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Sample records for acid symporter pat1

  1. The orally active antihyperglycemic drug beta-guanidinopropionic acid is transported by the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Linda; Dorn, Madlen; Markwardt, Fritz; Brandsch, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The orally administered creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA) decreases plasma glucose levels by increasing the sensitivity to insulin. This effect is based on a beta-GPA induced expression of mRNA and total protein content of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. Although the oral availability of beta-GPA is well established, the underlying uptake mechanism has not yet been studied. We investigated whether the H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, which is expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells, accepts guanidine derivatives as substrates. Uptake of l-[(3)H]proline into Caco-2 cells expressing hPAT1 constitutively was strongly inhibited by beta-GPA and its derivatives guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and 4-guanidinobutyric acid (4-GBA). Competition assays revealed apparent affinity constants of about 1.5 mM. Electrophysiological measurements at hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes unequivocally demonstrated that beta-GPA, GAA and 4-GBA are effectively transported by this transport system in an electrogenic manner. We conclude that hPAT1 might be responsible for the intestinal absorption of beta-GPA thereby allowing its oral administration. Moreover, with beta-GPA we identified a new high affinity hPAT1 substrate that might be an interesting starting point for future drug design-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19358571

  2. Proton-Assisted Amino Acid Transporter PAT1 Complexes with Rag GTPases and Activates TORC1 on Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H.; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M.; Shaw, Michael K.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H+-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments. PMID:22574197

  3. Differential expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporters (PAT[1] and PAT[2]) in tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The PATs have been identified as growth-regulatory nutrient sensors in Drosophila and as activators of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mammalian cell cultures. These studies suggest that, beyond their classical function as transporters of simple amino acids (AA), the PATs act as tranceptors,...

  4. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  5. Identification of homologues to the pathogenicity factor Pat-1, a putative serine protease of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Burger, Annette; Gräfen, Ines; Engemann, Jutta; Niermann, Erik; Pieper, Martina; Kirchner, Oliver; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Hybridization of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis total DNA against the pathogenicity gene pat-1 indicated the presence of pat-1 homologous nucleotide sequences on the chromosome and on plasmid pCM2. Isolation of the corresponding DNA fragments and nucleotide sequence determination showed that there are three pat-1 homologous genes: chpA (chromosome) and phpA and phpB (plasmid pCM2). The gene products share common characteristics, i.e. a signal sequence for Sec-dependent secretion, a serine protease motif, and six cysteine residues at conserved positions. Gene chpA located on the chromosome is a pseudogene since it contains a translational stop codon after 97 of 280 amino acids. In contrast to pat-1, cloning of the plasmid encoded homologs phpA and phpB into the avirulent plasmid free Cmm strain CMM100 did not result in a virulent phenotype. So far, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for Pat-1, however, site specific mutagenesis of pat-1 showed that the serine residue in the motif GDSGG is required for the virulent phenotype of pat-1 and thus Pat-1 could be a functional protease. PMID:16255147

  6. Identification of Conformationally Sensitive Amino Acids in the Na+/Dicarboxylate Symporter (SdcS)†

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Aditya D.; Pajor, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    The Na+/dicarboxylate symporter (SdcS) from Staphylococcus aureus is a homolog of the mammalian Na+/dicarboxylate cotransporters (NaDC1) from solute carrier family 13 (SLC 13). The present study examined succinate transport by SdcS heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, using right-side-out (RSO) and inside-out (ISO) membrane vesicles. The Km values for succinate in RSO and ISO vesicles were similar, about 30 μM. The single cysteine of SdcS was replaced to produce the cysteineless transporter, C457S, which demonstrated similar functional characteristics as the wild-type. Single cysteine mutants were made in SdcS-C457S at positions that are functionally important in the mammalian NaDC1. Mutant N108C of SdcS was sensitive to chemical labeling by MTSET ([2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]-methanethiosulfonate) from both the cytoplasmic and extracellular side, depending on the conformational state of the transporter, suggesting that Asn-108 may be found in the translocation pore of the protein. Mutant D329C was sensitive to MTSET in the presence of Na+ but only from the extracellular side. Finally, mutant L436C was insensitive to MTSET although changes in its kinetic properties indicate that this residue may be important in substrate binding. In conclusion, this work identifies Asn-108 as a key residue in the translocation pathway of the protein, accessible in different states from both sides of the membrane. Functional characterization of SdcS should provide useful structural as well as functional details about mammalian transporters from the SLC 13 family. PMID:19260674

  7. DeltapH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves: II. Evidence for Multiple Aliphatic, Neutral Amino Acid Symports.

    PubMed

    Li, Z C; Bush, D R

    1991-08-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent K(m) and K(i) values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the beta-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the alpha-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and

  8. The cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor Pat1 is required for rRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Muppavarapu, Mridula; Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Pat1 is a key cytoplasmic mRNA degradation factor, the loss of which severely increases mRNA half-lives. Several recent studies have shown that Pat1 can enter the nucleus and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As a result, many nuclear roles have been proposed for Pat1. In this study, we analyzed four previously suggested nuclear roles of Pat1 and show that Pat1 is not required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing or pre-mRNA decay in yeast. However, lack of Pat1 results in accumulation of pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Intriguingly, we identified a novel genetic relationship between Pat1 and the rRNA decay machinery, specifically the exosome and the TRAMP complex. While the pre-rRNA processing intermediates that accumulate in the pat1 deletion mutant are, at least to some extent, recognized as aberrant by the rRNA degradation machinery, it is unlikely that these accumulations are the cause of their synthetic sick relationship. Here, we show that the dysregulation of the levels of mRNAs related to ribosome biogenesis could be the cause of the accumulation of the pre-rRNA processing intermediates. Although our results support a role for Pat1 in transcription, they nevertheless suggest that the primary cause of the dysregulated mRNA levels is most likely due to Pat1's role in mRNA decapping and mRNA degradation. PMID:26918764

  9. His-65 in the proton–sucrose symporter is an essential amino acid whose modification with site-directed mutagenesis increases transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jade M.-Y.; Bush, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    The proton–sucrose symporter that mediates phloem loading is a key component of assimilate partitioning in many higher plants. Previous biochemical investigations showed that a diethyl pyrocarbonate-sensitive histidine residue is at or near the substrate-binding site of the symporter. Among the proton–sucrose symporters cloned to date, only the histidine residue at position 65 of AtSUC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is conserved across species. To test whether His-65 is involved in the transport reaction, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional expression in yeast to determine the significance of this residue in the reaction mechanism. Symporters with mutations at His-65 exhibited a range of activities; for example, the H65C mutant resulted in the complete loss of transport capacity, whereas H65Q was almost as active as wild type. Surprisingly, the H65K and H65R symporters transport sucrose at significantly higher rates (increased Vmax) than the wild-type symporter, suggesting His-65 may be associated with a rate-limiting step in the transport reaction. RNA gel blot and protein blot analyses showed that, with the exception of H65C, the variation in transport activity was not because of alterations in steady-state levels of mRNA or symporter protein. Significantly, those symporters with substitutions of His-65 that remained transport competent were no longer sensitive to inactivation by diethyl pyrocarbonate, demonstrating that this is the inhibitor-sensitive histidine residue. Taken together with our previous results, these data show that His-65 is involved in sucrose binding, and increased rates of transport implicate this region of the protein in the transport reaction. PMID:9671798

  10. Air transport of plutonium metal : content expansion initiative for the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Paul T.; Caviness, Michael L.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  11. Association of the herpes simplex virus type 1 Us11 gene product with the cellular kinesin light-chain-related protein PAT1 results in the redistribution of both polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Benboudjema, Louisa; Mulvey, Matthew; Gao, Yuehua; Pimplikar, Sanjay W; Mohr, Ian

    2003-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) Us11 gene encodes a multifunctional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein that is expressed late in infection and packaged into the tegument layer of the virus particle. As a tegument component, Us11 associates with nascent capsids after its synthesis late in the infectious cycle and is delivered into newly infected cells at times prior to the expression of viral genes. Us11 is also an abundant late protein that regulates translation through its association with host components and contains overlapping nucleolar retention and nuclear export signals, allowing its accumulation in both nucleoli and the cytosol. Thus, at various times during the viral life cycle and in different intracellular compartments, Us11 has the potential to execute discrete tasks. The analysis of these functions, however, is complicated by the fact that Us11 is not essential for viral replication in cultured cells. To discover new host targets for the Us11 protein, we searched for cellular proteins that interact with Us11 and have identified PAT1 as a Us11-binding protein according to multiple, independent experimental criteria. PAT1 binds microtubules, participates in amyloid precursor protein trafficking, and has homology to the kinesin light chain (KLC) in its carboxyl terminus. The carboxyl-terminal dsRNA-binding domain of Us11, which also contains the nucleolar retention and nuclear export signals, binds PAT1, whereas 149 residues derived from the KLC homology region of PAT1 are important for binding to Us11. Both PAT1 and Us11 colocalize within a perinuclear area in transiently transfected and HSV-1-infected cells. The 149 amino acids derived from the KLC homology region are required for colocalization of the two polypeptides. Furthermore, although PAT1 normally accumulates in the nuclear compartment, Us11 expression results in the exclusion of PAT1 from the nucleus and its accumulation in the perinuclear space. Similarly, Us11 does not

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T

    PubMed Central

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K.; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K.; Nadala, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1T. PMID:26358606

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T.

    PubMed

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K; Nadala, Cesar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1(T). PMID:26358606

  14. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  15. Drosophila PAT1 is required for Kinesin-1 to transport cargo and to maximize its motility

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Philippe; Davies, Tim; Williams, Lucy S.; Mishima, Masanori; Palacios, Isabel M.

    2010-01-01

    Kinesin heavy chain (KHC), the force-generating component of Kinesin-1, is required for the localization of oskar mRNA and the anchoring of the nucleus in the Drosophila oocyte. These events are crucial for the establishment of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. KHC is also essential for the localization of Dynein and for all ooplasmic flows. Interestingly, oocytes without Kinesin light chain show no major defects in these KHC-dependent processes, suggesting that KHC binds its cargoes and is activated by a novel mechanism. Here, we shed new light on the molecular mechanism of Kinesin function in the germline. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical and motor-tracking studies, we show that PAT1, an APP-binding protein, interacts with Kinesin-1, functions in the transport of oskar mRNA and Dynein and is required for the efficient motility of KHC along microtubules. This work suggests that the role of PAT1 in cargo transport in the cell is linked to PAT1 function as a positive regulator of Kinesin motility. PMID:20630947

  16. Pat1 protects centromere-specific histone H3 variant Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Guo, Jiasheng; Dittman, Lauren E.; Haase, Julian; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved histone H3 variant Cse4 and its homologues are essential components of specialized centromere (CEN)-specific nucleosomes and serve as an epigenetic mark for CEN identity and propagation. Cse4 is a critical determinant for the structure and function of the kinetochore and is required to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. The kinetochore protein Pat1 regulates the levels and spatial distribution of Cse4 at centromeres. Deletion of PAT1 results in altered structure of CEN chromatin and chromosome segregation errors. In this study, we show that Pat1 protects CEN-associated Cse4 from ubiquitination in order to maintain proper structure and function of the kinetochore in budding yeast. PAT1-deletion strains exhibit increased ubiquitination of Cse4 and faster turnover of Cse4 at kinetochores. Psh1, a Cse4-specific E3-ubiquitin ligase, interacts with Pat1 in vivo and contributes to the increased ubiquitination of Cse4 in pat1∆ strains. Consistent with a role of Psh1 in ubiquitination of Cse4, transient induction of PSH1 in a wild-type strain resulted in phenotypes similar to a pat1∆ strain, including a reduction in CEN-associated Cse4, increased Cse4 ubiquitination, defects in spatial distribution of Cse4 at kinetochores, and altered structure of CEN chromatin. Pat1 interacts with Scm3 and is required for its maintenance at kinetochores. In conclusion, our studies provide novel insights into mechanisms by which Pat1 affects the structure of CEN chromatin and protects Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination for faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:25833709

  17. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases

    PubMed Central

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6–7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  18. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases.

    PubMed

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M Gregor; Kaback, H Ronald; Fendler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6-7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  19. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-01-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3′ end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3′ end protection and 5′–3′ decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes. PMID:26092942

  20. Taurine uptake across the human intestinal brush-border membrane is via two transporters: H+-coupled PAT1 (SLC36A1) and Na+- and Cl−-dependent TauT (SLC6A6)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Catriona M H; Howard, Alison; Walters, Julian R F; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Thwaites, David T

    2009-01-01

    Taurine is an essential amino acid in some mammals and is conditionally essential in humans. Taurine is an abundant component of meat and fish-based foods and has been used as an oral supplement in the treatment of disorders such as cystic fibrosis and hypertension. The purpose of this investigation was to identity the relative contributions of the solute transporters involved in taurine uptake across the luminal membrane of human enterocytes. Distinct transport characteristics were revealed following expression of the candidate solute transporters in Xenopus laevis oocytes: PAT1 (SLC36A1) is a H+-coupled, pH-dependent, Na+- and Cl−-independent, low-affinity, high-capacity transporter for taurine and β-alanine; TauT (SLC6A6) is a Na+- and Cl−-dependent, high-affinity, low-capacity transporter of taurine and β-alanine; ATB0,+ (SLC6A14) is a Na+- and Cl−-dependent, high-affinity, low-capacity transporter which accepts β-alanine but not taurine. Taurine uptake across the brush-border membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers showed characteristics of both PAT1- and TauT-mediated transport. Under physiological conditions, Cl−-dependent TauT-mediated uptake predominates at low taurine concentrations, whereas at higher concentrations typical of diet, Cl−-independent PAT1-mediated uptake is the major absorptive mechanism. Real-time PCR analysis of human duodenal and ileal biopsy samples demonstrates that PAT1, TauT and ATB0,+ mRNA are expressed in each tissue but to varying degrees. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate both taurine uptake via PAT1 and functional coexpression of PAT1 and TauT at the apical membrane of the human intestinal epithelium. PAT1 may be responsible for bulk taurine uptake during a meal whereas TauT may be important for taurine supply to the intestinal epithelium and for taurine capture between meals. PMID:19074966

  1. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    SciTech Connect

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes; Bencsura, Akos; Heja, Laszlo; Kardos, Julianna

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  2. Characterization of New Polyol/H+ Symporters in Debaryomyces hansenii

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Iliana; Madeira, Ana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.; Leandro, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a halotolerant yeast that produces and assimilates a wide variety of polyols. In this work we evaluate polyol transport in D. hansenii CBS 767, detecting the occurrence of polyol/H+ (and sugar/H+) symporter activity, through the transient extracellular alkalinization of unbuffered starved cell suspensions. From the D. hansenii genome database, we selected nine ORFs encoding putative transporter proteins to clone in a centromeric plasmid with C-terminal GFP tagging and screened for polyol/H+ symporters by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Five distinct D. hansenii polyol/H+ symporters were identified and characterized, with different specificities and affinities for polyols, namely one glycerol-specific (DhStl1), one D-galactitol-specific (DhSgl1, Symporter galactitol/H+ 1), one D-(+)-chiro-inositol-specific (DhSyi1, Symporter D-(+)-chiro-inositol/H+ 1), one for D-sorbitol/D-mannitol/ribitol/D-arabitol/D-galactitol (DhSyl1, Symporter Polyols 1) and another for D-sorbitol/D-mannitol/ribitol/D-arabitol (DhSyl2, Symporter Polyols 2). This work contributed to the annotation of new yeast polyol transporters, including two specific for uncommon substrates as galactitol and D-(+)-chiro-inositol. PMID:24505419

  3. Structure-based mechanism for Na(+)/melibiose symport by MelB.

    PubMed

    Ethayathulla, Abdul S; Yousef, Mohammad S; Amin, Anowarul; Leblanc, Gérard; Kaback, H Ronald; Guan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial melibiose permease (MelB) belongs to the glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide:cation symporter family, a part of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Structural information regarding glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide:cation symporter family transporters and other Na(+)-coupled permeases within MFS has been lacking, although a wealth of biochemical and biophysical data are available. Here we present the three-dimensional crystal structures of Salmonella typhimurium MelBSt in two conformations, representing an outward partially occluded and an outward inactive state of MelBSt. MelB adopts a typical MFS fold and contains a previously unidentified cation-binding motif. Three conserved acidic residues form a pyramidal-shaped cation-binding site for Na(+), Li(+) or H(+), which is in close proximity to the sugar-binding site. Both cosubstrate-binding sites are mainly contributed by the residues from the amino-terminal domain. These two structures and the functional data presented here provide mechanistic insights into Na(+)/melibiose symport. We also postulate a structural foundation for the conformational cycling necessary for transport catalysed by MFS permeases in general. PMID:24389923

  4. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose

  5. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase requires two steps, protein phosphorylation and binding to the PAT-1 domain of lipid droplet coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hu, Liping; Dalen, Knut; Dorward, Heidi; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Russell, Deanna; Gong, Dawei; Londos, Constantine; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Holm, Cecilia; Rizzo, Mark A; Brasaemle, Dawn; Sztalryd, Carole

    2009-11-13

    Lipolysis is an important metabolic pathway controlling energy homeostasis through degradation of triglycerides stored in lipid droplets and release of fatty acids. Lipid droplets of mammalian cells are coated with one or more members of the PAT protein family, which serve important functions in regulating lipolysis. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms by which PAT family members, perilipin A, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP), and LSDP5, control lipolysis catalyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a major lipase in adipocytes and several non-adipose cells. We applied fluorescence microscopic tools to analyze proteins in situ in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and anisotropy Forster resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data show that ADFP and LSDP5 exchange between lipid droplet and cytoplasmic pools, whereas perilipin A does not. Differences in protein mobility do not correlate with PAT protein-mediated control of lipolysis catalyzed by HSL or endogenous lipases. Forster resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that each of the three PAT proteins bind HSL through interaction of the lipase with amino acids within the highly conserved amino-terminal PAT-1 domain. ADFP and LSDP5 bind HSL under basal conditions, whereas phosphorylation of serine residues within three amino-terminal protein kinase A consensus sequences of perilipin A is required for HSL binding and maximal lipolysis. Finally, protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL increases lipolysis in cells expressing ADFP or LSDP5; in contrast, phosphorylation of perilipin A exerts the major control over HSL-mediated lipolysis when perilipin is the main lipid droplet protein. PMID:19717842

  6. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sarala J; Nesler, Katherine R; Rosen, Sarah F; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A

    2012-12-15

    The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  7. The conserved P body component HPat/Pat1 negatively regulates synaptic terminal growth at the larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sarala J.; Nesler, Katherine R.; Rosen, Sarah F.; Kato, Yasuko; Nakamura, Akira; Ramaswami, Mani; Barbee, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The temporal and spatial regulation of protein synthesis plays an important role in the control of neural physiology. In axons and dendrites, translationally repressed mRNAs are actively transported to their destinations in a variety of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). A subset of these neuronal RNPs has been shown to contain proteins associated with mRNA processing bodies (P bodies). P bodies are a class of highly conserved cytoplasmic granules that have been linked to both mRNA decay and translational repression via general and miRNA-mediated pathways. Here, we characterize functions for HPat/Pat1 (also known as Patr-1), a core component of P bodies, at the glutamatergic larval Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We show that hpat mutants exhibit a strong synaptic hyperplasia at the NMJ. The synaptic defects observed in hpat mutants are associated with rearrangement of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton suggesting that HPat negatively regulates presynaptic microtubule-based growth during NMJ development. Consistent with this, overexpression of HPat also blocks the rapid growth of presynaptic boutons induced by spaced depolarization. Finally, we demonstrate that HPat interacts genetically with the catalytic subunit of the deadenylase complex (twin/CCR4) and the miRNA pathway (Argonaute 1) to control bouton formation. We propose that HPat is required to target mRNAs involved in the control of microtubule architecture and synaptic terminal growth for repression, presumably in P bodies, via both general and miRNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23097047

