown experiments using small interfering RNA demonstrated that this increase in MKP-1 mRNA stability depended on HuR, an RNA-binding protein known to promote enhanced mRNA stability. Furthermore, ETYA-induced, HuR-mediated mRNA stabilization resulted from HuR-MKP-1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation, which served to protect MKP-1 mRNA from the mRNA degradation machinery. Conclusion ETYA induces MKP-1 through HuR at the post-transcriptional level in a receptor-independent manner. The mechanism revealed here suggests

  3. Ascorbic acid suppresses endotoxemia and NF-κB signaling cascade in alcoholic liver fibrosis in guinea pigs: A mechanistic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abhilash, P.A.; Harikrishnan, R.; Indira, M.

    2014-01-15

    Alcohol consumption increases the small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and intestinal permeability of endotoxin. The endotoxin mediated inflammatory signaling plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. We evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), silymarin and alcohol abstention on the alcohol induced endotoxemia and NF-κB activation cascade pathway in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Guinea pigs were administered ethanol at a daily dose of 4 g/kg b.wt for 90 days. After 90 days, ethanol administration was stopped. The ethanol treated animals were divided into abstention, silymarin (250 mg/kg b.wt) and AA (250 mg/kg b.wt) supplemented groups and maintained for 30 days. The SIBO, intestinal permeability and endotoxin were significantly increased in the ethanol group. The mRNA expressions of intestinal proteins claudin, occludin and zona occludens-1 were significantly decreased in ethanol group. The mRNA levels of inflammatory receptors, activity of IKKβ and the protein expressions of phospho-IκBα, NF-κB, TNF-α, TGF-β{sub 1} and IL-6 were also altered in ethanol group. The expressions of fibrosis markers α-SMA, α{sub 1} (I) collagen and sirius red staining in the liver revealed the induction of fibrosis. But the supplementation of AA could induce greater reduction of ethanol induced SIBO, intestinal barrier defects, NF-κB activation and liver fibrosis than silymarin. The possible mechanism may be the inhibitory effect of AA on SIBO, intestinal barrier defect and IKKβ, which decreased the activation of NF-κB and synthesis of cytokines. This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Alcohol increases intestinal bacterial overgrowth and permeability of endotoxin. • Endotoxin mediated inflammation plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. • Ascorbic acid reduces endotoxemia, NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokines. • AA's action is by inhibition of SIBO, IKKβ and alteration of

  4. Preparation of Oxaliplatin-Deoxycholic Acid Derivative Nanocomplexes and In Vivo Evaluation of Their Oral Absorption and Tumor Growth Suppression.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    To prepare orally available oxaliplatin (OXA), nanocomplexes were formed by ionic conjugation of OXA with the deoxycholic acid derivative, Nalpha-deoxycholy-L-lysyl-methylester (DCK), as an oral absorption enhancer. We characterized the DCK-conjugated OXA nanocomplexes by differential scanning calorimetry, particle size determination, and morphological analysis. To evaluate the effects of DCK on the intestinal permeability of OXA, we assessed the solubilities and partition coefficients of OXA and the OXA/DCK nanocomplex, and then conducted in vitro artificial intestinal membrane and Caco-2 cell permeability studies. Finally, bioavailability in rats and tumor growth inhibition in the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC7) model after oral administration of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex were investigated compared to pure OXA. Analysis of the ionic complex formation of OXA with DCK revealed that OXA existed in an amorphous form within the complex, resulting in for- mation of nanocomp;exes (35.05 +/- 4.48 nm in diameter). The solubility of OXA in water was approximately 7.07 mg/mL, whereas the water solubility of OXA/DCK was approximately 2.04 mg/mL and its partition coefficient was approximately 1.2-fold higher than that of OXA. The in vitro intestinal membrane permeability of OXA was significantly enhanced by complex formation with DCK. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed that the Cm value of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 3.18-fold higher than that of OXA (32.22 +/- 10.24 ng/mL), and the resulting oral bioavailability of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex was 39.3-fold more than that of OXA. Furthermore, the oral administration of OXA/DCK significantly inhibited tumor growth in SCC7-bearing mice, and maximally inhibited tumor volume by 54% compared to the control. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the OXA/DCK nanocomplex as an oral anti-cancer therapy because it improves the oral absorption of OXA, which may improve patient compliance and expand the therapeutic

  5. Biomarker-Based Calibration of Retrospective Exposure Predictions of Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estimated historical exposures and serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been extensively used in epidemiologic studies that examined associations between PFOA exposures and adverse health outcomes among residents in highly exposed areas in the Mid-Ohio Valley. Using measured serum PFOA levels in 2005–2006, we applied two calibration methods to these retrospective exposure predictions: (1) multiplicative calibration and (2) Bayesian pharmacokinetic calibration with larger adjustments to more recent exposure estimates and smaller adjustments to exposure estimates for years farther in the past. We conducted simulation studies of various hypothetical exposure scenarios and compared hypothetical true historical intake rates with estimates based on mis-specified baseline exposure and pharmacokinetic models to find the method with the least bias. The Bayesian method outperformed the multiplicative method if a change to bottled water consumption was not reported or if the half-life of PFOA was mis-specified. On the other hand, the multiplicative method outperformed the Bayesian method if actual tap water consumption rates were systematically overestimated. If tap water consumption rates gradually decreased over time because of substitution with bottled water or other liquids, neither method clearly outperformed another. Calibration of retrospective exposure estimates using recently collected biomarkers may help reduce uncertainties in environmental epidemiologic studies. PMID:24730513

  6. Prediction of Protein Submitochondrial Locations by Incorporating Dipeptide Composition into Chou's General Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Waris, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrion is the key organelle of eukaryotic cell, which provides energy for cellular activities. Submitochondrial locations of proteins play crucial role in understanding different biological processes such as energy metabolism, program cell death, and ionic homeostasis. Prediction of submitochondrial locations through conventional methods are expensive and time consuming because of the large number of protein sequences generated in the last few decades. Therefore, it is intensively desired to establish an automated model for identification of submitochondrial locations of proteins. In this regard, the current study is initiated to develop a fast, reliable, and accurate computational model. Various feature extraction methods such as dipeptide composition (DPC), Split Amino Acid Composition, and Composition and Translation were utilized. In order to overcome the issue of biasness, oversampling technique SMOTE was applied to balance the datasets. Several classification learners including K-Nearest Neighbor, Probabilistic Neural Network, and support vector machine (SVM) are used. Jackknife test is applied to assess the performance of classification algorithms using two benchmark datasets. Among various classification algorithms, SVM achieved the highest success rates in conjunction with the condensed feature space of DPC, which are 95.20 % accuracy on dataset SML3-317 and 95.11 % on dataset SML3-983. The empirical results revealed that our proposed model obtained the highest results so far in the literatures. It is anticipated that our proposed model might be useful for future studies. PMID:26746980

  7. Molecular dissection of valproic acid effects in acute myeloid leukemia identifies predictive networks.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Frank G; Lang, Katharina M; Fütterer, Markus; Komarica, Vladimir; Schmid, Mathias; Döhner, Hartmut; Schlenk, Richard F; Döhner, Konstanze; Knudsen, Steen; Bullinger, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) like valproic acid (VPA) display activity in leukemia models and induce tumor-selective cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts. As there are limited data on HDACIs effects, we aimed to dissect VPA effects in vitro using myeloid cell lines with the idea to integrate findings with in vivo data from AML patients treated with VPA additionally to intensive chemotherapy (n = 12). By gene expression profiling we identified an in vitro VPA response signature enriched for genes/pathways known to be implicated in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Following VPA treatment in vivo, gene expression changes in AML patients showed concordant results with the in vitro VPA response despite concomitant intensive chemotherapy. Comparative miRNA profiling revealed VPA-associated miRNA expression changes likely contributing to a VPA-induced reversion of deregulated gene expression. In addition, we were able to define markers predicting VPA response in vivo such as CXCR4 and LBH. These could be validated in an independent cohort of VPA and intensive chemotherapy treated AML patients (n = 114) in which they were inversely correlated with relapse-free survival. In summary, our data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of VPA in myeloid blasts, which might be useful in further advancing HDAC inhibition based treatment approaches in AML. PMID:27309669

  8. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cloned human and mouse preprocathepsin B cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S J; San Segundo, B; McCormick, M B; Steiner, D F

    1986-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a lysosomal thiol proteinase that may have additional extralysosomal functions. To further our investigations on the structure, mode of biosynthesis, and intracellular sorting of this enzyme, we have determined the complete coding sequences for human and mouse preprocathepsin B by using cDNA clones isolated from human hepatoma and kidney phage libraries. The nucleotide sequences predict that the primary structure of preprocathepsin B contains 339 amino acids organized as follows: a 17-residue NH2-terminal prepeptide sequence followed by a 62-residue propeptide region, 254 residues in mature (single chain) cathepsin B, and a 6-residue extension at the COOH terminus. A comparison of procathepsin B sequences from three species (human, mouse, and rat) reveals that the homology between the propeptides is relatively conserved with a minimum of 68% sequence identity. In particular, two conserved sequences in the propeptide that may be functionally significant include a potential glycosylation site and the presence of a single cysteine at position 59. Comparative analysis of the three sequences also suggests that processing of procathepsin B is a multistep process, during which enzymatically active intermediate forms may be generated. The availability of the cDNA clones will facilitate the identification of possible active or inactive intermediate processive forms as well as studies on the transcriptional regulation of the cathepsin B gene. PMID:3463996

  9. Prediction of uranium and technetium sorption during titration of contaminated acidic groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates uranium and technetium sorption onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of acidic groundwater. The contaminated groundwater exhibits oxic conditions with high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U, Tc, and various metal cations. More than 90% of U and Tc was removed from the aqueous phase as Al and Fe precipitated above pH 5.5, but was partially resolublized at higher pH values. An equilibrium hydrolysis and precipitation reaction model adequately described variations in aqueous concentrations of metal cations. An anion exchange reaction model was incorporated to simulate sulfate, U and Tc sorption onto variably charged (pH-dependent) Al and Fe hydroxides. Modeling results indicate that competitive sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases needs to be considered to adequately predict U and Tc mobility. The model could be useful for future studies of the speciation of U, Tc and co-existing ions during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  10. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  11. Thought suppression, impaired regulation of urges, and Addiction-Stroop predict affect-modulated cue-reactivity among alcohol dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Carter, Kristin; Ropes, Katie; Howard, Matthew O

    2012-01-01

    Abstinent alcohol dependent individuals commonly employ thought suppression to cope with stress and intrusive cognitions about alcohol. This strategy may inadvertently bias attention towards alcohol-related stimuli while depleting neurocognitive resources needed to regulate urges, manifested as decreased heart rate variability (HRV) responsivity to alcohol cues. The present study tested the hypothesis that trait and state thought suppression, impaired regulation of urges, and alcohol attentional bias as measured by the Addiction-Stroop would have significant effects on the HRV responsivity of 58 adults in residential treatment for alcohol dependence (mean age=39.6 ± 9.4, 81% female) who participated in an affect-modulated cue-reactivity protocol. Regression analyses controlling for age, level of pre-treatment alcohol consumption, and baseline HRV indicated that higher levels of trait thought suppression, impaired regulation of alcohol urges, and attentional fixation on alcohol cues were associated with lower HRV responsivity during stress-primed alcohol cue-exposure. Moreover, there was a significant state × trait suppression interaction on HRV cue-responsivity, such that alcohol dependent persons reporting high levels of state and trait suppression exhibited less HRV during cue-exposure than persons reporting low levels of state and trait suppression. Results suggest that chronic thought suppression taxes regulatory resources reflected in reduced HRV responsivity, an effect that is particularly evident when high trait suppressors engage in intensive suppression of drinking-related thoughts under conditions of stress. Treatment approaches that offer effective alternatives to the maladaptive strategy of suppressing alcohol urges may be crucial for relapse prevention. PMID:21967855

  12. Cilostazol suppresses β-amyloid production by activating a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 via the upregulation of SIRT1-coupled retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-11-01

    The accumulation of plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, results from the sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by activation of β- and γ-secretases. However, the production of Aβ can be avoided by alternate cleavage of APP by α-and γ-secretases. We hypothesized that cilostazol attenuates Aβ production by increasing a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10)/α-secretase activity via SIRT1-coupled retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ) activation in N2a cells expressing human APP Swedish mutation (N2aSwe). To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, the culture medium was switched from medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to medium containing 1% FBS, and cells were cultured for 3∼24 hr. After depletion of FBS in media, N2aSwe cells showed increased accumulations of full-length APP (FL-APP) and Aβ in a time-dependent manner (3-24 hr) in association with decreased ADAM10 protein expression. When pretreated with cilostazol (10-30 μM), FL-APP and Aβ levels were significantly reduced, and ADAM10 and α-secretase activities were restored. Furthermore, the effect of cilostazol on ADAM10 expression was antagonized by pretreating Rp-cAMPS and sirtinol and by SIRT1-gene silencing. In the N2aSwe cells overexpressing the SIRT1 gene, ADAM10, and sAPPα levels were significantly elevated. In addition, like all-trans retinoic acid, cilostazol enhanced the protein expressions of RARβ and ADAM10, and the cilostazol-stimulated ADAM10 elevation was significantly attenuated by LE135 (a RARβ inhibitor), sirtinol, and RARβ-gene silencing. In conclusion, cilostazol suppresses the accumulations of FL-APP and Aβ by activating ADAM10 via the upregulation of SIRT1-coupled RARβ. PMID:24903973