  8. Allosteric Mechanisms of Molecular Machines at the Membrane: Transport by Sodium-Coupled Symporters.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Michael V; Cuendet, Michel A; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-06-01

    Solute transport across cell membranes is ubiquitous in biology as an essential physiological process. Secondary active transporters couple the unfavorable process of solute transport against its concentration gradient to the energetically favorable transport of one or several ions. The study of such transporters over several decades indicates that their function involves complex allosteric mechanisms that are progressively being revealed in atomistic detail. We focus on two well-characterized sodium-coupled symporters: the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is the prototype for the "gated pore" mechanism in the mammalian synaptic monoamine transporters, and the archaeal GltPh, which is the prototype for the "elevator" mechanism in the mammalian excitatory amino acid transporters. We present the evidence for the role of allostery in the context of a quantitative formalism that can reconcile biochemical and biophysical data and thereby connects directly to recent insights into the molecular structure and dynamics of these proteins. We demonstrate that, while the structures and mechanisms of these transporters are very different, the available data suggest a common role of specific models of allostery in their functions. We argue that such allosteric mechanisms appear essential not only for sodium-coupled symport in general but also for the function of other types of molecular machines in the membrane. PMID:26892914

  9. Two glucose/xylose transporter genes from the yeast Candida intermedia: first molecular characterization of a yeast xylose–H+ symporter

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Maria José; Gonçalves, Paula; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    Candida intermedia PYCC 4715 was previously shown to grow well on xylose and to transport this sugar by two different transport systems: high-capacity and low-affinity facilitated diffusion and a high-affinity xylose–proton symporter, both of which accept glucose as a substrate. Here we report the isolation of genes encoding both transporters, designated GXF1 (glucose/xylose facilitator 1) and GXS1 (glucose/xylose symporter 1) respectively. Although GXF1 was isolated by functional complementation of an HXT-null (where Hxt refers to hexose transporters) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolation of the GXS1 cDNA required partial purification and micro-sequencing of the transporter, identified by its relative abundance in cells grown on low xylose concentrations. Both genes were expressed in S. cerevisiae and the kinetic parameters of glucose and xylose transport were determined. Gxs1 is the first yeast xylose/glucose–H+ symporter to be characterized at the molecular level. Comparison of its amino acid sequence with available sequence data revealed the existence of a family of putative monosaccharide–H+ symporters encompassing proteins from several yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:16402921

  10. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satinder K.; Pal, Aritra

    2016-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. PMID:25950965

  11. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K; Pal, Aritra

    2015-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. PMID:25950965

  12. Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NHE1) and lactate/H(+) symporters (MCTs) in pH homeostasis and cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Counillon, Laurent; Bouret, Yann; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    The Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger NHE1 and the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 are crucial for intracellular pH regulation, particularly under active metabolism. NHE1, a reversible antiporter, uses the energy provided by the Na(+) gradient to expel H(+) ions generated in the cytosol. The reversible H(+)/lactate(-) symporters MCT1 and 4 cotransport lactate and proton, leading to the net extrusion of lactic acid in glycolytic tumors. In the first two sections of this article we review important features and remaining questions on the structure, biochemical function and cellular roles of these transporters. We then use a fully-coupled mathematical model to simulate their relative contribution to pH regulation in response to lactate production, as it occurs in highly hypoxic and glycolytic tumor cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26944480

  13. The Na+/I− Symporter (NIS): Mechanism and Medical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Portulano, Carla; Paroder-Belenitsky, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The Na+/I− symporter (NIS) is the plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates active I− transport in the thyroid and other tissues, such as salivary glands, stomach, lactating breast, and small intestine. In the thyroid, NIS-mediated I− uptake plays a key role as the first step in the biosynthesis of the thyroid hormones, of which iodine is an essential constituent. These hormones are crucial for the development of the central nervous system and the lungs in the fetus and the newborn and for intermediary metabolism at all ages. Since the cloning of NIS in 1996, NIS research has become a major field of inquiry, with considerable impact on many basic and translational areas. In this article, we review the most recent findings on NIS, I− homeostasis, and related topics and place them in historical context. Among many other issues, we discuss the current outlook on iodide deficiency disorders, the present stage of understanding of the structure/function properties of NIS, information gleaned from the characterization of I− transport deficiency-causing NIS mutations, insights derived from the newly reported crystal structures of prokaryotic transporters and 3-dimensional homology modeling, and the novel discovery that NIS transports different substrates with different stoichiometries. A review of NIS regulatory mechanisms is provided, including a newly discovered one involving a K+ channel that is required for NIS function in the thyroid. We also cover current and potential clinical applications of NIS, such as its central role in the treatment of thyroid cancer, its promising use as a reporter gene in imaging and diagnostic procedures, and the latest studies on NIS gene transfer aimed at extending radioiodide treatment to extrathyroidal cancers, including those involving specially engineered NIS molecules. PMID:24311738

  14. The Na+/I- symporter (NIS): mechanism and medical impact.

    PubMed

    Portulano, Carla; Paroder-Belenitsky, Monika; Carrasco, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    The Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) is the plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates active I(-) transport in the thyroid and other tissues, such as salivary glands, stomach, lactating breast, and small intestine. In the thyroid, NIS-mediated I(-) uptake plays a key role as the first step in the biosynthesis of the thyroid hormones, of which iodine is an essential constituent. These hormones are crucial for the development of the central nervous system and the lungs in the fetus and the newborn and for intermediary metabolism at all ages. Since the cloning of NIS in 1996, NIS research has become a major field of inquiry, with considerable impact on many basic and translational areas. In this article, we review the most recent findings on NIS, I(-) homeostasis, and related topics and place them in historical context. Among many other issues, we discuss the current outlook on iodide deficiency disorders, the present stage of understanding of the structure/function properties of NIS, information gleaned from the characterization of I(-) transport deficiency-causing NIS mutations, insights derived from the newly reported crystal structures of prokaryotic transporters and 3-dimensional homology modeling, and the novel discovery that NIS transports different substrates with different stoichiometries. A review of NIS regulatory mechanisms is provided, including a newly discovered one involving a K(+) channel that is required for NIS function in the thyroid. We also cover current and potential clinical applications of NIS, such as its central role in the treatment of thyroid cancer, its promising use as a reporter gene in imaging and diagnostic procedures, and the latest studies on NIS gene transfer aimed at extending radioiodide treatment to extrathyroidal cancers, including those involving specially engineered NIS molecules. PMID:24311738

  15. Functional characterization of a member of alanine or glycine: cation symporter family in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins of amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. The alanine or glycine: cation symporter (AGCS) family belongs to APC superfamily and is found in prokaryotes, but its substrate specificity remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that a halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica has two putative ApagcS genes. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of genes, ApagcS1, exhibited high homology to Pseudomonas AgcS. The ApagcS1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli JW4166 which is deficient in glycine uptake. Kinetics studies in JW4166 revealed that ApAgcS1 is a sodium-dependent glycine transporter. Competition experiments showed the significant inhibition by glutamine, asparagine, and glycine. The level of mRNA for ApagcS1 was induced by NaCl and nitrogen-deficient stresses. Uptake of glutamine by ApAgcS1 was also observed. Based on these data, the physiological role of ApAgcS1 was discussed. PMID:25421789

  16. Identification of a Second Substrate-binding Site in Solute-Sodium Symporters*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S. E.; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P.; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ∼1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na+/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport. PMID:25398883

  17. A novel peculiar mutation in the sodium/iodide symporter gene in spanish siblings with iodide transport defect.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shinji; Okamoto, Hiroomi; Tamada, Aiko; Sanchez-Franco, F

    2002-08-01

    Previously, we reported two Spanish siblings with congenital hypothyroidism due to total failure of iodide transport. These were the only cases reported to date who received long-term iodide treatment over 10 yr. We examined the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene of these patients. A large deletion was observed by long and accurate PCR using primers derived from introns 2 and 7 of the NIS gene. PCR-direct sequencing revealed a deletion of 6192 bases spanning from exon 3 to intron 7 and an inverted insertion of a 431-base fragment spanning from exon 5 to intron 5 of the NIS gene. The patients were homozygous for the mutation, and their mother was heterozygous. In the mutant, deletion of exons 3-7 was suggested by analysis using programs to predict exon/intron organization, resulting in an in-frame 182-amino acid deletion from Met(142) in the fourth transmembrane domain to Gln(323) in the fourth exoplasmic loop. The mutant showed no iodide uptake activity when transfected into COS-7 cells, confirming that the mutation was the direct cause of the iodide transport defect in these patients. Further, the mutant NIS protein was synthesized, but not properly expressed, on the cell surface, but was mostly accumulated in the cytoplasm, suggesting impaired targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:12161518

  18. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H(+) symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity.

    PubMed

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The uric acid/xanthine H(+) symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1-11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin. PMID:27088252

  19. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H+ symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J.; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The uric acid/xanthine H+ symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1–11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin. PMID:27088252

  20. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H+ symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J.; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-04-01

    The uric acid/xanthine H+ symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1-11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin.

  1. Molecular characterization of V59E NIS, a Na+/I- symporter mutant that causes congenital I- transport defect.

    PubMed

    Reed-Tsur, Mia D; De la Vieja, Antonio; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2008-06-01

    I(-) is actively transported into thyrocytes via the Na+/I(-) symporter (NIS), a key glycoprotein located on the basolateral plasma membrane. The cDNA encoding rat NIS was identified in our laboratory, where an extensive structure/function characterization of NIS is being conducted. Several NIS mutants have been identified as causes of congenital I(-) transport defect (ITD), including V59E NIS. ITD is characterized by low thyroid I(-) uptake, low saliva/plasma I(-) ratio, hypothyroidism, and goiter and may cause mental retardation if untreated. Studies of other ITD-causing NIS mutants have revealed valuable information regarding NIS structure/function. V59E NIS was reported to exhibit as much as 30% of the activity of wild-type NIS. However, this observation was at variance with the patients' phenotype of total lack of activity. We have thoroughly characterized V59E NIS and studied several amino acid substitutions at position 59. We demonstrated that, in contrast to the previous report, V59E NIS is inactive, although it is properly targeted to the plasma membrane. Glu and all other charged amino acids or Pro at position 59 also yielded nonfunctional NIS proteins. However, I(-) uptake was rescued to different degrees by the other substitutions. Although the Km values for Na+ and I(-) were not altered in these active mutants, we found that the structural requirement for NIS function at position 59 is a neutral, helix-promoting amino acid. This result suggests that the region that contains V59 may be involved in intramembrane helix-helix interactions during the transport cycle without being in direct contact with the substrates. PMID:18339708

  2. Methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter correlated with aggressiveness and metastasis in papillary thyroid carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun-Yu; Wang, Huan-Jun; Wang, Hai-Peng; Yao, Jin-Ming; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Shang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Huan-Gao; Dong, Jian-Jun; Liao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter has been reported to increase the incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In this meta-analysis stratified via methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter, we evaluate the relationship between methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter and PTC. The association between methylation with aggressiveness and metastasis potential of PTC is also discussed. Methods: We searched electronic databases for original articles and references of included studies both in English and Chinese from 1966 to 2014. Two reviewers selected the case-control study and extracted data from relevant literature independently. Results: Seven articles, including 360 cases and 268 controls, were involved in this meta-analysis. The prevalence of PTC in patients with methylated sodium iodide symporter promoter was significantly higher than those with non-methylated promoter (OR=7.36, 95% CI: 4.25-12.74, P<0.001). Stratified analysis showed that PTC patients with multiple lesions, capsule invasion and lymphatic metastasis had significantly higher rates of methylation (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.12-4.41, P=0.02; OR=2.14, 95% CI: 1.12-4.08, P=0.02; OR=3.56, 95% CI: 1.97-6.46, P<0.0001). But no relationship was found among the methylation of sodium iodide symporter and age, gender and size of tumor. Conclusions: The methylation of sodium iodide symporter promoter is related with PTC and its aggressive and metastatic potential. Due to the limited sample size, more clinical researches should be taken in the future. PMID:26379865

  3. A novel sucrose/H+ symport system and an intracellular sucrase in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2011-07-01

    The flagellated form of pathogenic parasitic protozoa Leishmania, resides in the alimentary tract of its sandfly vector, where sucrose serves as a major nutrient source. In this study we report the presence of a sucrose transport system in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. The kinetics of sucrose uptake in promastigotes are biphasic in nature with both high affinity K(m) (K(m) of ∼ 75 μM) and low affinity K(m) (K(m)∼ 1.38 mM) components. By contrast the virulent amastigotes take up sucrose via a low affinity process with a K(m) of 2.5mM. The transport of sucrose into promastigotes leads to rapid intracellular acidification, as indicated by changes in the fluorescence of the pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(6) Carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). In experiments with right side-out plasma membrane vesicles derived from L. donovani promastigotes, an artificial pH gradient was able to drive the active accumulation of sucrose. These data are consistent with the operation of a H(+)-sucrose symporter. The symporter was shown to be independent of Na(+) and to be insensitive to cytochalasin B, to the flavonoid phloretin and to the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase inhibitor ouabain. However, the protonophore carbonylcyanide P- (trifluromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and a number of thiol reagents caused significant inhibition of sucrose uptake. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of a stable intracellular pool of the sucrose splitting enzyme, sucrase, in promastigote stage parasites. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that L. donovani promastigotes take up sucrose via a novel H(+)-sucrose symport system and that, on entering the cell, the sucrose is hydrolysed to its component monosaccharides by an intracellular sucrase, thereby providing an energy source for the parasites. PMID:21515279

  4. Proton-assisted amino acid transporters are conserved regulators of proliferation and amino acid-dependent mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heublein, S; Kazi, S; Ögmundsdóttir, M H; Attwood, E V; Kala, S; Boyd, C A R; Wilson, C; Goberdhan, D C I

    2011-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and downstream mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling cascades promote normal growth and are frequently hyperactivated in tumour cells. mTORC1 is also regulated by local nutrients, particularly amino acids, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Unexpectedly, members of the proton-assisted amino acid transporter (PAT or SLC36) family emerged from in vivo genetic screens in Drosophila as transporters with uniquely potent effects on mTORC1-mediated growth. Here we show the two human PATs that are widely expressed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines, PAT1 and PAT4, behave similarly to fly PATs when expressed in Drosophila. siRNA knockdown reveals that these molecules are required for activation of mTORC1 targets and for proliferation in human MCF-7 breast cancer and HEK-293 embryonic kidney cell lines. Furthermore, activation of mTORC1 in starved HEK-293 cells stimulated by amino acids requires PAT1 and PAT4, and is elevated in PAT1-overexpressing cells. Importantly, in HEK-293 cells, PAT1 is highly concentrated in intracellular compartments, including endosomes, where mTOR shuttles upon amino acid stimulation. Our data are therefore consistent with a model in which PATs modulate mTORC1's activity not by transporting amino acids into the cell, but by modulating the intracellular response to amino acids. PMID:20498635

  5. Mechanism of anion selectivity and stoichiometry of the Na+/I- symporter (NIS)

    PubMed Central

    Paroder-Belenitsky, Monika; Maestas, Matthew J.; Dohán, Orsolya; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Follenzi, Antonia; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Eskandari, Sepehr; Amzel, L. Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    I- uptake in the thyroid, the first step in thyroid hormone biosynthesis, is mediated by the Na+/I- symporter (NIS) with an electrogenic 2Na+ : 1I- stoichiometry. We have obtained mechanistic information on NIS by characterizing the congenital I- transport defect-causing NIS mutant G93R. This mutant is targeted to the plasma membrane but is inactive. Substitutions at position 93 show that the longer the side chain of the neutral residue at this position, the higher the Km for the anion substrates. Unlike WT NIS, which mediates symport of Na+ and the environmental pollutant perchlorate electroneutrally, G93T/N/Q/E/D NIS, strikingly, do it electrogenically with a 2∶1 stoichiometry. Furthermore, G93E/Q NIS discriminate between anion substrates, a discovery with potential clinical relevance. A 3D homology model of NIS based on the structure of the bacterial Na+/galactose transporter identifies G93 as a critical player in the mechanism of the transporter: the changes from an outwardly to an inwardly open conformation during the transport cycle use G93 as a pivot. PMID:22011571

  6. Oncolytic Measles Virus Expressing the Sodium Iodide Symporter to Treat Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Evanthia; Atherton, Pamela J.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Knutson, Keith L.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Cliby, William A.; Haluska, Paul; Long, Harry J.; Oberg, Ann; Aderca, Ileana; Block, Matthew S.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Keeney, Gary; Peng, Kah Whye; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    Edmonston vaccine strains of measles virus (MV) have significant antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models of ovarian cancer. MV engineered to express the sodium iodide symporter gene (MV-NIS) facilitates localization of viral gene expression and offers a tool for tumor radiovirotherapy. Here, we report results from a clinical evaluation of MV-NIS in patients with taxol- and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. MV-NIS was given intraperitoneally every 4 weeks for up to 6 cycles. Treatment was well tolerated and associated with promising median overall survival in these patients with heavily pretreated ovarian cancer; no dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 16 patients treated at high-dose levels (108–109 TCID50), and their median overall survival of 26.5 months compared favorably with other contemporary series. MV receptor CD46 and nectin-4 expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in patient tumors. Sodium iodide symporter expression in patient tumors after treatment was confirmed in three patients by 123I uptake on SPECT/CTs and was associated with long progression-free survival. Immune monitoring posttreatment showed an increase in effector T cells recognizing the tumor antigens IGFBP2 and FRα, indicating that MV-NIS treatment triggered cellular immunity against the patients' tumor and suggesting that an immune mechanism mediating the observed antitumor effect. Our findings support further clinical evaluation of MV-NIS as an effective immunovirotherapy. PMID:25398436

  7. Mechanism of anion selectivity and stoichiometry of the Na+/I- symporter (NIS).

    PubMed

    Paroder-Belenitsky, Monika; Maestas, Matthew J; Dohán, Orsolya; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Follenzi, Antonia; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Eskandari, Sepehr; Amzel, L Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    I(-) uptake in the thyroid, the first step in thyroid hormone biosynthesis, is mediated by the Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) with an electrogenic 2Na(+):1I(-) stoichiometry. We have obtained mechanistic information on NIS by characterizing the congenital I(-) transport defect-causing NIS mutant G93R. This mutant is targeted to the plasma membrane but is inactive. Substitutions at position 93 show that the longer the side chain of the neutral residue at this position, the higher the K(m) for the anion substrates. Unlike WT NIS, which mediates symport of Na(+) and the environmental pollutant perchlorate electroneutrally, G93T/N/Q/E/D NIS, strikingly, do it electrogenically with a 21 stoichiometry. Furthermore, G93E/Q NIS discriminate between anion substrates, a discovery with potential clinical relevance. A 3D homology model of NIS based on the structure of the bacterial Na(+)/galactose transporter identifies G93 as a critical player in the mechanism of the transporter: the changes from an outwardly to an inwardly open conformation during the transport cycle use G93 as a pivot. PMID:22011571

  8. ZrFsy1, a high-affinity fructose/H+ symporter from fructophilic yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Maria José; Sychrová, Hana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a fructophilic yeast than can grow at very high sugar concentrations. We have identified an ORF encoding a putative fructose/H(+) symporter in the Z. rouxii CBS 732 genome database. Heterologous expression of this ORF in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking its own hexose transporters (hxt-null) and subsequent kinetic characterization of its sugar transport activity showed it is a high-affinity low-capacity fructose/H(+) symporter, with Km 0.45 ± 0.07 mM and Vmax 0.57 ± 0.02 mmol h(-1) (gdw)(-1). We named it ZrFsy1. This protein also weakly transports xylitol and sorbose, but not glucose or other hexoses. The expression of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii is higher when the cells are cultivated at extremely low fructose concentrations (<0.2%) and on non-fermentable carbon sources such as mannitol and xylitol, where the cells have a prolonged lag phase, longer duplication times and change their microscopic morphology. A clear phenotype was determined for the first time for the deletion of a fructose/H(+) symporter in the genome where it occurs naturally. The effect of the deletion of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii cells is only evident when the cells are cultivated at very low fructose concentrations, when the ZrFsy1 fructose symporter is the main active fructose transporter system. PMID:23844167

  9. ZrFsy1, a High-Affinity Fructose/H+ Symporter from Fructophilic Yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Maria José; Sychrová, Hana; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a fructophilic yeast than can grow at very high sugar concentrations. We have identified an ORF encoding a putative fructose/H+ symporter in the Z. rouxii CBS 732 genome database. Heterologous expression of this ORF in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking its own hexose transporters (hxt-null) and subsequent kinetic characterization of its sugar transport activity showed it is a high-affinity low-capacity fructose/H+ symporter, with Km 0.45±0.07 mM and Vmax 0.57±0.02 mmol h−1 (gdw) −1. We named it ZrFsy1. This protein also weakly transports xylitol and sorbose, but not glucose or other hexoses. The expression of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii is higher when the cells are cultivated at extremely low fructose concentrations (<0.2%) and on non-fermentable carbon sources such as mannitol and xylitol, where the cells have a prolonged lag phase, longer duplication times and change their microscopic morphology. A clear phenotype was determined for the first time for the deletion of a fructose/H+ symporter in the genome where it occurs naturally. The effect of the deletion of ZrFSY1 in Z. rouxii cells is only evident when the cells are cultivated at very low fructose concentrations, when the ZrFsy1 fructose symporter is the main active fructose transporter system. PMID:23844167

  10. Project Overview: Inhibition of the Sodium-Iodide Symporter by Perchlorate: Evaluation of Lifestage Sensitivity Using PBPK Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) competitively inhibits uptake of iodide by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) in laboratory animals and humans. NIS is found in many tissues, but is primarily responsible for sequestering iodide into the thyroid, enabling biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. The N...

  11. Functional expression of a myo-inositol/H+ symporter from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Drew, M E; Langford, C K; Klamo, E M; Russell, D G; Kavanaugh, M P; Landfear, S M

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of surface molecules in such kinetoplastid protozoa as members of the genus Leishmania contain inositol and are either glycosyl inositol phospholipids or glycoproteins that are tethered to the external surface of the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. We have shown that the biosynthetic precursor for these abundant glycolipids, myo-inositol, is translocated across the parasite plasma membrane by a specific transporter that is structurally related to mammalian facilitative glucose transporters. This myo-inositol transporter has been expressed and characterized in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments demonstrate that this protein is a sodium-independent electrogenic symporter that appears to utilize a proton gradient to concentrate myo-inositol within the cell. Immunolocalization experiments with a transporter-specific polyclonal antibody reveal the presence of this protein in the parasite plasma membrane. PMID:7565702

  12. Spin Labeling Studies of Transmembrane Signaling and Transport: Applications to Phototaxis, ABC Transporters and Symporters.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins still represent a major challenge for structural biologists. This chapter will focus on the application of continuous wave and pulsed EPR spectroscopy on spin-labeled membrane proteins. Site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy has evolved as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of proteins, especially membrane proteins, as this method works largely independently of the size and complexity of the biological system under investigation. This chapter describes applications of this technique to three different systems: the archaeal photoreceptor/-transducer complex SRII/HtrII as an example for transmembrane signaling and two transport systems, the histidine ATP-binding cassette transporter HisQMP, and the sodium-proline symporter PutP. PMID:26477256

  13. Cellulose Deficiency Is Enhanced on Hyper Accumulation of Sucrose by a H+-Coupled Sucrose Symporter.

    PubMed

    Yeats, Trevor H; Sorek, Hagit; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-05-01

    In order to understand factors controlling the synthesis and deposition of cellulose, we have studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) double mutant shaven3 shaven3-like1 (shv3svl1), which was shown previously to exhibit a marked cellulose deficiency. We discovered that exogenous sucrose (Suc) in growth medium greatly enhances the reduction in hypocotyl elongation and cellulose content of shv3svl1 This effect was specific to Suc and was not observed with other sugars or osmoticum. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled cellulose synthase complexes revealed a slowing of cellulose synthase complexes in shv3svl1 compared with the wild type that is enhanced in a Suc-conditional manner. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed a cellulose deficiency of shv3svl1 but indicated that cellulose crystallinity was unaffected in the mutant. A genetic suppressor screen identified mutants of the plasma membrane Suc/H(+) symporter SUC1, indicating that the accumulation of Suc underlies the Suc-dependent enhancement of shv3svl1 phenotypes. While other cellulose-deficient mutants were not specifically sensitive to exogenous Suc, the feronia (fer) receptor kinase mutant partially phenocopied shv3svl1 and exhibited a similar Suc-conditional cellulose defect. We demonstrate that shv3svl1, like fer, exhibits a hyperpolarized plasma membrane H(+) gradient that likely underlies the enhanced accumulation of Suc via Suc/H(+) symporters. Enhanced intracellular Suc abundance appears to favor the partitioning of carbon to starch rather than cellulose in both mutants. We conclude that SHV3-like proteins may be involved in signaling during cell expansion that coordinates proton pumping and cellulose synthesis. PMID:27013021

  14. Characterization of source- and sink-specific sucrose/H+ symporters from carrot.

    PubMed

    Shakya, R; Sturm, A

    1998-12-01

    To understand how sucrose (Suc) is transported from source leaves to developing tap roots of carrot (Daucus carota L.), we cloned two cDNAs (DcSUT1 and DcSUT2) for proteins with homologies to plant Suc/H+ symporters. The deduced polypeptide sequences are 52% identical and have 12 predicted membrane-spanning domains each. Transport activities were confirmed by expression of the clones in yeast cells. Both transporters had optimal activity below pH 5.0 and Michaelis constant values of 0.5 mM. Suc uptake was inhibited by protonophores, suggesting that Suc transport is linked to the proton electrochemical potential across the plasma membrane. DcSUT1 and DcSUT2 had markedly different expression patterns. Transcripts of DcSUT1 were found only in the green parts of plants, with highest levels in the lamina of source leaves, indicating that DcSUT1 is required for the loading of Suc into the phloem. In leaf lamina expression was diurnally regulated, suggesting that Suc export from the leaves is higher during the day than during the night. The mRNA of DcSUT2 was found mainly in sink organs, and no diurnal expression pattern was detected in the storage root. Here, expression was not restricted to the phloem but was much higher in storage parenchyma tissues of phloem and xylem. The close relationship of DcSUT2 with a Suc/H+ symporter from fava bean, which facilitates Suc uptake into the cotyledons of developing seeds, indicates that this carrot Suc transporter may be involved in loading Suc into storage parenchyma cells. PMID:9847123

  15. Sodium Iodide Symporter for Nuclear Molecular Imaging and Gene Therapy: From Bedside to Bench and Back

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging, defined as the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms, can be obtained by various imaging technologies, including nuclear imaging methods. Imaging of normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid cancer, and treatment of thyroid cancer with radioiodine rely on the expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in these cells. NIS is an intrinsic membrane protein with 13 transmembrane domains and it takes up iodide into the cytosol from the extracellular fluid. By transferring NIS function to various cells via gene transfer, the cells can be visualized with gamma or positron emitting radioisotopes such as Tc-99m, I-123, I-131, I-124 and F-18 tetrafluoroborate, which are accumulated by NIS. They can also be treated with beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, such as I-131, Re-186, Re-188 and At-211, which are also accumulated by NIS. This article demonstrates the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of NIS as a radionuclide-based reporter gene for trafficking cells and a therapeutic gene for treating cancers. PMID:22539935

  16. Mammary radioiodine accumulation due to functional sodium iodide symporter expression in a benign fibroadenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, F.; Unterholzner, S.; Diebold, J.; Knesewitsch, P.; Hahn, K.; Spitzweg, C. . E-mail: Christine.Spitzweg@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2006-11-03

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has been characterized to mediate the active transport of iodide not only in the thyroid gland but also in various non-thyroidal tissues, including lactating mammary gland and the majority of breast cancers, thereby offering the possibility of diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine application in breast cancer. In this report, we present a 57-year-old patient with multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma, who showed focal radioiodine accumulation in a lesion in the right breast on a posttherapy {sup 131}I scan following radioiodine therapy. CT and MR-mammography showed a focal solid lesion in the right breast suggestive of a fibroadenoma, which was confirmed by histological examination. Immunostaining of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections using a human NIS antibody demonstrated NIS-specific immunoreactivity confined to epithelial cells of mammary ducts. In conclusion, in a thyroid cancer patient we identified a benign fibroadenoma of the breast expressing high levels of functionally active NIS protein as underlying cause of focal mammary radioiodine accumulation on a posttherapy {sup 131}I scan. These data show for the first time that functional NIS expression is not restricted to lactating mammary gland and malignant breast tissue, but can also be detected in benign breast lesions, such as fibroadenomata of the breast.

  17. Decreased Expression of Thyroglobulin and Sodium Iodide Symporter Genes in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Popławska-Kita, Anna; Telejko, Beata; Siewko, Katarzyna; Kościuszko-Zdrodowska, Maria; Wawrusewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Krętowski, Adam; Hryniewicka, Justyna; Dzięcioł, Janusz; Bauer, Witold; Milewski, Robert; Szelachowska, Małgorzata; Górska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of sodium iodide symporter (NIS), thyroglobulin (Tg), tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF α ), and interleukin-1 β genes in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and healthy individuals. Subjects and Methods. Thyroid cells were obtained from 39 patients with HT and 15 controls by an ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. Results. The patients with HT had lower Tg and NIS mRNA (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as higher TNF α mRNA expression (P = 0.049) than the controls. In the HT group Tg mRNA expression correlated positively with NIS mRNA expression (R = 0.739, P = 0.0001) and thyroid volume (R = 0.465, P = 0.0005), as well as negatively with TNF α mRNA expression (R = -0.490, P = 0.001) and anti-peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) level (R = -0.482, P = 0.0002), whereas NIS mRNA expression correlated positively with thyroid volume (R = 0.319, P = 0.02), as well as negatively with TNF α mRNA expression (R = -0.529, P = 0.0006) and TPOAb level (R = -0.422, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Our results suggest that decreased Tg and NIS expression in thyroid cells may result in reduced active iodide transport and reduced thyroid volume in patients with HT. PMID:24723949

  18. A systematic evaluation of sorting motifs in the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS).

    PubMed

    Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Graslin, Fanny; Marcellin, Didier; Tcheremisinova, Iulia; Marchetti, Charles; Salleron, Lisa; Pognonec, Philippe; Pourcher, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is an integral membrane protein that plays a crucial role in iodide accumulation, especially in the thyroid. As for many other membrane proteins, its intracellular sorting and distribution have a tremendous effect on its function, and constitute an important aspect of its regulation. Many short sequences have been shown to contribute to protein trafficking along the sorting or endocytic pathways. Using bioinformatics tools, we identified such potential sites on human NIS [tyrosine-based motifs, SH2-(Src homology 2), SH3- and PDZ (post-synaptic density-95/discs large tumour suppressor/zonula occludens-1)-binding motifs, and diacidic, dibasic and dileucine motifs] and analysed their roles using mutagenesis. We found that several of these sites play a role in protein stability and/or targeting to the membrane. Aside from the mutation at position 178 (SH2 plus tyrosine-based motif) that affects iodide uptake, the most drastic effect is associated with the mutation of an internal PDZ-binding motif at position 121 that completely abolishes NIS expression at the plasma membrane. Mutating the sites located on the C-terminal domain of the protein has no effect except for the creation of a diacidic motif that decreases the total NIS protein level without affecting its expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26831514

  19. A novel mechanism of sodium iodide symporter repression in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vicki E; Read, Martin L; Turnell, Andrew S; Watkins, Rachel J; Watkinson, John C; Lewy, Greg D; Fong, Jim C W; James, Sally R; Eggo, Margaret C; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2009-09-15

    Differentiated thyroid cancers and their metastases frequently exhibit reduced iodide uptake, impacting on the efficacy of radioiodine ablation therapy. PTTG binding factor (PBF) is a proto-oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. We recently reported that PBF inhibits iodide uptake, and have now elucidated a mechanism by which PBF directly modulates sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity in vitro. In subcellular localisation studies, PBF overexpression resulted in the redistribution of NIS from the plasma membrane into intracellular vesicles, where it colocalised with the tetraspanin CD63. Cell-surface biotinylation assays confirmed a reduction in plasma membrane NIS expression following PBF transfection compared with vector-only treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down experiments demonstrated a direct interaction between NIS and PBF, the functional consequence of which was assessed using iodide-uptake studies in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells. PBF repressed iodide uptake, whereas three deletion mutants, which did not localise within intracellular vesicles, lost the ability to inhibit NIS activity. In summary, we present an entirely novel mechanism by which the proto-oncogene PBF binds NIS and alters its subcellular localisation, thereby regulating its ability to uptake iodide. Given that PBF is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, these findings have profound implications for thyroid cancer ablation using radioiodine. PMID:19706688

  20. Physiological sodium concentrations enhance the iodide affinity of the Na+/I- symporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Juan P.; Carrasco, Nancy; Mario Amzel, L.

    2014-06-01

    The Na+/I- symporter (NIS) mediates active I- transport—the first step in thyroid hormonogenesis—with a 2Na+:1I- stoichiometry. NIS-mediated 131I- treatment of thyroid cancer post-thyroidectomy is the most effective targeted internal radiation cancer treatment available. Here to uncover mechanistic information on NIS, we use statistical thermodynamics to obtain Kds and estimate the relative populations of the different NIS species during Na+/anion binding and transport. We show that, although the affinity of NIS for I- is low (Kd=224 μM), it increases when Na+ is bound (Kd=22.4 μM). However, this Kd is still much higher than the submicromolar physiological I- concentration. To overcome this, NIS takes advantage of the extracellular Na+ concentration and the pronounced increase in its own affinity for I- and for the second Na+ elicited by binding of the first. Thus, at physiological Na+ concentrations, ~79% of NIS molecules are occupied by two Na+ ions and ready to bind and transport I-.

  1. The Biology of the Sodium Iodide Symporter and its Potential for Targeted Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, M.; Spitzweg, C.; Vassaux, G.; Newbold, K.; Melcher, A.; Pandha, H.; Vile, R.; Harrington, K.

    2013-01-01

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for thyroidal, salivary, gastric, intestinal and mammary iodide uptake. It was first cloned from the rat in 1996 and shortly thereafter from human and mouse tissue. In the intervening years, we have learned a great deal about the biology of NIS. Detailed knowledge of its genomic structure, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and pharmacological modulation has underpinned the selection of NIS as an exciting approach for targeted gene delivery. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the potential of using NIS gene therapy as a means of delivering highly conformal radiation doses selectively to tumours. This strategy is particularly attractive because it can be used with both diagnostic (99mTc, 125I, 124I) and therapeutic (131I, 186Re, 188Re, 211At) radioisotopes and it lends itself to incorporation with standard treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. In this article, we review the biology of NIS and discuss its development for gene therapy. PMID:20201784

  2. Simulation of a bounded symport/antiport P system with Brane calculi.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zandron, Claudio

    2008-03-01

    Membrane systems (also called P systems) and Brane calculi have been recently introduced as formal models inspired by the structure and the functioning of living cells, but having in mind different goals. The aim of Membrane systems was the formal investigation of the computational nature and power of various features of the cell, while Brane calculi aims to define a model capable of a faithful and intuitive representation of various biological processes. The common background of the two formalisms and the recent growing of interests in applying P systems in Systems Biology have raised the natural question of bridging this two research areas. The present paper goes in this direction, as it presents a direct simulation of a variant of P systems by means of Brane calculi. In particular, we consider a Brane calculus based on three operations called Mate/Bud/Drip, and we show how to use such system to simulate Simple symport/antiport P systems, a variant of P systems purely based on communication of objects. As an example, a simplified sodium-potassium pump modeled in Simple SA is encoded in Mate/Bud/Drip Brane calculus. PMID:17889992

  3. The sodium/iodide Symporter (NIS): characterization, regulation, and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Dohán, Orsolya; De la Vieja, Antonio; Paroder, Viktoriya; Riedel, Claudia; Artani, Mona; Reed, Mia; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2003-02-01

    The Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) is an integral plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates active I(-) transport into the thyroid follicular cells, the first step in thyroid hormone biosynthesis. NIS-mediated thyroidal I(-) transport from the bloodstream to the colloid is a vectorial process made possible by the selective targeting of NIS to the basolateral membrane. NIS also mediates active I(-) transport in other tissues, including salivary glands, gastric mucosa, and lactating mammary gland, in which it translocates I(-) into the milk for thyroid hormone biosynthesis by the nursing newborn. NIS provides the basis for the effective diagnostic and therapeutic management of thyroid cancer and its metastases with radioiodide. NIS research has proceeded at an astounding pace after the 1996 isolation of the rat NIS cDNA, comprising the elucidation of NIS secondary structure and topology, biogenesis and posttranslational modifications, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, electrophysiological analysis, isolation of the human NIS cDNA, and determination of the human NIS genomic organization. Clinically related topics include the analysis of congenital I(-) transport defect-causing NIS mutations and the role of NIS in thyroid cancer. NIS has been transduced into various kinds of cancer cells to render them susceptible to destruction with radioiodide. Most dramatically, the discovery of endogenous NIS expression in more than 80% of human breast cancer samples has raised the possibility that radioiodide may be a valuable novel tool in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:12588808

  4. Ionic selectivity of chloride ion symport in mechanisms controlling resting potential and osmotic homeostasis in earthworm somatic muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, E M; Volkov, M E; Zefirov, A L

    2008-05-01

    Replacement of Cl(-) for Br(-) in bathing solution did not reduce resting potential and had no effect on modulation of transmembrane potential in hyper- and hypoosmotic solutions. Under these conditions, baclofen, an agonist of GABAergic B-type receptors, failed to activate Na(+)/K(+)-pump in earthworm somatic muscle cells. It was hypothesized that the contribution of Cl(-) symport to osmotic homeostasis is not highly selective in respect to replacement of Cl(-) to Br(-) ions, whereas in case of activation of electrogenic ion pumps, this replacement is equivalent to removal of Cl(-) ions from the bathing solution. PMID:19145278

  5. The Na+/I− symporter (NIS) mediates electroneutral active transport of the environmental pollutant perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Dohán, Orsolya; Portulano, Carla; Basquin, Cécile; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Amzel, L. Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Na+/I− symporter (NIS) is a key plasma membrane protein that mediates active I− uptake in the thyroid, lactating breast, and other tissues with an electrogenic stoichiometry of 2 Na+ per I−. In the thyroid, NIS-mediated I− uptake is the first step in the biosynthesis of the iodine-containing thyroid hormones, which are essential early in life for proper CNS development. In the lactating breast, NIS mediates the translocation of I− to the milk, thus supplying this essential anion to the nursing newborn. Perchlorate (ClO4−) is a well known competitive inhibitor of NIS. Exposure to food and water contaminated with ClO4− is common in the U.S. population, and the public health impact of such exposure is currently being debated. To date, it is still uncertain whether ClO4− is a NIS blocker or a transported substrate of NIS. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that NIS actively transports ClO4−, including ClO4− translocation to the milk. A simple mathematical fluxes model accurately predicts the effect of ClO4− transport on the rate and extent of I− accumulation. Strikingly, the Na+/ ClO4− transport stoichiometry is electroneutral, uncovering that NIS translocates different substrates with different stoichiometries. That NIS actively concentrates ClO4− in maternal milk suggests that exposure of newborns to high levels of ClO4− may pose a greater health risk than previously acknowledged because ClO4− would thus directly inhibit the newborns' thyroidal I− uptake. PMID:18077370

  6. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-04-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  7. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; Banga, Jasvinder Paul; O’Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Clarke, Susan E. M.; Ballinger, James R.; Szanda, Istvan; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123I-iodide, 131I-iodide and 99mTc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([18F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. Methods [18F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF4− with [18F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. Results [18F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. Conclusion [18F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00259-010-1523-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20577737

  9. Monoclonal antibodies that bind the renal Na/sup +//glucose symport system. 2. Stabilization of an active conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.S.R.; Lever, J.E.