  13. Retinoic acid and sodium butyrate suppress the cardiac expression of hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory mediators in Npr1 gene-disrupted haplotype mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Umadevi; Kumar, Prerna; Mani, Indra; Chen, David; Kessler, Isaac; Periyasamy, Ramu; Raghavaraju, Giri; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the genetically determined differences in the natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) copies affecting the expression of cardiac hypertrophic markers, proinflammatory mediators, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in a gene-dose-dependent manner. We determined whether stimulation of Npr1 by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyric acid (SB) suppress the expression of cardiac disease markers. In the present study, we utilized Npr1 gene-disrupted heterozygous (Npr1(+/-), 1-copy), wild-type (Npr1(+/+), 2-copy), gene-duplicated (Npr1(++/+), 3-copy) mice, which were treated intraperitoneally with RA, SB, and a combination of RA/SB, a hybrid drug (HB) for 2 wk. Untreated 1-copy mice showed significantly increased heart weight-body weight (HW/BW) ratio, blood pressure, hypertrophic markers, including beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) and proto-oncogenes (c-fos and c-jun), proinflammatory mediator nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and MMPs (MMP-2, MMP-9) compared with 2-copy and 3-copy mice. The heterozygous (haplotype) 1-copy mice treated with RA, SB, or HB, exhibited significant reduction in the expression of β-MHC, c-fos, c-jun, NF-κB, MMP-2, and MMP-9. In drug-treated animals, the activity and expression levels of HDAC were significantly reduced and histone acetyltransferase activity and expression levels were increased. The drug treatments significantly increased the fractional shortening and reduced the systolic and diastolic parameters of the Npr1(+/-) mice hearts. Together, the present results demonstrate that a decreased Npr1 copy number enhanced the expression of hypertrophic markers, proinflammatory mediators, and MMPs, whereas an increased Npr1 repressed the cardiac disease markers in a gene-dose-dependent manner. PMID:27199456

  14. 12(S)-Hydroxyheptadeca-5Z,8E,10E-trienoic acid suppresses UV-induced IL-6 synthesis in keratinocytes, exerting an anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Ryu, Ho-Cheol; Ng, Yee Ching; Kim, Cheolmin; Wei, Jun-Dong; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2012-01-01

    12(S)-Hydroxyheptadeca-5Z,8E,10E-trienoic acid (12-HHT) is an enzymatic product of prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) derived from cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Despite the high level of 12-HHT present in tissues and bodily fluids, its precise function remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that 12-HHT treatment in HaCaT cells remarkably down-regulated the ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with cutaneous inflammation. In an approach to identify the down-stream signaling mechanism by which 12-HHT down-regulates UVB-induced IL-6 synthesis in keratinocytes, we observed that 12-HHT inhibits the UVB-stimulated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). In addition, we found that 12-HHT markedly up-regulates MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a critical negative regulator of p38 MAPK. When MKP-1 was suppressed by siRNA knock-down, the 12-HHT-mediated inhibitory effects on the UVB-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB, as well as the production of IL-6, were attenuated in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that 12-HHT exerts anti-inflammatory effect via up-regulation of MKP-1, which negatively regulates p38 MAPK and NF-κB, thus attenuating IL-6 production in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Considering the critical role of IL-6 in cutaneous inflammation, our findings provide the basis for the application of 12-HHT as a potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic agent in UV-induced skin diseases. PMID:22391335

  15. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4 (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.—Sasso, O., Migliore, M., Habrant, D., Armirotti, A., Albani, C., Summa, M., Moreno-Sanz, G., Scarpelli, R., Piomelli, D. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage. PMID:25757568

  16. Artificial Neural Network Prediction for Thermal Decomposition of Potassium Nitrate (KNO3) and Benzoic Acid (C6H5COOH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beken, Murat

    The aim of this work is to correlate the results of experimental data by using the differential thermal analysis (DTA) method and predictions of artificial neural networks (ANNs). Thermal decomposition of potassium nitrate (KNO3) and benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) have been analyzed by the simultaneous DTA method. Kinetic parameters (critical points, the change of enthalpy) have been investigated. A computer model, based on multilayer feed-forwarding back-propagation is used for the prediction of critical points, phase transitions of potassium nitrate (KNO3) and benzoic acid (C6H5COOH). As a result of our study, we conclude that the ANN model shows a considerably good result about the prediction of experimental data.

  17. Inhibition of Eph receptor A4 by 2,5-dimethylpyrrolyl benzoic acid suppresses human pancreatic cancer growing orthotopically in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hironobu; Nakamura, Toru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Hontani, Kouji; Inoko, Kazuho; Takahashi, Mizuna; Sato, Shoki; Abe, Hirotake; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Sato, Nagato; Hiraoka, Kei; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Ephrin receptor A4 (EphA4) is overexpressed in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and activate cell growth. Recent studies have identified small molecules that block EphA4. In this study, we investigated the correlation between EphA4 expression and the prognosis of patients with PDAC. We also examined the cytostatic efficacy of 2,5-dimethylpyrrolyl benzoic acid (compound 1), a small molecule that blocks EphA4, in PDAC cells. Overall survival of patients with EphA4 positivity was significantly shorter than that of patients with EphA4 negativity (P = 0.029). In addition, multivariate analysis revealed that EphA4 expression was an independent prognostic factor in PDAC patients (P = 0.039). Compound 1 showed a cytostatic efficacy in PDAC cells expressing EphA4 in vitro and in vivo. Our study indicated that compound 1 suppressed both EphA4 and Akt phosphorylations, and induced apoptosis in PDAC cells expressing EphA4. In conclusion,compound 1 has a high potential as a therapeutic agent for patients with PDAC. PMID:26516928

  18. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 suppresses cold thermogenesis by limiting the oxidation of lipid droplet-derived fatty acids in brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kosuke; LeClair, Katherine B.; Zhang, Yongzhao; Li, Yingxia; Ozdemir, Cafer; Krisko, Tibor I.; Hagen, Susan J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Banks, Alexander S.; Cohen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a central role in energy homeostasis. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 (Them1), a BAT-enriched long chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase, is upregulated by cold and downregulated by warm ambient temperatures. Them1−/− mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to diet-induced obesity and diabetes, but the mechanistic contribution of Them1 to the regulation of cold thermogenesis remains unknown. Methods Them1−/− and Them1+/+ mice were subjected to continuous metabolic monitoring to quantify the effects of ambient temperatures ranging from thermoneutrality (30 °C) to cold (4 °C) on energy expenditure, core body temperature, physical activity and food intake. The effects of Them1 expression on O2 consumption rates, thermogenic gene expression and lipolytic protein activation were determined ex vivo in BAT and in primary brown adipocytes. Results Them1 suppressed thermogenesis in mice even in the setting of ongoing cold exposure. Without affecting thermogenic gene transcription, Them1 reduced O2 consumption rates in both isolated BAT and primary brown adipocytes. This was attributable to decreased mitochondrial oxidation of endogenous but not exogenous fatty acids. Conclusions These results show that Them1 may act as a break on uncontrolled heat production and limit the extent of energy expenditure. Pharmacologic inhibition of Them1 could provide a targeted strategy for the management of metabolic disorders via activation of brown fat. PMID:27110486

  19. Chebulagic acid (CA) attenuates LPS-induced inflammation by suppressing NF-{kappa}B and MAPK activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D. Bharat; Reddanna, Pallu

    2009-03-27

    Chebulagic acid (CA), a natural anti-oxidant, showed potent anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7, a mouse macrophage cell line. These effects were exerted via inhibition of NO and PGE{sub 2} production and down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. CA inhibited NF-{kappa}B activation by LPS, and this was associated with the abrogation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation and subsequent decreases in nuclear p50 and p65 protein levels. Further, the phosphorylation of p38, ERK 1/2 and JNK in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was suppressed by CA in a concentration-dependent manner. LPS-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also effectively inhibited by CA. These results suggest that CA exerts anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and MAP kinase phosphorylation.

  20. Valproic Acid Enhances iPSC Induction From Human Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Through the Suppression of Reprogramming-Induced Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhai, Yingying; Yu, Dehai; Cui, Jiuwei; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Reprogramming of human somatic cells into pluripotent cells (iPSCs) by defined transcription factors is an extremely inefficient process. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) during reprogramming can improve the induction of iPSCs. To examine the specific mechanism underlying the role of VPA in reprogramming, we transfected human bone marrow-derived cells (HSC-J2 and HSC-L1) with lentiviruses carrying defined factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC, OSKM) in the presence of VPA. We found that, OSKM lentiviruses caused significant senescence in transfected cells. Administration of VPA, however, significantly suppressed this reprogramming-induced stress. Notably, VPA treatment improved cell proliferation in the early stages of reprogramming, and this was related to the down-regulation of the activated p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also released the G2/M phase blockade in lentivirus-transfected cells. This study demonstrates a new mechanistic role of the histone deacetylase inhibitor in enhancing the induction of pluripotency. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1719-1727, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26620855

  1. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabrina; Hendrikx, Tim; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Ozsvar-Kozma, Maria; Göderle, Laura; Mallat, Ziad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Nitschke, Lars; Binder, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G) is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells. PMID:26947073

  2. Anti-inflammatory roles of retinoic acid in rat brain astrocytes: Suppression of interferon-gamma-induced JAK/STAT phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Ji, Kyung-Ae; Jeon, Sae-Bom; Yang, Myung-Soon; Kim, Ho; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Shong, Minho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2005-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of retinoic acid (RA) has been investigated for several decades. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that 9-cis-RA (cRA) and all-trans-RA (tRA) inhibit interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced inflammatory responses in astrocytes. In primary cultured rat brain astrocytes and C6 astroglioma cells, both cRA and tRA decreased IFN-gamma-induced expression of interferon regulatory factor-1. Both RA isoforms also reduced IFN-gamma-induced activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, Janus kinase (JAK)1, and JAK2. This inhibitory effect was significant when cells were pre-treated with RA prior to IFN-gamma. Furthermore, the effect of pre-treated RA was abolished in the presence of cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for de novo protein synthesis. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), which are negative regulators of the JAK/STAT pathway, may be candidate mediators of the anti-inflammatory function of RA. Both cRA and tRA induced SOCS3 mRNA expression. These results suggest that RA induces an anti-inflammatory effect by suppressing the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in IFN-gamma-treated astrocytes. SOCS3 may be at least one of the mechanisms that mediate the anti-inflammatory roles of RA. PMID:15721283

  3. Identification of genes involved in indole-3-butyric acid-induced adventitious root formation in nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.) by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Chengcai; Ma, Chunlei; Zhang, Liqun; Gong, Wuyun; Wu, Liyun

    2013-02-10

    The plant hormone auxin plays a key role in adventitious rooting. To increase our understanding of genes involved in adventitious root formation, we identified transcripts differentially expressed in single nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 77 differentially expressed transcripts, including 70 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated sequences, were identified in tea cuttings under IBA treatment. Seven candidate transcripts were selected and analyzed for their response to IBA, and IAA by real time RT-PCR. All these transcripts were up regulated by at least two folds one day after IBA treatment. Meanwhile, IAA showed less positive effects on the expression of candidate transcripts. The full-length cDNA of a F-box/kelch gene was also isolated and found to be similar to a group of At1g23390 like genes. These unigenes provided a new source for mining genes related to adventitious root formation, which facilitate our understanding of relative fundamental metabolism. PMID:23201417

  4. Using the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition to predict protein solubility: an approach with entropies in information theory.

    PubMed

    Xiaohui, Niu; Nana, Li; Jingbo, Xia; Dingyan, Chen; Yuehua, Peng; Yang, Xiao; Weiquan, Wei; Dongming, Wang; Zengzhen, Wang

    2013-09-01

    Protein solubility plays a major role and has strong implication in the proteomics. Predicting the propensity of a protein to be soluble or to form inclusion body is a fundamental and not fairly resolved problem. In order to predict the protein solubility, almost 10,000 protein sequences were downloaded from NCBI. Then the sequences were eliminated for the high homologous similarity by CD-HIT. Thus, there were 5692 sequences remained. Based on protein sequences, amino acid and dipeptide compositions were generally extracted to predict protein solubility. In this study, the entropy in information theory was introduced as another predictive factor in the model. Experiments involving nine different feature vector combinations, including the above-mentioned three kinds of factors, were conducted with support vector machines (SVMs) as prediction engine. Each combination was evaluated by re-substitution test and 10-fold cross-validation test. According to the evaluation results, the accuracies and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) values were boosted by the introduction of the entropy. The best combination was the one with amino acid, dipeptide compositions and their entropies. Its accuracy reached 90.34% and Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) value was 0.7494 in re-substitution test, while 88.12% and 0.7945 respectively for 10-fold cross-validation. In conclusion, the introduction of the entropy significantly improved the performance of the predictive method. PMID:23524162

  5. Usefulness of mycophenolic acid monitoring with PETINIA for prediction of adverse events in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ham, Ji Yeon; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Huh, Seung; Kim, Chan-Duck; Won, Dong Il; Song, Kyung Eun; Cho, Jang-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Background Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is required to optimize the immunosuppressive effect and minimize toxicity. We validated a new particle-enhanced turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (PETINIA) for the determination of MPA levels and evaluated the relationship of MPA trough level with drug-related adverse events. Methods PETENIA and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to determine MPA concentrations from 54 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). Agreement between PETINIA and LC-MS results was assessed by Passing-Bablok regression and the Bland-Altman plot method. The association of adverse events with MPA trough level obtained by PETINIA was analyzed. Results PETINIA revealed a good agreement with the LC-MS; Regression analysis gave an equation of y = 1.27x - 0.12 (r(2) = 0.975, p < 0.001). PETINIA showed a systemic positive bias with a mean difference of 0.66 mg/L compared to LC-MS. However, the magnitude of the positive bias decreased to 0.44 mg/L within the therapeutic range of MPA. Multiple logistic regression showed that MPA trough level determined by PETINIA was an independent risk factor for adverse events (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.25-4.16, p = 0.007). MPA trough level predicted adverse events with a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 86.7% using a cut-off level of 5.25 mg/L. Conclusions Good correlation between the two methods indicates that PETINIA is an acceptable method for the monitoring of MPA therapeutic levels. Furthermore, MPA trough level obtained by PETINIA is a useful monitoring tool to minimize toxicity in KTRs. PMID:26981890