    1987-09-08

    Conformation-dependent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling of the pig renal Na/sup +//glucose symporter was investigated with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb's). When renal brush border membranes were pretreated with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC), washed, and then treated at neutral pH with FITC in the presence of transporter substrates Na/sup +/ and glucose, most of the incorporated fluorescence was associated with a single peak after resolution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular mass of the FITC-labeled species ranged from 79 to 92 kDa. Labeling of this peak was specifically reduced by 70% if Na/sup +/ and glucose were omitted. Na/sup +/ could not be replaced by K/sup +/, Rb/sup +/, or Li/sup +/. FITC labeling of this peak was also stimulated after incubation of membranes with MAb's known to influence high-affinity phlorizin binding, and stimulation was synergistically increased when MAb's were added in the presence of Na/sup +/ and glucose. Substrate-induced or MAb-induced labeling correlated with inactivation of Na/sup +/-dependent phlorizin binding. MAb's recognized an antigen of 75 kDa in the native membranes whereas substrate-induced FITC labeling was accompanied by loss of antigen recognition and protection from proteolysis. These findings are consistent with a model in which MAb's stabilize a Na/sup +/-induced active conformer of the Na/sup +//glucose symport system.

  10. Sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-mediated accumulation of [(211)At]astatide in NIS-transfected human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Sean; Mairs, Robert J; Welsh, Phil; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2002-10-01

    The cellular expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has been shown to confer iodide-concentrating capacity in non-thyroid cell types. We examined the role of NIS in the uptake of the alpha-particle emitting radiohalide [(211)At]astatide in the UVW human glioma cell line transfected to express NIS. [(211)At]Astatide uptake is shown to be NIS-dependent, with characteristics similar to [(131)I]iodide uptake. These studies suggest [(211)At]astatide as a possible alternative radionuclide to [(131)I]iodide for NIS-based endoradiotherapy, and provide a model for the study of [(211)At]astatide behavior at a cellular level. PMID:12381453

  11. Efficient solutions to hard computational problems by P systems with symport/antiport rules and membrane division.

    PubMed

    Song, Bosheng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Pan, Linqiang

    2015-04-01

    P systems are computing models inspired by some basic features of biological membranes. In this work, membrane division, which provides a way to obtain an exponential workspace in linear time, is introduced into (cell-like) P systems with communication (symport/antiport) rules, where objects are never modified but they just change their places. The computational efficiency of this kind of P systems is studied. Specifically, we present a (uniform) linear time solution to the NP-complete problem, Subset Sum by using division rules for elementary membranes and communication rules of length at most 3. We further prove that such P system allowing division rules for non-elementary membranes can efficiently solve the PSPACE-complete problem, QSAT in a uniform way. PMID:25802073

  12. Kinetics Analysis of the Plasma Membrane Sucrose-H+ Symporter from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics behavior of the H+-sucrose (Suc) symporter was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves by analyzing the effect of external and internal pH (pHo and pHi, respectively) on Suc uptake. The apparent Km for Suc uptake increased 18-fold as the pHo increased from 5.5 to 7.5. Over this same pHo range, the apparent Vmax for Suc uptake remained constant. The effects of pHi in the presence or absence of internal Suc were exclusively restricted to changes in Vmax. Thus, proton concentration on the inside of the membrane vesicles ([H+]i) behaved as a noncompetitive inhibitor of Suc uptake. The Km for the proton concentration on the outside of the membrane vesicles was estimated to be pH 6.3, which would indicate that at physiological apoplastic pH Suc transport might be sensitive to changes in pHo. On the other hand, the [H+]i for half-maximal inhibition of Suc uptake was approximately pH 5.4, making regulation of Suc transport through changes in [H+]i unlikely. These results were interpreted in the framework of the kinetics models for co-transport systems developed by D. Sanders, U.-P. Hansen, D. Gradmann, and C. L. Slayman (J Membr Biol [1984] 77: 123-152). Based on their analysis, the behavior of the Suc symporter with respect to the [H+]i is interpreted as an ordered binding mechanism by which the binding of Suc on the apoplastic side of the membrane and its release on the symplastic side precedes that of H+ (i.e. a first-on, first-off model). PMID:12232379

  13. In Vitro Analysis of the H+-Hexose Symporter on the Plasma Membrane of Sugarbeets (Beta vulgaris L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Tubbe, Axel; Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of hexose transport into plasma membrane vesicles isolated from mature sugarbeet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) was investigated. The initial rate of glucose uptake into the vesicles was stimulated approximately fivefold by imposing a transmembrane pH gradient (ΔpH), alkaline inside, and approximately fourfold by a negative membrane potential (ΔΨ), generated as a K+-diffusion potential, negative inside. The -fold stimulation was directly related to the relative ΔpH or ΔΨ gradient imposed, which were determined by the uptake of acetate or tetraphenylphosphonium, respectively. ΔΨ- and ΔpH-dependent glucose uptake showed saturation kinetics with a Km of 286 micromolar for glucose. Other hexose molecules (e.g. 2-deoxy-d-glucose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and d-mannose) were also accumulated into plasma membrane vesicles in a ΔpH-dependent manner. Inhibition constants of a number of compounds for glucose uptake were determined. Effective inhibitors of glucose uptake included: 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, 5-thio-d-glucose, d-fructose, d-galactose, and d-mannose, but not 1-O-methyl-d-glucose, d- and l-xylose, l-glucose, d-ribose, and l-sorbose. Under all conditions of proton motive force magnitude and glucose and sucrose concentration tested, there was no effect of sucrose on glucose uptake. Thus, hexose transport on the sugarbeet leaf plasma membrane was by a H+-hexose symporter, and the carrier and possibly the energy source were not shared by the plasma membrane H+-sucrose symporter. PMID:16669023

  14. Cellulose Deficiency Is Enhanced on Hyper Accumulation of Sucrose by a H+-Coupled Sucrose Symporter1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yeats, Trevor H.; Sorek, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand factors controlling the synthesis and deposition of cellulose, we have studied the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) double mutant shaven3 shaven3-like1 (shv3svl1), which was shown previously to exhibit a marked cellulose deficiency. We discovered that exogenous sucrose (Suc) in growth medium greatly enhances the reduction in hypocotyl elongation and cellulose content of shv3svl1. This effect was specific to Suc and was not observed with other sugars or osmoticum. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled cellulose synthase complexes revealed a slowing of cellulose synthase complexes in shv3svl1 compared with the wild type that is enhanced in a Suc-conditional manner. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed a cellulose deficiency of shv3svl1 but indicated that cellulose crystallinity was unaffected in the mutant. A genetic suppressor screen identified mutants of the plasma membrane Suc/H+ symporter SUC1, indicating that the accumulation of Suc underlies the Suc-dependent enhancement of shv3svl1 phenotypes. While other cellulose-deficient mutants were not specifically sensitive to exogenous Suc, the feronia (fer) receptor kinase mutant partially phenocopied shv3svl1 and exhibited a similar Suc-conditional cellulose defect. We demonstrate that shv3svl1, like fer, exhibits a hyperpolarized plasma membrane H+ gradient that likely underlies the enhanced accumulation of Suc via Suc/H+ symporters. Enhanced intracellular Suc abundance appears to favor the partitioning of carbon to starch rather than cellulose in both mutants. We conclude that SHV3-like proteins may be involved in signaling during cell expansion that coordinates proton pumping and cellulose synthesis. PMID:27013021

  15. TcPho91 is a contractile vacuole phosphate sodium symporter that regulates phosphate and polyphosphate metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Veronica; Docampo, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    We have identified a phosphate transporter (TcPho91) localized to the bladder of the contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. TcPho91 has 12 transmembrane domains, an N-terminal regulatory SPX (named after SYG1, Pho81 and XPR1) domain and an anion permease domain. Functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by two-electrode voltage clamp showed that TcPho91 is a low-affinity transporter with a Km for Pi in the millimolar range, and sodium-dependency. Epimastigotes overexpressing TcPho91-green fluorescent protein have significantly higher levels of pyrophosphate (PPi ) and short-chain polyphosphate (polyP), suggesting accumulation of Pi in these cells. Moreover, when overexpressing parasites were maintained in a medium with low Pi , they grew at higher rates than control parasites. Only one allele of TcPho91 in the CL strain encodes for the complete open reading frame, while the other one is truncated encoding for only the N-terminal domain. Taking advantage of this characteristic, knockdown experiments were performed resulting in cells with reduced growth rate as well as a reduction in PPi and short-chain polyP levels. Our results indicate that TcPho91 is a phosphate sodium symporter involved in Pi homeostasis in T. cruzi. PMID:26031800

  16. Proton/l-Glutamate Symport and the Regulation of Intracellular pH in Isolated Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Snedden, Wayne A.; Chung, Induk; Pauls, Randy H.; Bown, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    Addition of l-[U-14C]glutamate to a suspension of mechanically isolated asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri Regel) mesophyll cells results in (a) alkalinization of the medium, (b) uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate, and (c) efflux of [14C]4-aminobutyrate, a product of glutamate decarboxylation. All three phenomena were eliminated by treatment with 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate. In vitro glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) assays showed that (a) 2 millimolar aminooxyacetate eliminated enzyme activity, (b) activity was pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, and (c) activity exhibited a sharp pH optimum at 6.0 that decreased to 20% of optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 7.0. Addition of 1.5 millimolar sodium butyrate or sodium acetate to cell suspensions caused immediate alkalinization of the medium followed by a resumption of acidification of the medium at a rate approximately double the initial rate. The data indicate that (a) continued H+/l-glutamate contransport is dependent upon GAD activity, (b) the pH-dependent properties of GAD are consistent with a role in a metabolic pH-stat, and (c) the regulation of intracellular pH during H+/l-Glu symport may involve both H+ consumption during 4-aminobutyrate production and ATP-driven H+ efflux. PMID:16668938

  17. Oncolytic Measles Virus Encoding Thyroidal Sodium Iodide Symporter for Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Radiovirotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongtao; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic measles virus (MV) encoding the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (MV-NIS) has proved to be safe after intraperitoneal or intravenous administration in patients with ovarian cancer or multiple myeloma, respectively, but it has not yet been administered through intratumoral injection in humans. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck (SCCHN) usually is locally invasive and spreads to the cervical lymph nodes, which are suitable for the intratumoral administration of oncolytic viruses. To test whether oncolytic MV is an effective treatment for SCCHN, we used oncolytic MV-NIS to infect SCCHN in vitro and in vivo. The data show that SCCHN cells were infected and killed by MV-NIS in vitro. Permissiveness of the tumor cells to MV infection was not affected by irradiation after viral addition. Monitored noninvasively through radioiodine-based single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography, intratumorally virus-delivered NIS has concentrated the radioiodine in the MV-NIS–treated tumors in the FaDu mouse xenograft model of human SCCHN, and the antitumor effect could be boosted significantly (p<0.05) either with concomitant cyclophosphamide therapy or with appropriately timed administration of radioiodine 131I. MV-NIS could be a promising new anticancer agent that may substantially enhance the outcomes of standard therapy after intratumoral administration in patients with locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:22235810

  18. Enhancement of human sodium iodide symporter gene therapy for breast cancer by HDAC inhibitor mediated transcriptional modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Madhura G.; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Jadhav, Smita; Gupta, Sudeep; Ahn, Beyong-Cheol; De, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant expression of human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in breast cancer (BC) has raised the possibility of using targeted radioiodide therapy. Here we investigate modulation of endogenous, functional NIS expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase reporter based initial screening of six different HDACi shows 2–10 fold enhancement of NIS promoter activity in majority of the cell types tested. As a result of drug treatment, endogenous NIS transcript and protein shows profound induction in BC cells. To get an insight on the mechanism of such transcriptional activation, role of Stat4, CREB and other transcription factors are revealed by transcription factor profiling array. Further, NIS-mediated intracellular iodide uptake also enhances substantially (p < 0.05) signifying functional relevance of the transcriptional modulation strategy. Gamma camera imaging confirms 30% higher uptake in VPA or NaB treated BC tumor xenograft. Corroborating with such functional impact of NIS, significant reduction in cell survival (p < 0.005) is observed in VPA, NaB or CI994 drug and 131I combination treatment in vivo indicating effective radioablation. Thus, for the first time this study reveals the mechanistic basis and demonstrates functional relevance of HDACi pre-treatment strategy in elevating NIS gene therapy approach for BC management in clinic. PMID:26777440

  19. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:25974752

  20. The Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) as an Imaging Reporter for Gene, Viral, and Cell-based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Penheiter, Alan R; Russell, Stephen J; Carlson, Stephanie K

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical tomographic imaging systems increasingly are being utilized for non-invasive imaging of reporter gene products to reveal the distribution of molecular therapeutics within living subjects. Reporter gene and probe combinations can be employed to monitor vectors for gene, viral, and cell-based therapies. There are several reporter systems available; however, those employing radionuclides for positron emission tomography (PET) or singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer the highest sensitivity and the greatest promise for deep tissue imaging in humans. Within the category of radionuclide reporters, the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has emerged as one of the most promising for preclinical and translational research. NIS has been incorporated into a remarkable variety of viral and non-viral vectors in which its functionality is conveniently determined by in vitro iodide uptake assays prior to live animal imaging. This review on the NIS reporter will focus on 1) differences between endogenous NIS and heterologously-expressed NIS, 2) qualitative or comparative use of NIS as an imaging reporter in preclinical and translational gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, and cell trafficking research, and 3) use of NIS as an absolute quantitative reporter. PMID:22263922

  1. S-Nitrosylation of NF-κB p65 Inhibits TSH-Induced Na(+)/I(-) Symporter Expression.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Juan Pablo; Peyret, Victoria; Nazar, Magalí; Romero, Jorge Miguel; Lucero, Ariel Maximiliano; Montesinos, María del Mar; Bocco, José Luis; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Masini-Repiso, Ana María

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in a wide variety of cellular physiological processes. In thyroid cells, NO-synthase III-endogenously produced NO reduces TSH-stimulated thyroid-specific gene expression, suggesting a potential autocrine role of NO in modulating thyroid function. Further studies indicate that NO induces thyroid dedifferentiation, because NO donors repress TSH-stimulated iodide (I(-)) uptake. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the NO-inhibited Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS)-mediated I(-) uptake in thyroid cells. We showed that NO donors reduce I(-) uptake in a concentration-dependent manner, which correlates with decreased NIS protein expression. NO-reduced I(-) uptake results from transcriptional repression of NIS gene rather than posttranslational modifications reducing functional NIS expression at the plasma membrane. We observed that NO donors repress TSH-induced NIS gene expression by reducing the transcriptional activity of the nuclear factor-κB subunit p65. NO-promoted p65 S-nitrosylation reduces p65-mediated transactivation of the NIS promoter in response to TSH stimulation. Overall, our data are consistent with the notion that NO plays a role as an inhibitory signal to counterbalance TSH-stimulated nuclear factor-κB activation, thus modulating thyroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26587909

  2. Substrate-induced unlocking of the inner gate determines the catalytic efficiency of a neurotransmitter:sodium symporter.

    PubMed

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Krüger, Mie B; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Li, Zheng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Kniazeff, Julie; Gotfryd, Kamil; Mortensen, Jonas S; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik

    2015-10-30

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) mediate reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for several therapeutics and psychostimulants. The prokaryotic NSS homologue, LeuT, represents a principal structural model for Na(+)-coupled transport catalyzed by these proteins. Here, we used site-directed fluorescence quenching spectroscopy to identify in LeuT a substrate-induced conformational rearrangement at the inner gate conceivably leading to formation of a structural intermediate preceding transition to the inward-open conformation. The substrate-induced, Na(+)-dependent change required an intact primary substrate-binding site and involved increased water exposure of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The findings were supported by simulations predicting disruption of an intracellular interaction network leading to a discrete rotation of transmembrane segment 5 and the adjacent intracellular loop 2. The magnitude of the spectroscopic response correlated inversely with the transport rate for different substrates, suggesting that stability of the intermediate represents an unrecognized rate-limiting barrier in the NSS transport mechanism. PMID:26363074

  3. D-cycloserine transport in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells: mediation by a H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, D. T.; Armstrong, G.; Hirst, B. H.; Simmons, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    1. The ability of D-cycloserine to act as a substrate for H+/amino acid symport has been tested in epithelial layers of Caco-2 human intestinal cells. 2. In Na(+)-free media with the apical bathing media held at pH 6.0, D-cycloserine (20 mM) is an effective inhibitor of net transepithelial transport (Jnet) of L-alanine (100 microM) and its accumulation (across the apical membrane) in a similar manner to amino acid substrates (L-alanine, beta-alanine, L-proline and glycine). In contrast L-valine was ineffective as an inhibitor for H+/amino acid symport. Both inhibition of L-alanine Jnet and its accumulation by D-cycloserine were dose-dependent, maximal inhibition being achieved by 5-10 mM. 3. Both D-cycloserine and known substrates for H+/amino acid symport stimulated an inward short circuit current (Isc) when voltage-clamped monolayers of Caco-2 epithelia, mounted in Ussing chambers, were exposed to apical substrate in Na(+)-free media, with apical pH held at 6.0. The D-cycloserine dependent increase in Isc was dose-dependent with an apparent Km = 15.8 +/- 2.0 (mean +/- s.e. mean) mM, and Vmax = 373 +/- 21 nmol cm-2h-1. 4. D-Cycloserine (20 mM) induced a prompt acidification of Caco-2 cell cytosol when superfused at the apical surface in both Na+ and Na(+)-free conditions. Cytosolic acidification in response to D-cycloserine was dependent upon superfusate pH, being attenuated at pH 8 and enhanced in acidic media. 5. The increment in Isc with 20 mM D-cycloserine was non-additive with other amino acid substrates for H+/amino acid symport. PMID:8548174

  4. Upregulation of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) protein expression by an innate immunity component: Promising potential for targeting radiosensitive retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Jaisy; Singh, Narinderbir; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Krishnakumar, Subramanium; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur

    2015-10-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB), a malignant tumour of the eye arising from developing retina, is the most frequent primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. Its primary management with chemotherapy involves combination regimen of etoposide, vincristine and carboplatin and intra vitreal chemotherapy using melphalan when vitreous seeds develop. Radiotherapy is another effective mode in treating RB. We recently explored the notion if radiotherapy in RB can be mediated via Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS), an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein which is a key regulator of iodide access to thyroid gland. Its expression has been exploited successfully for diagnostic imaging and molecular radionuclide-based therapy of thyroid cancer. We determined that NIS is expressed endogenously in RB tumour tissues, and in retinoblastoma cell lines Y79 and Weri-Rb-1, and therefore made an attempt to enhance the endogenously low expression of NIS protein in both Y79 and Weri-Rb-1 cells. Here we report about the potential of bovine lactoferrin (bLf) which is a known chemo preventive and emerging safe anti-cancer bio drug, as well as a natural transcriptional activator of genes, to enhance the endogenous expression of NIS in Y79 and Weri-Rb-1 cells. Real time PCR revealed that both cell lines express mRNA of lactoferrin receptors while flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed the cells efficiently internalize bLf which upregulates NIS expression. These findings highlight an important step that could be taken towards the development of less harmful approaches for the treatment of RB by employing natural supplement bLf (with its clinically proven safe profile), and warrants further studies in future, focussing on enhancing NIS expression in RB cells and NIS functional assays in these cells. PMID:26213306

  5. Use of the thyrocyte sodium iodide symporter as the basis for a perchlorate cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Irene E; Jakoby, Michael G; Geryk, Bruce; Schneider, Roger L; Cropek, Donald M

    2009-02-01

    Perchlorates are strong oxidants widely employed in military and civilian energetic materials and recently have been scrutinized as persistent environmental pollutants. The perchlorate anion, ClO(4)(-), is a well-known and potent competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expressed in the basolateral membranes of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes). Iodide uptake by thyroid follicular cells is rapid and reproducible. The competitive radiotransporter assay in this study shows promise as a rapid and convenient method to assay for ClO(4)(-) in water samples at the nM level. This work describes the initial efforts to define the assay conditions that enhance NIS selectivity for ClO(4)(-). Experiments of 10 min co-incubation of ClO(4)(-) and (125)I(-) demonstrate a more significant effect on (125)I(-) transport, with a quantifiable ClO(4)(-) concentration range of 50 nM (5 ppb) to 2 microM (200 ppb), and IC(50) of 180 nM (18 ppb), nearly three-fold lower than previous reports. Since the IC(50) in our assay for other known competitor anions (SCN(-), ClO(3)(-), NO(3)(-)) remains unchanged from previous research, the increased sensitivity for ClO(4)(-) also produces a three-fold enhancement in selectivity. In addition to the possible applicability of the thyrocyte to the development of a cellular perchlorate biosensor, we propose that the high affinity of the NIS for ClO(4)(-) also creates the potential for exploiting this membrane protein as a selective, sensitive, and broadly applicable biomechanical mechanism for controlled movement and concentration of perchlorate. PMID:19173056

  6. Anti-natrium/iodide symporter antibodies and other anti-thyroid antibodies in children with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Anna M; Czarnocka, Barbara; Demkow, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies against the Na/I symporter (anti-NIS ab) have been found in adult patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases. As easily available for the immune system, NIS can play a role in the initial stage of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Children with Turner's syndrome (TS) being at high risk of autoimmune thyroid disease development seem a valuable group for the investigation of the early autoimmune process. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of anti-NIS ab and its potential clinical significance in TS children. Fifty four girls with TS were examined (age 11.9 ± 2.46 years), and 23 healthy girls with normal thyroid function, free of autoimmune diseases. Anti-NIS antibodies were measured by the in-house ELISA method and the Western blotting. Sera considered positive for anti-NIS ab were used for the iodide uptake bioassay using COS7 cells stably transfected with hNIS. In all patients the thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies presence and thyroid ultrasonography were evaluated. In 20% of the patients a subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed and 70.4% had antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO - 64.8% and Anti-Tg - 24%). Anti-NISab were present in 14.8% girls with TS and in none of the control group. Their presence was unrelated to other antithyroid antibodies titre or patients' age. A positive correlation between the anti-NIS ab presence and the hypothyroidism was found (p < 0.04). Anti-NIS ab-positive sera did not suppress iodine uptake. In conclusion, anti-NIS antibodies were present in 14.8% of children with TS and they were related to the presence of hypothyroidism. PMID:22836628

  7. The Effect on Sodium/Iodide Symporter and Pendrin in Thyroid Colloid Retention Developed by Excess Iodide Intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yi; Lin, Chu-Hui; Yang, Li-Hua; Li, Wang-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Qian, Jiang; Huang, Jia-Luan; Lei, Yi-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that excess iodide can lead to thyroid colloid retention, a classic characteristic of iodide-induced goiter. However, the mechanism has not been fully unrevealed. Iodide plays an important role in thyroid function at multiple steps of thyroid colloid synthesis and transport among which sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and pendrin are essential. In our study, we fed female BALB/c mice with different concentrations of high-iodine water including group A (control group, 0 μg/L), group B (1500 μg/L), group C (3000 μg/L), group D (6000 μg/L), and group E (12,000 μg/L). After 7 months of feeding, we found that excess iodide could lead to different degrees of thyroid colloid retention. Besides, NIS and pendrin expression were downregulated in the highest dose group. The thyroid iodide intake function detected by urine iodine assay and thyroidal (125)I experiments showed that the urine level of iodine increased, while the iodine intake rate decreased when the concentration of iodide used in feeding water increased (all p < 0.05 vs. control group). In addition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated a reduction in the number of intracellular mitochondria of thyroid cells. Based on these findings, we concluded that the occurrence of thyroid colloid retention exacerbated by excess iodide was associated with the suppression of NIS and pendrin expression, providing an additional insight of the potential mechanism of action of excess iodide on thyroid gland. PMID:26660892

  8. A novel mutation in the sodium/iodide symporter gene in the largest family with iodide transport defect.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, S; Bhayana, S; Dean, H J

    1999-09-01

    We previously reported nine children with an autosomally recessive form of congenital hypothyroidism due to an iodide transport defect in a large Hutterite family with extensive consanguinity living in central Canada. Since the original report, we have diagnosed congenital hypothyroidism by newborn TSH screening in 9 additional children from the family. We performed direct sequencing of the PCR products of each NIS (sodium/iodide symporter) gene exon with flanking introns amplified from genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood cells of the patients. We identified a novel NIS gene mutation, G395R (Gly395-->Arg; GGA-->AGA), in 10 patients examined in the present study. All of the parents tested were heterozygous for the mutation, suggesting that the patients were homozygous. The mutation was located in the 10th transmembrane helix. Expression experiments by transfection of the mutant NIS complimentary DNA into COS-7 cells showed no perchlorate-sensitive iodide uptake, confirming that the mutation is the direct cause of the iodide transport defect in these patients. A patient who showed an intermediate saliva/serum technetium ratio (14.0; normal, > or = 20) and was considered to have a partial or less severe defect in the previous report (IX-24) did not have a NIS gene mutation. It is now possible to use gene diagnostics of this unique NIS mutation to identify patients with congenital hypothyroidism due to an iodide transport defect in this family and to determine the carrier state of potential parents for genetic counseling and arranging rapid and early diagnosis of their infants. PMID:10487695

  9. The sodium/iodide symporter NIS is a transcriptional target of the p53-family members in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, F; Piconese, S; Lacoste, C; Schinzari, V; Testoni, B; Valogne, Y; Gerbal-Chaloin, S; Samuel, D; Bréchot, C; Faivre, J; Levrero, M

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid iodide accumulation via the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS; SLC5A5) has been the basis for the longtime use of radio-iodide in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancers. NIS is also expressed, but poorly functional, in some non-thyroid human cancers. In particular, it is much more strongly expressed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines than in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). The transcription factors and signaling pathways that control NIS overexpression in these cancers is largely unknown. We identified two putative regulatory clusters of p53-responsive elements (p53REs) in the NIS core promoter, and investigated the regulation of NIS transcription by p53-family members in liver cancer cells. NIS promoter activity and endogenous NIS mRNA expression are stimulated by exogenously expressed p53-family members and significantly reduced by member-specific siRNAs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that the p53–REs clusters in the NIS promoter are differentially occupied by the p53-family members to regulate basal and DNA damage-induced NIS transcription. Doxorubicin strongly induces p53 and p73 binding to the NIS promoter, leading to an increased expression of endogenous NIS mRNA and protein in HCC and CCA cells, but not in PHH. Silencing NIS expression reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells, pointing to a possible role of a p53-family-dependent expression of NIS in apoptotic cell death. Altogether, these results indicate that the NIS gene is a direct target of the p53 family and suggests that the modulation of NIS by DNA-damaging agents is potentially exploitable to boost NIS upregulation in vivo. PMID:24052075

  10. Induction of Sodium/Iodide Symporter (NIS) Expression and Radioiodine Uptake in Non-Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was designed to explore the therapeutic potential of suppressing MAP kinase and PI3K/Akt pathways and histone deacetylase (HDAC) to induce the expression of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and radioiodine uptake in non-thyroid cancer cells. Methods We tested the effects of the MEK inhibitor RDEA119, the Akt inhibitor perifosine, and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA on NIS expression in thirteen human cancer cell lines derived from melanoma, hepatic carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, colon carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and brain cancers. We also examined radioiodine uptake and histone acetylation at the NIS promoter in selected cells. Results Overall, the three inhibitors could induce NIS expression, to various extents, in melanoma and all the epithelial carcinoma-derived cells but not in brain cancer-derived cells. SAHA was most effective and its effect could be significantly enhanced by RDEA119 and perifosine. The expression of NIS, at both mRNA and protein levels, was most robust in the melanoma cell M14, hepatic carcinoma cell HepG2, and the gastric carcinoma cell MKN-7 cell. Radioiodine uptake was correspondingly induced, accompanied by robust increase in histone acetylation at the NIS promoter, in these cells when treated with the three inhibitors. Conclusions This is the first demonstration that simultaneously suppressing the MAP kinase and PI3K/Akt pathways and HDAC could induce robust NIS expression and radioiodine uptake in certain non-thyroid human cancer cells, providing novel therapeutic implications for adjunct radioiodine treatment of these cancers. PMID:22359623

  11. Optimization of Multimodal Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using the Human Sodium Iodide Symporter for PET and Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wolfs, Esther; Holvoet, Bryan; Gijsbers, Rik; Casteels, Cindy; Roberts, Scott J.; Struys, Tom; Maris, Michael; Ibrahimi, Abdelilah; Debyser, Zeger; Van Laere, Koen; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Deroose, Christophe M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The use of stably integrated reporter gene imaging provides a manner to monitor the in vivo fate of engrafted cells over time in a non-invasive manner. Here, we optimized multimodal imaging (small-animal PET, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI)) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), by means of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and firefly luciferase (Fluc) as reporters. Methods First, two multicistronic lentiviral vectors (LV) were generated for multimodal imaging: BLI, 124I PET/SPECT and CLI. Expression of the imaging reporter genes was validated in vitro using 99mTcO4− radioligand uptake experiments and BLI. Uptake kinetics, specificity and tracer elution were determined as well as the effect of the transduction process on the cell's differentiation capacity. MSCs expressing the LV were injected intravenously or subcutaneously and imaged using small-animal PET, CLI and BLI. Results The expression of both imaging reporter genes was functional and specific. An elution of 99mTcO4− from the cells was observed, with 31% retention after 3 h. After labeling cells with 124I in vitro, a significantly higher CLI signal was noted in hNIS expressing murine MSCs. Furthermore, it was possible to visualize cells injected intravenously using BLI or subcutaneously in mice, using 124I small-animal PET, CLI and BLI. Conclusions This study identifies hNIS as a suitable reporter gene for molecular imaging with PET and CLI, as confirmed with BLI through the expression of Fluc. It supports the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter gene imaging and future clinical applications. PMID:24747914

  12. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters*

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function. PMID:25869126

  13. The correlation of sodium iodide symporter and BRAF(V600E) mutation in classical variant papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yazgan, Aylin; Yıldırım, Nilüfer; Gözalan, Ayşegül; Gümüştaş, Sinem; Kılıçarslan, Aydan; Balci, Serdar; Aydın, Cevdet; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-06-01

    BRAF(V600E) mutation was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 96 consecutive cases with classical variant papillary thyroid cancer, and immunohistochemical staining of Na+/I- symporter (NIS) protein was evaluated. Localization (intracellular or membranous), density, and the intensity of cytoplasmic staining were characterized semiquantitatively. Extrathyroidal invasion, surgical margin positivity, and lymph node metastasis were compared with BRAF(V600E) mutation and NIS expression. Eighty-eight patients who had at least 24-month follow-up were also included in survival analysis. BRAF(V600E) mutation was determined in 78.1% (75/96) and functional NIS activity in 74% (71/96) of the cases. There were statistically significant differences in mean ages between BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive (48.6) and BRAF(V600E) mutation-negative cases (37.3; Levene test, P=.419; Student t test, P=.001). The surgical margin positivity (46.7%) and extrathyroidal extension percentage (54.7%) in the BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive group were higher than the negative (28.6% and 33.3%, respectively) group, without statistical significance (P=.138 and P=.084, respectively). Functional NIS activity was higher in BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive cases (78.1%) than mutation-negative ones (57.1%; P=.047). The possibility of moderate and intense cytoplasmic staining in BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive cases (72%) was 6.3 times higher than the possibility of weak staining (28%) in the mutation-positive cases (95% confidence interval, 2.2-18.8; P=.001). Functional NIS expression is higher in patients with classical variant papillary thyroid cancer with BRAF(V600E) mutation. However, the clinical features were not found to be associated with NIS expression. There may be different mechanisms determining the outcome of therapy. PMID:27180062

  14. Cellular Bioenergetics is an Important Determinant of the Molecular Imaging Signal Derived from Luciferase and the Sodium-Iodide Symporter

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Connie; Chan, Angel; Lin, Xiaoping; Higuchi, Takahiro; Terrovitis, John; Afzal, Junaid M.; Rittenbach, Andrew; Sun, Dongdong; Vakrou, Styliani; Woldemichael, Kirubel; O’Rourke, Brian; Wahl, Richard; Pomper, Martin; Tsui, Benjamin; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Molecular imaging is useful for longitudinal assessment of engraftment. However, it is not known which factors, other than cell number can influence the molecular imaging signal obtained from reporter genes. Objective The effects of cell dissociation/suspension on cellular bioenergetics and the signal obtained by firefly luciferase(fluc) and human Na-I symporter(hNIS) labeling of cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) was investigated. Methods and Results 18FDG uptake, ATP levels, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and bioluminescence were measured in vitro, in adherent and suspended CDCs. In vivo dual isotope SPECT-CT imaging or bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed 1hr and 24hrs following CDC transplantation. SPECT quantification was performed using a phantom for signal calibration. Cell loss between 1hr & 24hrs post-transplantation was quantified by qPCR and ex vivo luciferase assay. Cell dissociation followed by suspension for 1hr resulted in decreased glucose uptake, cellular ATP, 99mTc uptake and BLI signal by 82%, 43%, 42%, and 44% respectively, when compared to adherent cells, in vitro. In vivo 99mTc uptake was significantly lower at 1hr, when compared to 24hrs following cell transplantation in the non-infarct (p<0.001, n=3) and infarct (p<0.001, n =4) model, despite significant cell loss during this period. The in vivo BLI signal was significantly higher at 1hr than at 24hrs (p<0.01), with the BLI signal being higher when CDCs were suspended in glucose-containing medium compared to saline(PBS). Conclusion Adhesion is an important determinant of cellular bioenergetics, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and BLI signal. BLI and NIS imaging may be useful for in vivo optimization of bioenergetics in transplanted cells. PMID:23255420

  15. Posttranscriptional regulation of sodium-iodide symporter mRNA expression in the rat thyroid gland by acute iodide administration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Nascimento, Caroline; Calil-Silveira, Jamile; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2010-04-01

    Iodide is an important regulator of thyroid activity. Its excess elicits the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, characterized by an acute suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis, which has been ascribed to serum TSH reduction or TGF-beta increase and production of iodolipids in the thyroid. These alterations take hours/days to occur, contrasting with the promptness of Wolff-Chaikoff effect. We investigated whether acute iodide administration could trigger events that precede those changes, such as reduction of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) mRNA abundance and adenylation, and if perchlorate treatment could counteract them. Rats subjected or not to methylmercaptoimidazole treatment (0.03%) received NaI (2,000 microg/0.5 ml saline) or saline intraperitoneally and were killed 30 min up to 24 h later. Another set of animals was treated with iodide and perchlorate, in equimolar doses. NIS mRNA content was evaluated by Northern blotting and real-time PCR, and NIS mRNA poly(A) tail length by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-poly(A) test (RACE-PAT). We observed that NIS mRNA abundance and poly(A) tail length were significantly reduced in all periods of iodide treatment. Perchlorate reversed these effects, indicating that iodide was the agent that triggered the modifications observed. Since the poly(A) tail length of mRNAs is directly associated with their stability and translation efficiency, we can assume that the rapid decay of NIS mRNA abundance observed was due to a reduction of its stability, a condition in which its translation could be impaired. Our data show for the first time that iodide regulates NIS mRNA expression at posttranscriptional level, providing a new mechanism by which iodide exerts its autoregulatory effect on thyroid. PMID:20107044

  16. Putative role of the H(+)/sucrose symporter SLC45A3 as an osmolyte transporter in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Vitavska, Olga; Edemir, Bayram; Wieczorek, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    The solute carrier family 45 a3 member (SLC45A3), known also as prostein, has been implicated with prostate cancer and the regulation of lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes. Recently, we expressed SLC45A3 in yeast cells and characterised it as a proton-coupled sucrose symporter. However, the physiological functions of SLC45A3 were still unknown. Here, we report that SLC45A3 occurs in the kidney and is highly expressed in the medullary collecting duct (IMCD), a part of the kidney responsible for final urine concentration and faced to hyperosmotic environment. Moreover, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of endogenous SLC45A3 in rat IMCD cells as well as in NRK52E cells increased up to four-fold under hyperosmotic conditions at 600 mOsmol/kg. Using NRK52E cells as an experimental model, we investigated the proton-coupled sugar transport and found that the uptake of sucrose or glucose was enhanced by hyperosmolarity. Down-regulation of expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the osmotically inducible part of sucrose uptake and confirmed the involvement of SLC45A3 in this process. Furthermore, we observed an up to four-fold elevation of sucrose uptake triggered by hyperosmolarity across the apical membrane of NRK52E cells, while uptake across the basolateral membrane was not affected. Due to this finding, we conclude that SLC45A3 may occur at the luminal side of kidney epithelial cells and thus may take up solutes from the tubular fluid. Altogether, we show that SLC45A3 is a novel sugar transporter in kidney and hypothesise that the disaccharide sucrose, and probably the monosaccharides glucose and fructose, may serve as compatible osmolytes in urine. PMID:27228996

  17. Establishment of radioactive astatine and iodine uptake in cancer cell lines expressing the human sodium/iodide symporter.