  6. Prediction of enzyme function based on 3D templates of evolutionarily important amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, David M; Ward, R Matthew; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kimmel, Marek; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Background Structural genomics projects such as the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) yield many new structures, but often these have no known molecular functions. One approach to recover this information is to use 3D templates – structure-function motifs that consist of a few functionally critical amino acids and may suggest functional similarity when geometrically matched to other structures. Since experimentally determined functional sites are not common enough to define 3D templates on a large scale, this work tests a computational strategy to select relevant residues for 3D templates. Results Based on evolutionary information and heuristics, an Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA) pipeline built templates for 98 enzymes, half taken from the PSI, and sought matches in a non-redundant structure database. On average each template matched 2.7 distinct proteins, of which 2.0 share the first three Enzyme Commission digits as the template's enzyme of origin. In many cases (61%) a single most likely function could be predicted as the annotation with the most matches, and in these cases such a plurality vote identified the correct function with 87% accuracy. ETA was also found to be complementary to sequence homology-based annotations. When matches are required to both geometrically match the 3D template and to be sequence homologs found by BLAST or PSI-BLAST, the annotation accuracy is greater than either method alone, especially in the region of lower sequence identity where homology-based annotations are least reliable. Conclusion These data suggest that knowledge of evolutionarily important residues improves functional annotation among distant enzyme homologs. Since, unlike other 3D template approaches, the ETA method bypasses the need for experimental knowledge of the catalytic mechanism, it should prove a useful, large scale, and general adjunct to combine with other methods to decipher protein function in the structural proteome. PMID:18190718

  7. Nucleic Acid Content in Crustacean Zooplankton: Bridging Metabolic and Stoichiometric Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Bullejos, Francisco José; Carrillo, Presentación; Gorokhova, Elena; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and stoichiometric theories of ecology have provided broad complementary principles to understand ecosystem processes across different levels of biological organization. We tested several of their cornerstone hypotheses by measuring the nucleic acid (NA) and phosphorus (P) content of crustacean zooplankton species in 22 high mountain lakes (Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees mountains, Spain). The P-allocation hypothesis (PAH) proposes that the genome size is smaller in cladocerans than in copepods as a result of selection for fast growth towards P-allocation from DNA to RNA under P limitation. Consistent with the PAH, the RNA:DNA ratio was >8-fold higher in cladocerans than in copepods, although ‘fast-growth’ cladocerans did not always exhibit higher RNA and lower DNA contents in comparison to ‘slow-growth’ copepods. We also showed strong associations among growth rate, RNA, and total P content supporting the growth rate hypothesis, which predicts that fast-growing organisms have high P content because of the preferential allocation to P-rich ribosomal RNA. In addition, we found that ontogenetic variability in NA content of the copepod Mixodiaptomus laciniatus (intra- and interstage variability) was comparable to the interspecific variability across other zooplankton species. Further, according to the metabolic theory of ecology, temperature should enhance growth rate and hence RNA demands. RNA content in zooplankton was correlated with temperature, but the relationships were nutrient-dependent, with a positive correlation in nutrient-rich ecosystems and a negative one in those with scarce nutrients. Overall our results illustrate the mechanistic connections among organismal NA content, growth rate, nutrients and temperature, contributing to the conceptual unification of metabolic and stoichiometric theories. PMID:24466118

  8. Prediction of protein subcellular localization by support vector machines using multi-scale energy and pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Shi, J-Y; Zhang, S-W; Pan, Q; Cheng, Y-M; Xie, J

    2007-07-01

    As more and more genomes have been discovered in recent years, there is an urgent need to develop a reliable method to predict the subcellular localization for the explosion of newly found proteins. However, many well-known prediction methods based on amino acid composition have problems utilizing the sequence-order information. Here, based on the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition (PseAA), a new feature extraction method, the multi-scale energy (MSE) approach, is introduced to incorporate the sequence-order information. First, a protein sequence was mapped to a digital signal using the amino acid index. Then, by wavelet transform, the mapped signal was broken down into several scales in which the energy factors were calculated and further formed into an MSE feature vector. Following this, combining this MSE feature vector with amino acid composition (AA), we constructed a series of MSEPseAA feature vectors to represent the protein subcellular localization sequences. Finally, according to a new kind of normalization approach, the MSEPseAA feature vectors were normalized to form the improved MSEPseAA vectors, named as IEPseAA. Using the technique of IEPseAA, C-support vector machine (C-SVM) and three multi-class SVMs strategies, quite promising results were obtained, indicating that MSE is quite effective in reflecting the sequence-order effects and might become a useful tool for predicting the other attributes of proteins as well. PMID:17235454

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides Developed Using an Amino Acid-Based Activity Prediction Method

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Xiaolu; Fan, Yingzi; He, Gu; Wan, Yang; Yu, Chaoheng; Tang, Jianying; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Pan, Ying; Liu, Yan; Lu, Lian

    2014-01-01

    To design and discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with high levels of antimicrobial activity, a number of machine-learning methods and prediction methods have been developed. Here, we present a new prediction method that can identify novel AMPs that are highly similar in sequence to known peptides but offer improved antimicrobial activity along with lower host cytotoxicity. Using previously generated AMP amino acid substitution data, we developed an amino acid activity contribution matrix that contained an activity contribution value for each amino acid in each position of the model peptide. A series of AMPs were designed with this method. After evaluating the antimicrobial activities of these novel AMPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, DP7 was chosen for further analysis. Compared to the parent peptide HH2, this novel AMP showed broad-spectrum, improved antimicrobial activity, and in a cytotoxicity assay it showed lower toxicity against human cells. The in vivo antimicrobial activity of DP7 was tested in a Staphylococcus aureus infection murine model. When inoculated and treated via intraperitoneal injection, DP7 reduced the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage solution. Electron microscope imaging and the results indicated disruption of the S. aureus outer membrane by DP7. Our new prediction method can therefore be employed to identify AMPs possessing minor amino acid differences with improved antimicrobial activities, potentially increasing the therapeutic agents available to combat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24982064

  10. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  11. Human β-D-3 Exacerbates MDA5 but Suppresses TLR3 Responses to the Viral Molecular Pattern Mimic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Fiona; MacPherson, Heather; Webb, Sheila; Kilanowski, Fiona; Lettice, Laura; McGlasson, Sarah L.; Wheeler, Ann P.; Chen, Valerie; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Melrose, Lauren; Davidson, Donald J.; Dorin, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic host defence peptide and is part of the innate immune response. HBD3 is present on a highly copy number variable block of six β-defensin genes, and increased copy number is associated with the autoimmune disease psoriasis. It is not known how this increase influences disease development, but psoriasis is a T cell-mediated disease and activation of the innate immune system is required for the initial trigger that leads to the amplification stage. We investigated the effect of hBD3 on the response of primary macrophages to various TLR agonists. HBD3 exacerbated the production of type I Interferon-β in response to the viral ligand mimic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) in both human and mouse primary cells, although production of the chemokine CXCL10 was suppressed. Compared to polyI:C alone, mice injected with both hBD3 peptide and polyI:C also showed an enhanced increase in Interferon-β. Mice expressing a transgene encoding hBD3 had elevated basal levels of Interferon-β, and challenge with polyI:C further increased this response. HBD3 peptide increased uptake of polyI:C by macrophages, however the cellular response and localisation of polyI:C in cells treated contemporaneously with hBD3 or cationic liposome differed. Immunohistochemistry showed that hBD3 and polyI:C do not co-localise, but in the presence of hBD3 less polyI:C localises to the early endosome. Using bone marrow derived macrophages from knockout mice we demonstrate that hBD3 suppresses the polyI:C-induced TLR3 response mediated by TICAM1 (TRIF), while exacerbating the cytoplasmic response through MDA5 (IFIH1) and MAVS (IPS1/CARDIF). Thus, hBD3, a highly copy number variable gene in human, influences cellular responses to the viral mimic polyI:C implying that copy number may have a significant phenotypic effect on the response to viral infection and development of autoimmunity in humans. PMID:26646717

  12. Human β-Defensin 3 [corrected] Exacerbates MDA5 but Suppresses TLR3 Responses to the Viral Molecular Pattern Mimic Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Semple, Fiona; MacPherson, Heather; Webb, Sheila; Kilanowski, Fiona; Lettice, Laura; McGlasson, Sarah L; Wheeler, Ann P; Chen, Valerie; Millhauser, Glenn L; Melrose, Lauren; Davidson, Donald J; Dorin, Julia R

    2015-12-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic host defence peptide and is part of the innate immune response. HBD3 is present on a highly copy number variable block of six β-defensin genes, and increased copy number is associated with the autoimmune disease psoriasis. It is not known how this increase influences disease development, but psoriasis is a T cell-mediated disease and activation of the innate immune system is required for the initial trigger that leads to the amplification stage. We investigated the effect of hBD3 on the response of primary macrophages to various TLR agonists. HBD3 exacerbated the production of type I Interferon-β in response to the viral ligand mimic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) in both human and mouse primary cells, although production of the chemokine CXCL10 was suppressed. Compared to polyI:C alone, mice injected with both hBD3 peptide and polyI:C also showed an enhanced increase in Interferon-β. Mice expressing a transgene encoding hBD3 had elevated basal levels of Interferon-β, and challenge with polyI:C further increased this response. HBD3 peptide increased uptake of polyI:C by macrophages, however the cellular response and localisation of polyI:C in cells treated contemporaneously with hBD3 or cationic liposome differed. Immunohistochemistry showed that hBD3 and polyI:C do not co-localise, but in the presence of hBD3 less polyI:C localises to the early endosome. Using bone marrow derived macrophages from knockout mice we demonstrate that hBD3 suppresses the polyI:C-induced TLR3 response mediated by TICAM1 (TRIF), while exacerbating the cytoplasmic response through MDA5 (IFIH1) and MAVS (IPS1/CARDIF). Thus, hBD3, a highly copy number variable gene in human, influences cellular responses to the viral mimic polyI:C implying that copy number may have a significant phenotypic effect on the response to viral infection and development of autoimmunity in humans. PMID:26646717

  13. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  14. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma. PMID:15154607

  15. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only.

    PubMed

    Nikita V, Dovidchenko; Oxana V, Galzitskaya

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  16. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only

    PubMed Central

    Dovidchenko, Nikita V; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  17. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4(+) T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Norris, Philip J; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L; Villacres, Maria C; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L; Gange, Stephen J; Nugent, C Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T; Keating, Sheila M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4(+) T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4(+) T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods.  A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results.  There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions.  These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  18. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  19. Protection against phalloidin-induced liver injury by oleanolic acid involves Nrf2 activation and suppression of Oatp1b2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie; Wu, Kai Connie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized pharmacological activation of Nrf2 with oleanolic acid (OA, 22.5 mg/kg, sc for 4d) and the genetic Nrf2 activation (Nrf2-null, wild-type, and Keap1-HKO mice) to examine the role of Nrf2 in protection against phalloidin hepatotoxicity. Mice were given phalloidin (1.5 mg/kg, ip for 8 h) to examine liver injury and the expression of toxicity-related genes. Phalloidin increased serum enzyme activities and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null and wild-type mice, but less injury was seen in Keap1-HKO mice and OA-pretreated mice. Phalloidin increased the expression of neutrophil-specific chemokine mKC and MIP-2 in Nrf2-null and WT mice, but such increases were attenuated in Keap1-HKO and OA-pretreated mice. Phalloidin increased, while Nrf2 activation attenuated, the expression of genes involved in acute-phase response (Ho-1) and DNA-damage response genes (Gadd45 and Chop10). Phalloidin is taken up by hepatocytes through Oatp1b2, but there was no difference in basal and phalloidin-induced Oatp1b2 expression among Nrf2-null, wild-type, and Keap1-HKO mice. In contrast, OA decreased phalloidin-induced Oatp1b2. Phalloidin activated MAPK signaling (p-JNK), which was attenuated by activation of Nrf2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that protection against phalloidin hepatotoxicity by OA involves activation of Nrf2 and suppression of Oatp1b2. PMID:25280775

  20. DNA polymerase-mediated synthesis of unbiased threose nucleic acid (TNA) polymers requires 7-deazaguanine to suppress G:G mispairing during TNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Matthew R; Larsen, Andrew C; Zahurancik, Walter J; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Meyers, Madeline; Suo, Zucai; Chaput, John C

    2015-04-01

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an unnatural genetic polymer capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution to generate folded molecules with ligand-binding activity. This property, coupled with a nuclease-resistant backbone, makes TNA an attractive candidate for future applications in biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that an engineered form of the Archaean replicative DNA polymerase 9°N, known commercially as Therminator DNA polymerase, can copy a three-letter genetic alphabet (A,T,C) from DNA into TNA. However, our ability to transcribe four-nucleotide libraries has been limited by chain termination events that prevent the synthesis of full-length TNA products. Here, we show that chain termination is caused by tG:dG mispairing in the enzyme active site. We demonstrate that the unnatural base analogue 7-deazaguanine (7dG) will suppress tGTP misincorporation by inhibiting the formation of Hoogsteen tG:dG base pairs. DNA templates that contain 7dG in place of natural dG residues replicate with high efficiency and >99% overall fidelity. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements indicate that the rate of tCTP incorporation is 5-fold higher opposite 7dG than dG and only slightly lower than dCTP incorporation opposite either 7dG or dG. These results provide a chemical solution to the problem of how to synthesize large, unbiased pools of TNA molecules by polymerase-mediated synthesis. PMID:25785966