    PubMed

    Petrich, T; Helmeke, H-J; Meyer, G J; Knapp, W H; Pötter, E

    2002-07-01

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) has been recognized as an attractive target for radioiodine-mediated cancer gene therapy. In this study we investigated the role of human NIS for cellular uptake of the high LET alpha-emitter astatine-211 ((211)At) in comparison with radioiodine as a potential radionuclide for future applications. A mammalian NIS expression vector was constructed and used to generate six stable NIS-expressing cancer cell lines (three derived from thyroid carcinoma, two from colon carcinoma, one from glioblastoma). Compared with the respective control cell lines, steady state radionuclide uptake of NIS-expressing cell lines increased up to 350-fold for iodine-123 ((123)I), 340-fold for technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)TcO(4)(-)) and 60-fold for (211)At. Cellular (211)At accumulation was found to be dependent on extracellular Na(+) ions and displayed a similar sensitivity towards sodium perchlorate inhibition as radioiodide and (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake. Heterologous competition with unlabelled NaI decreased NIS-mediated (211)At uptake to levels of NIS-negative control cells. Following uptake both radioiodide and (211)At were rapidly (apparent t(1/2) 3-15 min) released by the cells as determined by wash-out experiments. Data of scintigraphic tumour imaging in a xenograft nude mice model of transplanted NIS-modified thyroid cells indicated that radionuclide uptake in NIS-expressing tumours was up to 70 times ((123)I), 25 times ((99m)TcO(4)(-)) and 10 times ((211)At) higher than in control tumours or normal tissues except stomach (3-5 times) and thyroid gland (5-10 times). Thirty-four percent and 14% of the administered activity of (123)I and (211)At, respectively, was found in NIS tumours by region of interest analysis ( n=2). Compared with cell culture experiments, the effective half-life in vivo was greatly prolonged (6.5 h for (123)I, 5.2 h for (211)At) and preliminary dosimetric calculations indicate high tumour absorbed doses (3.5 Gy

  18. Stromal Targeting of Sodium Iodide Symporter Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells Allows Enhanced Imaging and Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Kerstin; Schwenk, Nathalie; Dolp, Patrick; Willhauck, Michael J.; Zischek, Christoph; Zach, Christian; Hacker, Markus; Göke, Burkhard; Wagner, Ernst; Nelson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The tumor-homing property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has lead to their use as delivery vehicles for therapeutic genes. The application of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as therapy gene allows noninvasive imaging of functional transgene expression by 123I-scintigraphy or PET-imaging, as well as therapeutic application of 131I or 188Re. Based on the critical role of the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted)/CCL5 secreted by MSCs in the course of tumor stroma recruitment, use of the RANTES/CCL5 promoter should allow tumor stroma-targeted expression of NIS after MSC-mediated delivery. Using a human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) xenograft mouse model (Huh7), we investigated distribution and tumor recruitment of RANTES-NIS-engineered MSCs after systemic injection by gamma camera imaging. 123I-scintigraphy revealed active MSC recruitment and CCL5 promoter activation in the tumor stroma of Huh7 xenografts (6.5% ID/g 123I, biological half-life: 3.7 hr, tumor-absorbed dose: 44.3 mGy/MBq). In comparison, 7% ID/g 188Re was accumulated in tumors with a biological half-life of 4.1 hr (tumor-absorbed dose: 128.7 mGy/MBq). Administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I or 188Re (55.5 MBq) in RANTES-NIS-MSC-treated mice resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival without significant differences between 131I and 188Re. These data demonstrate successful stromal targeting of NIS in HCC tumors by selective recruitment of NIS-expressing MSCs and by use of the RANTES/CCL5 promoter. The resulting tumor-selective radionuclide accumulation was high enough for a therapeutic effect of 131I and 188Re opening the exciting prospect of NIS-mediated radionuclide therapy of metastatic cancer using genetically engineered MSCs as gene delivery vehicles. PMID:23402366

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTERS 1 and 2: fructose and xylitol/H+ symporters in pollen and young xylem cells.

    PubMed

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Volke, Melanie; Konrad, Kai R; Wippel, Kathrin; Hoth, Stefan; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains six genes, AtPMT1 to AtPMT6 (Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTER 1-6), which form a distinct subfamily within the large family of more than 50 monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) genes. So far, only AtPMT5 [formerly named AtPLT5 (At3g18830)] has been characterized and was shown to be a plasma membrane-localized H(+)-symporter with broad substrate specificity. The characterization of AtPMT1 (At2g16120) and AtPMT2 (At2g16130), two other, almost identical, members of this transporter subfamily, are presented here. Expression of the AtPMT1 and AtPMT2 cDNAs in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) revealed that these proteins catalyse the energy-dependent, high-capacity transport of fructose and xylitol, and the transport of several other compounds with lower rates. Expression of their cRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both proteins are voltage-dependent and catalyse the symport of their substrates with protons. Fusions of AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to Arabidopsis plasma membranes. Analyses of reporter genes performed with AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 promoter sequences showed expression in mature (AtPMT2) or germinating (AtPMT1) pollen grains, as well as in growing pollen tubes, hydathodes, and young xylem cells (both genes). The expression was confirmed with an anti-AtPMT1/AtPMT2 antiserum (alphaAtPMT1/2) raised against peptides conserved in AtPMT1 and AtPMT2. The physiological roles of the proteins are discussed and related to plant cell wall modifications. PMID:19969532

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTERS 1 and 2: fructose and xylitol/H+ symporters in pollen and young xylem cells

    PubMed Central

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Konrad, Kai R.; Wippel, Kathrin; Hoth, Stefan; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains six genes, AtPMT1 to AtPMT6 (Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTER 1–6), which form a distinct subfamily within the large family of more than 50 monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) genes. So far, only AtPMT5 [formerly named AtPLT5 (At3g18830)] has been characterized and was shown to be a plasma membrane-localized H+-symporter with broad substrate specificity. The characterization of AtPMT1 (At2g16120) and AtPMT2 (At2g16130), two other, almost identical, members of this transporter subfamily, are presented here. Expression of the AtPMT1 and AtPMT2 cDNAs in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) revealed that these proteins catalyse the energy-dependent, high-capacity transport of fructose and xylitol, and the transport of several other compounds with lower rates. Expression of their cRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both proteins are voltage-dependent and catalyse the symport of their substrates with protons. Fusions of AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to Arabidopsis plasma membranes. Analyses of reporter genes performed with AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 promoter sequences showed expression in mature (AtPMT2) or germinating (AtPMT1) pollen grains, as well as in growing pollen tubes, hydathodes, and young xylem cells (both genes). The expression was confirmed with an anti-AtPMT1/AtPMT2 antiserum (αAtPMT1/2) raised against peptides conserved in AtPMT1 and AtPMT2. The physiological roles of the proteins are discussed and related to plant cell wall modifications. PMID:19969532

  1. Arabidopsis POLYOL TRANSPORTER5, a new member of the monosaccharide transporter-like superfamily, mediates H+-Symport of numerous substrates, including myo-inositol, glycerol, and ribose.

    PubMed

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Geiger, Dietmar; Stadler, Ruth; Klebl, Franz; Landouar-Arsivaud, Lucie; Lemoine, Rémi; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Six genes of the Arabidopsis thaliana monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) superfamily share significant homology with polyol transporter genes previously identified in plants translocating polyols (mannitol or sorbitol) in their phloem (celery [Apium graveolens], common plantain [Plantago major], or sour cherry [Prunus cerasus]). The physiological role and the functional properties of this group of proteins were unclear in Arabidopsis, which translocates sucrose and small amounts of raffinose rather than polyols. Here, we describe POLYOL TRANSPORTER5 (AtPLT5), the first member of this subgroup of Arabidopsis MST-like transporters. Transient expression of an AtPLT5-green fluorescent protein fusion in plant cells and functional analyses of the AtPLT5 protein in yeast and Xenopus oocytes demonstrate that AtPLT5 is located in the plasma membrane and characterize this protein as a broad-spectrum H+-symporter for linear polyols, such as sorbitol, xylitol, erythritol, or glycerol. Unexpectedly, however, AtPLT5 catalyzes also the transport of the cyclic polyol myo-inositol and of different hexoses and pentoses, including ribose, a sugar that is not transported by any of the previously characterized plant sugar transporters. RT-PCR analyses and AtPLT5 promoter-reporter gene plants revealed that AtPLT5 is most strongly expressed in Arabidopsis roots, but also in the vascular tissue of leaves and in specific floral organs. The potential physiological role of AtPLT5 is discussed. PMID:15598803

  2. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  3. Cd{sup 2+} versus Zn{sup 2+} uptake by the ZIP8 HCO{sub 3}{sup -}-dependent symporter: Kinetics, electrogenicity and trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhiwei; Li Hong; Soleimani, Manoocher; Girijashanker, Kuppuswami; Reed, Jodie M.; He Lei; Dalton, Timothy P.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2008-01-25

    The mouse Slc39a8 gene encodes the ZIP8 transporter, which has been shown to be a divalent cation/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} symporter. Using ZIP8 cRNA-injected Xenopus oocyte cultures, we show herein that: [a] ZIP8-mediated cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) and zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) uptake have V{sub max} values of 1.8 {+-} 0.08 and 1.0 {+-} 0.08 pmol/oocyte/h, and K{sub m} values of 0.48 {+-} 0.08 and 0.26 {+-} 0.09 {mu}M, respectively; [b] ZIP8-mediated Cd{sup 2+} uptake is most inhibited by Zn{sup 2+}, second-best inhibited by Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}, and not inhibited by Mn{sup 2+} or Fe{sup 2+}; and [c] electrogenicity studies demonstrate an influx of two HCO{sub 3}{sup -} anions per one Cd{sup 2+} (or one Zn{sup 2+}) cation, i.e. electroneutral complexes. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) polarized epithelial cells retrovirally infected with ZIP8 cDNA and tagged with hemagglutinin at the C-terminus, we show that-similar to ZIP4-the ZIP8 eight-transmembrane protein is largely internalized during Zn{sup 2+} homeostasis, but moves predominantly to the cell surface membrane (trafficking) under conditions of Zn{sup 2+} depletion.

  4. Functional integration of the HUP1 hexose symporter gene into the genome of C. reinhardtii: Impacts on biological H(2) production.

    PubMed

    Doebbe, Anja; Rupprecht, Jens; Beckmann, Julia; Mussgnug, Jan H; Hallmann, Armin; Hankamer, Ben; Kruse, Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Phototrophic organisms use photosynthesis to convert solar energy into chemical energy. In nature, the chemical energy is stored in a diverse range of biopolymers. These sunlight-derived, energy-rich biopolymers can be converted into environmentally clean and CO(2) neutral fuels. A select group of photosynthetic microorganisms have developed the ability to extract and divert protons and electrons derived from water to chloroplast hydrogenase(s) to produce molecular H(2) fuel. Here, we describe the development and characterization of C. reinhardtii strains, derived from the high H(2) production mutant Stm6, into which the HUP1 (hexose uptake protein) hexose symporter from Chlorella kessleri was introduced. The isolated cell lines can use externally supplied glucose for heterotrophic growth in the dark. More importantly, external glucose supply (1mM) was shown to increase the H(2) production capacity in strain Stm6Glc4 to approximately 150% of that of the high-H(2) producing strain, Stm6. This establishes the foundations for a new fuel production process in which H(2)O and glucose can simultaneously be used for H(2) production. It also opens new perspectives on future strategies for improving bio-H(2) production efficiency under natural day/night regimes and for using sugar waste material for energy production in green algae as photosynthetic catalysts. PMID:17624461

  5. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression.

    PubMed

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  6. Ectopic expression of the sodium-iodide symporter enables imaging of transplanted cardiac stem cells in vivo by SPECT or PET

    PubMed Central

    Terrovitis, John; Kwok, Keng Fai; Lautamäki, Riikka; Engles, James M; Barth, Andreas S; Kizana, Eddy; Miake, Junichiro; Leppo, Michelle K; Fox, James; Seidel, Jurgen; Pomper, Martin; Wahl, Richard L; Tsui, Benjamin; Bengel, Frank; Marbán, Eduardo; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) which promotes in vivo cellular uptake of 99mTc or 124I, as a reporter gene for cell tracking by SPECT or PET imaging. Background Stem cells offer the promise of cardiac repair. Stem cell labeling is a prerequisite to tracking cell fate in vivo. Methods The human NIS cDNA was transduced into rat cardiac-derived stem cells (rCDCs) using lentiviral vectors. Rats were injected intra-myocardially with up to 4 million NIS+-rCDCs immediately following LAD ligation. Dual isotope SPECT (or PET) imaging was performed, using 99mTc (or 124I) for cell detection and 201Tl (or 13NH3) for myocardial delineation. In a subset of animals, high resolution ex vivo SPECT scans of explanted hearts were obtained to confirm that in vivo signals were derived from the cell injection site. Results NIS expression in rCDCs did not affect cell viability and proliferation. NIS activity was verified in isolated transduced cells by measuring 99mTc uptake. NIS+ rCDCs were visualized in vivo as regions of 99mTc or 124I uptake within a perfusion deficit in the SPECT and PET images, respectively. Cells could be visualized by SPECT up to day 6 post-injection. Ex vivo SPECT confirmed that in vivo 99mTc signals were localized to the cell injection sites. Conclusion Ectopic NIS expression allows non invasive in vivo stem cell tracking in the myocardium, using either SPECT or PET. The general approach shows significant promise in tracking the fate of transplanted cells participating in cardiac regeneration, given its ability to observe living cells using clinically-applicable imaging modalities. PMID:18992656

  7. Tissue-Specific Induction of Mouse ZIP8 and ZIP14 Divalent Cation/Bicarbonate Symporters by, and Cytokine Response to, Inflammatory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Wang, Zhifang; Bao, Shengying; Knoell, Daren L; Nebert, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Mouse Slc39a8 and Slc39a14 genes encode ZIP8 and ZIP14, respectively, which are ubiquitous divalent cation/(HCO3−)2 symporters responsible for uptake of Zn2+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ into cells. Cd2+ and other toxic nonessential metals can displace essential cations, thereby entering vertebrate cells. Whereas Slc39a8 encodes a single protein, Slc39a14 has two exons 4 which, via alternative splicing, give rise to ZIP14A and ZIP14B; why differences exist in cell-type-specific expression of ZIP14A and ZIP14B remains unknown. Inflammatory stimuli have been associated with ZIP8 and ZIP14 up-regulation, but a systematic study of many tissues simultaneously in a laboratory animal following inflammatory cytokine exposure has not yet been reported. Herein we show that C57BL/6J male mice—treated intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or interleukin-6 (IL6)—exhibited quantatively very different, highly tissue-specific, and markedly time-dependent up- and down-regulation of ZIP8, ZIP14A and ZIP14B mRNA levels in twelve tissues. Magnitude of the inflammatory response was confirmed by measuring the proinflammatory cytokine TNF, IL6 and interleukin-1β (IL1B) mRNA levels in the same tissues of these animals. Our data suggest that most if not all tissues use ZIP8, ZIP14A and/or ZIP14B) for Zn2+ uptake, some tissues under basal conditions and others moreso when inflammatory stressors are present; collectively, this might lead to substantial alterations in plasma Zn2+ levels, due to Zn2+ redistribution not just in liver, but across many vital organs. In the context of cadmium-mediated toxicity, our data suggest that tissues other than liver, kidney and lung should also be considered. PMID:24728862

  8. A novel oncolytic viral therapy and imaging technique for gastric cancer using a genetically engineered vaccinia virus carrying the human sodium iodide symporter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric cancers have poor overall survival despite recent advancements in early detection methods, endoscopic resection techniques, and chemotherapy treatments. Vaccinia viral therapy has had promising therapeutic potential for various cancers and has a great safety profile. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a novel genetically-engineered vaccinia virus carrying the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene, GLV-1 h153, on gastric cancers and its potential utility for imaging with 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy and 124I positron emission tomography (PET). Methods GLV-1 h153 was tested against five human gastric cancer cell lines using cytotoxicity and standard viral plaque assays. In vivo, subcutaneous flank tumors were generated in nude mice with human gastric cancer cells, MKN-74. Tumors were subsequently injected with either GLV-1 h153 or PBS and followed for tumor growth. 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy and 124I microPET imaging were performed. Results GFP expression, a surrogate for viral infectivity, confirmed viral infection by 24 hours. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1, GLV-1 h153 achieved > 90% cytotoxicity in MNK-74, OCUM-2MD3, and AGS over 9 days, and >70% cytotoxicity in MNK- 45 and TMK-1. In vivo, GLV-1 h153 was effective in treating xenografts (p < 0.001) after 2 weeks of treatment. GLV-1 h153-infected tumors were readily imaged by 99mTc pertechnetate scintigraphy and 124I microPET imaging 2 days after treatment. Conclusions GLV-1 h153 is an effective oncolytic virus expressing the hNIS protein that can efficiently regress gastric tumors and allow deep-tissue imaging. These data encourages its continued investigation in clinical settings. PMID:24383569

  9. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  10. Combined 2-deoxy glucose and metformin improves therapeutic efficacy of sodium-iodide symporter-mediated targeted radioiodine therapy in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sushmita; Thaker, Nirmal; De, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Radiosensitization using either metformin or 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) in various cancer cells has been reported. The present study reveals novel information on combining these drugs to enhance radiosensitization effect in breast cancer (BC) cells. Responses to low-dose Cobalt60 radiation, as well as a newly emerged radioiodine therapy target for BC, that is, sodium-iodide symporter (NIS or SLC5A5) protein, are tested. As therapeutic potential of NIS in BC is often limited due to low uptake and fast efflux rate of iodine, the scope of these two radiosensitizers to further improve NIS-mediated (131)I therapeutic efficacy is explored. Two BC cell lines, MCF-7, and MDA MB231 are tested to optimize minimal drug doses required for radiosensitization. A combination of 2 mM metformin and 20 mM 2-DG with 2 grey (Gy) Cobalt60 radiation shows significant radiosensitization effect (P=0.0002). In cells treated with the combination therapy, increased γH2A.X foci formation was noted. Further, MCF-7 BC cells overexpressing NIS (MCF-7 NIS) was established, and using the optimized drug concentrations, significant radiosensitization (P=0.0019) by 50 μ Ci (131)I usage was found to be the case as well. Apoptosis data corroborates with the result of clonogenic assay showing significant increase in apoptotic population upon dual drug-mediated radiosensitization. In case of metformin treatment, lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of the cell has been observed. The encouraging radiosensitization effect observed using combined 2-DG and metformin may aid in reducing Cobalt60 radiation exposure or for targeted radioiodine therapy in BC cells with NIS expression. This study indicates high potential of this drug combination in sensitizing BC cells for NIS-mediated-targeted radioiodine therapy, which otherwise may have lacked efficacy. PMID:26355636

  11. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  12. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  13. Sialic acid acquisition in bacteria-one substrate, many transporters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gavin H

    2016-06-15

    The sialic acids are a family of 9-carbon sugar acids found predominantly on the cell-surface glycans of humans and other animals within the Deuterostomes and are also used in the biology of a wide range of bacteria that often live in association with these animals. For many bacteria sialic acids are simply a convenient source of food, whereas for some pathogens they are also used in immune evasion strategies. Many bacteria that use sialic acids derive them from the environment and so are dependent on sialic acid uptake. In this mini-review I will describe the discovery and characterization of bacterial sialic acids transporters, revealing that they have evolved multiple times across multiple diverse families of transporters, including the ATP-binding cassette (ABC), tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP), major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and sodium solute symporter (SSS) transporter families. In addition there is evidence for protein-mediated transport of sialic acids across the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria, which can be coupled to periplasmic processing of different sialic acids to the most common form, β-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) that is most frequently taken up into the cell. PMID:27284039

  14. Sialic Acid Transport Contributes to Pneumococcal Colonization ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Carolyn; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia and meningitis. Airway colonization is a necessary precursor to disease, but little is known about how the bacteria establish and maintain colonization. Carbohydrates are required as a carbon source for pneumococcal growth and, therefore, for colonization. Free carbohydrates are not readily available in the naso-oropharynx; however, N- and O-linked glycans are common in the airway. Sialic acid is the most common terminal modification on N- and O-linked glycans and is likely encountered frequently by S. pneumoniae in the airway. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid supports pneumococcal growth when provided as a sole carbon source. Growth on sialic acid requires import into the bacterium. Three genetic regions have been proposed to encode pneumococcal sialic acid transporters: one sodium solute symporter and two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Data demonstrate that one of these, satABC, is required for transport of sialic acid. A satABC mutant displayed significantly reduced growth on both sialic acid and the human glycoprotein alpha-1. The importance of satABC for growth on human glycoprotein suggests that sialic acid transport may be important in vivo. Indeed, the satABC mutant was significantly reduced in colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that S. pneumoniae is able to use sialic acid as a sole carbon source and that utilization of sialic acid is likely important during pneumococcal colonization. PMID:21189320

  15. ΔpH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Chang; Bush, Daniel R.