  1. In vitro and in vivo downregulation of C3 by lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 suppressed cytokine-mediated complement system activation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Boram; Kim, Hye Rim; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is one of the proteins associated with complement cascades. C3 plays an essential role in three different pathways-the alternative, classical and lectin pathways. It is well known that cytokines activate complement system and increase complement component C3 production. In the current study, we found that lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 (pLTA) inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-mediated C3 mRNA and protein expression in HaCaT cells. pLTA inhibited C3 expression through the inhibition of the phosphorylation of p65 and p38 in the TNF-α-treated cells, while the inhibition of STAT1/2 and JAK2 phosphorylation by pLTA contributed to the reduction of C3 in IFN-γ-treated cells. When mice were pre-injected with pLTA followed by re-injection of TNF-α, serum C3 level was decreased as compared to TNF-α-injected only. Further studies revealed that membrane attack complex (MAC) increased by TNF-α injection was lessened in pLTA-pre-injected mice. A bactericidal assay using mouse sera showed that MAC activity in pLTA-pre-injected mice was lower than in TNF-α only-injected mice. These results suggest that pLTA can suppress inflammatory cytokine-mediated complement activation through the inhibition of C3 synthesis. pLTA application has the potential to alleviate complement-mediated diseases caused by excessive inflammation. PMID:27231239

  2. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Analysis of Genes Regulated by Application of Exogenous Abscisic Acid in Pepper Plant (Capsicum annuum L.) Leaves under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen-Hui; Yin, Yan-Xu; Li, Da-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major factors limiting pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) production during winter and early spring in non-tropical regions. Application of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) effectively alleviates the symptoms of chilling injury, such as wilting and formation of necrotic lesions on pepper leaves; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. The aim of this study was to identify genes that are differentially up- or downregulated in ABA-pretreated hot pepper seedlings incubated at 6°C for 48 h, using a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. A total of 235 high-quality ESTs were isolated, clustered and assembled into a collection of 73 unigenes including 18 contigs and 55 singletons. A total of 37 unigenes (50.68%) showed similarities to genes with known functions in the non-redundant database; the other 36 unigenes (49.32%) showed low similarities or unknown functions. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the 37 unigenes could be classified into nine functional categories. The expression profiles of 18 selected genes were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR; the expression levels of 10 of these genes were at least two-fold higher in the ABA-pretreated seedlings under chilling stress than water-pretreated (control) plants under chilling stress. In contrast, the other eight genes were downregulated in ABA-pretreated seedlings under chilling stress, with expression levels that were one-third or less of the levels observed in control seedlings under chilling stress. These results suggest that ABA can positively and negatively regulate genes in pepper plants under chilling stress. PMID:23825555

  3. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis in Association with Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Hiromi; Yanai, Ryoji; Yoshimura, Takeru; Nagai, Tomohiko; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sobrin, Lucia; Connor, Kip M.; Sakoda, Yukimi; Tamada, Koji; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2015-01-01

    Omega (ω)–3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators and thereby contribute to the regulation of inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) is a well-established animal model of autoimmune retinal inflammation. To investigate the potential effects of dietary intake of ω-3 LCPUFAs on uveitis, we examined the anti-inflammatory properties of these molecules in comparison with ω-6 LCPUFAs in a mouse EAU model. C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing ω-3 LCPUFAs or ω-6 LCPUFAs for 2 weeks before as well as after the induction of EAU by subcutaneous injection of a fragment of human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein emulsified with complete Freund’s adjuvant. Both clinical and histological scores for uveitis were smaller for mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs than for those fed ω-6 LCPUFAs. The concentrations of the T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine interferon-γ and the Th17 cytokine interleukin-17 in intraocular fluid as well as the production of these cytokines by lymph node cells were reduced for mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs. Furthermore, the amounts of mRNAs for the Th1- and Th17-related transcription factors T-bet and RORγt, respectively, were reduced both in the retina and in lymph node cells of mice fed ω-3 LCPUFAs. Our results thus show that a diet enriched in ω-3 LCPUFAs suppressed uveitis in mice in association with inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cell function. PMID:26393358

  4. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D; Campbell, Latoya E; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F; Coletta, Dawn K; Roust, Lori R; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = - 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  5. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D.; Campbell, Latoya E.; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Roust, Lori R.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Carroll, Chad C.; Katsanos, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = – 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  6. Accurate prediction of the toxicity of benzoic acid compounds in mice via oral without using any computer codes.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Gharagheizi, Farhad; Shokrolahi, Arash; Zakinejad, Sajjad

    2012-10-30

    Most of benzoic acid derivatives are toxic, which may cause serious public health and environmental problems. Two novel simple and reliable models are introduced for desk calculations of the toxicity of benzoic acid compounds in mice via oral LD(50) with more reliance on their answers as one could attach to the more complex outputs. They require only elemental composition and molecular fragments without using any computer codes. The first model is based on only the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms, which can be improved by several molecular fragments in the second model. For 57 benzoic compounds, where the computed results of quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) were recently reported, the predicted results of two simple models of present method are more reliable than QSTR computations. The present simple method is also tested with further 324 benzoic acid compounds including complex molecular structures, which confirm good forecasting ability of the second model. PMID:22959133

  7. Anacardic acid (6-nonadecyl salicylic acid), an inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses expression of nuclear factor-κB–regulated gene products involved in cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and inflammation through inhibition of the inhibitory subunit of nuclear factor-κBα kinase, leading to potentiation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bokyung; Pandey, Manoj K.; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Yi, Tingfang; Chaturvedi, Madan M.; Liu, Mingyao

    2008-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid) is derived from traditional medicinal plants, such as cashew nuts, and has been linked to anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and radiosensitization activities through a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Because of the role of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in these cellular responses, we postulated that anacardic acid might interfere with this pathway. We found that this salicylic acid potentiated the apoptosis induced by cytokine and chemotherapeutic agents, which correlated with the down-regulation of various gene products that mediate proliferation (cyclin D1 and cyclooxygenase-2), survival (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cFLIP, cIAP-1, and survivin), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), all known to be regulated by the NF-κB. We found that anacardic acid inhibited both inducible and constitutive NF-κB activation; suppressed the activation of IκBα kinase that led to abrogation of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα; inhibited acetylation and nuclear translocation of p65; and suppressed NF-κB–dependent reporter gene expression. Down-regulation of the p300 histone acetyltransferase gene by RNA interference abrogated the effect of anacardic acid on NF-κB suppression, suggesting the critical role of this enzyme. Overall, our results demonstrate a novel role for anacardic acid in potentially preventing or treating cancer through modulation of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:18349320

  8. Prediction of bulk milk fatty acid composition based on farming practices collected through on-farm surveys.

    PubMed

    Coppa, M; Ferlay, A; Chassaing, C; Agabriel, C; Glasser, F; Chilliard, Y; Borreani, G; Barcarolo, R; Baars, T; Kusche, D; Harstad, O M; Verbič, J; Golecký, J; Martin, B

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the fatty acid (FA) composition of bulk milk using data describing farming practices collected via on-farm surveys. The FA composition of 1,248 bulk cow milk samples and the related farming practices were collected from 20 experiments led in 10 different European countries at 44°N to 60°N latitude and sea level to 2,000 m altitude. Farming practice-based FA predictions [coefficient of determination (R(2)) >0.50] were good for C16:0, C17:0, saturated FA, polyunsaturated FA, and odd-chain FA, and very good (R(2) ≥0.60) for trans-11 C18:1, trans-10 + trans-11 C18:1, cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid, total trans FA, C18:3n-3, n-6:n-3 ratio, and branched-chain FA. Fatty acids were predicted by cow diet composition and by the altitude at which milk was produced, whereas animal-related factors (i.e., lactation stage, breed, milk yield, and proportion of primiparous cows in the herd) were not significant in any of the models. Proportion of fresh herbage in the cow diet was the main predictor, with the highest effect in almost all FA models. However, models built solely on conserved forage-derived samples gave good predictions for odd-chain FA, branched-chain FA, trans-10 C18:1 and C18:3n-3 (R(2) ≥0.46, 0.54, 0.52, and 0.70, respectively). These prediction models could offer farmers a valuable tool to help improve the nutritional quality of the milk they produce. PMID:23664341

  9. Predicting the Sorption of Aromatic Acids to Noncarbonized and Carbonized Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo; Kah, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Approaches based on the octanol-water partition coefficient are commonly used to describe sorption of neutral organic compounds in environmental systems, but they are not suitable for organic acids, which can dissociate to form anions. We here investigate the applicability of an alternative approach based on the pH-dependent distribution ratio (DOW) to describe sorption of aromatic acids to sorbents representing different degrees of carbonization. Sorption isotherms for four structurally similar acids ((2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D), 4-chloro-2-15 methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)butanoic16 acid (2,4-DB), and 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol (triclosan)) were measured for 15 sorbents: fresh and carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes, and activated carbon. Dissociation greatly affected the sorption of all acids. Sorption coefficients measured in the high pH range indicated that sorption of the anions ranged over several orders of magnitude and should not be neglected. Sorption trends for all sorbates and carbonized sorbents could be very well described by a single regression equation that included DOW of the sorbate and the specific surface area of the sorbent (R(2) > 0.89). PMID:26949216

  10. Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Predict Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinny-Köster, Benedict; Bartels, Michael; Becker, Susen; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in amino acid metabolism. In former studies, a ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (Fischer’s ratio) revealed associations with hepatic encephalopathy. Furthermore, low concentrations of branched-chain amino acids were linked to sarcopenia in literature. Encephalopathy and sarcopenia are known to dramatically worsen the prognosis. Aim of this study was to investigate a complex panel of plasma amino acids in the context of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods 166 patients evaluated for orthotopic liver transplantation were included. 19 amino acids were measured from citrated plasma samples using mass spectrometry. We performed survival analysis for plasma amino acid constellations and examined the relationship to established mortality predictors. Results 33/166 (19.9%) patients died during follow-up. Lower values of valine (p<0.001), Fischer’s ratio (p<0.001) and valine to phenylalanine ratio (p<0.001) and higher values of phenylalanine (p<0.05) and tyrosine (p<0.05) were significantly associated with mortality. When divided in three groups, the tertiles discriminated cumulative survival for valine (p = 0.016), phenylalanine (p = 0.024) and in particular for valine to phenylalanine ratio (p = 0.003) and Fischer’s ratio (p = 0.005). Parameters were also significantly correlated with MELD and MELD-Na score. Conclusions Amino acids in plasma are valuable biomarkers to determine increased risk of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. In particular, valine concentrations and constellations composed of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were strongly associated with prognosis. Due to their pathophysiological importance, the identified amino acids could be used to examine individual dietary recommendations to serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27410482

  11. Prediction of intramuscular fat content and major fatty acid groups of lamb M. longissimus lumborum using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephanie M; Ponnampalam, Eric N; Schmidt, Heinar; Wynn, Peter; Hopkins, David L

    2015-12-01

    A hand held Raman spectroscopic device was used to predict intramuscular fat (IMF) levels and the major fatty acid (FA) groups of fresh intact ovine M. longissimus lumborum (LL). IMF levels were determined using the Soxhlet method, while FA analysis was conducted using a rapid (KOH in water, methanol and sulphuric acid in water) extraction procedure. IMF levels and FA values were regressed against Raman spectra using partial least squares regression and against each other using linear regression. The results indicate that there is potential to predict PUFA (R(2)=0.93) and MUFA (R(2)=0.54) as well as SFA values that had been adjusted for IMF content (R(2)=0.54). However, this potential was significantly reduced when correlations between predicted and observed values were determined by cross validation (R(2)cv=0.21-0.00). Overall, the prediction of major FA groups using Raman spectra was more precise (relative reductions in error of 0.3-40.8%) compared to the null models. PMID:26188359

  12. Using increment of diversity to predict mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite: integrating pseudo-amino acid composition and structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Li; Li, Qian-Zhong; Zhang, Li-Qing

    2012-04-01

    Due to the complexity of Plasmodium falciparum (PF) genome, predicting mitochondrial proteins of PF is more difficult than other species. In this study, using the n-peptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) obtained from structural alphabet named Protein Blocks as feature parameter, the increment of diversity (ID) is firstly developed to predict mitochondrial proteins. By choosing the 1-peptide compositions on the N-terminal regions with 20 residues as the only input vector, the prediction performance achieves 86.86% accuracy with 0.69 Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) by the jackknife test. Moreover, by combining with the hydropathy distribution along protein sequence and several reduced amino acid alphabets, we achieved maximum MCC 0.82 with accuracy 92% in the jackknife test by using the developed ID model. When evaluating on an independent dataset our method performs better than existing methods. The results indicate that the ID is a simple and efficient prediction method for mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite. PMID:21191803

  13. Protein stability: a single recorded mutation aids in predicting the effects of other mutations in the same amino acid site

    PubMed Central

    Wainreb, Gilad; Wolf, Lior; Ashkenazy, Haim; Dehouck, Yves; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate prediction of protein stability is important for understanding the molecular underpinnings of diseases and for the design of new proteins. We introduce a novel approach for the prediction of changes in protein stability that arise from a single-site amino acid substitution; the approach uses available data on mutations occurring in the same position and in other positions. Our algorithm, named Pro-Maya (Protein Mutant stAbilitY Analyzer), combines a collaborative filtering baseline model, Random Forests regression and a diverse set of features. Pro-Maya predicts the stability free energy difference of mutant versus wild type, denoted as ΔΔG. Results: We evaluated our algorithm extensively using cross-validation on two previously utilized datasets of single amino acid mutations and a (third) validation set. The results indicate that using known ΔΔG values of mutations at the query position improves the accuracy of ΔΔG predictions for other mutations in that position. The accuracy of our predictions in such cases significantly surpasses that of similar methods, achieving, e.g. a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.79 and a root mean square error of 0.96 on the validation set. Because Pro-Maya uses a diverse set of features, including predictions using two other methods, it also performs slightly better than other methods in the absence of additional experimental data on the query positions. Availability: Pro-Maya is freely available via web server at http://bental.tau.ac.il/ProMaya. Contact: nirb@tauex.tau.ac.il; wolf@cs.tau.ac.il Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21998155

  14. Evaluation of equations predicting the net portal appearance of amino acid nitrogen in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Martineau, R; Côrtes, C; Ortigues-Marty, I; Ouellet, D R; Lapierre, H

    2014-03-01

    A better assessment of digestible protein and AA flows is required to improve the predictions of animal performance in ruminants (e.g., growth and yields of milk and milk protein). In that respect, 2 recent meta-analyses were conducted in our laboratory to establish the relationships between net portal appearance of AA nitrogen (NPA-AAN) and dietary characteristics either from the National Research Council (Washington, DC) or Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA; St Genès Champanelle, France). Three prediction equations were selected from these meta-analyses: one equation based only on N intake (NI) and 2 equations based on NI, the intake of neutral detergent fiber, plus the dietary concentration of either total digestible nutrients or digestible organic matter. In the current meta-analysis, 2 new equations were developed to predict NPA-AAN from the estimated supply of metabolizable protein (MP) and the protein truly digestible in the intestine (PDI). The reliability of these 5 equations to predict NPA-AAN was evaluated using an independent database. On average, NPA-AAN predictions based on the supply of MP or PDI had the highest coefficient of determination and the lowest root of mean square prediction error and mean and regression biases compared with predictions based on dietary characteristics, suggesting better reliability with the former. No major difference was detected between NPA-AAN predictions based on parameters from the National Research Council or INRA, except that predictions based on MP had the lowest mean and regression biases. In each equation, mean of residual NPA-AAN (observed NPA-AAN minus predicted values) was lowest and negative for sheep compared with dairy cows, suggesting that NPA-AAN were overpredicted in sheep. Many continuous variables biased NPA-AAN predictions based on NI only, but none of the tested variables biased the predictions based on the supply of MP or PDI, corroborating the better reliability for the

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon reaction rates with peroxy-acid treatment: prediction of reactivity using local ionization potential.

    PubMed

    Shoulder, J M; Alderman, N S; Breneman, C M; Nyman, M C

    2013-08-01

    Property-Encoded Surface Translator (PEST) descriptors were found to be correlated with the degradation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the peroxy-acid process. Reaction rate constants (k) in hr(-1) for nine PAHs (acenaphthene, anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) were determined by a peroxy-acid treatment method that utilized acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and a sulphuric acid catalyst to degrade the polyaromatic structures. Molecular properties of the selected nine PAHs were derived from structures optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) and HF/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Properties of adiabatic and vertical ionization potential (IP), highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO), HOMO/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap energies and HOMO/singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) gap energies were not correlated with rates of peroxy-acid reaction. PEST descriptors were calculated from B3LYP/6-31G(d) optimized structures and found to have significant levels of correlation with k. PIP Min described the minimum local IP on the surface of the molecule and was found to be related to k. PEST technology appears to be an accurate method in predicting reactivity and could prove to be a valuable asset in building treatment models and in remediation design for PAHs and other organic contaminants in the environment. PMID:23734862

  16. Climate warming is predicted to reduce omega-3, long-chain, polyunsaturated fatty acid production in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Arts, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    Phytoplankton are the main source of energy and omega-3 (n-3) long-chain essential fatty acids (EFA) in aquatic ecosystems. Their growth and biochemical composition are affected by surrounding environmental conditions, including temperature, which continues to increase as a result of climate warming. Increasing water temperatures may negatively impact the production of EFA by phytoplankton through the process of homeoviscous adaptation. To investigate this, we conducted an exploratory data synthesis with 952 fatty acid (FA) profiles from six major groups of marine and freshwater phytoplankton. Temperature was strongly correlated with a decrease in the proportion of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated FA (LC-PUFA) and an increase in omega-6 FA and saturated FA. Based on linear regression models, we predict that global n-3 LC-PUFA production will be reduced by 8.2% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 27.8% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with an increase in water temperature of 2.5 °C. Using a previously published estimate of the global production of EPA by diatoms, which contribute to most of the world's supply of EPA, we predict a loss of 14.2 Mt of EPA annually as a result of ocean warming. The n-3 LC-PUFA are vitally important for an array of key physiological functions in aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and these FA are mainly produced by phytoplankton. Therefore, reduced production of these EFA, as a consequence of climate warming, is predicted to negatively affect species that depend on these compounds for optimum physiological function. Such profound changes in the biochemical composition of phytoplankton cell membranes can lead to cascading effects throughout the world's ecosystems. PMID:27070119

  17. Effect of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Administration on the Residual Virus Pool in a Model of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy-Mediated Suppression in SIVmac239-Infected Indian Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M.; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K.; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Quiñones, Octavio A.; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I.; Wai, John S.; Tan, Christopher M.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J.; Piatak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4+ T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches. PMID:25182644

  18. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  19. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  20. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems. PMID:26197108

  1. Use of Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Remedial Options for an Acid Mine Drainage Stream, With Emphasis on Prediction Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, R. L.; Kimball, B. A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in Southwestern Colorado, drains a sub-alpine watershed with numerous abandoned mines. A synoptic study conducted in 1999 indicates that the Mineral Creek watershed contributes 60% of the observed copper load for the Upper Animas River. In addition, zinc concentrations observed during the 1999 study exceed toxicity standards along the entire length of Mineral Creek. Given these findings, Mineral Creek is the potential site of future remedial actions to improve stream-water quality. Using the 1999 data, a reactive transport model was used to predict the effects of a small treatment system that neutralizes acidic inflow waters. Model application indicates that the treatment system would significantly improve water quality, producing higher pH values and lower dissolved metal concentrations downstream. Despite this progress, the results of model application may be of limited use for planning remediation, due to the potential uncertainty of model predictions (e.g. errors in the characterization of hydrologic and geochemical processes). An additional study was therefore conducted in 2005 to develop estimates of prediction uncertainty. The 2005 study implemented a paired-synoptic approach in which two synoptics were conducted under similar hydrologic conditions. The first synoptic was similar to the 1999 study in that the overall goal was to characterize stream-water quality under existing (acidic) conditions. The second synoptic study was conducted during a continuous sodium hydroxide injection that was designed to mimic a small treatment system. As in the initial model application, data collected under existing conditions (synoptic 1) will be used to calibrate the reactive transport model. Model inputs will then be modified to reflect the effects of treatment, and predictions of post-remediation water quality will be obtained by model application. The results of this application will then be compared to data from the post

  2. Amino acid residue doublet propensity in the protein-RNA interface and its application to RNA interface prediction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oanh T P; Yura, Kei; Go, Nobuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play essential roles in a number of regulatory mechanisms for gene expression such as RNA splicing, transport, translation and post-transcriptional control. As the number of available protein-RNA complex 3D structures has increased, it is now possible to statistically examine protein-RNA interactions based on 3D structures. We performed computational analyses of 86 representative protein-RNA complexes retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Interface residue propensity, a measure of the relative importance of different amino acid residues in the RNA interface, was calculated for each amino acid residue type (residue singlet interface propensity). In addition to the residue singlet propensity, we introduce a new residue-based propensity, which gives a measure of residue pairing preferences in the RNA interface of a protein (residue doublet interface propensity). The residue doublet interface propensity contains much more information than the sum of two singlet propensities alone. The prediction of the RNA interface using the two types of propensities plus a position-specific multiple sequence profile can achieve a specificity of about 80%. The prediction method was then applied to the 3D structure of two mRNA export factors, TAP (Mex67) and UAP56 (Sub2). The prediction enables us to point out candidate RNA interfaces, part of which are consistent with previous experimental studies and may contribute to elucidation of atomic mechanisms of mRNA export. PMID:17130160

  3. Review of nucleic acid amplification tests and clinical prediction rules for diagnosis of tuberculosis in acute care facilities.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Amit S; Davis, J Lucian; Schecter, Gisela F; Barry, Pennan M; Flood, Jennifer M

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important cause of hospitalization and mortality in the United States. Prevention of TB transmission in acute care facilities relies on prompt identification and implementation of airborne isolation, rapid diagnosis, and treatment of presumptive pulmonary TB patients. In areas with low TB burden, this strategy may result in inefficient utilization of airborne infection isolation rooms (AIIRs). We reviewed TB epidemiology and diagnostic approaches to inform optimal TB detection in low-burden settings. Published clinical prediction rules for individual studies have a sensitivity ranging from 81% to 100% and specificity ranging from 14% to 63% for detection of culture-positive pulmonary TB patients admitted to acute care facilities. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have a specificity of >98%, and the sensitivity of NAATs varies by acid-fast bacilli sputum smear status (positive smear, ≥95%; negative smear, 50%-70%). We propose an infection prevention strategy using a clinical prediction rule to identify patients who warrant diagnostic evaluation for TB in an AIIR with an NAAT. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether use of clinical prediction rules and NAATs results in optimized utilization of AIIRs and improved detection and treatment of presumptive pulmonary TB patients. PMID:26166303

  4. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  5. Predicting cellulose solvating capabilities of acid-base conjugate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Arno; King, Alistair W T; Mutikainen, Ilpo; Hummel, Michael; Selg, Christoph; Hauru, Lauri K J; Sixta, Herbert; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka

    2013-11-01

    Different acid-base conjugates were made by combining a range of bases and superbases with acetic and propionic acid. Only the combinations that contained superbases were capable of dissolving cellulose. Proton affinities were calculated for the bases. A range, within which cellulose dissolution occurred, when combined with acetic or propionic acid, was defined for further use. This was above a proton affinity value of about 240 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2/6-311+G(d,p)//MP2/ 6-311+G(d,p) ab initio level. Understanding dissolution allowed us to determine that cation acidity contributed considerably to the ability of ionic liquids to dissolve cellulose and not just the basicity of the anion. By XRD analyses of suitable crystals, hydrogen bonding interactions between anion and cation were found to be the dominant interactions in the crystalline state. From determination of viscosities of these conjugates over a temperature range, certain structures were found to have as low a viscosity as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, which was reflected in their high rate of cellulose dissolution but not necessarily the quantitative solubility of cellulose in those ionic liquids. 1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate, which is one of the best structures for cellulose dissolution, was then distilled using laboratory equipment to demonstrate its recyclability. PMID:24106149

  6. PREDICTING THE PRECIPITATION OF ACID AND DIRECT DYES IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple screening test was used to determine whether acid and direct dyes precipitate at calcium concentrations typical of hard waters in the Southeastern Piedmont region of the United States. f 52 dyes tested, only three direct dyes (Direct Black 19, Direct Black 22, and Direct...

  7. Prediction of preweaning ADG in beef calves from milk fatty acid methyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown milk yield (MWT) has an important influence on calf preweaning ADG (PRWADG), but MWT accounts for only a moderate amount of variation in PRWADG. The objective of this study was to determine if milk fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), alone and in combination with MWT, could improve a...

  8. SubMito-PSPCP: Predicting Protein Submitochondrial Locations by Hybridizing Positional Specific Physicochemical Properties with Pseudoamino Acid Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Knowing the submitochondrial location of a mitochondrial protein is an important step in understanding its function. We developed a new method for predicting protein submitochondrial locations by introducing a new concept: positional specific physicochemical properties. With the framework of general form pseudoamino acid compositions, our method used only about 100 features to represent protein sequences, which is much simpler than the existing methods. On the dataset of SubMito, our method achieved over 93% overall accuracy, with 98.60% for inner membrane, 93.90% for matrix, and 70.70% for outer membrane, which are comparable to all state-of-the-art methods. As our method can be used as a general method to upgrade all pseudoamino-acid-composition-based methods, it should be very useful in future studies. We implement our method as an online service: SubMito-PSPCP. PMID:24027753

  9. pKa prediction for acidic phosphorus-containing compounds using multiple linear regression with computational descriptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donghai; Du, Ruobing; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2016-07-01

    Ninety-six acidic phosphorus-containing molecules with pKa 1.88 to 6.26 were collected and divided into training and test sets by random sampling. Structural parameters were obtained by density functional theory calculation of the molecules. The relationship between the experimental pKa values and structural parameters was obtained by multiple linear regression fitting for the training set, and tested with the test set; the R(2) values were 0.974 and 0.966 for the training and test sets, respectively. This regression equation, which quantitatively describes the influence of structural parameters on pKa , and can be used to predict pKa values of similar structures, is significant for the design of new acidic phosphorus-containing extractants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218266

  10. Established dietary estimates of net acid production do not predict measured net acid excretion in patients with Type 2 diabetes on Paleolithic-Hunter-Gatherer-type diets

    PubMed Central

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Shi, Lijie; Schloetter, Monique; Sebastian, Anthony; Remer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Formulas developed to estimate diet-dependent net acid excretion (NAE) generally agree with measured values for typical Western diets. Whether they can also appropriately predict NAE for "Paleolithic-type" (Paleo) diets – which contain very high amounts of fruits and vegetables (F&V) and concurrent high amounts of protein is unknown. Here we compare measured NAEs with established NAE-estimates in subjects with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Thirteen subjects with well controlled T2D were randomized to either a Paleo or American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet for 14 days. 24-hour urine collections were performed at baseline and end of the diet period, and analyzed for titratable acid, bicarbonate, and ammonium to calculate measured NAE. Three formulas for estimating NAE from dietary intake were used; two (NAE_diet R or L) that include dietary mineral intake and sulfate- and organic acid (OA) production, and one that is empirically-derived (NAE_diet F) only considering potassium and protein intake. Results Measured NAE on the Paleo diet was significantly lower than on the ADA diet (+31±22 vs. 112±52 mEq/day, p=0.002). Although all formula estimates showed similar and reasonable correlations (r=0.52–0.76) with measured NAE, each one underestimated measured values. The formula with the best correlation did not contain an estimate of dietary organic acid production. Conclusions Paleo diets are lower in NAE than typical Western diets. However, commonly used formulas clearly underestimate NAE, especially for diets with very high F&V (as the Paleo diet), and in subjects with T2D. This may be due to an inappropriate estimation of proton loads stemming from OAs, underlining the necessity for improved measures of OA-related proton sources. PMID:23859996

  11. Characterization, performance, and prediction of a lead-acid battery under simulated electric vehicle driving requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.; Bozek, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A state-of-the-art 6-V battery module in current use by the electric vehicle industry was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine its performance characteristics under the SAE J227a driving schedules B, C, and D. The primary objective of the tests was to determine the effects of periods of recuperation and long and short periods of electrical regeneration in improving the performance of the battery module and hence extendng the vehicle range. A secondary objective was to formulate a computer program that would predict the performance of this battery module for the above driving schedules. The results show excellent correlation between the laboratory tests and predicted results. The predicted performance compared with laboratory tests was within +2.4 to -3.7 percent for the D schedule, +0.5 to -7.1 percent for the C schedule, and better than -11.4 percent for the B schedule.