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid transport into plasma membrane vesicles isolated from mature sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv Great Western) leaves was investigated. The transport of alanine, leucine, glutamine, glutamate, isoleucine, and arginine was driven by a trans-membrane proton concentration difference. ΔpH-Dependent alanine, leucine, glutamine, and glutamate transport exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and double-reciprocal plots of the data were linear with apparent Km values of 272, 346, 258, and 1981 micromolar, respectively. These results are consistent with carrier mediated transport. ΔpH-Dependent isoleucine and arginine transport exhibited biphasic kinetics, suggesting these amino acids may be transported by at least two transport systems. Symport mediated alanine transport was electrogenic as demonstrated by the effect of membrane potential (ΔΨ) on ΔpH-dependent flux. In the absence of significant charge compensation, a low rate of alanine transport was observed. When ΔΨ was held at 0 millivolt with symmetric potassium concentrations and valinomycin, the rate of flux was stimulated fourfold. In the presence of a negative ΔΨ, alanine transport increased sixfold. These results are consistent with an electrogenic transport process which results in a net flux of positive charge into the vesicles. The effect of changing ΔΨ on the kinetics of alanine transport altered Vmax with no apparent change in Km. Amino acid transport was inhibited by the protein modifier diethyl pyrocarbonate, but was insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulfonic acid, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, phenylglyoxal, and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Four amino acid symport systems, two neutral, one acidic, and one basic, were resolved based on inter-amino acid competition experiments. One neutral system appears to be active for all neutral amino acids while the second exhibited a low affinity for isoleucine, threonine, valine, and proline

  16. In vivo Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide (131I) Therapy of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Transfected with a Lentivirus Expressing Sodium Iodide Symporter

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuo; Zhang, Min; Guo, Rui; Miao, Ying; Hu, Jiajia; Xi, Yun; Li, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite recent improvements in the survival rates for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), novel treatment strategies are required to improve distant metastasis-free survival. The sodium iodine symporter (NIS) gene has been applied for in vivo imaging and cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the potential of NIS gene therapy as a therapeutic approach in NPC by performing non-invasive imaging using 125I and 131I therapy in vivo. Methods We constructed a lentiviral vector expressing NIS and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter, and stably transfected the vector into CNE-2Z NPC cells to create CNE-2Z-NIS cells. CNE-2Z and CNE-2Z-NIS tumor xenografts were established in nude mice; 125I uptake, accumulation and efflux were measured using micro-SPECT/CT imaging; the therapeutic effects of treatment with 131I were assessed over 25 days by measuring tumor volume and immunohistochemical staining of the excised tumors. Results qPCR, immunofluorescence and Western blotting confirmed that CNE-2Z-NIS cells expressed high levels of NIS mRNA and protein. CNE-2Z-NIS cells and xenografts took up and accumulated significantly more 125I than CNE-2Z cells and xenografts. In vitro, 131I significantly reduced the clonogenic survival of CNE-2Z-NIS cells. In vivo, 131I effectively inhibited the growth of CNE-2Z-NIS xenografts. At the end of 131I therapy, CNE-2Z-NIS xenograft tumor cells expressed higher levels of NIS and caspase-3 and lower levels of Ki-67. Conclusion Lentiviruses effectively delivered and mediated long-lasting expression of NIS in CNE-2Z cells which enabled uptake and accumulation of radioisotopes and provided a significant therapeutic effect in an in vivo model of NPC. NIS-mediated radioiodine treatment merits further investigation as a potentially effective, low toxicity therapeutic strategy for NPC. PMID:25621996

  17. Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS)-Mediated Radionuclide (131I, 188Re) Therapy of Liver Cancer After Transcriptionally Targeted Intratumoral in Vivo NIS Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Klutz, Kathrin; Willhauck, Michael J.; Wunderlich, Nathalie; Zach, Christian; Anton, Martina; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Göke, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We reported the therapeutic efficacy of 131I in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells stably expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) under the control of the tumor-specific α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter. In the current study we investigated the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated in vivo NIS gene transfer followed by 131I and 188Re administration for the treatment of HCC xenografts. We used a replication-deficient adenovirus carrying the human NIS gene linked to the mouse AFP promoter (Ad5-AFP-NIS) for in vitro and in vivo NIS gene transfer. Functional NIS expression was confirmed by in vivo γ-camera imaging, followed by analysis of NIS protein and mRNA expression. Human HCC (HepG2) cells infected with Ad5-AFP-NIS concentrated 50% of the applied activity of 125I, which was sufficiently high for a therapeutic effect in an in vitro clonogenic assay. Four days after intratumoral injection of Ad5-AFP-NIS (3×109 plaque-forming units) HepG2 xenografts accumulated 14.5% injected dose (ID)/g 123I with an effective half-life of 13 hr (tumor-absorbed dose, 318 mGy/MBq 131I). In comparison, 9.2% ID/g 188Re was accumulated in tumors with an effective half-life of 12.8 hr (tumor-absorbed dose, 545 mGy/MBq). After adenovirus-mediated NIS gene transfer in HepG2 xenografts administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I or 188Re (55.5 MBq) resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival without a significant difference between 188Re and 131I. In conclusion, a therapeutic effect of 131I and 188Re was demonstrated in HepG2 xenografts after tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated in vivo NIS gene transfer. PMID:21488714

  18. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions. PMID:26721276

  19. Cation-halide transport through peptide pores containing aminopicolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Basak, Debajyoti; Sridhar, Sucheta; Bera, Amal K; Madhavan, Nandita

    2016-05-18

    Synthetic pores that selectively transport ions of biological significance through membranes could be potentially used in medical diagnostics or therapeutics. Herein, we report cation-selective octapeptide pores derived from alanine and aminopicolinic acid. The ion transport mechanism through the pores has been established to be a cation-chloride symport. The cation-chloride co-transport is biologically essential for the efficient functioning of the central nervous system and has been implicated in diseases such as epilepsy. The pores formed in synthetic lipid bilayers do not exhibit any closing events. The ease of synthesis as well as infinite lifetimes of these pores provides scope for modifying their transport behaviour to develop sensors. PMID:27137995

  20. Induction of amino acid transporters expression by endurance exercise in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Taro Yoshinaga, Mariko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Regulation of amino acid transporter expression in working muscle remains unclear. •Expression of amino acid transporters for leucine were induced by a bout of exercise. •Requirement of leucine in muscle cells might regulate expression of its transporters. •This information is beneficial for understanding the muscle remodeling by exercise. -- Abstract: We here investigated whether an acute bout of endurance exercise would induce the expression of amino acid transporters that regulate leucine transport across plasma and lysosomal membranes in rat skeletal muscle. Rats ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 28 m/min for 90 min. Immediately after the exercise, we observed that expression of mRNAs encoding L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and CD98 was induced in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) mRNA was also induced by the exercise in those three muscles. Expression of proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) mRNA was slightly but not significantly induced by a single bout of exercise in soleus and EDL muscles. Exercise-induced mRNA expression of these amino acid transporters appeared to be attenuated by repeated bouts of the exercise. These results suggested that the expression of amino acid transporters for leucine may be induced in response to an increase in the requirement for this amino acid in the cells of working skeletal muscles.

  1. Molecular dissection of membrane-transport proteins: mass spectrometry and sequence determination of the galactose-H+ symport protein, GalP, of Escherichia coli and quantitative assay of the incorporation of [ring-2-13C]histidine and (15)NH(3).

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Henrietta; Ashcroft, Alison E; Keen, Jeffrey N; Henderson, Peter J F; Herbert, Richard B

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mass of the galactose-H(+) symport protein GalP, as its histidine-tagged derivative GalP(His)(6), has been determined by electrospray MS (ESI-MS) with an error of <0.02%. One methionine residue, predicted to be present from the DNA sequence, was deduced to be absent. This is a significant advance on the estimation of the molecular masses of membrane-transport proteins by SDS/PAGE, where there is a consistent under-estimation of the true molecular mass due to anomalous electrophoretic migration. Addition of a size-exclusion chromatography step after Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetate affinity purification was essential to obtain GalP(His)(6) suitable for ESI-MS. Controlled trypsin, trypsin+chymotrypsin and CNBr digestion of the protein yielded peptide fragments suitable for ESI-MS and tandem MS analysis, and accurate mass determination of the derived fragments resulted in identification of 82% of the GalP(His)(6) protein. Tandem MS analysis of selected peptides then afforded 49% of the actual amino acid sequence of the protein; the absence of the N-terminal methionine was confirmed. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization MS allowed identification of one peptide that was not detected by ESI-MS. All the protein/peptide mass and sequence determinations were in accord with the predictions of amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the galP gene. [ring-2-(13)C]Histidine was incorporated into GalP(His)(6) in vivo, and ESI-MS analysis enabled the measurement of a high (80%) and specific incorporation of label into the histidine residues in the protein. MS could also be used to confirm the labelling of the protein by (15)NH(3) (93% enrichment) and [(19)F]tryptophan (83% enrichment). Such MS measurements will serve in the future analysis of the structures of membrane-transport proteins by NMR, and of their topology by indirect techniques. PMID:11931651

  2. Expression cloning in yeast of a cDNA encoding a broad specificity amino acid permease from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Frommer, W B; Hummel, S; Riesmeier, J W

    1993-01-01

    To study amino acid transport in plants at the molecular level, we have isolated an amino acid permease cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana by complementation of a yeast mutant defective in proline uptake with a cDNA. The predicted polypeptide of 53 kDa is highly hydrophobic with 12 putative membrane-spanning regions and shows no significant homologies to other known transporters. Expression of the cDNA enables the yeast mutant to take up L-[14C]proline. Competition studies argue for a broad but stereospecific substrate recognition by the permease, which resembles neutral or general amino acid transport systems from Chlorella and higher plants. Both pH dependence and inhibition by protonophores are consistent with a proton symport mechanism. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8327465

  3. PAT1.1; Pinellas Action Tracking System; Tracks Audit Findings and Corrective Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Mellican, P.L.

    1993-04-09

    PAT was derived from a system that began at the Rocky Flats Plant and was further enhanced at the Mound Plant. Pinellas Plant obtained this system in 1990 to track Tiger Team Findings; it has been expanded to include new modules which encompass a wide range of related functions. Functionality includes tracking of findings and associated corrective actions from various sources such as line operations, self-assessments, oversight assessments, and external organizations. Other functionality includes Management Walk-About tracking, NEPA prioritization, Occurrence/incident Report corrective action tracking, and Management Action Item Tracking. The system utilizes state of the art relational database technology with pop-up windows for table lookups and entry of descriptive text. Standards such as assessment identification numbers, area designations, and finding category codes have been developed to provide enhanced query capabilities and the ability to group findings for trending purposes on a plant-wide basis.

  4. Proton-dependent glutamine uptake by aphid bacteriocyte amino acid transporter ApGLNT1.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Wilson, Alex C C; Luetje, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Aphids house large populations of the gammaproteobacterial symbiont Buchnera aphidicola in specialized bacteriocyte cells. The combined biosynthetic capability of the holobiont (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Buchnera) is sufficient for biosynthesis of all twenty protein coding amino acids, including amino acids that animals alone cannot synthesize; and that are present at low concentrations in A. pisum's plant phloem sap diet. Collaborative holobiont amino acid biosynthesis depends on glutamine import into bacteriocytes, which serves as a nitrogen-rich amino donor for biosynthesis of other amino acids. Recently, we characterized A. pisum glutamine transporter 1 (ApGLNT1), a member of the amino acid/auxin permease family, as the dominant bacteriocyte plasma membrane glutamine transporter. Here we show ApGLNT1 to be structurally and functionally related to mammalian proton-dependent amino acid transporters (PATs 1-4). Using functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, combined with two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we demonstrate that ApGLNT1 is electrogenic and that glutamine induces large inward currents. ApGLNT1 glutamine induced currents are dependent on external glutamine concentration, proton (H+) gradient across the membrane, and membrane potential. Based on these transport properties, ApGLNT1-mediated glutamine uptake into A. pisum bacteriocytes can be regulated by changes in either proton gradients across the plasma membrane or membrane potential. PMID:26028424

  5. Contrast of volatile fatty acid driven and inorganic acid or base driven phosphorus release and uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Addition of an inorganic acid or base was detrimental to net phosphorus removals in short-term batch experiments, suggesting there might be system upset when pH changes. In contrast, addition of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) increased anaerobic phosphorus release and aerobic phosphorus uptake while maintaining or improving net phosphorus removals. The effect of pH change differed if the acid or base added was inorganic versus organic. Volatile fatty acids that resulted in poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate rather than poly-3-hydroxy-valerate resulted in greater net phosphorus removals, and this corresponded to differences in consumption of reducing equivalents. Acetic acid resulted in improved net phosphorus removal compared to sodium acetate, suggesting that acid forms of VFAs might be superior as supplemental VFAs. It is hypothesized that anaerobic phosphorus release following addition of inorganic acid is primarily a result of phosphorus and proton (H+) symport (excretion from the cell) for pH homeostasis, whereas addition of VFAs results in phosphorus and H+ release to maintain the proton motive force. PMID:22834218

  6. Sucrose Loading in Isolated Veins of Pisum sativum: Regulation by Abscisic Acid, Gibberellic Acid, and Cell Turgor.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Peretó, J G; Vercher, Y; Beltrán, J P

    1989-09-01

    Enzymatically isolated vein networks from mature pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) leaves were employed to investigate the properties of sucrose loading and the effect of phytohormones and cell turgor on this process. The sucrose uptake showed two components: a saturable and a first-order kinetics system. The high affinity system (K(m), 3.3 millimolar) was located at the plasmalemma (p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and orthovanadate sensitivity). Further characterization of this system, including pH dependence and effects of energy metabolism inhibitors, supported the H(+)-sugar symport concept for sucrose loading. Within a physiological range (0.1-100 micromolar) and after 90 min, abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) promoted 1 millimolar sucrose uptake. These responses were partially (ABA) or totally (GA(3)) turgor-dependent. In experiments of combined hormonal treatments, ABA counteracted the GA(3) positive effects on sucrose uptake. The abolishment of these responses by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and experiments on proton flux suggest that both factors (cell turgor and hormones) are modulating the H(+) ATPase plasmalemma activity. The results are discussed in terms of their physiological relevance. PMID:16667007

  7. A novel hNIS/tdTomato fusion reporter for visualizing the relationship between the cellular localization of sodium iodide symporter and its iodine uptake function under heat shock treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Chan Joo; Chung, Taemoon; Youn, Hyewon; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    The function of membrane-localized sodium iodide symporter (NIS) determines the efficacy of radioiodine therapy in thyroid cancer. Here, we describe a dual mode reporter fused with human NIS (hNIS) and a red fluorescent protein named tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) for the in vitro and in vivo imaging of hNIS protein expression, localization, and iodide uptake function. Human cervical epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line (HeLa)-hNIS/tdTomato cells were established by transducing a fusion gene expressing hNIS/tdTomato under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter. Fluorescence imaging, confocal microscopy, and an 125I uptake assay were performed to validate the integrity of the fusion protein. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide were used to block newly synthesized hNIS proteins. In vivo images were acquired using a gamma camera and a Maestro fluorescence imaging device. The fluorescence intensity of membrane-localized hNIS and 125I uptake both were increased after heat shock. Scintigraphy and fluorescence imaging indicated specific accumulation of the hNIS/tdTomato fusion protein in xenografted tumors, supporting the utility of this system for in vivo monitoring of hNIS expression and activity. We developed a novel hNIS/tdTomato dual mode reporter that enables visualization of the expression, localization, and iodine uptake function of hNIS in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25773964

  8. Preclinical efficacy of the oncolytic measles virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter in iodine non-avid anaplastic thyroid cancer: a novel therapeutic agent allowing noninvasive imaging and radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Reddi, H V; Madde, P; McDonough, S J; Trujillo, M A; Morris, J C; Myers, R M; Peng, K W; Russell, S J; McIver, B; Eberhardt, N L

    2012-09-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an extremely aggressive disease resistant to radioiodine treatment because of loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression. To enhance prognosis of this fatal cancer, we validated the preclinical efficacy of measles virus (MV)-NIS, the vaccine strain of the oncolytic MV (MV-Edm), modified to include the NIS gene. Western blotting analysis confirmed that a panel of eight anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC)-derived cell lines do not express NIS protein, but do express CD46, the MV receptor. In vitro cell death assays and in vivo xenograft studies demonstrate the oncolytic efficacy of MV-NIS in BHT-101 and KTC-3, ATC-derived cell lines. Radioactive iodine uptake along with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-computed tomography imaging of KTC-3 xenografts after (99)Tc(m) administration confirmed NIS expression in vitro and in vivo, respectively, after virus treatment. Adjuvant administration of RAI, to MV-NIS-treated KTC-3 tumors showed a trend for increased tumor cell killing. As current treatment for ATC is only palliative, and MV-NIS is currently Food and Drug Administration approved for human clinical trials in myeloma, our data indicate that targeting ATC with MV-NIS could prove to be a novel therapeutic strategy for effective treatment of iodine-resistant ATC and will expedite its testing in clinical trials for this aggressive disease. PMID:22790962

  9. Abnormal radioiodine uptake on post-therapy whole body scan and sodium/iodine symporter expression in a dermoid cyst of the ovary: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Campennì, Alfredo; Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Tuccari, Giovanni; Fogliani, Simone; Ruggeri, Rosaria M; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    In patients affected by differentiated thyroid cancer, the whole-body scan (WBS) with 131-radioiodine, especially when performed after a therapeutic activity of 131I, represents a sensitive procedure for detecting thyroid remnant and/or metastatic disease. Nevertheless, a wide spectrum of potentially pitfalls has been reported. Herein we describe a 63-year-old woman affected by follicular thyroid cancer, who was accidentally found to have an abdominal mass at post-dose WBS (pWBS). pWBS showed abnormal radioiodine uptake in the upper mediastinum, consistent with lymph-node metastases, and a slight radioiodine uptake in an abdominal focal area. Computed tomography revealed an inhomogeneous mass in the pelvis, previously unrecognized. The lesion, surgically removed, was found to be a typical dermoid cyst of the ovary, without any evidence of thyroid tissue. By immunohistochemistry, a moderate expression of the sodium-iodine symporter (NIS) was demonstrated in the epithelial cells, suggesting a NIS-dependent uptake of radioiodine by the cyst. PMID:26331324

  10. Molecular basis of essential amino acid transport from studies of insect nutrient amino acid transporters of the SLC6 family (NAT-SLC6)

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Two protein families that represent major components of essential amino acid transport in insects have been identified. They are annotated as the SLC6 and SLC7 families of transporters according to phylogenetic proximity to characterized amino acid transporters (HUGO nomenclature). Members of these families have been identified as important apical and basolateral parts of transepithelial essential amino acid absorption in the metazoan alimentary canal. Synergistically, they play critical physiological roles as essential substrate providers to diverse metabolic processes, including generic protein synthesis. This review briefly clarifies the requirements for amino acid transport and a variety of amino acid transport mechanisms, including the aforementioned families. Further it focuses on the large group of Nutrient Amino acid Transporters (NATs), which comprise a recently identified subfamily of the Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter family (NSS or SLC6). The first insect NAT, cloned from the caterpillar gut, has a broad substrate spectrum similar to mammalian B0 transporters. Several new NAT-SLC6 members have been characterized in an effort to explore mechanisms for the essential amino acid absorption in model dipteran insects. The identification and functional characterization of new B0-like and narrow specificity transporters of essential amino acids in fruit fly and mosquitoes leads to a fundamentally important insight: that NATs evolved and act together as the integrated active core of a transport network that mediates active alimentary absorption and systemic distribution of essential amino acids. This role of NATs is projected from the most primitive prokaryotes to the most complex metazoan organisms, and represents an interesting platform for unraveling the molecular evolution of amino acid transport and modeling amino acid transport disorders. The comparative study of NATs elucidates important adaptive differences between essential amino acid transportomes