  12. Characterization, performance, and prediction of a lead-acid battery under simulated electric vehicle driving requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.; Bozek, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    A state-of-the-art 6-V battery module in current use by the electric vehicle industry was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine its performance characteristics under the SAE J227a driving schedules B, C, and D. The primary objective of the tests was to determine the effects of periods of recuperation and long and short periods of electrical regeneration in improving the performance of the battery module and hence extendng the vehicle range. A secondary objective was to formulate a computer program that would predict the performance of this battery module for the above driving schedules. The results show excellent correlation between the laboratory tests and predicted results. The predicted performance compared with laboratory tests was within +2.4 to -3.7 percent for the D schedule, +0.5 to -7.1 percent for the C schedule, and better than -11.4 percent for the B schedule.

  13. In vitro and in vivo studies on adlay-derived seed extracts: phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, serum uric acid suppression, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mouming; Zhu, Dashuai; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Xiao; Dong, Yi

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polished adlay, brown adlay, adlay bran, and adlay hull to prevent and treat hyperuricemia. Brown adlay extract effectively decreased the serum uric acid levels of oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Free and bound phenolic extracts from these materials contained significant amounts of phenolics, with free phenolics dominated by chlorogenic acid and p-coumaric acid while bound phenolics dominated by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Free and bound phenolics of adlay bran exhibited significant xanthine oxidase inhibition activities, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, oxygen radical absorbance capacities, and superoxide radical scavenging activities. Adlay bran phenolics could be effective xanthine oxidase inhibitors and radical scavengers. p-Coumaric acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with strong superoxide radical scavenging activity. However, ferulic acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with weak superoxide radical scavenging activity. Chlorogenic acid is a superoxide radical scavenger with weak xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. PMID:25029106

  14. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  15. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  16. CE-PLoc: an ensemble classifier for predicting protein subcellular locations by fusing different modes of pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifullah; Majid, Abdul; Hayat, Maqsood

    2011-08-10

    Precise information about protein locations in a cell facilitates in the understanding of the function of a protein and its interaction in the cellular environment. This information further helps in the study of the specific metabolic pathways and other biological processes. We propose an ensemble approach called "CE-PLoc" for predicting subcellular locations based on fusion of individual classifiers. The proposed approach utilizes features obtained from both dipeptide composition (DC) and amphiphilic pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) based feature extraction strategies. Different feature spaces are obtained by varying the dimensionality using PseAAC for a selected base learner. The performance of the individual learning mechanisms such as support vector machine, nearest neighbor, probabilistic neural network, covariant discriminant, which are trained using PseAAC based features is first analyzed. Classifiers are developed using same learning mechanism but trained on PseAAC based feature spaces of varying dimensions. These classifiers are combined through voting strategy and an improvement in prediction performance is achieved. Prediction performance is further enhanced by developing CE-PLoc through the combination of different learning mechanisms trained on both DC based feature space and PseAAC based feature spaces of varying dimensions. The predictive performance of proposed CE-PLoc is evaluated for two benchmark datasets of protein subcellular locations using accuracy, MCC, and Q-statistics. Using the jackknife test, prediction accuracies of 81.47 and 83.99% are obtained for 12 and 14 subcellular locations datasets, respectively. In case of independent dataset test, prediction accuracies are 87.04 and 87.33% for 12 and 14 class datasets, respectively. PMID:21864791

  17. Predicting lipase types by improved Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Ya; Li, Hong-Chun; Gao, Jia-Qiang; Fang, Bai-Shan

    2008-01-01

    By proposing a improved Chou's pseudo amino acid composition approach to extract the features of the sequences, a powerful predictor based on k-nearest neighbor was introduced to identify the types of lipases according to their sequences. To avoid redundancy and bias, demonstrations were performed on a dataset where none of the proteins has > or =25% sequence identity to any other. The overall success rate thus obtained by the 10-fold cross-validation test was over 90%, indicating that the improved Chou's pseudo amino acid composition might be a useful tool for extracting the features of protein sequences, or at lease can play a complementary role to many of the other existing approaches. PMID:19075826

  18. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  19. Predicting the Types of J-Proteins Using Clustered Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pengmian; Zuo, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    J-proteins are molecular chaperones and present in a wide variety of organisms from prokaryote to eukaryote. Based on their domain organizations, J-proteins can be classified into 4 types, that is, Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV. Different types of J-proteins play distinct roles in influencing cancer properties and cell death. Thus, reliably annotating the types of J-proteins is essential to better understand their molecular functions. In the present work, a support vector machine based method was developed to identify the types of J-proteins using the tripeptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet. In the jackknife cross-validation, the maximum overall accuracy of 94% was achieved on a stringent benchmark dataset. We also analyzed the amino acid compositions by using analysis of variance and found the distinct distributions of amino acids in each family of the J-proteins. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the proposed model, an online web server was developed and can be freely accessed. PMID:24804260

  20. Downregulation of NO and PGE2 in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by trans-isoferulic acid via suppression of PI3K/Akt-dependent NF-κB and activation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1.

    PubMed

    Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Kang, Chang-Hee; Park, Sang Rul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Choi, Il-Whan; Hyun, Jin-Won; Chang, Weon-Young; Kim, Yeon-Su; Lee, Hak-Ju; Kim, Gi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about whether trans-isoferulic acid (TIA) regulates the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, we examined the effect of TIA isolated from Clematis mandshurica on LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in BV2 microglial cells. We found that TIA inhibited the production of LPS-induced NO and PGE2 without accompanying cytotoxicity in BV2 microglial cells. TIA also downregulated the expression levels of specific regulatory genes such as inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by suppressing LPS-induced NF-κB activity via dephosphorylation of PI3K/Akt. In addition, we demonstrated that a specific NF-κB inhibitor PDTC and a selective PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY294002 effectively attenuated the expression of LPS-stimulated iNOS and COX-2 mRNA, while LY294002 suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activity, suggesting that TIA attenuates the expression of these proinflammatory genes by suppressing PI3K/Akt-mediated NF-κB activity. Our results showed that TIA suppressed NO and PGE2 production through the induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Taken together, our data indicate that TIA suppresses the production of proinflammatory mediators such as NO and PGE2, as well as their regulatory genes, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells, by inhibiting PI3K/Akt-dependent NF-κB activity and enhancing Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. PMID:24291391

  1. Measures of site resourcing predict virologic suppression, immunologic response and HIV disease progression following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD)

    PubMed Central

    Oyomopito, R; Lee, MP; Phanuphak, P; Lim, PL; Ditangco, R; Zhou, J; Sirisanthana, T; Chen, YMA; Pujari, S; Kumarasamy, N; Sungkanuparph, S; Lee, CKC; Kamarulzaman, A; Oka, S; Zhang, FJ; Mean, CV; Merati, T; Tau, G; Smith, J; Li, PCK

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Surrogate markers of HIV disease progression are HIV RNA in plasma viral load (VL) and CD4 cell count (immune function). Despite improved international access to antiretrovirals, surrogate marker diagnostics are not routinely available in resource-limited settings. Therefore, the objective was to assess effects of economic and diagnostic resourcing on patient treatment outcomes. Methods Analyses were based on 2333 patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) from 2000 onwards. Sites were categorized by World Bank country income criteria (high/low) and annual frequency of VL (≥ 3, 1–2 or <1) or CD4 (≥ 3 or <3) testing. Endpoints were time to AIDS/death and change in CD4 cell count and VL suppression (<400 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL) at 12 months. Demographics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification, baseline VL/CD4 cell counts, hepatitis B/C coinfections and HAART regimen were covariates. Time to AIDS/death was analysed by proportional hazards models. CD4 and VL endpoints were analysed using linear and logistic regression, respectively. Results Increased disease progression was associated with site-reported VL testing less than once per year [hazard ratio (HR)=1.4; P=0.032], severely symptomatic HIV infection (HR=1.4; P=0.003) and hepatitis C virus coinfection (HR=1.8; P=0.011). A total of 1120 patients (48.2%) had change in CD4 cell count data. Smaller increases were associated with older age (P<0.001) and `Other' HIV source exposures, including injecting drug use and blood products (P=0.043). A total of 785 patients (33.7%) contributed to the VL suppression analyses. Patients from sites with VL testing less than once per year [odds ratio (OR)=0.30; P<0.001] and reporting `Other' HIV exposures experienced reduced suppression (OR=0.28; P<0.001). Conclusion Low measures of site resourcing were associated with less favourable patient outcomes, including a 35% increase in disease progression in patients from sites

  2. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S.

    2015-09-22

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. The isomerization suppression agent is phosphorous acid, a phosphorous acid ester, phosphinic acid, a phosphinic acid ester or combinations thereof. Methods of refining natural oils are described.

  3. Retrospective Exposure Estimation and Predicted versus Observed Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid Concentrations for Participants in the C8 Health Project

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Verónica M.; Ryan, P. Barry; Steenland, Kyle; Bartell, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People living or working in eastern Ohio and western West Virginia have been exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) released by DuPont Washington Works facilities. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate historical PFOA exposures and serum concentrations experienced by 45,276 non-occupationally exposed participants in the C8 Health Project who consented to share their residential histories and a 2005–2006 serum PFOA measurement. Methods: We estimated annual PFOA exposure rates for each individual based on predicted calibrated water concentrations and predicted air concentrations using an environmental fate and transport model, individual residential histories, and maps of public water supply networks. We coupled individual exposure estimates with a one-compartment absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) model to estimate time-dependent serum concentrations. Results: For all participants (n = 45,276), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 14.2 and 24.3 ppb, respectively [Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (rs) = 0.67]. For participants who provided daily public well water consumption rate and who had the same residence and workplace in one of six municipal water districts for 5 years before the serum sample (n = 1,074), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 32.2 and 40.0 ppb, respectively (rs = 0.82). Conclusions: Serum PFOA concentrations predicted by linked exposure and ADME models correlated well with observed 2005–2006 human serum concentrations for C8 Health Project participants. These individualized retrospective exposure and serum estimates are being used in a variety of epidemiologic studies being conducted in this region. PMID:21813367

  4. Using acid insoluble ash marker ratios (diet:digesta) to predict digestibility of wheat and barley metabolizable energy and nitrogen retention in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Scott, T A; Hall, J W

    1998-05-01

    Routine bioassay measurements of AME or N retention of broiler diets require measurements of gross energy (GE) or N and an acid insoluble ash marker in diet, excreta, or ileal digesta. These measurements of GE and N are time-consuming and expensive in comparison to measurements of added or natural occurring levels of acid insoluble ash. Data from bioassay measurements of AME and N retention of 138 wheat and 97 barley samples (with or without enzyme) were used to develop prediction equations relying on measurements of one that uses acid insoluble ash of diet, excreta or ileal digesta and GE and N of diet only; and a second equation using only acid insoluble ash of diet, excreta, or ileal digesta. The prediction equations demonstrate that part of or all of routine bomb calorimetry measurements for GE used to determine AME of wheat- or barley-based diets could be eliminated if a prediction error of 80 kcal/kg ME or less were acceptable. The prediction of N retention as compared to AME, based in part or totally on acid insoluble ash measurements, was less accurate; the prediction errors were equal to 2.3 and 6.5% for wheat- and barley-based diets, respectively. Ongoing research to improve the determination (speed, ease, and accuracy) of acid insoluble ash could provide a useful method to assess feeding value of ingredients and commercial poultry diets. PMID:9603354

  5. Prediction of posttranslational modification sites from amino acid sequences with kernel methods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yongcui; Tian, Yingjie; Shao, Xiaojian; Wu, Ling-Yun; Deng, Naiyang

    2014-03-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is the chemical modification of a protein after its translation and one of the later steps in protein biosynthesis for many proteins. It plays an important role which modifies the end product of gene expression and contributes to biological processes and diseased conditions. However, the experimental methods for identifying PTM sites are both costly and time-consuming. Hence computational methods are highly desired. In this work, a novel encoding method PSPM (position-specific propensity matrices) is developed. Then a support vector machine (SVM) with the kernel matrix computed by PSPM is applied to predict the PTM sites. The experimental results indicate that the performance of new method is better or comparable with the existing methods. Therefore, the new method is a useful computational resource for the identification of PTM sites. A unified standalone software PTMPred is developed. It can be used to predict all types of PTM sites if the user provides the training datasets. The software can be freely downloaded from http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/PTMPred. PMID:24291233

  6. Anti-androgens act jointly in suppressing spiggin concentrations in androgen-primed female three-spined sticklebacks - prediction of combined effects by concentration addition.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, T G; Katsiadaki, I; Jolly, C; Sanders, M; Mayer, I; Scott, A P; Morris, S; Kortenkamp, A; Scholze, M

    2013-09-15

    Increasing attention is being directed at the role played by anti-androgenic chemicals in endocrine disruption of wildlife within the aquatic environment. The co-occurrence of multiple contaminants with anti-androgenic activity highlights a need for the predictive assessment of combined effects, but information about anti-androgen mixture effects on wildlife is lacking. This study evaluated the suitability of the androgenised female stickleback screen (AFSS), in which inhibition of androgen-induced spiggin production provides a quantitative assessment of anti-androgenic activity, for predicting the effect of a four component mixture of anti-androgens. The anti-androgenic activity of four known anti-androgens (vinclozolin, fenitrothion, flutamide, linuron) was evaluated from individual concentration-response data and used to design a mixture containing each chemical at equipotent concentrations. Across a 100-fold concentration range, a concentration addition approach was used to predict the response of fish to the mixture. Two studies were conducted independently at each of two laboratories. By using a novel method to adjust for differences between nominal and measured concentrations, good agreement was obtained between the actual outcome of the mixture exposure and the predicted outcome. This demonstrated for the first time that androgen receptor antagonists act in concert in an additive fashion in fish and that existing mixture methodology is effective in predicting the outcome, based on concentration-response data for individual chemicals. The sensitivity range of the AFSS assay lies within the range of anti-androgenicity reported in rivers across many locations internationally. The approach taken in our study lays the foundations for understanding how androgen receptor antagonists work together in fish and is essential in informing risk assessment methods for complex anti-androgenic mixtures in the aquatic environment. PMID:23792627

  7. Predicting protein-RNA interaction amino acids using random forest based on submodularity subset selection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Lin; Fan, Yong-Xian; Yan, Junchi

    2014-11-13

    Protein-RNA interaction plays a very crucial role in many biological processes, such as protein synthesis, transcription and post-transcription of gene expression and pathogenesis of disease. Especially RNAs always function through binding to proteins. Identification of binding interface region is especially useful for cellular pathways analysis and drug design. In this study, we proposed a novel approach for binding sites identification in proteins, which not only integrates local features and global features from protein sequence directly, but also constructed a balanced training dataset using sub-sampling based on submodularity subset selection. Firstly we extracted local features and global features from protein sequence, such as evolution information and molecule weight. Secondly, the number of non-interaction sites is much more than interaction sites, which leads to a sample imbalance problem, and hence biased machine learning model with preference to non-interaction sites. To better resolve this problem, instead of previous randomly sub-sampling over-represented non-interaction sites, a novel sampling approach based on submodularity subset selection was employed, which can select more representative data subset. Finally random forest were trained on optimally selected training subsets to predict interaction sites. Our result showed that our proposed method is very promising for predicting protein-RNA interaction residues, it achieved an accuracy of 0.863, which is better than other state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, it also indicated the extracted global features have very strong discriminate ability for identifying interaction residues from random forest feature importance analysis. PMID:25462339

  8. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase–Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions

    PubMed Central

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A.; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate–active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  9. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    PubMed

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  10. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  11. Overexpression of fatty acid synthase predicts a poor prognosis for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    DUAN, JIANGMAN; SUN, LI; HUANG, HONGXIANG; WU, ZHENZHEN; WANG, LIN; LIAO, WANGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a lipogenic multi-enzyme complex, is reported to be overexpressed in various types of of tumor tissues and serves an important role in tumor development and progression. However, the expression of FASN and its possible role in gastric cancer (GC) remains to be defined. In the present study, FASN expression in a group sample of 167 GC tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and its correlation with clinicopathological features was analyzed. By clinical analysis, it was identified that FASN overexpression was positively correlated with the overall survival [P=0.008; hazard ratio (HR), 4.412; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.463–13.305] and recurrence rate (P=0.014; HR, 1.705; 95% CI, 1.116–2.606) in patients with GC. In addition, expression of the FASN protein in GC tissues was correlated with age (P=0.032), clinical stage (P<0.001), gastric wall invasion (P=0.014), lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) and distant metastasis (P<0.001), however not with gender (P>0.05). In addition, FASN was observed to be overexpressed in GC tissues at an mRNA and protein level, compared with the adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P<0.05). Taken together, it was suggested that FASN was closely associated with GC metastasis and survival, which further provided evidence that FASN may be a promising prognostic biomarker for patients with GC. PMID:26936091

  12. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  13. Suppression of lithium chloride-induced conditioned gaping (a model of nausea-induced behaviour) in rats (using the taste reactivity test) with metoclopramide is enhanced by cannabidiolic acid.

    PubMed

    Rock, E M; Parker, L A

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to determine the potential of various doses of metoclopramide (MCP, a dopamine antagonist) to reduce lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping (a nausea-induced behaviour) in rats, using the taste reactivity test. We then evaluated whether an ineffective low dose of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA, 0.1 μg/kg, Rock and Parker, 2013), the potent acidic precursor of cannabidiol (CBD, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis) could enhance the anti-nausea effects of an ineffective low dose of MCP. MCP (3.0 mg/kg) reduced conditioned gaping responses. Coadministration of ineffective doses of MCP (0.3 mg/kg) and CBDA (0.1 μg/kg) enhanced the suppression of conditioned gaping, over that of either drug alone, without interfering with conditioned taste avoidance. MCP dose-dependently reduced nausea-induced conditioned gaping in rats. As well, the suppression of conditioned gaping was enhanced when ineffective doses of MCP and CBDA were coadministered. These data suggest that CBDA could be a powerful adjunct treatment to anti-emetic regimens for chemotherapy-induced nausea. PMID:24012649

  14. Improving amino-acid identification, fit and C(alpha) prediction using the Simplex method in automated model building.

    PubMed

    Romo, Tod D; Sacchettini, James C; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2006-11-01

    Automated methods for protein model building in X-ray crystallography typically use a two-phased approach that involves first modeling the protein backbone followed by building in the side chains. The latter phase requires the identification of the amino-acid side-chain type as well as fitting of the side-chain model into the observed electron density. While mistakes in identification of individual side chains are common for a number of reasons, sequence alignment can sometimes be used to correct errors by mapping fragments into the true (expected) amino-acid sequence and exploiting contiguity constraints among neighbors. However, side chains cannot always be confidently aligned; this depends on having sufficient accuracy in the initial calls. The recognition of amino-acid side-chains based on the surrounding pattern of electron density, whether by features, density correlation or free atoms, can be sensitive to inaccuracies in the coordinates of the predicted backbone C(alpha) atoms to which they are anchored. By incorporating a Nelder-Mead Simplex search into the side-chain identification and model-building routines of TEXTAL, it is demonstrated that this form of residue-by-residue rigid-body real-space refinement (in which the C(alpha) itself is allowed to shift) can improve the initial accuracy of side-chain selection by over 25% on average (from 25% average identity to 32% on a test set of five representative proteins, without corrections by sequence alignment). This improvement in amino-acid selection accuracy in TEXTAL is often sufficient to bring the pairwise amino-acid identity of chains in the model out of the so-called ;twilight zone' for sequence-alignment methods. When coupled with sequence alignment, use of the Simplex search yielded improvements in side-chain accuracy on average by over 13 percentage points (from 64 to 77%) and up to 38 percentage points (from 40 to 78%) in one case compared with using sequence alignment alone. PMID:17057345

  15. Coulomb explosion in dicationic noble gas clusters: A genetic algorithm-based approach to critical size estimation for the suppression of Coulomb explosion and prediction of dissociation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Subhajit; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a genetic algorithm based investigation of structural fragmentation in dicationic noble gas clusters, Arn+2, Krn+2, and Xen+2, where n denotes the size of the cluster. Dications are predicted to be stable above a threshold size of the cluster when positive charges are assumed to remain localized on two noble gas atoms and the Lennard-Jones potential along with bare Coulomb and ion-induced dipole interactions are taken into account for describing the potential energy surface. Our cutoff values are close to those obtained experimentally [P. Scheier and T. D. Mark, J. Chem. Phys. 11, 3056 (1987)] and theoretically [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 194 (1982)]. When the charges are allowed to be equally distributed over four noble gas atoms in the cluster and the nonpolarization interaction terms are allowed to remain unchanged, our method successfully identifies the size threshold for stability as well as the nature of the channels of dissociation as function of cluster size. In Arn2+, for example, fissionlike fragmentation is predicted for n =55 while for n =43, the predicted outcome is nonfission fragmentation in complete agreement with earlier work [Golberg et al., J. Chem. Phys. 100, 8277 (1994)].

  16. The ups and downs of J/psi suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-10-17

    An overview of the present status of J/psi suppression in pA and nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented. In both cases, model predictions are summarized and compared to the data. The ''anomalous'' J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions is discussed in some detail. Predictions are also shown for quarkonium suppression at collider energies.

  17. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  18. Urinary N-methylnicotinamide and β-aminoisobutyric acid predict catch-up growth in undernourished Brazilian children

    PubMed Central

    Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi; Lima, Aldo A.M.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Leite, Álvaro M.; Moura, Alessandra F.; Lima, Noélia L.; Soares, Alberto M.; Havt, Alexandre; Moore, Sean R.; Pinkerton, Relana; Swann, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Enteric infections, enteropathy and undernutrition in early childhood are preventable risk factors for child deaths, impaired neurodevelopment, and later life metabolic diseases. However, the mechanisms linking these exposures and outcomes remain to be elucidated, as do biomarkers for identifying children at risk. By examining the urinary metabolic phenotypes of nourished and undernourished children participating in a case-control study in Semi-Arid Brazil, we identified key differences with potential relevance to mechanisms, biomarkers and outcomes. Undernutrition was found to perturb several biochemical pathways, including choline and tryptophan metabolism, while also increasing the proteolytic activity of the gut microbiome. Furthermore, a metabolic adaptation was observed in the undernourished children to reduce energy expenditure, reflected by increased N-methylnicotinamide and reduced β-aminoisobutyric acid excretion. Interestingly, accelerated catch-up growth was observed in those undernourished children displaying a more robust metabolic adaptation several months earlier. Hence, urinary N-methylnicotinamide and β-aminoisobutyric acid represent promising biomarkers for predicting short-term growth outcomes in undernourished children and for identifying children destined for further growth shortfalls. These findings have important implications for understanding contributors to long-term sequelae of early undernutrition, including cognitive, growth, and metabolic functions. PMID:26816084

  19. Comparison of acid-base models for prediction of hospital mortality after trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lewis J; Kellum, John A

    2008-06-01

    This study determines whether mortality after major trauma is predicted by the strong ion gap (SIG) and whether recent refinements in the calculation of SIG improve its predictive value. The design was an observational, retrospective review of trauma patients admitted on a single service at a level 1 facility. The setting was an urban level 1 trauma facility. An unselected cohort of patients sustaining blunt and/or penetrating injury requiring intensive care unit care was chosen. There were no interventions. Age, injury mechanism, survival, arterial blood gases, hemoglobin, albumin, electrolytes, lactate, standard base deficit, strong ion difference (SID), buffer base, and SIG were analyzed. Patients were grouped into survivors and nonsurvivors according to in-hospital survival truncated to 28 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used for further analysis of univariate predictors of mortality, and receiver-operator characteristic curves were generated for mortality. Both nonsurvivors (n = 26) and survivors (n = 52) were similar with respect to age (31.9 +/- 11.5 vs. 33.5 +/- 11.6 years) and injury mechanism (blunt 61% vs. 58%) Nonsurvivors were more likely to have multicavity injury (54% vs. 26%; P < 0.01) than survivors. Nonsurvivor and survivor pH (7.36 +/- 0.15 vs. 7.38 +/- 0.09), HCO3(-) (20.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 21.7 +/- 2.5 mEq/L; P = 0.11), albumin (3.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.5 gm/dL), lactate (2.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 2.3 +/- 1.3 mmol/L; P = 0.24), and phosphate (3.1 +/- 0.9 vs. 3.4 +/- 0.8 mEq/L; P = 0.26) were similar. Forty-two percent of nonsurvivors had normal lactate levels, whereas 33% of survivors had lactic acidosis. However, the apparent SID (41.0 +/- 4.2 vs. 36.7 +/- 5.5 mEq/L; P < 0.001), effective SID (32.7 +/- 4.2 vs. 35.4 +/- 4.9 mEq/L; P = 0.019), and SIG (8.3 +/- 4.4 vs. 1.3 +/- 3.6 mEq/L; P < 0.001) were all significantly different between nonsurvivors and survivors. Only one (2%) survivor had an SIG greater than 5 mEq/L, and only two (7

  20. Histological Changes in Pancreatic Islets of Animals with Experimental Diabetes Caused by Xanthurenic Acid under Condition of Suppression of Its Endogenous Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Meyramov, G G; Kohnert, К-D; Kikimbaeva, А А; Аitkulov, А М; Кystaubaeva, Z T; Тykeshanova, G M; Dupont, O-N; Laryushina, Е М; Меyramova, А G; Zhuzbaeva, G O; Коvalenko, О L; Shaybek, A S

    2015-09-01

    Long-term administration of pyridoxine to rats kept on a diabetogenic diet stimulating endogenous synthesis of xanthurenic acid resulted in minimal glycemia, less pronounced decrease in insulin content in β-cells, and more intensive excretion of xanthurenic acid with urine. Histological changes were observed in 23% pancreatic islets, whereas in rats not treated with pyridoxine, destruction and necrosis of 40-45% β-cells were found in 38% of studied islets. PMID:26463059

  1. Suppression of phase separation in solutions of bovine gamma IV-crystallin by polar modification of the sulfur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, J; Berland, C; Broide, M; Ogun, O; Melhuish, J; Benedek, G

    1991-01-01

    The calf lens protein gamma IV-crystallin, a strong determinant of the net phase-separation temperature of the lens, was chemically modified with N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate. The phase-separation temperatures of solutions of the modified protein were measured and found to be dramatically reduced with respect to those of the native protein. At neutral pH the reagent alkylates only the cysteine and methionine residues and introduces a doubly charged phosphate anion at a maximum distance of 10-12 A from the sulfur atoms. At a protein concentration of 38 g/liter, and with 30% of the cysteines and 40% of the methionines alkylated, the phase-separation temperature is lowered from approximately 25 +/- 2 degrees C to approximately 12 +/- 2 degrees C. The ascending limbs of the coexistence curves for the native and modified proteins were determined at two different degrees of modification. The coexistence curve of the protein with 35% of the cysteines and 40% of the methionines modified shows that as protein concentration approaches the critical concentration of 289 g/liter, there is a much larger suppression of the critical temperature, from approximately 38 +/- 2 degrees C in the native protein to approximately 16 +/- 2 degrees C. Incubation of intact calf lenses in vitro with the reagent results in the suppression of the phase-separation temperature by 3-9 degrees C. These results are consistent with the view that the observed suppression in the critical temperature is due to an increase in the hydrophilicity of the protein in the vicinity of the sulfur-containing residues. PMID:2052573

  2. Using Chou's pseudo amino acid composition to predict protein quaternary structure: a sequence-segmented PseAAC approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Pan, Quan

    2008-10-01

    In the protein universe, many proteins are composed of two or more polypeptide chains, generally referred to as subunits, which associate through noncovalent interactions and, occasionally, disulfide bonds to form protein quaternary structures. It has long been known that the functions of proteins are closely related to their quaternary structures; some examples include enzymes, hemoglobin, DNA polymerase, and ion channels. However, it is extremely labor-expensive and even impossible to quickly determine the structures of hundreds of thousands of protein sequences solely from experiments. Since the number of protein sequences entering databanks is increasing rapidly, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for classifying the quaternary structures of proteins from their primary sequences. Since the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) was introduced, a variety of approaches, such as residue conservation scores, von Neumann entropy, multiscale energy, autocorrelation function, moment descriptors, and cellular automata, have been utilized to formulate the PseAAC for predicting different attributes of proteins. Here, in a different approach, a sequence-segmented PseAAC is introduced to represent protein samples. Meanwhile, multiclass SVM classifier modules were adopted to classify protein quaternary structures. As a demonstration, the dataset constructed by Chou and Cai [(2003) Proteins 53:282-289] was adopted as a benchmark dataset. The overall jackknife success rates thus obtained were 88.2-89.1%, indicating that the new approach is quite promising for predicting protein quaternary structure. PMID:18427713

  3. [Research on prediction method of fatty acid content in edible oil based on Raman spectroscopy and multi-output least squares support vector regression machine].