  11. Genetic selection for modulators of a retinoic-acid-responsive reporter in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Burt; Karpilow, Jon; Dunn, Christine; Peterson, Isaac; Maxfield, Andrew; Zharkikh, Ludmilla; Abedi, Majid; Hurlburt, Anthony; Hardman, Joshua; Hsu, Forrest; Li, Wenhua; Rebentisch, Matthew; Sandrock, Robert; Sandrock, Tanya; Kamb, Alexander; Teng, David H-F

    2003-01-01

    We used a genetic screening methodology, a human cell line bearing a retinoic-acid-responsive enhanced GFP reporter, and a flow sorter to recover dominant modulators of reporter expression. Four inducers and three suppressors that were fused to the C terminus of a protein scaffold for stability were isolated and their mechanisms of action studied. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that six of these dominant agents exerted their effects at the protein level. The single cDNA coding fragment that was isolated comprised the central 64-amino-acid section of human cyclophilin B, which contained its peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain; this cyclophilin fragment repressed expression of the retinoic-acid-responsive reporter. The remaining clones encoded peptides shorter than 30 amino acids unrelated to known gene open reading frames. Genetic epistasis studies between the strongest inducer, R3, and a dominant-negative mutant of RARalpha suggest that the two factors function in the same pathway. Transcript microarray analyses suggest that R3 induced a subset of the retinoid-responsive genes in melanoma cells. Finally, yeast two-hybrid assays and co-immunoprecipitation studies of human cell extracts identified PAT1 as a protein that interacts with R3. PMID:12663543

  12. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  13. Arabidopsis plants harbouring a mutation in AtSUC2, encoding the predominant sucrose/proton symporter necessary for efficient phloem transport, are able to complete their life cycle and produce viable seed

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Avinash C.; Dasgupta, Kasturi; Ajieren, Eric; Costilla, Gabriella; McGarry, Roisin C.; Ayre, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims AtSUC2 encodes a sucrose/proton symporter that localizes throughout the collection and transport phloem and is necessary for efficient transport of sucrose from source to sink tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants harbouring homozygous AtSUC2 null alleles accumulate sugar, starch, and anthocyanin in mature leaves, have severely delayed development and stunted growth and, in previous studies, failed to complete their life cycle by producing viable seed. Methods An AtSUC2 allele with a T-DNA insertion in the second intron was analysed. Full-length transcript from this allele is not produced, and a truncated protein translated from sequences upstream of the insertion site did not catalyse sucrose uptake into yeast, supporting the contention that this is a null allele. Mutant plants were grown in a growth chamber with a diurnal light/dark cycle, and growth patterns recorded. Key Results This allele (SALK_038124, designated AtSUC2-4) has the hallmarks of previously described null alleles but, despite compromised carbon partitioning and growth, produces viable seeds. The onset of flowering was chronologically delayed but occurred at the same point in the plastochron index as wild type. Conclusions AtSUC2 is important for phloem loading and is therefore fundamental to phloem transport and plant productivity, but plants can complete their life cycle and produce viable seed in its absence. Arabidopsis appears to have mechanisms for mobilizing reduced carbon from the phloem into developing seeds independent of AtSUC2. PMID:19789176

  14. Knock out of the BASIGIN/CD147 chaperone of lactate/H+ symporters disproves its pro-tumour action via extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) induction.

    PubMed

    Marchiq, Ibtissam; Albrengues, Jean; Granja, Sara; Gaggioli, Cédric; Pouysségur, Jacques; Simon, Marie-Pierre

    2015-09-22

    BASIGIN/CD147/EMMPRIN is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein strongly expressed in tumours. BASIGIN controls tumour metabolism, particularly glycolysis by facilitating lactic acid export through the two monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and hypoxia-inducible MCT4. However, before being recognized as a co-carrier of MCTs, BASIGIN was described as an inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Early on, a model emerged in which, tumour cells use the extracellular domain of BASIGIN to recognize and stimulate neighbouring fibroblasts to produce MMPs. However, this model has remained hypothetical since a direct link between BASIGIN and MMPs production has not yet been clearly established. To validate the BASIGIN/MMP hypothesis, we developed BASIGIN knockouts in three human tumour cell lines derived from glioma, colon, and lung adenocarcinoma. By using co-culture experiments of either human or mouse fibroblasts and tumour cell lines we showed, contrary to what has been abundantly published, that the disruption of BASIGIN in tumour cells and in MEFs has no action on the production of MMPs. Our findings do not support the notion that the pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated via induction of MMPs. Therefore, we propose that to date, the strongest pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated through the control of fermentative glycolysis. PMID:26284589

  15. Assessment of the Effect of Two Distinct Restricted Iodine Diet Durations on Urinary Iodine Levels (Collected over 24 h or as a Single-Spot Urinary Sample) and Na+/I- Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Padovani, Rosália P.; Maciel, Rui M.B.; Kasamatsu, Teresa S.; Freitas, Beatriz C.G.; Marone, Marilia M.S.; Camacho, Cleber P.; Biscolla, Rosa Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A restricted iodine diet (RID) may be recommended for depletion of the whole-body iodine pool in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer referred for radioiodine treatment or a whole-body scan. Evaluation of the iodine pool is possible through urinary iodide (UI) measurements, which can be collected in 24-hour (24U) or spot urinary (sU) samples. However, the minimum period required for an RID to lower the iodine pool, the measurement of iodine in sU samples as a iodine pool marker, and the influence of the iodine pool on Na+/I- symporter (NIS) expression are debatable in the literature. Objectives To compare the effects of 15- and 30-day RID on UI measurements in 24U and sU samples and the impact of RID on NIS expression. Methods Thyroidectomized patients went on a 15- or 30-day RID and collected 24U and sU samples before and after the RID. Twenty healthy individuals were evaluated for mRNA NIS expression before and after the RID. Results Of 306 patients, only 125 properly complied with both the RID and 24U collection. We observed a correlation between sU and 24U UI before the RID (n = 306, ρ = 0.47, p < 0.001), after a 15-day RID (n = 79, ρ = 0.49, p < 0.001), and after a 30-day RID (n = 46, ρ = 0.73, p < 0.001). There was a significant decrease in UI after the RID. The median UI measurement was 275 μg/l at baseline and 99 and 80 μg/l after a 15- and 30-day RID, respectively. There was a significant increase in NIS expression after a 15-day RID. Conclusions A 15-day RID is sufficient to deplete the iodine pool. sU can replace 24U UI as a marker for assessing the iodine pool. NIS expression was increased after a 15-day RID. PMID:26279995

  16. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  18. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  19. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  1. The cell membrane and the struggle for life of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Konings, Wil N

    2002-08-01

    The major life-threatening event for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in their natural environment is the depletion of their energy sources and LAB can survive such conditions only for a short period of time. During periods of starvation LAB can exploit optimally the potential energy sources in their environment usually by applying proton motive force generating membrane transport systems. These systems include in addition to the proton translocating F0F1-ATPase: a respiratory chain when hemin is present in the medium, electrogenic solute uptake and excretion systems, electrogenic lactate/proton symport and precursor/product exchange systems. Most of these metabolic energy-generating systems offer as additional bonus the prevention of a lethal decrease of the internal and external pH. LAB have limited biosynthetic capacities and rely heavily on the presence of essential components such as sources of amino acids in their environment. The uptake of amino acids requires a major fraction of the available metabolic energy of LAB. The metabolic energy cost of amino acid uptake can be reduced drastically by accumulating oligopeptides instead of the individual amino acids and by proton motive force-generating efflux of excessively accumulated amino acids. Other life-threatening conditions that LAB encounter in their environment are rapid changes in the osmolality and the exposure to cytotoxic compounds, including antibiotics. LAB respond to osmotic upshock or downshock by accumulating or releasing rapidly osmolytes such as glycine-betaine. The life-threatening presence of cytotoxic compounds, including antibiotics, is effectively counteracted by powerful drug extruding multidrug resistance systems. The number and variety of defense mechanisms in LAB is surprisingly high. Most defense mechanisms operate in the cytoplasmic membrane to control the internal environment and the energetic status of LAB. Annotation of the functions of the genes in the genomes of LAB will undoubtedly

  2. Amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (slc6a19) and ancillary protein: impact on function.

    PubMed

    Margheritis, Eleonora; Imperiali, Francesca Guia; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Vollero, Alessandra; Terova, Genciana; Rimoldi, Simona; Girardello, Rossana; Bossi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Amino acids play an important role in the metabolism of all organisms. Their epithelial re-absorption is due to specific transport proteins, such as B(0)AT1, a Na(+)-coupled neutral amino acid symporter belonging to the solute carrier 6 family. Here, a recently cloned fish orthologue, from the intestine of Salmo salar, was electrophysiologically characterized with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, in Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing the transporter. Substrate specificity, apparent affinities and the ionic dependence of the transport mechanism were determined in the presence of specific collectrin. Results demonstrated that like the human, but differently from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) orthologue, salmon B(0)AT1 needs to be associated with partner proteins to be correctly expressed at the oocyte plasma membrane. Cloning of sea bass collectrin and comparison of membrane expression and functionality of the B(0)AT1 orthologue transporters allowed a deeper investigation on the role of their interactions. The parameters acquired by electrophysiological and immunolocalization experiments in the mammalian and fish transporters contributed to highlight the dynamic of relations and impacts on transport function of the ancillary proteins. The comparative characterization of the physiological parameters of amino acid transporters with auxiliary proteins can help the comprehension of the regulatory mechanism of essential nutrient absorption. PMID:27255547

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  5. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  6. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  7. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  8. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  9. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  10. Amino acid transport by membrane vesicles of an obligate anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Ubbink-Kok, T; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from the obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was inserted in these membrane vesicles by membrane fusion by using the freeze-thaw sonication technique (A. J. M. Driessen, W. de Vrij, and W. N. Konings, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7555-7559, 1985) to accommodate them with a functional proton motive force-generating system. With ascorbate-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine-cytochrome c as the electron donor, a proton motive force (delta p) of -80 to -120 mV was generated in these fused membranes. This delta p drove the accumulation of leucine and lysine up to 40- and 100-fold, respectively. High transport activities were observed in fused membranes containing Escherichia coli lipids, whereas the transport activities in fused membranes containing mainly soybean lipids or phosphatidylcholine were low. It is suggested that branched-chain amino acids and lysine were taken up by separate systems. The effects of the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin indicated that lysine and leucine were translocated in symport with a proton. PMID:2828326

  11. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  12. Mfsd2a Is a Transporter for the Essential ω-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in Eye and Is Important for Photoreceptor Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bernice H; Chan, Jia Pei; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Poh, Rebecca W; Foo, Juat Chin; Galam, Dwight L A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nguyen, Long N; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Yeo, Sia W; Luu, Chi D; Wenk, Markus R; Silver, David L

    2016-05-13

    Eye photoreceptor membrane discs in outer rod segments are highly enriched in the visual pigment rhodopsin and the ω-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The eye acquires DHA from blood, but transporters for DHA uptake across the blood-retinal barrier or retinal pigment epithelium have not been identified. Mfsd2a is a newly described sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) symporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier that transports LPCs containing DHA and other long-chain fatty acids. LPC transport via Mfsd2a has been shown to be necessary for human brain growth. Here we demonstrate that Mfsd2a is highly expressed in retinal pigment epithelium in embryonic eye, before the development of photoreceptors, and is the primary site of Mfsd2a expression in the eye. Eyes from whole body Mfsd2a-deficient (KO) mice, but not endothelium-specific Mfsd2a-deficient mice, were DHA-deficient and had significantly reduced LPC/DHA transport in vivo Fluorescein angiography indicated normal blood-retinal barrier function. Histological and electron microscopic analysis indicated that Mfsd2a KO mice exhibited a specific reduction in outer rod segment length, disorganized outer rod segment discs, and mislocalization of and reduction in rhodopsin early in postnatal development without loss of photoreceptors. Minor photoreceptor cell loss occurred in adult Mfsd2a KO mice, but electroretinography indicated visual function was normal. The developing eyes of Mfsd2a KO mice had activated microglia and up-regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic genes, likely adaptations to loss of LPC transport. These findings identify LPC transport via Mfsd2a as an important pathway for DHA uptake in eye and for development of photoreceptor membrane discs. PMID:27008858

  13. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain. PMID:21437781

  14. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  15. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  16. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  17. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  18. Insulin increases mRNA abundance of the amino acid transporter SLC7A5/LAT1 via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Dillon K.; Drummond, Micah J.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Borack, Michael S.; Jennings, Kristofer; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Amino acid transporters (AATs) provide a link between amino acid availability and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation although the direct relationship remains unclear. Previous studies in various cell types have used high insulin concentrations to determine the role of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and AAT mRNA abundance. However, this approach may limit applicability to human physiology. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of insulin on mTORC1 signaling and whether lower insulin concentrations stimulate AAT mRNA abundance in muscle cells. We hypothesized that lower insulin concentrations would increase mRNA abundance of select AAT via an mTORC1‐dependent mechanism in C2C12 myotubes. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) significantly increased phosphorylation of the mTORC1 downstream effectors p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and ribosomal protein S6 (S6). A low rapamycin dose (2.5 nmol/L) significantly reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated S6K1 and S6 phosphorylation. A high rapamycin dose (50 nmol/L) further reduced the insulin‐(0.5 nmol/L) stimulated phosphorylation of S6K1 and S6. Insulin (0.5 nmol/L) increased mRNA abundance of SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P ≤ 0.043) and SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≤ 0.021) at 240 min and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P = 0.039) at 30 min. High rapamycin prevented an increase in SLC38A2/SNAT2 (P = 0.075) and SLC36A1/PAT1 (P ≥ 0.06) mRNA abundance whereas both rapamycin doses prevented an increase in SLC7A5/LAT1 (P ≥ 0.902) mRNA abundance. We conclude that a low insulin concentration increases SLC7A5/LAT1 mRNA abundance in an mTORC1‐dependent manner in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:24760501

  19. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  20. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  1. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  2. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  3. Uptake of Amino Acids and Their Metabolic Conversion into the Compatible Solute Proline Confers Osmoprotection to Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Bleisteiner, Monika; Kerres, Anne; Hoffmann, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The data presented here reveal a new facet of the physiological adjustment processes through which Bacillus subtilis can derive osmostress protection. We found that the import of proteogenic (Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, and Arg) and of nonproteogenic (Orn and Cit) amino acids and their metabolic conversion into proline enhances growth under otherwise osmotically unfavorable conditions. Osmoprotection by amino acids depends on the functioning of the ProJ-ProA-ProH enzymes, but different entry points into this biosynthetic route are used by different amino acids to finally yield the compatible solute proline. Glu, Gln, Asp, and Asn are used to replenish the cellular pool of glutamate, the precursor for proline production, whereas Arg, Orn, and Cit are converted into γ-glutamic semialdehyde/Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, an intermediate in proline biosynthesis. The import of Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, Arg, Orn, and Cit did not lead to a further increase in the size of the proline pool that is already present in osmotically stressed cells. Hence, our data suggest that osmoprotection of B. subtilis by this group of amino acids rests on the savings in biosynthetic building blocks and energy that would otherwise have to be devoted either to the synthesis of the proline precursor glutamate or of proline itself. Since glutamate is the direct biosynthetic precursor for proline, we studied its uptake and found that GltT, an Na+-coupled symporter, is the main uptake system for both glutamate and aspartate in B. subtilis. Collectively, our data show how effectively B. subtilis can exploit environmental resources to derive osmotic-stress protection through physiological means. PMID:25344233

  4. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  5. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  6. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  7. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  8. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  9. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  10. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  11. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  12. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  13. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  15. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  16. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  17. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  18. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  19. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  1. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  5. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  6. The SLC36 family of proton-coupled amino acid transporters and their potential role in drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, David T; Anderson, Catriona MH

    2011-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) 36 family are involved in transmembrane movement of amino acids and derivatives. SLC36 consists of four members. SLC36A1 and SLC36A2 both function as H+-coupled amino acid symporters. SLC36A1 is expressed at the luminal surface of the small intestine but is also commonly found in lysosomes in many cell types (including neurones), suggesting that it is a multipurpose carrier with distinct roles in different cells including absorption in the small intestine and as an efflux pathway following intralysosomal protein breakdown. SLC36A1 has a relatively low affinity (Km 1–10 mM) for its substrates, which include zwitterionic amino and imino acids, heterocyclic amino acids and amino acid-based drugs and derivatives used experimentally and/or clinically to treat epilepsy, schizophrenia, bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia and cancer. SLC36A2 is expressed at the apical surface of the human renal proximal tubule where it functions in the reabsorption of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. SLC36A2 also transports amino acid derivatives but has a narrower substrate selectivity and higher affinity (Km 0.1–0.7 mM) than SLC36A1. Mutations in SLC36A2 lead to hyperglycinuria and iminoglycinuria. SLC36A3 is expressed only in testes and is an orphan transporter with no known function. SLC36A4 is widely distributed at the mRNA level and is a high-affinity (Km 2–3 µM) transporter for proline and tryptophan. We have much to learn about this family of transporters, but from current knowledge, it seems likely that their function will influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of amino acid-based drugs by mediating transport in both the small intestine and kidney. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Transporters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7 PMID:21501141

  7. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  8. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  9. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  10. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  11. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  12. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  13. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  14. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  15. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  16. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  17. Sodium-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by whole cells and membrane vesicles of Streptococcus bovis, a ruminal bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Strobel, H J; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1 cells were able to transport serine, threonine, or alanine, but only when they were incubated in sodium buffers. If glucose-energized cells were washed in potassium phosphate and suspended in potassium phosphate buffer, there was no detectable uptake. Cells deenergized with 2-deoxyglucose and incubated in sodium phosphate buffer were still able to transport serine, and this result indicated that the chemical sodium gradient was capable of driving transport. However, when the deenergized cells were treated with valinomycin and diluted into sodium phosphate to create both an artificial membrane potential and a chemical sodium gradient, rates of serine uptake were fivefold greater than in cells having only a sodium gradient. If deenergized cells were preloaded with sodium (no membrane potential or sodium gradient), there was little serine transport. Nigericin and monensin, ionophores capable of reversing sodium gradients across membranes, strongly inhibited sodium-dependent uptake of the three amino acids. Membrane vesicles loaded with potassium and diluted into either lithium or choline chloride were unable to transport serine, but rapid uptake was evident if sodium chloride was added to the assay mixture. Serine transport had an extremely poor affinity for sodium, and more than 30 mM was needed for half-maximal rates of uptake. Serine transport was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but an excess of alanine had little effect. Results indicated that S. bovis had separate sodium symport systems for serine or threonine and alanine, and either the membrane potential or chemical sodium gradient could drive uptake. PMID:3136141

  18. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  19. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  20. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  1. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  2. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  3. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  4. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  5. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  6. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  7. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  8. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  9. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  10. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  11. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  12. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  13. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  14. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  15. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  16. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  17. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  18. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  19. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  20. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  1. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  3. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  4. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  5. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  6. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  7. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  8. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  9. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  10. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  11. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  12. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  13. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  14. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  15. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  16. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  17. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  18. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  20. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs. PMID:21116406

  6. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  7. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  8. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  9. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  10. Acid-Base Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3− and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3− is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys. PMID:26597304