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-Yin; Zhang, Bing; Dong, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2013-11-01

    For the purpose of the rapid prediction of saturated fatty acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid content in edible vegetable oil, the Raman spectra of a batch of edible vegetable oils and their one-one mixtures with different ratios were measured in the range of 800-2 000 cm(-1), 91 samples were measured totally in this research, the obtained Raman spectra data were preprocessed by a new method proposed in this paper called auto-set fulcrums baseline fitting method based on peak-seeking algorithm, and 8 characteristic peak values (872 cm(-1) [v(C-C)], 972 cm(-1) [delta(C=C) trans], 1 082 cm(-1) [v(C-C)], 1 267 cm(-1) [delta(=C-H) cis], 1 303 cm(-1) [delta(CH2) twisting], 1 442 cm(-1) [delta(CH2) scissoring], 1 658 cm(-1) [v(C=C) cis], 1 748 cm(-1) [v(C=O)]) were extracted to be the eigenvalues for the whole spectra, among the 8 peaks there are three peaks (972, 1 267, 1 658 cm(-1)) that play an important role in the establishment of mathematical model, they are closely concerned with C=C band which distinguishes the three fatty acid types. By using these eigenvalues as inputs, and actual saturated fatty acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid contents of sample oils as outputs, a prediction mathematical model that predicts simultaneously the three fatty acid contents was established using multiple regression analysis: multi-output least squares support vector regression machine (MLS-SVR) and partial least squares (PLS). Results show that the MLS-SVR has better effects. The predicting results are compared with results of gas chromatography(GC), and the obtained root mean square error of prediction(RMSEP) for saturated fatty acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid are 0.496 7%, 0.840 0% and 1.019 9%, and the correlation coefficients (r) are 0.813 3, 0.999 2 and 0.998 1, respectively. When this model is applied in the detection of new unknown oil samples, the prediction error does not exceed 5%. Results show that the Raman spectra analysis technology based on MLS-SVR can be a convenient

  4. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  5. PIK3R1 targeting by miR-21 suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing PI3K/AKT signaling and reversing EMT, and predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAN, LI-XU; LIU, YAN-HUI; XIANG, JIAN-WEN; WU, QI-NIAN; XU, LEI-BO; LUO, XIN-LAN; ZHU, XIAO-LAN; LIU, CHAO; XU, FANG-PING; LUO, DONG-LAN; MEI, PING; XU, JIE; ZHANG, KE-PING; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that dysregulation of miR-21 functioned as an oncomiR in breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which miR-21 regulate breast tumor migration and invasion. We applied pathway analysis on genome microarray data and target-predicting algorithms for miR-21 target screening, and used luciferase reporting assay to confirm the direct target. Thereafter, we investigated the function of the target gene phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1 (α) (PIK3R1), and detected PIK3R1 coding protein (p85α) by immunohistochemistry and miR-21 by RT-qPCR on 320 archival paraffin-embedded tissues of breast cancer to evaluate the correlation of their expression with prognosis. First, we found that PIK3R1 suppressed growth, invasiveness, and metastatic properties of breast cancer cells. Next, we identified the PIK3R1 as a direct target of miR-21 and showed that it was negatively regulated by miR-21. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p85α overexpression phenocopied the suppression effects of antimiR-21 on breast cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, indicating its tumor suppressor role in breast cancer. On the contrary, PIK3R1 knockdown abrogated antimiR-21-induced effect on breast cancer cells. Notably, antimiR-21 induction increased p85α, accompanied by decreased p-AKT level. Besides, antimiR-21/PIK3R1-induced suppression of invasiveness in breast cancer cells was mediated by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). p85α downregulation was found in 25 (7.8%) of the 320 breast cancer patients, and was associated with inferior 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Taken together, we provide novel evidence that miR-21 knockdown suppresses cell growth, migration and invasion partly by inhibiting PI3K/AKT activation via direct targeting PIK3R1 and reversing EMT in breast cancer. p85α downregulation defined a specific subgroup of breast cancer with shorter 5-year DFS and OS

  6. Charmonium suppression in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S. |

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of {psi} and {psi}{prime} production from experiment NA50 at the CERN SPS are compared to calculations based on a hadronic model of charmonium suppression developed previously. Data on centrality dependence and total cross sections are in good accord with these predictions. Uncertainties in theoretical quantities such as NA50`s L parameter are discussed.

  7. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues. PMID:17848022

  8. Allyl isothiocyanate suppresses the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and de novo fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are a family of transcription factors that regulate lipid homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we used a stable cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter gene driven by an SRE-containing fatty acid synthase promoter to identify allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), one of the major isothiocyanates in cruciferous vegetables, as a novel SREBP inactivator. We found that AITC downregulated the proteolytic processing of SREBPs and the expression of their target genes in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells. Furthermore, AITC reduced the de novo synthesis of both fatty acids and cholesterol. Our results indicate a novel physiological function of AITC in lipid metabolism regulation. PMID:26822063

  9. Inhibition of Retinoic Acid Biosynthesis by the Bisdichloroacetyldiamine WIN 18,446 Markedly Suppresses Spermatogenesis and Alters Retinoid Metabolism in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Jisun; Haenisch, Michael; Muller, Charles H.; Goldstein, Alex S.; Arnold, Samuel; Isoherranen, Nina; Brabb, Thea; Treuting, Piper M.; Amory, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the regulation of testicular retinoic acid synthesis is crucial for understanding its role in spermatogenesis. Bisdichloroacetyldiamines strongly inhibit spermatogenesis. We reported previously that one of these compounds, WIN 18,446, potently inhibited spermatogenesis in rabbits by inhibiting retinoic acid synthesis. To understand how WIN 18,446 inhibits retinoic acid synthesis, we characterized its effects on human retinal dehydrogenase ALDH1A2 in vitro as well as its effects on retinoid metabolism in vivo using mice. WIN 18,446 strongly and irreversibly inhibited ALDH1A2 in vitro. In vivo, WIN 18,446 treatment completely abolished spermatogenesis after 4 weeks of treatment and modestly reduced adiposity in mice fed a chow diet. Effects of WIN 18,446 on retinoid concentrations were tissue-dependent. Although lung and liver retinyl ester concentrations were lower in WIN 18,446-treated animals, adipose retinyl ester levels were increased following the treatment. Interestingly, animals treated with WIN 18,446 had significantly higher circulating retinol concentrations compared with control mice. The effect on spermatogenesis by WIN 18,446 was not prevented by simultaneous treatment with retinoic acid, whereas effects on other tissues were partially or completely reversed. Cessation of WIN 18,446 treatment for 4 weeks reversed most retinoid-related phenotypes except for inhibition of spermatogenesis. Our data suggest that WIN 18,446 may be a useful model of systemic acquired retinoic acid deficiency. Given the effects observed in our study, inhibition of retinoic acid biosynthesis may have relevance for the treatment of obesity and in the development of novel male contraceptives. PMID:24711451

  10. Prediction of Golgi-resident protein types using general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions: Approaches with minimal redundancy maximal relevance feature selection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ya-Sen; Du, Pu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made in predicting Golgi-resident proteins. However, it is still a challenging task to identify the type of a Golgi-resident protein. Precise prediction of the type of a Golgi-resident protein plays a key role in understanding its molecular functions in various biological processes. In this paper, we proposed to use a mutual information based feature selection scheme with the general form Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions to predict the Golgi-resident protein types. The positional specific physicochemical properties were applied in the Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions. We achieved 91.24% prediction accuracy in a jackknife test with 49 selected features. It has the best performance among all the present predictors. This result indicates that our computational model can be useful in identifying Golgi-resident protein types. PMID:27155042

  11. Expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on neoplastic growth and prediction of prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, but exerts physiologic effects other than that on neurotransmitter in non-neuronal peripheral tissues and organs. GABA may affect cancer growth through activation GABA receptors. We investigated the gene expression of GABA receptors in tissue of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and non-cancerous tissues, and found that the gene expression of GABA receptor phenotypes was correlated with tumorigenesis and clinical prognosis. Methods Sixty-one snap-frozen human samples of NSCLC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues (5cm away from tumor) were analyzed. Gene expression of GABA receptors was detected by Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Survival times in relation to the expression of GABA receptor phenotypes were analyzed. Human NSCLC cell lines H1299, A549, H520, H460 and human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were used to determine the phenotypes of GABA inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. The effects of exogenous administration of GABA on H1299 cell growth were examined. Results The gene expressions were significantly higher in NSCLC tissues than in the paired non-cancerous tissues for GABAA receptor subunit α3 (GABRA3, P = 0.030); for GABAA receptor subunit epsilon (GABRE, P = 0.036); and GABAB receptor subunit 2 (GABBR2, P = 0.005). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with high expression of GABBR2 gene and low expression of GABRA3 gene had a better prognosis (P < 0.05). The administration of GABA resulted in suppressed proliferation of NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The use of the GABA receptor antagonist CGP35348 could reverse the inhibitory effect. Conclusions The pattern of GABA receptor gene phenotype expression may be involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis. A high expression of GABBR2 with a low expression of GABRA3 may predict a better outcome. The treatment with GABA

  12. Predicting the toxicity of sediment-associated trace metals with simultaneously extracted trace metal: Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations and dry weight-normalized concentrations: A critical comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.R.; MacDonald, D.D.; Cubbage, J.C.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    The relative abilities of sediment concentrations of simultaneously extracted trace metal: acid-volatile sulfide (SEM:AVS) and dry weight- normalized trace metals to correctly predict both toxicity and nontoxicity were compared by analysis of 77 field-collected samples. Relative to the SEM:AVS concentrations, sediment guidelines based upon dry weight-normalized concentrations were equally or slightly more accurate in predicting both nontoxic and toxic results in laboratory tests.

  13. Analysis of nine food additives in red wine by ion-suppression reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate as ion-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Shan-Shan; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Li, Xiao-Ping; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in red wine. The effects of ion-suppressors, i.e., trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and ammonium acetate (AmAc) on retention behavior of nine food additives in RP-HPLC separation were discussed in detail. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percent of ion-suppressors in the mobile-phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, respectively. The results showed that the ion suppressors had not only an ion suppression effect, but also an organic modification effect on the acidic analytes. The baseline separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA(0.01%, v/v)-AmAc(2.5 mmol L(-1)) aqueous solution as the mobile phase. The recoveries were between 80.2 - 99.5% for all analytes with RSDs in the range of 1.5 - 8.9%. The linearities were in the range of 0.2 - 100.0 mg L(-1) with determination coefficients (r(2)) higher than 0.9991 for all analytes. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 0.53 - 0.99 mg L(-1). The applicability of the proposed method to detect and quantify food additives has been demonstrated in the analysis of 30 real samples. PMID:23059992

  14. Statins and the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid stimulate the non-amyloidogenic pathway of amyloid-beta protein precursor processing by suppression of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kojro, Elzbieta; Füger, Petra; Prinzen, Claudia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Rat, Dorothea; Endres, Kristina; Fahrenholz, Falk; Postina, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins influence the proteolytic processing of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) and are reported to stimulate the activity of alpha-secretase, the major preventive secretase of Alzheimer's disease. Statins can increase the alpha-secretase activity by their cholesterol-lowering properties as well as by impairment of isoprenoids synthesis. In the present study, we elucidate the contribution of these pathways in alpha-secretase activation. We demonstrate that zaragozic acid, a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase which blocks cholesterol synthesis but allows synthesis of isoprenoids, also stimulates alpha-secretase activity. Treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with 50 microM zaragozic acid resulted in a approximately 3 fold increase of alpha-secretase activity and reduced cellular cholesterol by approximately 30%. These effects were comparable to results obtained from cells treated with a low lovastatin concentration (2 microM). Zaragozic acid-stimulated secretion of alpha-secretase-cleaved soluble AbetaPP was dose dependent and saturable. Lovastatin- or zaragozic acid-stimulated increase of alpha-secretase activity was completely abolished by a selective